software as a service

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pages: 307 words: 17,123

Behind the cloud: the untold story of how Salesforce.com went from idea to billion-dollar company--and revolutionized an industry by Marc Benioff, Carlye Adler

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Albert Einstein, Apple's 1984 Super Bowl advert, barriers to entry, Bay Area Rapid Transit, business continuity plan, call centre, carbon footprint, Clayton Christensen, cloud computing, corporate social responsibility, crowdsourcing, iterative process, Maui Hawaii, Nicholas Carr, platform as a service, Silicon Valley, software as a service, Steve Ballmer, Steve Jobs

., 208–209 Rewarding volunteers, 165 Ridout, Bob, 99 Ries, Al, 37 Risks: developing company persona, 27–28; taking, 18–20 Robinson, Phill, 58 Rosebud Sioux Tribe, 162 Rotating assignments, 248 Rudnitsky, David, 89–95 S SaaS (Software-as-a-Service): developing regulatory environment for, 221–222; inspiration for, 3–4, 135–139; on-demand model vs. hosted choice, 105–106; PaaS as extension of, 122–123; potentials in CRM for online, 6; providing API, 119; public relations for, 23–25; revenue recognition position paper for, 214; selling directly to end users, 52–54; testing product usability, 13–14 SaaS (Software-as-a-Service). See also PaaS Saba, 7, 8, 9 Sabbaticals, 1–3 Index Sales: abandoning unsuccessful strategies, 96–97; building with word-of-mouth, 47–49; call preparation for, 92–93; closing, 93; cooperative effort in, 92; corporate and enterprise models for, 177–178; directing with V2MOM, 232–233; enlisting customers for, 73–76; establishing pricing for, 78–79; facts creating credibility for, 94; free trial strategies, 67–68, 96–97; increasing number of reps for, 79–80; introducing prospects to happy customers, 100–101; landing and expanding, 95, 184–185; leveraging times of change, 82–85; metrics monitoring, 101; negotiating, 94; paperwork for, 94; performance incentives for, 245–246; preparing distribution and growth of, 86–91; pursuing game-changing, 95; recruiting as, 236–239; segmenting markets, 80–81; selling corporate services, 98–100; strategies for trial offers, 96–97; supporting existing customers, 97–98; targeting to higher education and NGOs, 166–168; telesales, 76–78; thinking big, 91–92; treating customers as partners, 69–71; visiting customers, 93; Web sites as reps for, 72–73 Sales force automation (SFA), 5–6 Sales reps: commissions motivating, 85; increasing number of, 79–80; sharing best practices with team, 94; using Web sites as, 72–73 SalesForce Australia, 189–191 Salesforce Foundation: establishment of, 140; 1–1–1 Model of, 142–143, 159–161 Salesforce.com: AppExchange and, 125–126, 196–197; beginnings of, 11–12, 14–21; branding, 28–32; collaborative spirit of, 131–132, 145; creating story about, 40–41; customer success managers at, 97–98; designing limitless system, 103–106; developing Web-based operating system, 120–125; employee-generated disaster relief at, 163–164; ensuring reliability, 110–113; environmental mission statement of, 163; evolving vision statements, 232; focusing, 12–13; free trial subscriptions, 67–68, 96; going after market leaders, 34, 36–38; harnessing customer ideas, 127–130; initial meetings about, 9–11; initiating product market, 60–61; introductory party for, 25–27; keeping on-message, 33–34, 35; listening to customers, 13–14, 85–86; listing on NYSE, 153, 210–211, 212–213; marking success with donations, 167–168; persona of, 27–28; preparing for sales growth, 86–91; product development at, 106–107, 115–118, 132–133; seed-and-grow strategy, 100; selling to end users, 52–54 Salesforce.com.

Salesforce.com changed corporate xiii FOREWORD philanthropy by integrating giving into its business model—and sharing that model so that myriad companies have collectively flooded talent, products, services, and billions of dollars into their communities. Because salesforce.com offers employees an opportunity to make a difference, not just earn a paycheck, it’s known as one of the best places to work. Its original application has become the number-one hosted CRM service, and the company has established itself as the leader in the Software-as-a-Service (SaaS) industry it pioneered. And, through relentless focus, creativity, and passion, salesforce.com inspired an enterprise cloud computing industry. In short, the new and unconventional ideas that salesforce.com has evangelized have changed the way we do business and changed the world. There has been a profound shift toward cloud computing in the past few years. Nearly every major public and private cloud is powered by Dell, and we are ecstatic to be running today’s most exciting companies, including salesforce.com, Facebook, Microsoft, and many others.

Play #2: Have a Big Dream I saw an opportunity to deliver business software applications in a new way. My vision was to make software easier to purchase, simpler to use, and more democratic without the complexities of installation, maintenance, and constant upgrades. Rather than selling multimillion-dollar CD-ROM software packages that took six to eighteen months for companies to install and required hefty investments in hardware and networking, we would sell Software-as-a-Service through a model known as cloud computing. Companies could pay per-user, 3 BEHIND THE CLOUD per-month fees for the services they used, and those services would be delivered to them immediately via the Internet, in the cloud. If we hosted it ourselves and used the Internet as a delivery platform, customers wouldn’t have to shut down their operations as their programs were installed. The software would be on a Web site that they could access from any device anywhere in the world, 24/7.

 

pages: 394 words: 110,352

The Art of Community: Building the New Age of Participation by Jono Bacon

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barriers to entry, collaborative editing, crowdsourcing, Debian, en.wikipedia.org, Firefox, game design, Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, Jono Bacon, openstreetmap, Richard Stallman, Skype, social software, software as a service, telemarketer, web application

Benefits and disadvantages of software as a service-based solutions Benefits Disadvantages Ease—setting up your entire toolchain could be as simple Data—when you use a software as a service solution, you as registering with a software as a service solution. put your data on someone else’s system. You have to continually back up your data outside the cloud, in case that cloud provider goes away intermittently or permanently. Maintenance—in the cloud someone else looks after Bandwidth limitations—some cloud providers limit disk security and updates so you don’t have to. space, bandwidth, and other attributes in a project. You may hit these limitations. SUPPORTING WORKFLOW WITH TOOLS Download at Boykma.Com 131 Benefits Disadvantages Potential reliability—software as a service solutions are Tool choice—if you pick a software as a service provider, typically hosted on high-bandwidth networks with a it may provide 80% of the tool choice that you want, but powerful backbone.

SUPPORTING WORKFLOW WITH TOOLS Download at Boykma.Com 131 Benefits Disadvantages Potential reliability—software as a service solutions are Tool choice—if you pick a software as a service provider, typically hosted on high-bandwidth networks with a it may provide 80% of the tool choice that you want, but powerful backbone. This could potentially offer may choose a different tool for another part of your improved reliability over a self-hosted solution. workflow. This could potentially limit what you want to do. At this point your head is probably spinning with options, and you may be unsure of what to choose. My recommendation is almost always to choose a software as a service-based solution. Software as a service-based solutions offer one major benefit: lower maintenance. The last thing you want to be doing in your community is spending time fiddling with tools. You should instead be focusing your efforts on growing community, building a team, and achieving the objectives and goals that you outlined in your strategic plan.

Eventually Jokosher outgrew Python-Hosting and settled on Launchpad. 130 CHAPTER FIVE Download at Boykma.Com Software As a Service The Jokosher example raises an important question when it comes to integration. Do you want to run the toolchain facilities yourself or use an existing online system? Integration has always been a challenge in IT, and subsequently many companies have sprung up to provide solutions. I have already mentioned Sourceforge and Launchpad, but there are many more. These solutions put integration at the center of their offering: they can give you most of the tools that you need in a single integrated system. These online services are often referred to as the cloud or software as a service. Many new projects make the mistake of setting up their own tools for the sake of just controlling the tools themselves.

 

pages: 468 words: 124,573

How to Build a Billion Dollar App: Discover the Secrets of the Most Successful Entrepreneurs of Our Time by George Berkowski

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Airbnb, Amazon Web Services, barriers to entry, Black Swan, business intelligence, call centre, crowdsourcing, en.wikipedia.org, game design, Google Glasses, Google Hangouts, Google X / Alphabet X, iterative process, Jeff Bezos, Jony Ive, Kickstarter, knowledge worker, Lean Startup, loose coupling, Mark Zuckerberg, minimum viable product, move fast and break things, Network effects, Oculus Rift, Paul Graham, self-driving car, Silicon Valley, Silicon Valley startup, Skype, Snapchat, social graph, software as a service, software is eating the world, Steve Jobs, Steven Levy, Y Combinator

It turns out that five business models underpin so many billions in value – and, interestingly, each model seems to contribute equally in terms of value. The first is gaming, where users pay for a virtual service or good. The second is e-commerce / marketplace, where users pay for a real world good or service. The third is advertising (or consumer audience building in the case where the company has not yet switched on the advertising). The fourth is Software as a Service (SaaS), whereby users pay for cloud-based software (typically via a subscription model). And the last is enterprise, whereby companies pay for larger-scale software (again, via a subscription-type model). So there isn’t a huge amount of reinventing the wheel here. If you want to make it big, it’s pretty clear what business models to stick to. EXPERIENCE MATTERS. Despite all the media hype, most billion-dollar companies are not founded by youngsters in their twenties, but by people of an average age of 34 (that makes my 36-year-old face smile).

Sketch on napkins, sketch ideas in Photoshop, do whatever you need to do to make your idea real and communicable to others. • As you flush out a great design, start prototyping it. Your goal is to get it into user’s hands quickly, so that you can get as much feedback as possible. Your goal is to get to drive towards delivering wow! • No matter what happens, you’ll need to have an app ready for real users’ hands. If your business model is simple (gaming, Software as a Service) expect to be operational, at least in a basic way. • If your model is more complicated (marketplace), then you have a solid proof of concept. Use that to secure investment to build it out. Team • You should not use the excuse of not having a cofounder to slow your progress, but finding a partner in crime who shares the vision and has complementary skills will make the journey more enjoyable

Players using this model are all about getting big, fast – and then being as sticky as possible. Our friends Instagram and Snapchat fall into this group. Flipboard represents the flipside that actively targeted big-ticket advertising from the get-go – and has been able to deliver. These players either develop their own advertising platforms (Flipboard), or seek to be acquired and monetise off the acquirers’ already well-established platform (as Instagram did with Facebook). 4. SOFTWARE AS A SERVICE (SAAS). This is where consumers pay for cloud-based software or services. WhatsApp is the first ‘mobile-first’ company with this model, charging some users $0.99 per year as a subscription via app-store payments, though its business model has evolved a number of times. A number of companies – which are not mobile first, but still have heavily used apps, such as Evernote (a note-taking app), Dropbox and Box (two document storage apps) – have this business model, whereby they charge subscriptions either via app-store payment channels, or bill you directly via your credit card. 5.

 

pages: 924 words: 241,081

The Art of Community by Jono Bacon

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barriers to entry, collaborative editing, crowdsourcing, Debian, DevOps, en.wikipedia.org, Firefox, game design, Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, Jono Bacon, Kickstarter, Mark Zuckerberg, openstreetmap, Richard Stallman, side project, Silicon Valley, Skype, slashdot, social graph, software as a service, telemarketer, union organizing, VA Linux, web application

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Building a Strategic Plan Somerville, Cody, Baking in Openness Sorkin, Aaron, Inspiring your community source control, Source Control, Source Control Southern California Linux Expo (SCALE), Ilan Rabinovitch, Southern California Linux Expo, Ilan Rabinovitch, Southern California Linux Expo Spafford, James, The Second Edition, James Spafford, Media Molecule, James Spafford, Media Molecule spam, Getting It Right by Not Getting It Wrong, Getting It Right by Not Getting It Wrong speaking at events, The Art of Community (see presentations at events) Spencer, Rick, Visualizing Data with Burndown Charts, Visualizing Data with Burndown Charts sponsored communities, The Case for Governance, Commercial sponsorship, Commercial sponsorship, Barriers to Input, Barriers to Input and governance, The Case for Governance conflict within, Barriers to Input, Barriers to Input councils of, Commercial sponsorship, Commercial sponsorship sponsors, Understanding Your Needs, Understanding Your Needs, Finding 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of, tracking community health through, Building a Set of Generals, Building a Set of Generals mission statement for, Define the scope of each team, and help team members understand that scope, Define the scope of each team, and help team members understand that scope of Ubuntu community, Write-centered communities, Write-centered communities scope of, Units of Belonging, Define the scope of each team, and help team members understand that scope, Define the scope of each team, and help team members understand that scope vs. councils, Setting Up a Community Council, Setting Up a Community Council Technical Board, of Ubuntu community, Technical Board, Technical Board Technorati, The Amateur Press testing usability, Observational Tests, Observational Tests, Observational Tests Texas Linux Fest, Ilan Rabinovitch, Southern California Linux Expo, Ilan Rabinovitch, Southern California Linux Expo The Art of Community, community of, Social Media, Social Media The West Wing (TV program), 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writing messages, Tuning up your messages, Tuning up your messages U Ubuntu Code of Conduct, Diversity, Diversity Ubuntu community, Write-centered communities, Baking in Openness, Baking in Openness, Understand the extent and range of collaboration among our teams, Striving for Clarity, Inspiring your community, Leading by example: Ubuntu, Leading by example: Ubuntu, Reviewing new developers: In depth, Reviewing new developers: In depth, Developing Knowledge, Developing Knowledge, Process Reassessment, Process Reassessment, An Example: Ubuntu Bug Workflow, Lessons learned, Feedback, Feedback, Providing Community Updates, Providing Community Updates, Videos, Videos, Hooks ’n’ Data, Hooks ’n’ Data, Plugging your stats into graphs, Visibility Is Key, Ensuring Effective Processes, Ensuring Effective Processes, In the Beginning..., In the Beginning..., Mark Shuttleworth, Mark Shuttleworth, Community Council, Community Council, Technical Board, Technical Board, Team councils, Team councils, Membership, Membership, Ubuntu Member, Ubuntu Member, Ubuntu Member, Ubuntu Member, Ubuntu Member, Ubuntu Member, Ubuntu Member, Ubuntu Member, Developer, Developer, Council or Board Member, Council or Board Member, Escalation, Escalation bug workflow example, An Example: Ubuntu Bug Workflow, Lessons learned bug-squashing parties, Plugging your stats into graphs contributor access to repositories, Reviewing new developers: In depth, Reviewing new developers: In depth developer mentoring campaign, Visibility Is Key history of, In the Beginning..., In the Beginning...

., Building Belonging into the Social Economy hashtags, Getting more eyeballs, Where to look, Asking for feedback, The buildup, At the event Hawthorn, Leslie, Step 4: Make Time, Event-specific notes, Event-specific notes health of community, tracking, Tracking Health, Tracking Health, Promoting a Feedback Culture, Promoting a Feedback Culture, Building a Set of Generals, Building a Set of Generals, Reacting to Community Concerns, Reacting to Community Concerns by calls to team leaders, Building a Set of Generals, Building a Set of Generals overview, Tracking Health, Tracking Health promoting feedback culture, Promoting a Feedback Culture, Promoting a Feedback Culture responding to concerns, Reacting to Community Concerns, Reacting to Community Concerns hiring community manager, Risk, Risk Holbach, Daniel, Planning, Hooks ’n’ Data, Visibility Is Key, Visibility Is Key hooks and data, Hooks ’n’ Data, Hooks ’n’ Data, Statistics and Automated Data, Plugging your stats into graphs, Surveys and Structured Feedback, Showing off your survey reports, Observational Tests, Observational Tests, Measuring Mechanics, Measuring Mechanics, Gathering General Perceptions, Perception of you, Part 2: Get the facts, Part 2: Get the facts gathering general perceptions, Gathering General Perceptions, Perception of you in conflict resolution, Part 2: Get the facts, Part 2: Get the facts measuring mechanics, Measuring Mechanics, Measuring Mechanics observational tests, Observational Tests, Observational Tests overview, Hooks ’n’ Data, Hooks ’n’ Data statistics and automated data, Statistics and Automated Data, Plugging your stats into graphs surveys, Surveys and Structured Feedback, Showing off your survey reports hotels, for event accommodation, Accommodation, Accommodation Hudson, Paul, The Professional Press, The Professional Press Humble Indie Bundle, Richard Esguerra, Humble Indie Bundle, Richard Esguerra, Humble Indie Bundle humor, Setting tone Hybrid Theory (album), Mike Shinoda, Linkin Park I identi.ca, Reporting, Reporting, Getting started with Facebook reporting with, Reporting, Reporting users of, Getting started with Facebook implementation plan, Structuring the plan incentives, for donations, Donations Innovate Developer Conference, Carolyn Mellor, X.commerce, PayPal, and eBay inspiring others, Inspiring your community, Inspiring your community, Inspired Words, Inspired Words, Aspire to Inspire, Aspire to Inspire as goal of governing body, Aspire to Inspire, Aspire to Inspire through writing, Inspiring your community, Inspiring your community, Inspired Words, Inspired Words insurance, for physical events, Insurance/unions, Insurance/unions Internet Relay Chat, The Art of Community (see IRC) interviews, building buzz with, Attracting Contributors IRC (Internet Relay Chat), IRC, IRC, Communications, Observational Tests, Privacy, Internet Relay Chat (IRC), Preparing for a session, Running a session features and benefits of, IRC, IRC logging, Communications privacy issues, Privacy usability testing over, Observational Tests use with online events, Internet Relay Chat (IRC), Preparing for a session, Running a session issues, communication between teams about, The Art of Community, Ensure that teams can communicate clearly and effectively (see also conflict) J Johnson & Johnson conflict resolution approach, Part 1: Calm and reassure, The fantastical user group debacle, Part 2: Get the facts, The fantastical user group debacle, Part 3: Discuss, The fantastical user group debacle, Part 4: Document, The fantastical user group debacle, Part 5: Reflect and maintain, The fantastical user group debacle calm and reassure, Part 1: Calm and reassure, The fantastical user group debacle discuss, Part 3: Discuss, The fantastical user group debacle document, Part 4: Document, The fantastical user group debacle get the facts, Part 2: Get the facts, The fantastical user group debacle reflect and maintain, Part 5: Reflect and maintain, The fantastical user group debacle Jokosher project, Planning Your Community, Planning Your Community, Communication fetishism, Reviewing new developers: In depth, Reviewing new developers: In depth, Bug reporting, Regular Workflow Assessment, Regular Workflow Assessment bug tracking, Bug reporting communication channels used for, Communication fetishism contributions of Laszlo Pandy, Reviewing new developers: In depth, Reviewing new developers: In depth workflow assessment during, Regular Workflow Assessment, Regular Workflow Assessment justice, lack of, Lack of Justice, Lack of Justice K KDE project, Enlightened Dictatorship, Enlightened Dictatorship, Creating and Running Events, Creating and Running Events keynotes, at events, Opening keynotes, Opening keynotes KGRUBEditor, Observational Tests KHTML technology, Enlightened Dictatorship, Enlightened Dictatorship KickStarter, Donations Kiss, Tom, James Spafford, Media Molecule L Langridge, Stuart (Aq), Planning Your Community Laporte, Leo, Foreword from the First Edition Launchpad (software collaboration platform), An Example: Ubuntu Bug Workflow, Getting to know the problem, Hooks ’n’ Data, Hooks ’n’ Data leadership, The Art of Community, The Art of Community (see community managers) (see governance) Lessig, Lawrence, Untwisting the tail, Announcing Your Community licensing, Untwisting the tail, Untwisting the tail, Videos, Mike Linksvayer, Creative Commons, Mike Linksvayer, Creative Commons Liebling, Alison, Gathering General Perceptions lightning talks, Lightning talks, Lightning talks Linkin Park, Mike Shinoda, Linkin Park, Mike Shinoda, Linkin Park Linksvayer, Mike, Mike Linksvayer, Creative Commons, Mike Linksvayer, Creative Commons Linspire (formerly Lindows), Blog wars, Blog wars Linux community, The Art of Community, The Art of Community, Write-centered communities, Diversity, Diversity, Linus Torvalds, Linux, Linus Torvalds, Linux (see also Ubuntu community) (see also Xubuntu community) Linux Demo Day, Building Buzz, Building Buzz Linux Format magazine, The Professional Press, The Professional Press listening to others, The Value of Listening, The Value of Listening, Membership, Barriers to Input, Barriers to Input LittleBigPlanet community, James Spafford, Media Molecule, James Spafford, Media Molecule live streaming, Videos, Videos LoCo (Ubuntu Local Community), Observational Tests, Building a Set of Generals, Building a Set of Generals, Responsibilities, Team councils, Team councils LUGFests, Ilan Rabinovitch, Southern California Linux Expo, Ilan Rabinovitch, Southern California Linux Expo LugRadio community, The Essence of Community, The Essence of Community, The Basis of Communication, The Basis of Communication, Unwrapping Opportunity, Unwrapping Opportunity, Unwrapping Opportunity, Unwrapping Opportunity, Unwrapping Opportunity, Unwrapping Opportunity, Becoming Yourself, Becoming Yourself, Communication fetishism, Communication fetishism, Discussion forums, Podcasts, Podcasts, Location/venue, Cost, Setting expectations, Setting expectations belief in, Unwrapping Opportunity, Unwrapping Opportunity effect of unedited productions, Becoming Yourself, Becoming Yourself events of, Unwrapping Opportunity, Unwrapping Opportunity, Location/venue, Cost forums of, Communication fetishism, Communication fetishism, Discussion forums origin of, The Essence of Community, The Essence of Community podcast, Podcasts, Podcasts response to rail strike, Unwrapping Opportunity, Unwrapping Opportunity sponsorship of, Setting expectations, Setting expectations stories in, The Basis of Communication, The Basis of Communication M MacQueue bulletion board, Foreword from the First Edition Macromedia Flash plug-in, Videos mailing lists, The Mediums, Mailing lists, Mailing lists, Netiquette, Netiquette, Gathering feedback, Gathering feedback, Privacy, Communicating Between Councils effect on how people behave, The Mediums for communication between councils, Communicating Between Councils for gathering feedback, Gathering feedback, Gathering feedback overview of, Mailing lists, Mailing lists privacy concerns, Privacy top posting to, Netiquette, Netiquette Major, John, Uniting Together managers, The Art of Community, The Art of Community (see community managers) (see governance) marketing, The Art of Community (see buzz, creating) maturing of members, Profiling the polemical, Profiling the polemical McMillan, John, Building Belonging into the Social Economy measuring community, Measuring Community, Community Self-Reflection, The Foundations of Feedback, The Foundations of Feedback, Defining Purpose, Defining Purpose, Hooks ’n’ Data, Hooks ’n’ Data, Statistics and Automated Data, Plugging your stats into graphs, Surveys and Structured Feedback, Showing off your survey reports, Observational Tests, Observational Tests, Measuring Mechanics, Measuring Mechanics, Gathering General Perceptions, Perception of you, Anonymity, Anonymity, Privacy, Privacy anonymity and, Anonymity, Anonymity establishing goals of, Defining Purpose, Defining Purpose meaning in measurements, The Foundations of Feedback, The Foundations of Feedback overview of, Measuring Community, Community Self-Reflection privacy issues, Privacy, Privacy use of hooks and data, Hooks ’n’ Data, Hooks ’n’ Data, Statistics and Automated Data, Plugging your stats into graphs, Surveys and Structured Feedback, Showing off your survey reports, Observational Tests, Observational Tests, Measuring Mechanics, Measuring Mechanics, Gathering General Perceptions, Perception of you gathering general perceptions, Gathering General Perceptions, Perception of you measuring mechanics, Measuring Mechanics, Measuring Mechanics observational tests, Observational Tests, Observational Tests overview, Hooks ’n’ Data, Hooks ’n’ Data statistics and automated data, Statistics and Automated Data, Plugging your stats into graphs surveys, Surveys and Structured Feedback, Showing off your survey reports Measuring the Quality of Prison Life study, Gathering General Perceptions mechanics of collaboration, The Mechanics of Collaboration, The Mechanics of Collaboration, Measuring Mechanics, Measuring Mechanics Media Molecule, James Spafford, Media Molecule, James Spafford, Media Molecule mediator, of conflict resolution, The Role of a Facilitator, Be clear meetings, The Art of Community, Attracting Contributors, Step 2: Find Help, Step 2: Find Help, Online Discussion Meetings, Running the meeting, Management and Communications, Weekly engagements (see also events) between company and community manager, Management and Communications, Weekly engagements building buzz with, Attracting Contributors for organizing events, Step 2: Find Help, Step 2: Find Help online discussion meetings, Online Discussion Meetings, Running the meeting Mellor, Carolyn, Carolyn Mellor, X.commerce, PayPal, and eBay, Carolyn Mellor, X.commerce, PayPal, and eBay members, The Art of Community, Responsibilities, Membership, Nominating and Electing Council Members, Forming a new council (see also contributers) approval of, Responsibilities of Community Council, Membership, Nominating and Electing Council Members, Forming a new council meritocracy, Meritocracy, Meritocracy, Enlightened Dictatorship Messina, Chris, Attracting Contributors, Organizing an Unconference, Organizing an Unconference, Organizing an Unconference, Organizing an Unconference Mickos, Mårten, The Role of a Community Manager in the Corporation, Mårten Mickos, MySQL and Eucalyptus, Mårten Mickos, MySQL and Eucalyptus microphones, at events, Room Layout mindcasting, Tim O’Reilly, O’Reilly Media mindshare, Mindshare, The Mindshare Opportunity, Defining Purpose, Gathering General Perceptions mission statement, Designing Your Community, Building a Mission Statement, Building a Mission Statement, Define the scope of each team, and help team members understand that scope, Define the scope of each team, and help team members understand that scope, The Mission, The Mission and buzz, The Mission, The Mission for each team, Define the scope of each team, and help team members understand that scope, Define the scope of each team, and help team members understand that scope overview of, Designing Your Community writing, Building a Mission Statement, Building a Mission Statement money from sponsors, The Art of Community, The Art of Community, Handling the Money, Handling the Money (see also costs) (see also finances) Mozilla, Attracting Contributors, Attracting Contributors, Mary Colvig, Mozilla, Mary Colvig, Mozilla mrben (Ben Thorp), The Essence of Community, The Basis of Communication, The Basis of Communication multimedia, use when announcing community, Announcing Your Community music industry, and community, Mike Shinoda, Linkin Park, Mike Shinoda, Linkin Park N negative energy, Honesty, Honesty netiquette, Netiquette, Netiquette news, on website, Staying Current, Staying Current Nielsen, Jakob, Announce, Announce Nielsen, Michael, Tim O’Reilly, O’Reilly Media nominating council members, Nominating and Electing Council Members, Forming a new council North, Gail, Dealing with Burnout notetakers, at summits, Inside a session O O'Reilly Media, Tim O’Reilly, O’Reilly Media, Tim O’Reilly, O’Reilly Media O'Reilly's Radar site, Staying Current O'Reilly, Tim, Don’t Be That Guy/Girl, Staying Current, Privacy, Tim O’Reilly, O’Reilly Media, Tim O’Reilly, O’Reilly Media Obama, Barack, Unwrapping Opportunity, Unwrapping Opportunity, Aspire to Inspire, Aspire to Inspire as inspirational orator, Aspire to Inspire, Aspire to Inspire election of, Unwrapping Opportunity, Unwrapping Opportunity objectives, in strategic plan, Structuring the plan, Pulling Together the Threads, Financially Supporting Your Community objectivity, in conflict resolution, Be objective, Be objective, Be objective Ogg Theora, Videos Oliver, Jamie, The Mindshare Opportunity, The Mindshare Opportunity On Writing Well (Zinsser), Don’t write like an institution on-ramp, The On-Ramp: Creating Collaborative Processes, The On-Ramp: Creating Collaborative Processes, The On-Ramp: Creating Collaborative Processes, Identifying the On-Ramp, Identifying the On-Ramp, Developing Knowledge, Developing Knowledge, Determining Contributions, Determining Contributions, Growing Kudos, Growing Kudos defined, The On-Ramp: Creating Collaborative Processes determining contributions, Determining Contributions, Determining Contributions identifying, Identifying the On-Ramp, Identifying the On-Ramp showing appreciation, Growing Kudos, Growing Kudos skills acquisition, Developing Knowledge, Developing Knowledge steps in, The On-Ramp: Creating Collaborative Processes, The On-Ramp: Creating Collaborative Processes one-on-one discussion, for gathering feedback, Gathering feedback, Gathering feedback online events, Organizing Online Events, Organizing Online Events, Organizing Online Events, Medium, Virtual worlds, Date/time, Date/time, Online Discussion Meetings, Running the meeting, Organizing Online Tutorials, Event-specific notes date and time of, Date/time, Date/time discussion meetings, Online Discussion Meetings, Running the meeting medium for hosting, Medium, Virtual worlds overview of, Organizing Online Events, Organizing Online Events tutorials, Organizing Online Events, Organizing Online Tutorials, Event-specific notes open days, building buzz with, Attracting Contributors Open Source Conference (OSCON), Long versus short presentations, Long versus short presentations open source development, Building Belonging into the Social Economy, Building Belonging into the Social Economy, Planning Your Community, Planning Your Community, Building a Strategic Plan, Building a Strategic Plan, Tool Access, Tool Access, Observational Tests, Observational Tests, Observational Tests, Why Community Building Has Become a Big Business, Why Community Building Has Become a Big Business, Linus Torvalds, Linux, Linus Torvalds, Linux access to tools, Tool Access, Tool Access and community, Why Community Building Has Become a Big Business, Why Community Building Has Become a Big Business differing motives for contributing to, Linus Torvalds, Linux, Linus Torvalds, Linux fixed release cycles, Building a Strategic Plan, Building a Strategic Plan in business, Building Belonging into the Social Economy, Building Belonging into the Social Economy Jokosher audio editor example, Planning Your Community, Planning Your Community usability testing, Observational Tests, Observational Tests, Observational Tests OpenAdvantage, Becoming the Advocate, Becoming the Advocate openess, The Art of Community (see also transparency) openness, Barriers to Input, Be open, Be open OpenSuSE Board, Commercial sponsorship opportunities, Unwrapping Opportunity, Unwrapping Opportunity, Unwrapping Opportunity, Designing Your Community, Designing Your Community, Designing Your Community, Designing Your Community, Designing Your Community and early days of Linux, Unwrapping Opportunity, Unwrapping Opportunity and Obama election, Unwrapping Opportunity documenting, Designing Your Community, Designing Your Community, Designing Your Community, Designing Your Community, Designing Your Community Oram, Andy, Preface, Simplicity is key Organizational Vision, Values and Mission (Scott), Building a Mission Statement OSCON (Open Source Conference), Long versus short presentations, Long versus short presentations outside the box thinking, Technique 2: Think outside the box, Technique 2: Think outside the box owner of goals, Structuring the plan P Packard, Keith, Transparency Pages, in Google+, Getting started with Google+ Pandy, Laszlo, Reviewing new developers: In depth, Reviewing new developers: In depth patience, The Value of Listening patterns, in burndown charts, Observing burndown patterns, Observing burndown patterns Paul, Celeste Lyn, Observational Tests, Observational Tests PayPal, Donations, Carolyn Mellor, X.commerce, PayPal, and eBay, Carolyn Mellor, X.commerce, PayPal, and eBay, Carolyn Mellor, X.commerce, PayPal, and eBay peer review, Reviewing new developers: In depth, Reviewing new developers: In depth performance reviews, Technique 1: Question assumptions personality issues, The Art of Community, Profiling the polemical, Profiling the polemical, Profiling the polemical, Profiling the polemical, Sharing feedback about personality issues, Sharing feedback about personality issues, Poisonous people, Poisonous people (see also conflict) attributes causing conflict, Profiling the polemical, Profiling the polemical maturity, Profiling the polemical, Profiling the polemical poisonous people, Poisonous people, Poisonous people sharing feedback about, Sharing feedback about personality issues, Sharing feedback about personality issues Persse, James, Building Great Processes phone calls, privacy during, Privacy physical events, Organizing Physical Events, Organizing Physical Events, Organizing Physical Events, Organizing Physical Events, Organizing Physical Events, Location/venue, Location/venue, Location/venue, Location/venue, Accommodation, Accommodation, Equipment, Equipment, Date/time, Date/time, Cost, Cost, Registering attendance, Registering attendance, Catering, Catering, Insurance/unions, Insurance/unions, Insurance/unions, Insurance/unions, Organizing a Sprint, Additional notes, Additional notes, Additional notes, Additional notes, Additional notes, Additional notes, Organizing a Summit, Inside a session, Inside a session, Event-specific notes, Event-specific notes, Event-specific notes, Event-specific notes, Event-specific notes, Event-specific notes, Event-specific notes, Organizing an Unconference, Event-specific notes, Event-specific notes, Event-specific notes, Event-specific notes, Event-specific notes accommodations for, Accommodation, Accommodation catering for, Catering, Catering, Additional notes, Event-specific notes, Event-specific notes conferences, Organizing Physical Events cost of, Cost, Cost, Additional notes, Event-specific notes date and time for, Date/time, Date/time, Additional notes, Event-specific notes, Event-specific notes equipment at, Equipment, Equipment, Additional notes, Event-specific notes, Event-specific notes insurance needs, Insurance/unions, Insurance/unions location of, Location/venue, Location/venue registering attendance, Registering attendance, Registering attendance, Additional notes, Event-specific notes, Event-specific notes remote participation in, Inside a session, Inside a session sprints, Organizing Physical Events, Organizing a Sprint, Additional notes summits, Organizing Physical Events, Organizing a Summit, Event-specific notes, Event-specific notes types of, Organizing Physical Events, Organizing Physical Events unconferences, Organizing an Unconference, Event-specific notes union requirements, Insurance/unions, Insurance/unions venue, Location/venue, Location/venue piracy, Foreword, Foreword planets, Syndication planning phase, of buzz cycle, Planning, Planning, Planning, Applying the buzz cycle, Applying the buzz cycle plenaries, at events, Plenaries, Plenaries podcasts, Podcasts, Podcasts politics, creating buzz compared to, Uniting Together, Uniting Together Pope, Alan, Social Media, Social Media positiveness, in conflict resolution, Be positive, Be positive postmortems, Review, Review presentations at events, Submitting your paper, Submitting your paper, Promoting your talk, Promoting your talk, Delivering Presentations, Long versus short presentations, Creating attractive slides, Long versus short presentations, Long versus short presentations, Long versus short presentations, Ilan Rabinovitch, Southern California Linux Expo, Ilan Rabinovitch, Southern California Linux Expo attracting presenters, Ilan Rabinovitch, Southern California Linux Expo, Ilan Rabinovitch, Southern California Linux Expo delivering, Delivering Presentations, Long versus short presentations long vs. short, Long versus short presentations, Long versus short presentations promoting, Promoting your talk, Promoting your talk slides in, Creating attractive slides, Long versus short presentations submitting proposal for, Submitting your paper, Submitting your paper press, as target of buzz campaign, The Professional Press, The Professional Press, The Amateur Press, The Amateur Press amateur, The Amateur Press, The Amateur Press professional, The Professional Press, The Professional Press pride, Avoid Ego, or Others Will Avoid You, Avoid Ego, or Others Will Avoid You privacy, Privacy, Privacy, Privacy, Part 2: Get the facts, Tim O’Reilly, O’Reilly Media, Tim O’Reilly, O’Reilly Media balancing with visibility, Tim O’Reilly, O’Reilly Media, Tim O’Reilly, O’Reilly Media during conflict resolution, Part 2: Get the facts during phone calls, Privacy when gathering feedback, Privacy, Privacy Process Improvement Essentials (Persse), Building Great Processes processes, Building Great Processes, Building Great Processes, Breaking Up the Puzzle, Building a process, Building a process, Simplicity is key, Simplicity is key, Avoiding bureaucracy, Avoiding bureaucracy, Transparency, Transparency, Assessing Needs, Assessing Needs, Community Cycles, Leading by example: Ubuntu, The Gates of Your Community, The Gates of Your Community, Assessing Contributors, Reviewing new developers: In depth, Managing Feedback, Gathering feedback, Document Them, Make Them Easy to Find, Make Them Easy to Find, Make Them Easy to Find, Make Them Easy to Find, Using Your Processes, Using Your Processes, The On-Ramp: Creating Collaborative Processes, Growing Kudos, The On-Ramp: Creating Collaborative Processes, The On-Ramp: Creating Collaborative Processes, The On-Ramp: Creating Collaborative Processes, Identifying the On-Ramp, Identifying the On-Ramp, Developing Knowledge, Developing Knowledge, Determining Contributions, Determining Contributions, Growing Kudos, Growing Kudos, Process Reassessment, Building Regularity, Responsibilities and community cycles, Community Cycles, Leading by example: Ubuntu announcing, Make Them Easy to Find, Make Them Easy to Find avoiding bureaucracy, Avoiding bureaucracy, Avoiding bureaucracy building, Building a process, Building a process categories of, Assessing Needs, Assessing Needs changes in, Responsibilities documentation of, Document Them, Make Them Easy to Find, Make Them Easy to Find encouraging use of, Using Your Processes, Using Your Processes for assessing contributors, Assessing Contributors, Reviewing new developers: In depth for attracting contributors, The Gates of Your Community, The Gates of Your Community for managing feedback, Managing Feedback, Gathering feedback good vs. bad, Building Great Processes, Building Great Processes in getting participation (the on-ramp), The On-Ramp: Creating Collaborative Processes, Growing Kudos, The On-Ramp: Creating Collaborative Processes, The On-Ramp: Creating Collaborative Processes, The On-Ramp: Creating Collaborative Processes, Identifying the On-Ramp, Identifying the On-Ramp, Developing Knowledge, Developing Knowledge, Determining Contributions, Determining Contributions, Growing Kudos, Growing Kudos defined, The On-Ramp: Creating Collaborative Processes determining contributions, Determining Contributions, Determining Contributions identifying, Identifying the On-Ramp, Identifying the On-Ramp showing appreciation, Growing Kudos, Growing Kudos skills acquisition, Developing Knowledge, Developing Knowledge steps in, The On-Ramp: Creating Collaborative Processes, The On-Ramp: Creating Collaborative Processes reassessing, Process Reassessment, Building Regularity simplicity as foundation of, Breaking Up the Puzzle, Simplicity is key, Simplicity is key transparency in, Transparency, Transparency product recalls, Building Great Processes, Building Great Processes professional press, as target of buzz campaign, The Professional Press, The Professional Press Project level, of projects, Tracking Projects projectors, using at events, The Ethos of the UDS, Room Layout, Room Layout, Room Layout projects, tracking, Tracking Projects, Tracking Projects, Structuring Your Projects, Structuring Your Projects, Managing Work Items, Documenting work items, Visualizing Data with Burndown Charts, Visualizing Data with Burndown Charts, Using burndown charts, Using burndown charts, Using burndown charts, Generating additional information, Using burndown charts, Using burndown charts, Observing burndown patterns, Observing burndown patterns, Building burndown charts into your workflow, Building burndown charts into your workflow managing work items, Managing Work Items, Documenting work items providing different levels of visibility, Tracking Projects, Tracking Projects using blueprints, Structuring Your Projects, Structuring Your Projects using burndown charts, Visualizing Data with Burndown Charts, Visualizing Data with Burndown Charts, Using burndown charts, Using burndown charts, Using burndown charts, Generating additional information, Using burndown charts, Using burndown charts, Observing burndown patterns, Observing burndown patterns, Building burndown charts into your workflow, Building burndown charts into your workflow benefits of, Using burndown charts, Using burndown charts building into workflow, Building burndown charts into your workflow, Building burndown charts into your workflow generating charts, Using burndown charts, Generating additional information overview, Visualizing Data with Burndown Charts, Visualizing Data with Burndown Charts patterns in charts, Observing burndown patterns, Observing burndown patterns reading charts, Using burndown charts, Using burndown charts Putnam, Robert, Building Belonging into the Social Economy Q quantity vs. quality, The risks of interpretation R Rabinovitch, Ilan, Location/venue, Ilan Rabinovitch, Southern California Linux Expo, Ilan Rabinovitch, Southern California Linux Expo Raymond, Eric, Bug Tracking read-mostly communities, Read-mostly communities, Read-mostly communities Really Simple Syndication (RSS) feeds, Syndication, Syndication recordMyDesktop, Videos Regional Membership Boards, Ubuntu Member, Ubuntu Member Reinventing Discovery (Nielsen), Tim O’Reilly, O’Reilly Media Reinventing the Bazaar (McMillan), Building Belonging into the Social Economy release cycles, Ubuntu community, Leading by example: Ubuntu, Leading by example: Ubuntu release parties, Organizing Physical Events, Organizing Online Events defined, Organizing Physical Events online, Organizing Online Events remote participation, in Ubuntu Developer Summit, Infrastructure, Infrastructure, Room Layout reporting, Bug reporting, Bug reporting, Reporting, Reporting, Reporting, Reporting, Showing off your survey reports, Showing off your survey reports, Measuring Mechanics, Measuring Mechanics bugs, Bug reporting, Bug reporting, Measuring Mechanics, Measuring Mechanics examples of, Reporting, Reporting making easy, Reporting, Reporting survey data, Showing off your survey reports, Showing off your survey reports reputation of community manager, Internal reputation, Community reputation resources, and governance, The Case for Governance respect for others, in Ubuntu Code of Conduct, Diversity responsibility, problems with, Problems with Responsibility, Problems with Responsibility revenue opportunities, Revenue Opportunities, Donations ReverbNation, The preparation review phase, of buzz cycle, Review, Review, Applying the buzz cycle, Applying the buzz cycle roles, Roles, Roles room layout, at events, Room Layout, Room Layout Ross, Blake, Attracting Contributors, Mary Colvig, Mozilla routine, breaking, Events, Events, Events RSS (Really Simple Syndication) feeds, Syndication, Syndication S SaaS (Software as a Service), Software As a Service, Software As a Service Safari® Books Online, Safari® Books Online salary of community manager, Salary, Salary Saxena, Deepak, Building Buzz, Building Buzz SCALE (Southern California Linux Expo), Ilan Rabinovitch, Southern California Linux Expo, Ilan Rabinovitch, Southern California Linux Expo Schaller, Christian, The Structure of Strife, The Structure of Strife scope of teams, Units of Belonging, Define the scope of each team, and help team members understand that scope, Define the scope of each team, and help team members understand that scope Scott, Cynthia D., Building a Mission Statement screen-scraping, Plugging your stats into graphs Screencast-O-Matic, Videos search engine optimization (SEO), Syndication, Syndication Second Life, Virtual worlds, Virtual worlds selling items, to generate revenue, Selling, Selling SEO (search engine optimization), Syndication, Syndication seriousness, Setting tone sessions, at events, Sessions, Sessions Severed Fifth project, Donations, Donations Sheen, Martin, Inspiring your community Shigeru Miyamoto, Technique 2: Think outside the box Shinoda, Mike, A Community Manager: Becoming the Community, Mike Shinoda, Linkin Park, Mike Shinoda, Linkin Park Shuttleworth, Mark, Hooks ’n’ Data, Commercial sponsorship, In the Beginning..., In the Beginning..., Scheduling signs, using at events, Assets simplicity as foundation of processes, Breaking Up the Puzzle, Simplicity is key, Simplicity is key size of community, The Case for Governance skills, Designing Your Community, Designing Your Community, Designing Your Community, Designing Your Community, Identify how we can divide our community into teams, Identify how we can divide our community into teams, Developing Knowledge, Developing Knowledge, Knowing When It Is Time acquisition of, Developing Knowledge, Developing Knowledge and formation of additional councils, Knowing When It Is Time mapping to teams, Identify how we can divide our community into teams, Identify how we can divide our community into teams required, documenting, Designing Your Community, Designing Your Community, Designing Your Community, Designing Your Community Skype, Voice over IP (VoIP), Voice over IP (VoIP) slides in presentations, Creating attractive slides, Long versus short presentations Smanis, Konstantinos, Observational Tests social capital, Building Belonging into the Social Economy, Building Belonging into the Social Economy, Building Belonging into the Social Economy, The Basis of Communication, The Basis of Communication building through storytelling, The Basis of Communication, The Basis of Communication defined, Building Belonging into the Social Economy social economy, Building Belonging into the Social Economy, Building Belonging into the Social Economy, Building Belonging into the Social Economy, Building Belonging into the Social Economy, The Basis of Communication, The Basis of Communication building belonging into, Building Belonging into the Social Economy, Building Belonging into the Social Economy communication in, The Basis of Communication, The Basis of Communication comparison with financial economy, Building Belonging into the Social Economy, Building Belonging into the Social Economy social media, The Art of Community, The Art of Community, The Art of Community, Don’t Be That Guy/Girl, Don’t Be That Guy/Girl, Being Social, Being Social, Being Social, Being Social, Being Social, Harnessing Social Media, Broadcasting, Broadcasting, Broadcasting, Tuning up your messages, Avoiding social media overkill, Avoiding social media overkill, Feedback, Feedback, Where to look, Where to look, Where to look, Debates, Debates, Asking for feedback, Asking for feedback, Collaboration, Collaboration, Campaigns and awareness, Events, Events, Controlling the Fire Hose, Controlling the Fire Hose, Optimizing How You Post, Optimizing How You Post, Being Socially Responsible, Being Socially Responsible, Organizing a Community Event, At the event, Running a Campaign, The buildup, Providing Community Updates, Providing Community Updates, Mike Shinoda, Linkin Park, Mike Shinoda, Linkin Park, Tim O’Reilly, O’Reilly Media, Tim O’Reilly, O’Reilly Media (see also Facebook) (see also Google+) (see also Twitter) broadcasting with, Being Social, Broadcasting, Broadcasting, Broadcasting, Tuning up your messages, Avoiding social media overkill, Avoiding social media overkill balanced use of, Avoiding social media overkill, Avoiding social media overkill content of broadcasts, Broadcasting, Broadcasting overview, Being Social using Twitter, Broadcasting, Tuning up your messages collaboration using, Being Social, Collaboration, Collaboration, Campaigns and awareness, Events, Events, Running a Campaign, The buildup coordinating events, Events, Events for campaigns and awareness, Campaigns and awareness, Running a Campaign, The buildup overview of, Being Social party-planning example, Collaboration, Collaboration controlling time using, Harnessing Social Media, Controlling the Fire Hose, Controlling the Fire Hose getting feedback using, Being Social, Feedback, Feedback, Where to look, Where to look, Where to look, Debates, Debates, Asking for feedback, Asking for feedback by asking for, Asking for feedback, Asking for feedback overview, Being Social Ubuntu 11.04 release example, Feedback, Feedback using Twitter, Where to look, Where to look, Where to look via debates, Debates, Debates most common networks, Being Social, Being Social optimizing posts to, Optimizing How You Post, Optimizing How You Post organizing community event using, Organizing a Community Event, At the event providing community updates with, Providing Community Updates, Providing Community Updates realistic expectations of, Don’t Be That Guy/Girl, Don’t Be That Guy/Girl responsible use of, Being Socially Responsible, Being Socially Responsible use by community leaders, Mike Shinoda, Linkin Park, Mike Shinoda, Linkin Park, Tim O’Reilly, O’Reilly Media, Tim O’Reilly, O’Reilly Media Mike Shinoda (Linkin Park), Mike Shinoda, Linkin Park, Mike Shinoda, Linkin Park Tim O'Reilly, Tim O’Reilly, O’Reilly Media, Tim O’Reilly, O’Reilly Media Software as a Service (SaaS), Software As a Service, Software As a Service software cycles, fixed release, Building a Strategic Plan, Building a Strategic Plan Somerville, Cody, Baking in Openness Sorkin, Aaron, Inspiring your community source control, Source Control, Source Control Southern California Linux Expo (SCALE), Ilan Rabinovitch, Southern California Linux Expo, Ilan Rabinovitch, Southern California Linux Expo Spafford, James, The Second Edition, James Spafford, Media Molecule, James Spafford, Media Molecule spam, Getting It Right by Not Getting It Wrong, Getting It Right by Not Getting It Wrong speaking at events, The Art of Community (see presentations at events) Spencer, Rick, Visualizing Data with Burndown Charts, Visualizing Data with Burndown Charts sponsored communities, The Case for Governance, Commercial sponsorship, Commercial sponsorship, Barriers to Input, Barriers to Input and governance, The Case for Governance conflict within, Barriers to Input, Barriers to Input councils of, Commercial sponsorship, Commercial sponsorship sponsors, Understanding Your Needs, Understanding Your Needs, Finding and Handling Sponsors, Finding and Handling Sponsors, Setting expectations, Setting expectations, The pitch, The pitch, Handling the Money, Handling the Money, Scheduling, Scheduling determining, Finding and Handling Sponsors, Finding and Handling Sponsors examining needs before approaching, Understanding Your Needs, Understanding Your Needs giving back to, Setting expectations, Setting expectations managing money from, Handling the Money, Handling the Money of Ubuntu Developer Summit, Scheduling, Scheduling pitching to, The pitch, The pitch Spread Firefox campaign, Attracting Contributors, Attracting Contributors, Mary Colvig, Mozilla, Mary Colvig, Mozilla Spreadshirt, Selling sprints, Organizing Physical Events, Organizing a Sprint, Additional notes Stallman, Richard, Dictatorial Charismatic Leadership stories, The Basis of Communication, The Basis of Communication, The Basis of Communication, The Basis of Communication, Attracting Contributors, Attracting Contributors, Delivering Presentations as mechanism behind communication, The Basis of Communication, The Basis of Communication as viral marketing assets, Attracting Contributors, Attracting Contributors building social capital through, The Basis of Communication, The Basis of Communication in presentations, Delivering Presentations strategic planning, The Art of Community, Planning Your Community, Community: The Bird’s-Eye View, Community: The Bird’s-Eye View, Community: The Bird’s-Eye View, Community: The Bird’s-Eye View, Designing Your Community, Designing Your Community, Designing Your Community, Baking in Openness, Baking in Openness, Baking in Openness, Baking in Openness, Building a Mission Statement, Building a Mission Statement, Structuring the plan, Structuring the plan, Structuring the plan, Structuring the plan, Structuring the plan, Brainstorming Ideas, Technique 3: Let’s make it suck, Pulling Together the Threads, Financially Supporting Your Community, Documenting Your Strategy, Documenting Your Strategy, Financially Supporting Your Community, Financially Supporting Your Community, Revenue Opportunities, Sponsorship, Strategy, Strategy (see also teams) brainstorming, Brainstorming Ideas, Technique 3: Let’s make it suck building positive environment, Community: The Bird’s-Eye View, Community: The Bird’s-Eye View contribute growth, Community: The Bird’s-Eye View, Community: The Bird’s-Eye View difference from business strategic planning, Structuring the plan, Structuring the plan documenting, Designing Your Community, Designing Your Community, Designing Your Community, Baking in Openness, Baking in Openness, Building a Mission Statement, Building a Mission Statement, Structuring the plan, Structuring the plan, Structuring the plan, Pulling Together the Threads, Financially Supporting Your Community, Documenting Your Strategy, Documenting Your Strategy defining objectives, Structuring the plan, Pulling Together the Threads, Financially Supporting Your Community ingredients of, Designing Your Community, Designing Your Community mission statement, Designing Your Community, Building a Mission Statement, Building a Mission Statement structure of documentation, Structuring the plan, Structuring the plan transparency/openess when, Baking in Openness, Baking in Openness finances, Financially Supporting Your Community, Financially Supporting Your Community, Revenue Opportunities, Sponsorship required resources, Financially Supporting Your Community, Financially Supporting Your Community revenue opportunities, Revenue Opportunities, Sponsorship for openess/transparency, Baking in Openness, Baking in Openness need for, Planning Your Community of company, conveying to community managers, Strategy, Strategy streaming, live, Videos, Videos stress, The Art of Community (see burnout) subcouncils, Responsibilities success criteria, in strategic plan, Structuring the plan, Structuring the plan, Structuring the plan summits, Organizing Physical Events, Organizing a Summit, Event-specific notes, Event-specific notes surface-level diversity, Diversity, Diversity surveys, Gathering feedback, Gathering Structured Feedback, Gathering Structured Feedback, Surveys and Structured Feedback, Surveys and Structured Feedback, Choosing questions, Choosing questions, Showing off your survey reports, Showing off your survey reports, Ensuring Effective Processes, Ensuring Effective Processes, Reacting to Community Concerns, Reacting to Community Concerns choosing questions for, Choosing questions, Choosing questions for finding causes of bottlenecks, Ensuring Effective Processes, Ensuring Effective Processes for gathering feedback, Gathering feedback, Gathering Structured Feedback, Gathering Structured Feedback for learning about community concerns, Reacting to Community Concerns, Reacting to Community Concerns purpose of, Surveys and Structured Feedback, Surveys and Structured Feedback reports from, Showing off your survey reports, Showing off your survey reports Sweet, Adam, Finding Your Place, Finding Your Place syndication of content, Syndication, Syndication T T-shirts, for events, Assets, Assets tales, The Basis of Communication tasks, communication between teams about, Ensure that teams can communicate clearly and effectively teams, Community: The Bird’s-Eye View, Community: The Bird’s-Eye View, Community: The Bird’s-Eye View, Units of Belonging, Units of Belonging, Units of Belonging, Write-centered communities, Write-centered communities, Diversity, Diversity, Identify how we can divide our community into teams, Identify how we can divide our community into teams, Define the scope of each team, and help team members understand that scope, Define the scope of each team, and help team members understand that scope, Define the scope of each team, and help team members understand that scope, Define the scope of each team, and help team members understand that scope, Understand the extent and range of collaboration among our teams, Understand the extent and range of collaboration among our teams, Ensure that teams can communicate clearly and effectively, Ensure that teams can communicate clearly and effectively, Building a Set of Generals, Building a Set of Generals, Setting Up a Community Council, Setting Up a Community Council, Responsibilities and Community Council, Responsibilities as units of belonging, Units of Belonging, Units of Belonging building, Community: The Bird’s-Eye View, Community: The Bird’s-Eye View collaboration between, Understand the extent and range of collaboration among our teams, Understand the extent and range of collaboration among our teams communication between, Community: The Bird’s-Eye View, Ensure that teams can communicate clearly and effectively, Ensure that teams can communicate clearly and effectively diversity within, Diversity, Diversity dividing community into, Identify how we can divide our community into teams, Identify how we can divide our community into teams leaders of, tracking community health through, Building a Set of Generals, Building a Set of Generals mission statement for, Define the scope of each team, and help team members understand that scope, Define the scope of each team, and help team members understand that scope of Ubuntu community, Write-centered communities, Write-centered communities scope of, Units of Belonging, Define the scope of each team, and help team members understand that scope, Define the scope of each team, and help team members understand that scope vs. councils, Setting Up a Community Council, Setting Up a Community Council Technical Board, of Ubuntu community, Technical Board, Technical Board Technorati, The Amateur Press testing usability, Observational Tests, Observational Tests, Observational Tests Texas Linux Fest, Ilan Rabinovitch, Southern California Linux Expo, Ilan Rabinovitch, Southern California Linux Expo The Art of Community, community of, Social Media, Social Media The West Wing (TV program), Inspiring your community, Inspiring your community theory versus action, Theory Versus Action: Action Wins, Theory Versus Action: Action Wins Thorp, Ben (mrben), The Essence of Community, The Basis of Communication, The Basis of Communication threats on community, The Basis of Communication, The Basis of Communication, Unwrapping Opportunity, Unwrapping Opportunity effect on sense of belonging, The Basis of Communication, The Basis of Communication LugRadio response to rail strike, Unwrapping Opportunity, Unwrapping Opportunity time zones, and online events, Date/time, Date/time tone, of writing, Avoiding bikeshedding, Setting tone tools, Building Great Infrastructure, Building Great Infrastructure, Software As a Service, Software As a Service, Avoiding Resource Fetishism, Avoiding Resource Fetishism, Tool Access, Tool Access, Don’t Be That Guy/Girl, Don’t Be That Guy/Girl, Controlling the Fire Hose, Controlling the Fire Hose access to, Tool Access, Tool Access and workflow, Building Great Infrastructure, Building Great Infrastructure debates over, Avoiding Resource Fetishism, Avoiding Resource Fetishism for managing social media, Controlling the Fire Hose, Controlling the Fire Hose social media as tool, Don’t Be That Guy/Girl, Don’t Be That Guy/Girl Software as a Service (SaaS), Software As a Service, Software As a Service top posting, Netiquette, Netiquette Torvalds, Linus, Dictatorial Charismatic Leadership, Linus Torvalds, Linux, Linus Torvalds, Linux Trac (software), Building Great Infrastructure tracking, The Art of Community, Bug Tracking, Bug triage, Bug reporting, Measuring Mechanics, Measuring Mechanics, Credibility and the Need to Track Progress, Credibility and the Need to Track Progress, The Importance of Tracking Our Work, The Importance of Tracking Our Work, Tracking the Right Things, Tracking the Right Things, Within the Context of a Company, Communicating up and down, Tracking Growth and Decline, Using burndown charts, Tracking Growth and Decline, Tracking Growth and Decline, Visibility Is Key, Visibility Is Key, Ensuring Effective Processes, Ensuring Effective Processes, Tracking Health, Tracking Health, Promoting a Feedback Culture, Promoting a Feedback Culture, Building a Set of Generals, Building a Set of Generals, Reacting to Community Concerns, Reacting to Community Concerns (see also projects, tracking) bugs, Bug Tracking, Bug triage, Bug reporting, Measuring Mechanics, Measuring Mechanics determining what to track, Tracking the Right Things, Tracking the Right Things effect on building credibility, Credibility and the Need to Track Progress, Credibility and the Need to Track Progress growth and decline, Tracking Growth and Decline, Using burndown charts, Tracking Growth and Decline, Tracking Growth and Decline, Visibility Is Key, Visibility Is Key, Ensuring Effective Processes, Ensuring Effective Processes areas of, Tracking Growth and Decline, Tracking Growth and Decline data visibility, Visibility Is Key, Visibility Is Key finding causes of, Ensuring Effective Processes, Ensuring Effective Processes overview, Tracking Growth and Decline, Using burndown charts health of community, Tracking Health, Tracking Health, Promoting a Feedback Culture, Promoting a Feedback Culture, Building a Set of Generals, Building a Set of Generals, Reacting to Community Concerns, Reacting to Community Concerns by calls to team leaders, Building a Set of Generals, Building a Set of Generals overview, Tracking Health, Tracking Health promoting feedback culture, Promoting a Feedback Culture, Promoting a Feedback Culture responding to concerns, Reacting to Community Concerns, Reacting to Community Concerns importance of, The Importance of Tracking Our Work, The Importance of Tracking Our Work within a company, Within the Context of a Company, Communicating up and down transparency, Baking in Openness, Baking in Openness, Striving for Clarity, Striving for Clarity, Transparency, Transparency, Bug Tracking, Bug Tracking, Building and Maintaining Transparency, Building and Maintaining Transparency, Communications, Communications, Perception of you, Perception of you, Dictatorial Charismatic Leadership and dictatorial communities, Dictatorial Charismatic Leadership in bug tracking, Bug Tracking, Bug Tracking in communication, Striving for Clarity, Striving for Clarity, Communications, Communications in personal feedback, Perception of you, Perception of you in processes, Transparency, Transparency in strategic plan, Baking in Openness, Baking in Openness in workflow, Building and Maintaining Transparency, Building and Maintaining Transparency trend line, Using burndown charts trending topics, Getting more eyeballs triaging, Bug triage, Bug triage, Measuring Mechanics, Measuring Mechanics Troy, Ryan, Codifying Your Council trust, Trust Is Everything, Trust Is Everything tutorials, online, Organizing Online Events, Organizing Online Tutorials, Event-specific notes Twitter, Reporting, Reporting, Being Social, Being Social, Twitter, Twitter, Getting started with Twitter, Getting started with Twitter, Broadcasting, Tuning up your messages, Tuning up your messages, Tuning up your messages, Where to look, Where to look, Where to look, Where to look, Where to look, The buildup, At the event, At the event, Tim O’Reilly, O’Reilly Media, Tim O’Reilly, O’Reilly Media, Tim O’Reilly, O’Reilly Media broadcasting with, Broadcasting, Tuning up your messages, The buildup, At the event, At the event, Tim O’Reilly, O’Reilly Media about events, The buildup, At the event, At the event mindcasting, Tim O’Reilly, O’Reilly Media getting feedback using, Where to look, Where to look, Where to look getting started with, Getting started with Twitter, Getting started with Twitter history of, Twitter, Twitter overview of, Being Social, Being Social reporting with, Reporting, Reporting searching tweets, Where to look, Where to look use by Tim O'Reilly, Tim O’Reilly, O’Reilly Media, Tim O’Reilly, O’Reilly Media writing messages, Tuning up your messages, Tuning up your messages U Ubuntu Code of Conduct, Diversity, Diversity Ubuntu community, Write-centered communities, Baking in Openness, Baking in Openness, Understand the extent and range of collaboration among our teams, Striving for Clarity, Inspiring your community, Leading by example: Ubuntu, Leading by example: Ubuntu, Reviewing new developers: In depth, Reviewing new developers: In depth, Developing Knowledge, Developing Knowledge, Process Reassessment, Process Reassessment, An Example: Ubuntu Bug Workflow, Lessons learned, Feedback, Feedback, Providing Community Updates, Providing Community Updates, Videos, Videos, Hooks ’n’ Data, Hooks ’n’ Data, Plugging your stats into graphs, Visibility Is Key, Ensuring Effective Processes, Ensuring Effective Processes, In the Beginning..., In the Beginning..., Mark Shuttleworth, Mark Shuttleworth, Community Council, Community Council, Technical Board, Technical Board, Team councils, Team councils, Membership, Membership, Ubuntu Member, Ubuntu Member, Ubuntu Member, Ubuntu Member, Ubuntu Member, Ubuntu Member, Ubuntu Member, Ubuntu Member, Developer, Developer, Council or Board Member, Council or Board Member, Escalation, Escalation bug workflow example, An Example: Ubuntu Bug Workflow, Lessons learned bug-squashing parties, Plugging your stats into graphs contributor access to repositories, Reviewing new developers: In depth, Reviewing new developers: In depth developer mentoring campaign, Visibility Is Key history of, In the Beginning..., In the Beginning...

., Scheduling signs, using at events, Assets simplicity as foundation of processes, Breaking Up the Puzzle, Simplicity is key, Simplicity is key size of community, The Case for Governance skills, Designing Your Community, Designing Your Community, Designing Your Community, Designing Your Community, Identify how we can divide our community into teams, Identify how we can divide our community into teams, Developing Knowledge, Developing Knowledge, Knowing When It Is Time acquisition of, Developing Knowledge, Developing Knowledge and formation of additional councils, Knowing When It Is Time mapping to teams, Identify how we can divide our community into teams, Identify how we can divide our community into teams required, documenting, Designing Your Community, Designing Your Community, Designing Your Community, Designing Your Community Skype, Voice over IP (VoIP), Voice over IP (VoIP) slides in presentations, Creating attractive slides, Long versus short presentations Smanis, Konstantinos, Observational Tests social capital, Building Belonging into the Social Economy, Building Belonging into the Social Economy, Building Belonging into the Social Economy, The Basis of Communication, The Basis of Communication building through storytelling, The Basis of Communication, The Basis of Communication defined, Building Belonging into the Social Economy social economy, Building Belonging into the Social Economy, Building Belonging into the Social Economy, Building Belonging into the Social Economy, Building Belonging into the Social Economy, The Basis of Communication, The Basis of Communication building belonging into, Building Belonging into the Social Economy, Building Belonging into the Social Economy communication in, The Basis of Communication, The Basis of Communication comparison with financial economy, Building Belonging into the Social Economy, Building Belonging into the Social Economy social media, The Art of Community, The Art of Community, The Art of Community, Don’t Be That Guy/Girl, Don’t Be That Guy/Girl, Being Social, Being Social, Being Social, Being Social, Being Social, Harnessing Social Media, Broadcasting, Broadcasting, Broadcasting, Tuning up your messages, Avoiding social media overkill, Avoiding social media overkill, Feedback, Feedback, Where to look, Where to look, Where to look, Debates, Debates, Asking for feedback, Asking for feedback, Collaboration, Collaboration, Campaigns and awareness, Events, Events, Controlling the Fire Hose, Controlling the Fire Hose, Optimizing How You Post, Optimizing How You Post, Being Socially Responsible, Being Socially Responsible, Organizing a Community Event, At the event, Running a Campaign, The buildup, Providing Community Updates, Providing Community Updates, Mike Shinoda, Linkin Park, Mike Shinoda, Linkin Park, Tim O’Reilly, O’Reilly Media, Tim O’Reilly, O’Reilly Media (see also Facebook) (see also Google+) (see also Twitter) broadcasting with, Being Social, Broadcasting, Broadcasting, Broadcasting, Tuning up your messages, Avoiding social media overkill, Avoiding social media overkill balanced use of, Avoiding social media overkill, Avoiding social media overkill content of broadcasts, Broadcasting, Broadcasting overview, Being Social using Twitter, Broadcasting, Tuning up your messages collaboration using, Being Social, Collaboration, Collaboration, Campaigns and awareness, Events, Events, Running a Campaign, The buildup coordinating events, Events, Events for campaigns and awareness, Campaigns and awareness, Running a Campaign, The buildup overview of, Being Social party-planning example, Collaboration, Collaboration controlling time using, Harnessing Social Media, Controlling the Fire Hose, Controlling the Fire Hose getting feedback using, Being Social, Feedback, Feedback, Where to look, Where to look, Where to look, Debates, Debates, Asking for feedback, Asking for feedback by asking for, Asking for feedback, Asking for feedback overview, Being Social Ubuntu 11.04 release example, Feedback, Feedback using Twitter, Where to look, Where to look, Where to look via debates, Debates, Debates most common networks, Being Social, Being Social optimizing posts to, Optimizing How You Post, Optimizing How You Post organizing community event using, Organizing a Community Event, At the event providing community updates with, Providing Community Updates, Providing Community Updates realistic expectations of, Don’t Be That Guy/Girl, Don’t Be That Guy/Girl responsible use of, Being Socially Responsible, Being Socially Responsible use by community leaders, Mike Shinoda, Linkin Park, Mike Shinoda, Linkin Park, Tim O’Reilly, O’Reilly Media, Tim O’Reilly, O’Reilly Media Mike Shinoda (Linkin Park), Mike Shinoda, Linkin Park, Mike Shinoda, Linkin Park Tim O'Reilly, Tim O’Reilly, O’Reilly Media, Tim O’Reilly, O’Reilly Media Software as a Service (SaaS), Software As a Service, Software As a Service software cycles, fixed release, Building a Strategic Plan, Building a Strategic Plan Somerville, Cody, Baking in Openness Sorkin, Aaron, Inspiring your community source control, Source Control, Source Control Southern California Linux Expo (SCALE), Ilan Rabinovitch, Southern California Linux Expo, Ilan Rabinovitch, Southern California Linux Expo Spafford, James, The Second Edition, James Spafford, Media Molecule, James Spafford, Media Molecule spam, Getting It Right by Not Getting It Wrong, Getting It Right by Not Getting It Wrong speaking at events, The Art of Community (see presentations at events) Spencer, Rick, Visualizing Data with Burndown Charts, Visualizing Data with Burndown Charts sponsored communities, The Case for Governance, Commercial sponsorship, Commercial sponsorship, Barriers to Input, Barriers to Input and governance, The Case for Governance conflict within, Barriers to Input, Barriers to Input councils of, Commercial sponsorship, Commercial sponsorship sponsors, Understanding Your Needs, Understanding Your Needs, Finding and Handling Sponsors, Finding and Handling Sponsors, Setting expectations, Setting expectations, The pitch, The pitch, Handling the Money, Handling the Money, Scheduling, Scheduling determining, Finding and Handling Sponsors, Finding and Handling Sponsors examining needs before approaching, Understanding Your Needs, Understanding Your Needs giving back to, Setting expectations, Setting expectations managing money from, Handling the Money, Handling the Money of Ubuntu Developer Summit, Scheduling, Scheduling pitching to, The pitch, The pitch Spread Firefox campaign, Attracting Contributors, Attracting Contributors, Mary Colvig, Mozilla, Mary Colvig, Mozilla Spreadshirt, Selling sprints, Organizing Physical Events, Organizing a Sprint, Additional notes Stallman, Richard, Dictatorial Charismatic Leadership stories, The Basis of Communication, The Basis of Communication, The Basis of Communication, The Basis of Communication, Attracting Contributors, Attracting Contributors, Delivering Presentations as mechanism behind communication, The Basis of Communication, The Basis of Communication as viral marketing assets, Attracting Contributors, Attracting Contributors building social capital through, The Basis of Communication, The Basis of Communication in presentations, Delivering Presentations strategic planning, The Art of Community, Planning Your Community, Community: The Bird’s-Eye View, Community: The Bird’s-Eye View, Community: The Bird’s-Eye View, Community: The Bird’s-Eye View, Designing Your Community, Designing Your Community, Designing Your Community, Baking in Openness, Baking in Openness, Baking in Openness, Baking in Openness, Building a Mission Statement, Building a Mission Statement, Structuring the plan, Structuring the plan, Structuring the plan, Structuring the plan, Structuring the plan, Brainstorming Ideas, Technique 3: Let’s make it suck, Pulling Together the Threads, Financially Supporting Your Community, Documenting Your Strategy, Documenting Your Strategy, Financially Supporting Your Community, Financially Supporting Your Community, Revenue Opportunities, Sponsorship, Strategy, Strategy (see also teams) brainstorming, Brainstorming Ideas, Technique 3: Let’s make it suck building positive environment, Community: The Bird’s-Eye View, Community: The Bird’s-Eye View contribute growth, Community: The Bird’s-Eye View, Community: The Bird’s-Eye View difference from business strategic planning, Structuring the plan, Structuring the plan documenting, Designing Your Community, Designing Your Community, Designing Your Community, Baking in Openness, Baking in Openness, Building a Mission Statement, Building a Mission Statement, Structuring the plan, Structuring the plan, Structuring the plan, Pulling Together the Threads, Financially Supporting Your Community, Documenting Your Strategy, Documenting Your Strategy defining objectives, Structuring the plan, Pulling Together the Threads, Financially Supporting Your Community ingredients of, Designing Your Community, Designing Your Community mission statement, Designing Your Community, Building a Mission Statement, Building a Mission Statement structure of documentation, Structuring the plan, Structuring the plan transparency/openess when, Baking in Openness, Baking in Openness finances, Financially Supporting Your Community, Financially Supporting Your Community, Revenue Opportunities, Sponsorship required resources, Financially Supporting Your Community, Financially Supporting Your Community revenue opportunities, Revenue Opportunities, Sponsorship for openess/transparency, Baking in Openness, Baking in Openness need for, Planning Your Community of company, conveying to community managers, Strategy, Strategy streaming, live, Videos, Videos stress, The Art of Community (see burnout) subcouncils, Responsibilities success criteria, in strategic plan, Structuring the plan, Structuring the plan, Structuring the plan summits, Organizing Physical Events, Organizing a Summit, Event-specific notes, Event-specific notes surface-level diversity, Diversity, Diversity surveys, Gathering feedback, Gathering Structured Feedback, Gathering Structured Feedback, Surveys and Structured Feedback, Surveys and Structured Feedback, Choosing questions, Choosing questions, Showing off your survey reports, Showing off your survey reports, Ensuring Effective Processes, Ensuring Effective Processes, Reacting to Community Concerns, Reacting to Community Concerns choosing questions for, Choosing questions, Choosing questions for finding causes of bottlenecks, Ensuring Effective Processes, Ensuring Effective Processes for gathering feedback, Gathering feedback, Gathering Structured Feedback, Gathering Structured Feedback for learning about community concerns, Reacting to Community Concerns, Reacting to Community Concerns purpose of, Surveys and Structured Feedback, Surveys and Structured Feedback reports from, Showing off your survey reports, Showing off your survey reports Sweet, Adam, Finding Your Place, Finding Your Place syndication of content, Syndication, Syndication T T-shirts, for events, Assets, Assets tales, The Basis of Communication tasks, communication between teams about, Ensure that teams can communicate clearly and effectively teams, Community: The Bird’s-Eye View, Community: The Bird’s-Eye View, Community: The Bird’s-Eye View, Units of Belonging, Units of Belonging, Units of Belonging, Write-centered communities, Write-centered communities, Diversity, Diversity, Identify how we can divide our community into teams, Identify how we can divide our community into teams, Define the scope of each team, and help team members understand that scope, Define the scope of each team, and help team members understand that scope, Define the scope of each team, and help team members understand that scope, Define the scope of each team, and help team members understand that scope, Understand the extent and range of collaboration among our teams, Understand the extent and range of collaboration among our teams, Ensure that teams can communicate clearly and effectively, Ensure that teams can communicate clearly and effectively, Building a Set of Generals, Building a Set of Generals, Setting Up a Community Council, Setting Up a Community Council, Responsibilities and Community Council, Responsibilities as units of belonging, Units of Belonging, Units of Belonging building, Community: The Bird’s-Eye View, Community: The Bird’s-Eye View collaboration between, Understand the extent and range of collaboration among our teams, Understand the extent and range of collaboration among our teams communication between, Community: The Bird’s-Eye View, Ensure that teams can communicate clearly and effectively, Ensure that teams can communicate clearly and effectively diversity within, Diversity, Diversity dividing community into, Identify how we can divide our community into teams, Identify how we can divide our community into teams leaders of, tracking community health through, Building a Set of Generals, Building a Set of Generals mission statement for, Define the scope of each team, and help team members understand that scope, Define the scope of each team, and help team members understand that scope of Ubuntu community, Write-centered communities, Write-centered communities scope of, Units of Belonging, Define the scope of each team, and help team members understand that scope, Define the scope of each team, and help team members understand that scope vs. councils, Setting Up a Community Council, Setting Up a Community Council Technical Board, of Ubuntu community, Technical Board, Technical Board Technorati, The Amateur Press testing usability, Observational Tests, Observational Tests, Observational Tests Texas Linux Fest, Ilan Rabinovitch, Southern California Linux Expo, Ilan Rabinovitch, Southern California Linux Expo The Art of Community, community of, Social Media, Social Media The West Wing (TV program), Inspiring your community, Inspiring your community theory versus action, Theory Versus Action: Action Wins, Theory Versus Action: Action Wins Thorp, Ben (mrben), The Essence of Community, The Basis of Communication, The Basis of Communication threats on community, The Basis of Communication, The Basis of Communication, Unwrapping Opportunity, Unwrapping Opportunity effect on sense of belonging, The Basis of Communication, The Basis of Communication LugRadio response to rail strike, Unwrapping Opportunity, Unwrapping Opportunity time zones, and online events, Date/time, Date/time tone, of writing, Avoiding bikeshedding, Setting tone tools, Building Great Infrastructure, Building Great Infrastructure, Software As a Service, Software As a Service, Avoiding Resource Fetishism, Avoiding Resource Fetishism, Tool Access, Tool Access, Don’t Be That Guy/Girl, Don’t Be That Guy/Girl, Controlling the Fire Hose, Controlling the Fire Hose access to, Tool Access, Tool Access and workflow, Building Great Infrastructure, Building Great Infrastructure debates over, Avoiding Resource Fetishism, Avoiding Resource Fetishism for managing social media, Controlling the Fire Hose, Controlling the Fire Hose social media as tool, Don’t Be That Guy/Girl, Don’t Be That Guy/Girl Software as a Service (SaaS), Software As a Service, Software As a Service top posting, Netiquette, Netiquette Torvalds, Linus, Dictatorial Charismatic Leadership, Linus Torvalds, Linux, Linus Torvalds, Linux Trac (software), Building Great Infrastructure tracking, The Art of Community, Bug Tracking, Bug triage, Bug reporting, Measuring Mechanics, Measuring Mechanics, Credibility and the Need to Track Progress, Credibility and the Need to Track Progress, The Importance of Tracking Our Work, The Importance of Tracking Our Work, Tracking the Right Things, Tracking the Right Things, Within the Context of a Company, Communicating up and down, Tracking Growth and Decline, Using burndown charts, Tracking Growth and Decline, Tracking Growth and Decline, Visibility Is Key, Visibility Is Key, Ensuring Effective Processes, Ensuring Effective Processes, Tracking Health, Tracking Health, Promoting a Feedback Culture, Promoting a Feedback Culture, Building a Set of Generals, Building a Set of Generals, Reacting to Community Concerns, Reacting to Community Concerns (see also projects, tracking) bugs, Bug Tracking, Bug triage, Bug reporting, Measuring Mechanics, Measuring Mechanics determining what to track, Tracking the Right Things, Tracking the Right Things effect on building credibility, Credibility and the Need to Track Progress, Credibility and the Need to Track Progress growth and decline, Tracking Growth and Decline, Using burndown charts, Tracking Growth and Decline, Tracking Growth and Decline, Visibility Is Key, Visibility Is Key, Ensuring Effective Processes, Ensuring Effective Processes areas of, Tracking Growth and Decline, Tracking Growth and Decline data visibility, Visibility Is Key, Visibility Is Key finding causes of, Ensuring Effective Processes, Ensuring Effective Processes overview, Tracking Growth and Decline, Using burndown charts health of community, Tracking Health, Tracking Health, Promoting a Feedback Culture, Promoting a Feedback Culture, Building a Set of Generals, Building a Set of Generals, Reacting to Community Concerns, Reacting to Community Concerns by calls to team leaders, Building a Set of Generals, Building a Set of Generals overview, Tracking Health, Tracking Health promoting feedback culture, Promoting a Feedback Culture, Promoting a Feedback Culture responding to concerns, Reacting to Community Concerns, Reacting to Community Concerns importance of, The Importance of Tracking Our Work, The Importance of Tracking Our Work within a company, Within the Context of a Company, Communicating up and down transparency, Baking in Openness, Baking in Openness, Striving for Clarity, Striving for Clarity, Transparency, Transparency, Bug Tracking, Bug Tracking, Building and Maintaining Transparency, Building and Maintaining Transparency, Communications, Communications, Perception of you, Perception of you, Dictatorial Charismatic Leadership and dictatorial communities, Dictatorial Charismatic Leadership in bug tracking, Bug Tracking, Bug Tracking in communication, Striving for Clarity, Striving for Clarity, Communications, Communications in personal feedback, Perception of you, Perception of you in processes, Transparency, Transparency in strategic plan, Baking in Openness, Baking in Openness in workflow, Building and Maintaining Transparency, Building and Maintaining Transparency trend line, Using burndown charts trending topics, Getting more eyeballs triaging, Bug triage, Bug triage, Measuring Mechanics, Measuring Mechanics Troy, Ryan, Codifying Your Council trust, Trust Is Everything, Trust Is Everything tutorials, online, Organizing Online Events, Organizing Online Tutorials, Event-specific notes Twitter, Reporting, Reporting, Being Social, Being Social, Twitter, Twitter, Getting started with Twitter, Getting started with Twitter, Broadcasting, Tuning up your messages, Tuning up your messages, Tuning up your messages, Where to look, Where to look, Where to look, Where to look, Where to look, The buildup, At the event, At the event, Tim O’Reilly, O’Reilly Media, Tim O’Reilly, O’Reilly Media, Tim O’Reilly, O’Reilly Media broadcasting with, Broadcasting, Tuning up your messages, The buildup, At the event, At the event, Tim O’Reilly, O’Reilly Media about events, The buildup, At the event, At the event mindcasting, Tim O’Reilly, O’Reilly Media getting feedback using, Where to look, Where to look, Where to look getting started with, Getting started with Twitter, Getting started with Twitter history of, Twitter, Twitter overview of, Being Social, Being Social reporting with, Reporting, Reporting searching tweets, Where to look, Where to look use by Tim O'Reilly, Tim O’Reilly, O’Reilly Media, Tim O’Reilly, O’Reilly Media writing messages, Tuning up your messages, Tuning up your messages U Ubuntu Code of Conduct, Diversity, Diversity Ubuntu community, Write-centered communities, Baking in Openness, Baking in Openness, Understand the extent and range of collaboration among our teams, Striving for Clarity, Inspiring your community, Leading by example: Ubuntu, Leading by example: Ubuntu, Reviewing new developers: In depth, Reviewing new developers: In depth, Developing Knowledge, Developing Knowledge, Process Reassessment, Process Reassessment, An Example: Ubuntu Bug Workflow, Lessons learned, Feedback, Feedback, Providing Community Updates, Providing Community Updates, Videos, Videos, Hooks ’n’ Data, Hooks ’n’ Data, Plugging your stats into graphs, Visibility Is Key, Ensuring Effective Processes, Ensuring Effective Processes, In the Beginning..., In the Beginning..., Mark Shuttleworth, Mark Shuttleworth, Community Council, Community Council, Technical Board, Technical Board, Team councils, Team councils, Membership, Membership, Ubuntu Member, Ubuntu Member, Ubuntu Member, Ubuntu Member, Ubuntu Member, Ubuntu Member, Ubuntu Member, Ubuntu Member, Developer, Developer, Council or Board Member, Council or Board Member, Escalation, Escalation bug workflow example, An Example: Ubuntu Bug Workflow, Lessons learned bug-squashing parties, Plugging your stats into graphs contributor access to repositories, Reviewing new developers: In depth, Reviewing new developers: In depth developer mentoring campaign, Visibility Is Key history of, In the Beginning..., In the Beginning...

 

pages: 525 words: 142,027

CIOs at Work by Ed Yourdon

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8-hour work day, Apple's 1984 Super Bowl advert, business intelligence, business process, call centre, cloud computing, crowdsourcing, distributed generation, Flash crash, Googley, Grace Hopper, Infrastructure as a Service, Innovator's Dilemma, inventory management, Julian Assange, knowledge worker, Mark Zuckerberg, Nicholas Carr, rolodex, shareholder value, Silicon Valley, six sigma, Skype, smart grid, smart meter, software as a service, Steve Ballmer, Steve Jobs, Steven Levy, the scientific method, WikiLeaks, Y2K, Zipcar

And, honestly, a lot of what Google Enterprise does is take Google consumer offerings and make them viable inside an enterprise. And it’s hugely successful for that. There are a lot of reasons why. You asked what are the great macro phenomena affecting technology. Yourdon: Yeah. Fried: I think that this is one of them. This is the one that I think is probably the most important. The rise of consumer-driven technology, consumer-driven computing, consumer-driven software-as-a-service offerings. I think that because there’s this motion from consumer to enterprise, I’m very focused on having my organization be in the avant-garde of trying to understand where there are new enterprise uses for previously consumer offerings. As one example, we’ve spent a fair amount of time trying to take Google’s consumer video chat product and turn it into corporate videoconferencing. Yourdon: Okay.

And so this idea of being data-driven, of realizing that the world is changing, you can’t be perfect, and you have to launch and change and change and change—and have an environment where you can do that—is absolutely core to us. __________ 1 Google, “Our philosophy: Ten things we know to be true.” www.google.com/about/corporate/company/tenthings.html. There’s a very deep part of the understanding reflected in the question that you asked, which is that Google is predicated on the notion of software as a service, where we’re running the software on servers that we control and we deploy it on a timeframe of our choosing—whereas all traditional technology companies are predicated on the idea of software that customers installed on their laptop, or on their personal computer, or in their own data center. And the pain of doing software installation, doing upgrades, and the necessity of it, all the difficulties in it lead to a “better get it right” mentality.

Fried: So … thank you for such good questions. Yourdon: Any one of these could keep us going for quite some time. Fried: So the technology trends that I see shaping the next few years. The one that was the most educational to me was understanding the domination of consumer-oriented technology over enterprise technology coupled with the enormous economies of scale only available to enormous software-as-a-service providers like Google. You know, these terms like the “cloud” have been hijacked by everyone. They can mean almost anything. So the … phenomena we’ve already talked about: the fact that personal expectations of technology and the role of technology [are] defined by people’s expectations outside of the workplace, instead of people’s experiences inside the workplace. I think that that’s number one, and there are all kinds of interesting corollaries from that.

 

pages: 215 words: 55,212

The Mesh: Why the Future of Business Is Sharing by Lisa Gansky

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Airbnb, Amazon Mechanical Turk, Amazon Web Services, banking crisis, barriers to entry, carbon footprint, cloud computing, credit crunch, crowdsourcing, diversification, Firefox, Google Earth, Internet of things, Kickstarter, late fees, Network effects, new economy, peer-to-peer lending, recommendation engine, RFID, Richard Florida, Richard Thaler, ride hailing / ride sharing, sharing economy, Silicon Valley, smart grid, social web, software as a service, TaskRabbit, the built environment, walkable city, yield management, young professional, Zipcar

The enhanced ability to leverage existing platforms, and lower incremental costs, is a big reason that Mesh businesses are starting to thrive. If we were to start Ofoto today, offering the same products and services (reliable network storage, customer order systems, backend systems, printing and shipping facilities), I estimate that it would take 10 percent of the nearly $60 million we raised at the time. Why? The cloud computing networks, tools, talent pool, and software as a service (SaaS) vendors in place today would allow us to go to market faster with far less capital. That reality improves nearly every aspect of getting a venture successfully off the ground and in condition to grow—the number of core staff required, the funding needed, and the time it takes to get to market. the seriously friendly effect. Knowing how to take advantage of social networks is important to Mesh businesses.

In general these businesses have started with a focus in a local urban area. The amount of capital available to you will likely shape how you craft your offer and choose to go to market. For these types of things, the infrastructure—the software and the technology—often exists in a form where you don’t have to pay very much. This is referred to as an application service provider, or ASP, model. (A related term is software as a service, or SaaS; it is also sometimes referred to as “services in the cloud.”) With ASP, instead of laying out a lot of cash to buy software or to buy computers to run it, you pay as you go. If you want software that allows you to track home exchanges, there are Web sites that allow you to use the infrastructure they’ve created. Amazon and other companies offer hosting, Web development, and fulfillment services.

Croix Falls Cinema SAP Schneeveis, Bob School of Everything (SoE) Seely Brown, John Self-storage listings, Mesh companies SellaBand Seventymm Share-based business during holidays mobile networks as foundation and niche markets shareability, compatible services See also The Mesh Shea, Lucy Sinclair, Cameron Sivers, Derek Skinnipopcorn SmartyPig smava Social lending. See Loans/social lending Social networking importance to the Mesh Mesh companies negative events, broadcasting on on Netflix network effect privacy, importance of and product improvement for word-of-mouth advertising See also Facebook Software getting for startup Mesh open development Software as a service (SaaS) Sourcemap SpareFoot Spride Share Standardization of products Starting a Mesh company capital needs customers, identifying define/redefine/scale stages first mover advantage marketing primary questions serendipity as factor shareable assets, identifying software, ASP model Stohr, Kate Supply chain forward and reverse integration reverse supply chain Sustainable design Swishing Taxi Magic TCHO Technology, Mesh-friendly Mesh companies TED Prize thinkspace thredUP adaptability of case study Tool sharing, Mesh companies Toyota, broken trust Transaction fees Transparency and adaptability “age of radical transparency,” and trust building Transportation efficiency communities developed for See also Bike sharing; Car sharing Travel-related services, Mesh companies Trials Tripkick Trust building basics of broken trust, examples of and customer complaints customer misbehavior, dealing with by delighting customers discoverers as trust agents lost trust, rebuilding maintaining trust negative events, impact on and privacy practices proprietary versus open control reviews, keeping perspective social networks, role of starting slow, necessity of and transparency trials/samples for “virtuous circle of trust,” Tryvertising Twitter Tylenol tragedy Upcycling Mesh companies Vacation Rentals by Owner (VRBO) Virgin Corporation, Mesh strategy Volkswagen, idea solicitation on Web Walmart customer data, use of greening of integration with suppliers Mesh possibilities for waste, created by Waste disposal and climate change as resource underutilization Waste management government initiatives for Mesh companies in Mesh ecosystem in natural ecosystem raw materials, sharing recycling and reuse services reverse value chain yield management See also Recycling and reuse services Water Legacy Wattzon.com Westmill Wind Farm Co-operative WhipCar Wilcox, Ronald Wilhelm, Eric Williamson, Oliver Wine cooperatives, Mesh companies Word of mouth, power of Work-space sharing, Mesh companies World of Goods Yelp Yield management Zipcar customer experience with Mesh model for partners Zopa Zynga Table of Contents Title Page Copyright Page Dedication Introduction Chapter 1 - Getting to Know the Mesh Chapter 2 - The Mesh Advantage Chapter 3 - Mesh Design Chapter 4 - In with the Mesh Chapter 5 - In Mesh We Trust Chapter 6 - The Mesh as Ecosystem Chapter 7 - Open to the Mesh Chapter 8 - Mesh Inc.

 

pages: 168 words: 50,647

The End of Jobs: Money, Meaning and Freedom Without the 9-To-5 by Taylor Pearson

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Airbnb, barriers to entry, Black Swan, call centre, cloud computing, Elon Musk, en.wikipedia.org, Frederick Winslow Taylor, future of work, Google Hangouts, Kevin Kelly, Kickstarter, knowledge economy, knowledge worker, loss aversion, low skilled workers, Lyft, Mark Zuckerberg, market fragmentation, means of production, Oculus Rift, passive income, passive investing, Peter Thiel, remote working, Ronald Reagan: Tear down this wall, sharing economy, side project, Silicon Valley, Skype, software as a service, software is eating the world, Startup school, Steve Jobs, Steve Wozniak, Stewart Brand, telemarketer, Thomas Malthus, Uber and Lyft, unpaid internship, Watson beat the top human players on Jeopardy!, web application, Whole Earth Catalog

If you only need a small amount of server space, you don’t have to go buy a server—you can rent or share a section of one. Broadly this has had the same effect for entrepreneurs that CD Baby had for musicians. The cost of the tools needed to invest in entrepreneurship has dropped dramatically because the infrastructure has gotten so much more efficient. Let’s look at a few of the primary tools and how entrepreneurs are using them. Software as a Service (SaaS): Plug and Play Tools and Systems Software as a service has arisen primarily in the last decade and facilitates a large part of the sharing economy. Instead of having to buy expensive equipment or sign long-term contracts, entrepreneurs can buy month-to-month access to different services that they need. Previously, a new company would have had to buy accounting software that would cost hundreds of dollars. Now, instead of buying expensive accounting software, you can use a month-to-month service like Xero, which starts at $9 a month.

Instead of hiring an editor on a full-time salary and hoping the new business worked, you could start working with someone on a part-time basis and pay them for a few hours of work each week. If the business started to take off, great! If it doesn’t, you haven’t started paying health insurance and gone through the expensive process of setting up a full time team member. Again, we see the same pattern as with Software as a Service: Dramatic reduction in cost and risk—less expensive and easier to find, lower risk Dramatic increase in potential—find the best qualified person in the world Previously, finding an editor for a craft beer magazine would have meant posting up job applications locally and hoping to find an expert. Now, it means you can find the most qualified person on the planet. Platforms like UpWork allow previous employers to leave reviews on team members and for people to build portfolios of work.

 

pages: 227 words: 32,306

Using Open Source Platforms for Business Intelligence: Avoid Pitfalls and Maximize Roi by Lyndsay Wise

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barriers to entry, business intelligence, business process, call centre, cloud computing, en.wikipedia.org, Just-in-time delivery, knowledge worker, Richard Stallman, software as a service, statistical model, supply-chain management, the market place

At the same time, due to the maturity of the market, other organizations do not follow either one of these structures but rely on vendors or consultants to make choices for them. Overall, the right strategy for your company might not be the same for another company. In addition to the types of applications, BI’s delivery and development also differ based on varying models within the industry. These include software as a service (SaaS) or cloud offerings, best of breed deployments, and OS. No matter what type of deployment, tying BI to business value and specific goals helps organizations develop a successful initiative independent of how BI is developed internally. However, the type of deployment also requires consideration because different choices will affect implementation times, development efforts, overall costs, and required resources for ongoing development and support.

The chart below provides a general understanding of various solution types and how they fit within the overall market enables both technical and business decision makers to make the right choices for their company. BI Delivery Type Breakdown. BI Type Definition Solution Parameters Traditional Business intelligence is installed and developed at the customer site, with the general purpose of reporting and analytics using historical data sets. Software as a Service BI offerings or components that are hosted by the solution provider and offered as a service to organizations through online access. Cloud Similar to SaaS based on the fact that solutions/data are hosted externally to the organization. In many cases, organizations develop and maintain their own BI applications. Similar to traditional BI in terms of delivery but focuses on real-time or continuous business visibility.

Unfortunately, even with this new involvement, many solutions are elusive to business users beyond their BI interaction after implementation. Even with all of the resources that exist, it is still difficult for organizations to understand how each product differentiates itself within the broader marketplace. A good example is a company that I worked with about a year ago that was looking specifically for a hosted (or Software as a Service, SaaS) BI solution. After the requirement-gathering phase, I developed a short list, focusing on SaaS BI vendors only. The project sponsor then told me that she was surprised I didn’t mention a specific vendor. She felt that vendor would be a perfect fit. The only problem was that this vendor did not and still does not provide a hosted option and was limited by platform and integration capabilities.

 

pages: 284 words: 92,688

Disrupted: My Misadventure in the Start-Up Bubble by Dan Lyons

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Airbnb, Bernie Madoff, bitcoin, call centre, cleantech, cloud computing, corporate governance, dumpster diving, fear of failure, Filter Bubble, Golden Gate Park, Google Glasses, Googley, Gordon Gekko, hiring and firing, Jeff Bezos, Lean Startup, Lyft, Mark Zuckerberg, Menlo Park, minimum viable product, new economy, Paul Graham, pre–internet, quantitative easing, ride hailing / ride sharing, Rosa Parks, Sand Hill Road, sharing economy, Silicon Valley, Silicon Valley ideology, Silicon Valley startup, Skype, Snapchat, software as a service, South of Market, San Francisco, Steve Ballmer, Steve Jobs, Steve Wozniak, telemarketer, tulip mania, Y Combinator, éminence grise

Andreessen Horowitz has invested in some of the Valley’s most highly valued companies, including Pinterest, Airbnb, and Box, and enlists its publicity machine (both its own internal operation and its friends in the tech press) to further its interests. In the spring of 2014, when “software as a service” (SaaS) stocks went into a slump, and when Box was still hoping to go public but had started to look wobbly, Andreessen’s content factory sprang into action. The firm produced blog posts and podcasts explaining that SaaS companies were misunderstood. Investors failed to understand how profitable these companies were going to be. The podcast was loaded up with a dizzying barrage of jargon and acronyms and metrics that SaaS companies have invented to measure their own performance. Software as a service is still something of a new business, and it is difficult if not impossible to compare the performance of any one SaaS company to the others.

My sense is that things will go well. Halligan used to work as a venture capitalist, so he thinks like an investor. Shah, before going to grad school at MIT, built a different software company and sold it. Also, from the perspective of Wall Street, HubSpot ticks all the right boxes. It sells to businesses, rather than to consumers. It’s a cloud computing company and uses a business model called software as a service, or SaaS, which means customers don’t install the software on their own computers but instead connect to it over the Internet and pay a monthly subscription fee. Cloud computing is hot right now. The whole tech industry is moving to this model. Investors love it. Over the years Halligan and Shah have come up with a creation myth about the company, which is that while they were in grad school they had a vision for how companies could transform their marketing departments.

But now it has published its financial results and the numbers are underwhelming. Sales are growing, but Box is spending way too much on sales and marketing, and losing huge amounts of money. To be sure, that’s the case for most of the other cloud software companies. But even by the relaxed standards of the second tech bubble, Box’s results are disappointing. Meanwhile, for some reason, shares in cloud computing and “software as a service” companies are starting to swoon. One index of thirty-seven publicly traded cloud-related companies loses $58 billion in market value over the course of two months. Salesforce.com, our rival and role model, drops 25 percent. Workday, another cloud company that’s comparable to HubSpot, drops 40 percent. On May 1, the Wall Street Journal reports that Box has decided to delay its IPO, since “investors’ love affair with cloud software is waning at the worst possible time.”

 

Industry 4.0: The Industrial Internet of Things by Alasdair Gilchrist

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3D printing, additive manufacturing, Amazon Web Services, augmented reality, autonomous vehicles, barriers to entry, business intelligence, business process, chief data officer, cloud computing, connected car, cyber-physical system, deindustrialization, fault tolerance, global value chain, Google Glasses, hiring and firing, industrial robot, inflight wifi, Infrastructure as a Service, Internet of things, inventory management, job automation, low skilled workers, millennium bug, pattern recognition, platform as a service, pre–internet, race to the bottom, RFID, Skype, smart cities, smart grid, smart meter, smart transportation, software as a service, stealth mode startup, supply-chain management, trade route, web application, WebRTC, WebSocket, Y2K

However, at the time little did anyone know the transformative nature of IP mobility and how it would radically change the workplace landscape. With the advent of IP mobility, employees could work anywhere and at any time, always having access to data and company applications and systems through VPNs (virtual private networks). Of course, to IT and security, this was a massive burden, and it logically led to deploying or outsourcing application in the cloud via SaaS (software as a service). Make no mistake, these were radical changes to the business mindset. After years of building security barriers and borders, security processes and procedures to protect their data, businesses were now allowing the free flow of information into the Internet. It proved, as we know now with hindsight, to be a brilliant decision and SaaS and cloud services are now considered the most cost effective ways to provide enterprise class software and to build SME data centers and development platforms.

Setup and configuration is automatic and resources are elastic. What this means is that is you request a level of compute and storage and then find that demand far exceeds this. The cloud will stretch to accommodate the demand without any customer interaction; the cloud will manage the demand dynamically by assigning more resources. There are three categories of service—IaaS (Infrastructure as a Service), PaaS (Platform as a Service), and SaaS (Software as a Service). Each category defines a set of services available to the customer, and this is key to the cloud— everything is offered as a service. This is based on the earlier SOA (service orientated architecture), where web services were used to access application functions. Similarly, the cloud operators use web services to expose their features and products as services. • IaaS (Infrastructure as a Service)—AWS’s basic product back in 2005 and it offered their excess infrastructure for lease to companies.

Instead of buying hardware and establishing a server room or data center a SME could rent compute, storage, and network from Amazon, the beauty being they would only pay for what they used. • PaaS (Platform as a Service)—Came about as Microsoft and others realized that developers required not just infrastructure but access to software development languages, libraries, APIs, and microservices in order to build Windows-based applications. Google also supplies PaaS to support its many homegrown applications such as Android and Google Apps. Industry 4.0 • SaaS (Software as a Service)—The precursor to the cloud in the form of web-based applications such as Salesforce. com, which launched in 1999. SaaS was a new way of accessing software, instead of accessing a local private server hosting a copy of the application, users used a web browser to access a web server-based shared application. SaaS was slow to gain acceptance until the mid 2000s, when broadband Internet access accelerated, thus permitting reliable application performance.

 

pages: 237 words: 64,411

Humans Need Not Apply: A Guide to Wealth and Work in the Age of Artificial Intelligence by Jerry Kaplan

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Affordable Care Act / Obamacare, Amazon Web Services, asset allocation, autonomous vehicles, bank run, bitcoin, Brian Krebs, buy low sell high, Capital in the Twenty-First Century by Thomas Piketty, combinatorial explosion, computer vision, corporate governance, crowdsourcing, en.wikipedia.org, Erik Brynjolfsson, estate planning, Flash crash, Gini coefficient, Goldman Sachs: Vampire Squid, haute couture, hiring and firing, income inequality, index card, industrial robot, invention of agriculture, Jaron Lanier, Jeff Bezos, job automation, John Maynard Keynes: Economic Possibilities for our Grandchildren, Loebner Prize, Mark Zuckerberg, mortgage debt, natural language processing, Own Your Own Home, pattern recognition, Satoshi Nakamoto, school choice, Schrödinger's Cat, Second Machine Age, self-driving car, sentiment analysis, Silicon Valley, Silicon Valley startup, Skype, software as a service, The Chicago School, Turing test, Watson beat the top human players on Jeopardy!, winner-take-all economy, women in the workforce, working poor, Works Progress Administration

As they individually run low on supplies, they fly over to a paint barrel to automatically refill and recharge, then return to the most useful open position. A series of cameras sprinkled around the perimeter of the project continuously monitors this flying menagerie and assesses the progress and quality of the job. The actual device directing this mechanical ballet needn’t even be present. It can be what’s called software-as-a-service (SAAS) rented by the manufacturer and running on the Amazon cloud.7 Why bother to put all that computing power out in the field where it may get rained on and be used only a few hours a week? Your licensed painting contractor, who might still be paying off the loan for all this fancy gear, shows up, sets up the cameras, marks the target area on an app running on his tablet, opens the paint barrel, and turns on the drones.

See also Social Security rights, of human vs. artificial person, 199–200 risk, 8, 55, 55–56, 137 government rating of, 178 Robot, Robot, and Hwang (law firm),147–48 robotic arm, 6, 35 robots. See forged laborers Rochester, Nathaniel, 19 Rockefeller, John D., 200 Rocket Fuel, 64–65, 67–71, 136 founding/current worth of, 72 Rolling Stone (magazine), 170 Roosevelt, Franklin Delano, 170 Rosenblatt, Frank, 24 Rothschild, Nathan Mayer, 58 R202 (mechanical factotum), 40 Rutter, Brad, 150 SAAS (software-as-a-service), 43 safety: autonomous vehicles, 89, 142, 195 commercial pilots, 151 highway, 44–45, 142, 178 traffic, 195 workplace, 37–38, 44–45 salaries, 116, 120, 145, 172 salespeople, 139 S&P 500 E-mini, 62 San Francisco State University, 121, 158 sanitation, 169 savings. See assets ownership Scheinman, Victor, 35 schools. See education system Schrodinger’s cat, 213n9 science, ix, 114 science fiction, ix–x, xii Seattle, 114 SEC (Securities and Exchange Commission), 8, 61–62, 63 segregation, 168, 222n10 self-driving vehicles.

See synthetic intellects “siren servers,” 7 Siri (Apple iPhone app), 198 skills, 119–26, 163 obsolescence of, 132, 134, 136–38, 142–43, 152, 153, 158 training to acquire, 13, 14, 132–33, 153–57 Slave Codes, 86 slave self-purchase, 201 smartphones, 105, 115–16 fast-paced innovation and, 26–27, 28, 31, 46, 198 social behavior, 9, 10, 37, 42, 48 fairness and, 74–75 synthetic intellects as threats to, 72–75, 91–92, 199–200 wealth and, 109–10, 114–15. See also moral agency social class. See class Social Security, 14, 169, 173–75 private investing vs., 182–85 social status, 117 software-as-a-service (SAAS), 43 solar power, 44 song identification, 39 sound recognition, 39, 42–43 Sousa, John Phillip, 208 “The Menace of Mechanical Music,” 192–93 space exploration, ix, 114, 116, 207 sports, 114–15, 161–63 Sputnik, ix SRI International, 27 Standard & Poor’s, 178 standard of living, 165–66 Stanford Artificial Intelligence Lab, x–xi, 27, 35, 38, 51, 52–53, 72, 85 Stanford Legal Informatics course, 148–49 Star Trek (TV series), x, 16 stockholders, 14–15, 58, 174–78 family members vs. diverse base of, 177, 178, 181–82 restricted vesting and, 184.

 

Frugal Innovation: How to Do Better With Less by Jaideep Prabhu Navi Radjou

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3D printing, additive manufacturing, Affordable Care Act / Obamacare, Airbnb, Albert Einstein, barriers to entry, Baxter: Rethink Robotics, Bretton Woods, business climate, business process, call centre, Capital in the Twenty-First Century by Thomas Piketty, carbon footprint, cloud computing, collaborative consumption, collaborative economy, connected car, corporate social responsibility, crowdsourcing, Elon Musk, financial innovation, global supply chain, income inequality, industrial robot, Internet of things, job satisfaction, Khan Academy, Kickstarter, late fees, Lean Startup, low cost carrier, M-Pesa, Mahatma Gandhi, megacity, minimum viable product, more computing power than Apollo, new economy, payday loans, peer-to-peer lending, Peter H. Diamandis: Planetary Resources, precision agriculture, race to the bottom, reshoring, ride hailing / ride sharing, risk tolerance, Ronald Coase, self-driving car, shareholder value, sharing economy, Silicon Valley, Silicon Valley startup, six sigma, smart grid, smart meter, software as a service, Steve Jobs, supply-chain management, TaskRabbit, The Fortune at the Bottom of the Pyramid, The Nature of the Firm, transaction costs, unbanked and underbanked, underbanked, women in the workforce, X Prize, yield management, Zipcar

“It’s usually good news for the customer because they’re getting their products or services quicker and at a lower price,” she says.9 Levi Strauss & Co, a clothing company, uses advanced technology to manage its supply chain – which includes product development, demand and supply planning, manufacturing and logistics – to ensure real-time visibility of products that move through its complex, multi-tiered supply chain network. In this way, the company can accurately forecast demand and supply, react faster and better to market conditions, maintain lower stock levels and keep costs down. A frugal services revolution GAPPAA.ORG Companies are finding new, highly effective and affordable ways to deliver services or services bundled with products. Such business models include: software as a service (SaaS) in computing; power by the hour in aircraft engines; massive open online courses (MOOCs) in education; hub-and-spoke and yield management models in airlines; online retailing; and cloud computing. By flexing their assets, airlines such as Southwest Airlines, easyJet and Ryanair have created a new, low-cost market segment for flyers within the US and Europe, and have succeeded in challenging long-haul incumbents.

MacArthur Foundation 14 John Deere 67 John Lewis 195 Johnson & Johnson 100, 111 Johnson, Warren 98 Jones, Don 112 jugaad (frugal ingenuity) 199, 202 Jugaad Innovation (Radjou, Prabhu and Ahuja, 2012) xvii, 17 just-in-time design 33–4 K Kaeser, Joe 217 Kalanick, Travis 163 Kalundborg (Denmark) 160 kanju 201 Karkal, Shamir 124 Kaufman, Ben 50–1, 126 Kawai, Daisuke 29–30 Kelly, John 199–200 Kennedy, President John 138 Kenya 57, 200–1 key performance indicators see KPIs Khan Academy 16–17, 113–14, 164 Khan, Salman (Sal) 16–17, 113–14 Kickstarter 17, 48, 137, 138 KieranTimberlake 196 Kimberly-Clark 25, 145 Kingfisher 86–7, 91, 97, 157, 158–9, 185–6, 192–3, 208 KissKissBankBank 17, 137 Knox, Steve 145 Knudstorp, Jørgen Vig 37, 68, 69 Kobori, Michael 83, 100 KPIs (key performance indicators) 38–9, 67, 91–2, 185–6, 208 Kuhndt, Michael 194 Kurniawan, Arie 151–2 L La Chose 108 La Poste 92–3, 157 La Ruche qui dit Oui 137 “labs on a chip” 52 Lacheret, Yves 173–5 Lada 1 laser cutters 134, 166 Laskey, Alex 119 last-mile challenge 57, 146, 156 L’Atelier 168–9 Latin America 161 lattice organisation 63–4 Laury, Véronique 208 Laville, Elisabeth 91 Lawrence, Jamie 185, 192–3, 208 LCA (life-cycle assessment) 196–7 leaders 179, 203–5, 214, 217 lean manufacturing 192 leanness 33–4, 41, 42, 170, 192 Learnbox 114 learning by doing 173, 179 learning organisations 179 leasing 123 Lee, Deishin 159 Lego 51, 126 Lego Group 37, 68, 69, 144 Legrand 157 Lenovo 56 Leroy, Adolphe 127 Leroy Merlin 127–8 Leslie, Garthen 150–1 Lever, William Hesketh 96 Levi Strauss & Co 60, 82–4, 100, 122–3 Lewis, Dijuana 212 life cycle of buildings 196 see also product life cycle life-cycle assessment (LCA) 196–7 life-cycle costs 12, 24, 196 Lifebuoy soap 95, 97 lifespan of companies 154 lighting 32, 56, 123, 201 “lightweighting” 47 linear development cycles 21, 23 linear model of production 80–1 Link 131 littleBits 51 Livi, Daniele 88 Livi, Vittorio 88 local communities 52, 57, 146, 206–7 local markets 183–4 Local Motors 52, 129, 152 local solutions 188, 201–2 local sourcing 51–2, 56, 137, 174, 181 localisation 56, 137 Locavesting (Cortese, 2011) 138 Logan car 2–3, 12, 179, 198–9 logistics 46, 57–8, 161, 191, 207 longevity 121, 124 Lopez, Maribel 65–6 Lopez Research 65–6 L’Oréal 174 Los Alamos National Laboratory 170 low-cost airlines 60, 121 low-cost innovation 11 low-income markets 12–13, 161, 203, 207 Lowry, Adam 81–2 M m-health 109, 111–12 M-KOPA 201 M-Pesa 57, 201 M3D 48, 132 McDonough Braungart Design Chemistry (MBDC) 84 McDonough, William 82 McGregor, Douglas 63 MacGyvers 17–18, 130, 134, 167 McKelvey, Jim 135 McKinsey & Company 81, 87, 209 mainstream, frugal products in 216 maintenance 66, 75, 76, 124, 187 costs 48–9, 66 Mainwaring, Simon 8 Maistre, Christophe de 187–8, 216 Maker Faire 18, 133–4 Maker platform 70 makers 18, 133–4, 145 manufacturing 20th-century model 46, 55, 80–1 additive 47–9 continuous 44–5 costs 47, 48, 52 decentralised 9, 44, 51–2 frugal 44–54 integration with logistics 57–8 new approaches 50–4 social 50–1 subtractive method 48 tools for 47, 47–50 Margarine Unie 96 market 15, 28, 38, 64, 186, 189, 192 R&D and 21, 26, 33, 34 market research 25, 61, 139, 141 market share 100 marketing 21–2, 24, 36, 61–3, 91, 116–20, 131, 139 and R&D 34, 37, 37–8 marketing teams 143, 150 markets 12–13, 42, 62, 215 see also emerging markets Marks & Spencer (M&S) 97, 215 Plan A 90, 156, 179–81, 183–4, 186–7, 214 Marriott 140 Mars 57, 158–9, 161 Martin Marietta 159 Martin, Tod 154 mass customisation 9, 46, 47, 48, 57–8 mass market 189 mass marketing 21–2 mass production 9, 46, 57, 58, 74, 129, 196 Massachusetts Institute of Technology see MIT massive open online courses see MOOCs materials 3, 47, 48, 73, 92, 161 costs 153, 161, 190 recyclable 74, 81, 196 recycled 77, 81–2, 83, 86, 89, 183, 193 renewable 77, 86 repurposing 93 see also C2C; reuse Mayhew, Stephen 35, 36 Mazoyer, Eric 90 Mazzella, Frédéric 163 MBDC (McDonough Braungart Design Chemistry) 84 MDI 16 measurable goals 185–6 Mechanical Engineer Laboratory (MEL) 52 “MEcosystems” 154–5, 156–8 Medicare 110 medication 111–12 Medicity 211 MedStartr 17 MEL (Mechanical Engineer Laboratory) 52 mental models 2, 193–203, 206, 216 Mercure 173 Merlin, Rose 127 Mestrallet, Gérard 53, 54 method (company) 81–2 Mexico 38, 56 Michelin 160 micro-factories 51–2, 52, 66, 129, 152 micro-robots 52 Microsoft 38 Microsoft Kinect 130 Microsoft Word 24 middle classes 197–8, 216 Migicovsky, Eric 137–8 Mikkiche, Karim 199 millennials 7, 14, 17, 131–2, 137, 141, 142 MindCET 165 miniaturisation 52, 53–4 Mint.com 125 MIT (Massachusetts Institute of Technology) 44–5, 107, 130, 134, 202 mobile health see m-health mobile phones 24, 32, 61, 129–30, 130, 168, 174 emerging market use 198 infrastructure 56, 198 see also smartphones mobile production units 66–7 mobile technologies 16, 17, 103, 133, 174, 200–1, 207 Mocana 151 Mochon, Daniel 132 modular design 67, 90 modular production units 66–7 Modularer Querbaukasten see MQB “mompreneurs” 145 Mondelez 158–9 Money Dashboard 125 Moneythink 162 monitoring 65–6, 106, 131 Monopoly 144 MOOCs (massive open online courses) 60, 61, 112, 113, 114, 164 Morieux, Yves 64 Morocco 207 Morris, Robert 199–200 motivation, employees 178, 180, 186, 192, 205–8 motivational approaches to shaping consumer behaviour 105–6 Motorola 56 MQB (Modularer Querbaukasten) 44, 45–6 Mulally, Alan 70, 166 Mulcahy, Simon 157 Mulliez family 126–7 Mulliez, Vianney 13, 126 multi-nodal innovation 202–3 Munari, Bruno 93 Murray, Mike 48–9 Musk, Elon 172 N Nano car 119, 156 National Geographic 102 natural capital, loss of 158–9 Natural Capital Leaders Platform 158–9 natural resources 45, 86 depletion 7, 72, 105, 153, 158–9 see also resources NCR 55–6 near-shoring 55 Nelson, Simon 113 Nemo, Sophie-Noëlle 93 Nest Labs 98–100, 103 Nestlé 31, 44, 68, 78, 94, 158–9, 194, 195 NetPositive plan 86, 208 networking 152–3, 153 new materials 47, 92 New Matter 132 new technologies 21, 27 Newtopia 32 next-generation customers 121–2 next-generation manufacturing techniques 44–6, 46–7 see also frugal manufacturing Nigeria 152, 197–8 Nike 84 NineSigma 151 Nissan 4, 4–5, 44, 199 see also Renault-Nissan non-governmental organisations 167 non-profit organisations 161, 162, 202 Nooyi, Indra 217 Norman, Donald 120 Norris, Greg 196 North American companies 216–17 North American market 22 Northrup Grumman 68 Norton, Michael 132 Norway 103 Novartis 44–5, 215 Novotel 173, 174 nudging 100, 108, 111, 117, 162 Nussbaum, Bruce 140 O O2 147 Obama, President Barack 6, 8, 13, 134, 138, 208 obsolescence, planned 24, 121 offshoring 55 Oh, Amy 145 Ohayon, Elie 71–2 Oliver Wyman 22 Olocco, Gregory 206 O’Marah, Kevin 58 on-demand services 39, 124 online communities 31, 50, 61, 134 online marketing 143 online retailing 60, 132 onshoring 55 Opel 4 open innovation 104, 151, 152, 153, 154 open-source approach 48, 129, 134, 135, 172 open-source hardware 51, 52, 89, 130, 135, 139 open-source software 48, 130, 132, 144–5, 167 OpenIDEO 142 operating costs 45, 215 Opower 103, 109, 119 Orange 157 Orbitz 173 organisational change 36–7, 90–1, 176, 177–90, 203–8, 213–14, 216 business models 190–3 mental models 193–203 organisational culture 36–7, 170, 176, 177–9, 213–14, 217 efficacy focus 181–3 entrepreneurial 76, 173 see also organisational change organisational structure 63–5, 69 outsourcing 59, 143, 146 over-engineering 27, 42, 170 Overby, Christine 25 ownership 9 Oxylane Group 127 P P&G (Procter & Gamble) 19, 31, 58, 94, 117, 123, 145, 195 packaging 57, 96, 195 Page, Larry 63 “pain points” 29, 30, 31 Palmer, Michael 212 Palo Alto Junior League 20 ParkatmyHouse 17, 63, 85 Parker, Philip 61 participation, customers 128–9 partner ecosystems 153, 154, 200 partners 65, 72, 148, 153, 156–8 sharing data with 59–60 see also distributors; hyper-collaboration; suppliers Partners in Care Foundation 202 partnerships 41, 42, 152–3, 156–7, 171–2, 174, 191 with SMBs 173, 174, 175 with start-ups 20, 164–5, 175 with suppliers 192–3 see also hyper-collaboration patents 171–2 Payne, Alex 124 PE International 196 Pearson 164–5, 167, 181–3, 186, 215 Pebble 137–8 peer-to-peer economic model 10 peer-to-peer lending 10 peer-to-peer sales 60 peer-to-peer sharing 136–7 Pélisson, Gérard 172–3 PepsiCo 38, 40, 179, 190, 194, 215 performance 47, 73, 77, 80, 95 of employees 69 Pernod Ricard 157 personalisation 9, 45, 46, 48, 62, 129–30, 132, 149 Peters, Tom 21 pharmaceutical industry 13, 22, 23, 33, 58, 171, 181 continuous manufacturing 44–6 see also GSK Philippines 191 Philips 56, 84, 100, 123 Philips Lighting 32 Picaud, Philippe 122 Piggy Mojo 119 piggybacking 57 Piketty, Thomas 6 Plan A (M&S) 90, 156, 179–81, 183–4, 186–7, 214 Planet 21 (Accor) 174–5 planned obsolescence 24, 121 Plastyc 17 Plumridge, Rupert 18 point-of-sale data 58 Poland 103 pollution 74, 78, 87, 116, 187, 200 Polman, Paul 11, 72, 77, 94, 203–5, 217 portfolio management tools 27, 33 Portugal 55, 103 postponement 57–8 Potočnik, Janez 8, 79 Prabhu, Arun 25 Prahalad, C.K. 12 predictive analytics 32–3 predictive maintenance 66, 67–8 Priceline 173 pricing 81, 117 processes digitising 65–6 entrenched 14–16 re-engineering 74 simplifying 169, 173 Procter & Gamble see P&G procurement priorities 67–8 product life cycle 21, 75, 92, 186 costs 12, 24, 196 sustainability 73–5 product-sharing initiatives 87 production costs 9, 83 productivity 49, 59, 65, 79–80, 153 staff 14 profit 14, 105 Progressive 100, 116 Project Ara 130 promotion 61–3 Propeller Health 111 prosumers xix–xx, 17–18, 125, 126–33, 136–7, 148, 154 empowering and engaging 139–46 see also horizontal economy Protomax 159 prototypes 31–2, 50, 144, 152 prototyping 42, 52, 65, 152, 167, 192, 206 public 50–1, 215 public sector, working with 161–2 publishers 17, 61 Pullman 173 Puma 194 purchasing power 5–6, 216 pyramidal model of production 51 pyramidal organisations 69 Q Qarnot Computing 89 Qualcomm 84 Qualcomm Life 112 quality 3, 11–12, 15, 24, 45, 49, 82, 206, 216 high 1, 9, 93, 198, 216 measure of 105 versus quantity 8, 23 quality of life 8, 204 Quicken 19–21 Quirky 50–1, 126, 150–1, 152 R R&D 35, 67, 92, 151 big-ticket programmes 35–6 and business development 37–8 China 40, 188, 206 customer focus 27, 39, 43 frugal approach 12, 26–33, 82 global networks 39–40 incentives 38–9 industrial model 2, 21–6, 33, 36, 42 market-focused, agile model 26–33 and marketing 34, 37, 37–8 recommendations for managers 34–41 speed 23, 27, 34, 149 spending 15, 22, 23, 28, 141, 149, 152, 171, 187 technology culture 14–15, 38–9 see also Air Liquide; Ford; GSK; IBM; immersion; Renault; SNCF; Tarkett; Unilever R&D labs 9, 21–6, 70, 149, 218 in emerging markets 40, 188, 200 R&D teams 26, 34, 38–9, 65, 127, 150, 194–5 hackers as 142 innovation brokering 168 shaping customer behaviour 120–2 Raspberry Pi 135–6, 164 Ratti, Carlo 107 raw materials see materials real-time demand signals 58, 59 Rebours, Christophe 157–8 recession 5–6, 6, 46, 131, 180 Reckitt Benckiser 102 recommendations for managers flexing assets 65–71 R&D 34–41 shaping consumer behaviour 116–24 sustainability 90–3 recruiting 70–1 recyclable materials 74, 81, 196 recyclable products 3, 73, 159, 195–6 recycled materials 77, 81–2, 83, 86, 89, 183, 193 recycling 8, 9, 87, 93, 142, 159 e-waste 87–8 electronic and electrical goods (EU) 8, 79 by Tarkett 73–7 water 83, 175 see also C2C; circular economy Recy’Go 92–3 regional champions 182 regulation 7–8, 13, 78–9, 103, 216 Reich, Joshua 124 RelayRides 17 Renault 1–5, 12, 117, 156–7, 179 Renault-Nissan 4–5, 40, 198–9, 215 renewable energy 8, 53, 74, 86, 91, 136, 142, 196 renewable materials 77, 86 Replicator 132 repurposing 93 Requardt, Hermann 189 reshoring 55–6 resource constraints 4–5, 217 resource efficiency 7–8, 46, 47–9, 79, 190 Resource Revolution (Heck, Rogers and Carroll, 2014) 87–8 resources 40, 42, 73, 86, 197, 199 consumption 9, 26, 73–7, 101–2 costs 78, 203 depletion 7, 72, 105, 153, 158–9 reducing use 45, 52, 65, 73–7, 104, 199, 203 saving 72, 77, 200 scarcity 22, 46, 72, 73, 77–8, 80, 158–9, 190, 203 sharing 56–7, 159–61, 167 substitution 92 wasting 169–70 retailers 56, 129, 214 “big-box” 9, 18, 137 Rethink Robotics 49 return on investment 22, 197 reuse 9, 73, 76–7, 81, 84–5, 92–3, 200 see also C2C revenues, generating 77, 167, 180 reverse innovation 202–3 rewards 37, 178, 208 Riboud, Franck 66, 184, 217 Rifkin, Jeremy 9–10 robots 47, 49–50, 70, 144–5, 150 Rock Health 151 Rogers, Jay 129 Rogers, Matt 87–8 Romania 2–3, 103 rookie mindset 164, 168 Rose, Stuart 179–80, 180 Roulin, Anne 195 Ryan, Eric 81–2 Ryanair 60 S S-Oil 106 SaaS (software as a service) 60 Saatchi & Saatchi 70–1 Saatchi & Saatchi + Duke 71–2, 143 sales function 15, 21, 25–6, 36, 116–18, 146 Salesforce.com 157 Santi, Paolo 108 SAP 59, 186 Saunders, Charles 211 savings 115 Sawa Orchards 29–31 Scandinavian countries 6–7 see also Norway Schmidt, Eric 136 Schneider Electric 150 Schulman, Dan 161–2 Schumacher, E.F. 104–5, 105 Schweitzer, Louis 1, 2, 3, 4, 179 SCM (supply chain management) systems 59 SCOR (supply chain operations reference) model 67 Seattle 107 SEB 157 self-sufficiency 8 selling less 123–4 senior managers 122–4, 199 see also CEOs; organisational change sensors 65–6, 106, 118, 135, 201 services 9, 41–3, 67–8, 124, 149 frugal 60–3, 216 value-added 62–3, 76, 150, 206, 209 Shapeways 51, 132 shareholders 14, 15, 76, 123–4, 180, 204–5 sharing 9–10, 193 assets 159–61, 167 customers 156–8 ideas 63–4 intellectual assets 171–2 knowledge 153 peer-to-peer 136–9 resources 56–7, 159–61, 167 sharing economy 9–10, 17, 57, 77, 80, 84–7, 108, 124 peer-to-peer sharing 136–9 sharing between companies 159–60 shipping costs 55, 59 shopping experience 121–2 SIEH hotel group 172–3 Siemens 117–18, 150, 187–9, 215, 216 Sigismondi, Pier Luigi 100 Silicon Valley 42, 98, 109, 150, 151, 162, 175 silos, breaking out of 36–7 Simple Bank 124–5 simplicity 8, 41, 64–5, 170, 194 Singapore 175 Six Sigma 11 Skillshare 85 SkyPlus 62 Small is Beautiful (Schumacher, 1973) 104–5 “small is beautiful” values 8 small and medium-sized businesses see SMBs Smart + Connected Communities 29 SMART car 119–20 SMART strategy (Siemens) 188–9 smartphones 17, 100, 106, 118, 130, 131, 135, 198 in health care 110, 111 see also apps SmartScan 29 SMBs (small and medium-sized businesses) 173, 174, 175, 176 SMS-based systems 42–3 SnapShot 116 SNCF 41–3, 156–7, 167 SoapBox 28–9 social business model 206–7 social comparison 109 social development 14 social goals 94 social learning 113 social manufacturing 47, 50–1 social media 16, 71, 85, 106, 108, 168, 174 for marketing 61, 62, 143 mining 29, 58 social pressure of 119 tools 109, 141 and transaction costs 133 see also Facebook; social networks; Twitter social networks 29, 71, 72, 132–3, 145, 146 see also Facebook; Twitter social pressure 119 social problems 82, 101–2, 141, 142, 153, 161–2, 204 social responsibility 7, 10, 14, 141, 142, 197, 204 corporate 77, 82, 94, 161 social sector, working with 161–2 “social tinkerers” 134–5 socialising education 112–14 Sofitel 173 software 72 software as a service (SaaS) 60 solar power 136, 201 sourcing, local 51–2, 56 Southwest Airlines 60 Spain 5, 6, 103 Spark 48 speed dating 175, 176 spending, on R&D 15, 22, 23, 28, 141, 149, 152, 171, 187 spiral economy 77, 87–90 SRI International 49, 52 staff see employees Stampanato, Gary 55 standards 78, 196 Starbucks 7, 140 start-ups 16–17, 40–1, 61, 89, 110, 145, 148, 150, 169, 216 investing in 137–8, 157 as partners 42, 72, 153, 175, 191, 206 see also Nest Labs; Silicon Valley Statoil 160 Steelcase 142 Stem 151 Stepner, Diana 165 Stewart, Emma 196–7 Stewart, Osamuyimen 201–2 Sto Corp 84 Stora Enso 195 storytelling 112, 113 Strategy& see Booz & Company Subramanian, Prabhu 114 substitution of resources 92 subtractive manufacturing 48 Sun Tzu 158 suppliers 67–8, 83, 148, 153, 167, 176, 192–3 collaboration with 76, 155–6 sharing with 59–60, 91 visibility 59–60 supply chain management see SCM supply chain operations reference (SCOR) model 67 supply chains 34, 36, 54, 65, 107, 137, 192–3 carbon footprint 156 costs 58, 84 decentralisation 66–7 frugal 54–60 integrating 161 small-circuit 137 sustainability 137 visibility 34, 59–60 support 135, 152 sustainability xix, 9, 12, 72, 77–80, 82, 97, 186 certification 84 as competitive advantage 80 consumers and 95, 97, 101–4 core design principle 82–4, 93, 195–6 and growth 76, 80, 104–5 perceptions of 15–16, 80, 91 recommendations for managers 90–3 regulatory demand for 78–9, 216 standard bearers of 80, 97, 215 see also Accor; circular economy; Kingfisher; Marks & Spencer; Tarkett; Unilever sustainable design 82–4 see also C2C sustainable distribution 57, 161 sustainable growth 72, 76–7 sustainable lifestyles 107–8 Sustainable Living Plan (Unilever) 94–7, 179, 203–4 sustainable manufacturing 9, 52 T “T-shaped” employees 70–1 take-back programmes 9, 75, 77, 78 Tally 196–7 Tarkett 73–7, 80, 84 TaskRabbit 85 Tata Motors 16, 119 Taylor, Frederick 71 technical design 37–8 technical support, by customers 146 technology 2, 14–15, 21–2, 26, 27 TechShop 9, 70, 134–5, 152, 166–7 telecoms sector 53, 56 Telefónica 147 telematic monitoring 116 Ternois, Laurence 42 Tesco 102 Tesla Motors 92, 172 testing 28, 42, 141, 170, 192 Texas Industries 159 Textoris, Vincent 127 TGV Lab 42–3 thermostats 98–100 thinking, entrenched 14–16 Thompson, Gav 147 Timberland 90 time 4, 7, 11, 41, 72, 129, 170, 200 constraints 36, 42 see also development cycle tinkerers 17–18, 133–5, 144, 150, 152, 153, 165–7, 168 TiVo 62 Tohamy, Noha 59–60 top-down change 177–8 top-down management 69 Total 157 total quality management (TQM) 11 total volatile organic compounds see TVOC Toyota 44, 100 Toyota Sweden 106–7 TQM (total quality management) 11 traffic 108, 116, 201 training 76, 93, 152, 167, 170, 189 transaction costs 133 transparency 178, 185 transport 46, 57, 96, 156–7 Transport for London 195 TrashTrack 107 Travelocity 174 trial and error 173, 179 Trout, Bernhardt 45 trust 7, 37, 143 TVOC (total volatile organic compounds) 74, 77 Twitter 29, 62, 135, 143, 147 U Uber 136, 163 Ubuntu 202 Uchiyama, Shunichi 50 UCLA Health 202–3 Udacity 61, 112 UK 194 budget cuts 6 consumer empowerment 103 industrial symbiosis 160 savings 115 sharing 85, 138 “un-management” 63–4, 64 Unboundary 154 Unilever 11, 31, 57, 97, 100, 142, 203–5, 215 and sustainability 94–7, 104, 179, 203–4 University of Cambridge Engineering Design Centre (EDC) 194–5 Inclusive Design team 31 Institute for Sustainability Leadership (CISL) 158–9 upcycling 77, 88–9, 93, 159 upselling 189 Upton, Eben 135–6 US 8, 38, 44, 87, 115, 133, 188 access to financial services 13, 17, 161–2 ageing population 194 ageing workforce 13 commuting 131 consumer spending 5, 6, 103 crowdfunding 137–8, 138 economic pressures 5, 6 energy use 103, 119, 196 environmental awareness 7, 102 frugal innovation in 215–16, 218 health care 13, 110, 208–13, 213 intellectual property 171 onshoring 55 regulation 8, 78, 216 sharing 85, 138–9 shifting production from China to 55, 56 tinkering culture 18, 133–4 user communities 62, 89 user interfaces 98, 99 user-friendliness 194 Utopies 91 V validators 144 value 11, 132, 177, 186, 189–90 aspirational 88–9 to customers 6–7, 21, 77, 87, 131, 203 from employees 217 shareholder value 14 value chains 9, 80, 128–9, 143, 159–60, 190, 215 value engineering 192 “value gap” 54–5 value-added services 62–3, 76, 150, 206, 209 values 6–7, 14, 178, 205 Vandebroek, Sophie 169 Vasanthakumar, Vaithegi 182–3 Vats, Tanmaya 190, 192 vehicle fleets, sharing 57, 161 Verbaken, Joop 118 vertical integration 133, 154 virtual prototyping 65 virtuous cycle 212–13 visibility 34, 59–60 visible learning 112–13 visioning sessions 193–4 visualisation 106–8 Vitality 111 Volac 158–9 Volkswagen 4, 44, 45–6, 129, 144 Volvo 62 W wage costs 48 wages, in emerging markets 55 Waitrose, local suppliers 56 Walker, James 87 walking the walk 122–3 Waller, Sam 195 Walmart 9, 18, 56, 162, 216 Walton, Sam 9 Wan Jia 144 Washington DC 123 waste 24, 87–9, 107, 159–60, 175, 192, 196 beautifying 88–9, 93 e-waste 24, 79, 87–8, 121 of energy 119 post-consumer 9, 75, 77, 78, 83 reducing 47, 74, 85, 96, 180, 209 of resources 169–70 in US health-care system 209 see also C2C; recycling; reuse water 78, 83, 104, 106, 158, 175, 188, 206 water consumption 79, 82–3, 100, 196 reducing 74, 75, 79, 104, 122–3, 174, 183 wealth 105, 218 Wear It Share It (Wishi) 85 Weijmarshausen, Peter 51 well-being 104–5 Wham-O 56 Whirlpool 36 “wicked” problems 153 wireless technologies 65–6 Wiseman, Liz 164 Wishi (Wear It Share It) 85 Witty, Andrew 35, 35–6, 37, 39, 217 W.L.

MacArthur Foundation 14 John Deere 67 John Lewis 195 Johnson & Johnson 100, 111 Johnson, Warren 98 Jones, Don 112 jugaad (frugal ingenuity) 199, 202 Jugaad Innovation (Radjou, Prabhu and Ahuja, 2012) xvii, 17 just-in-time design 33–4 K Kaeser, Joe 217 Kalanick, Travis 163 Kalundborg (Denmark) 160 kanju 201 Karkal, Shamir 124 Kaufman, Ben 50–1, 126 Kawai, Daisuke 29–30 Kelly, John 199–200 Kennedy, President John 138 Kenya 57, 200–1 key performance indicators see KPIs Khan Academy 16–17, 113–14, 164 Khan, Salman (Sal) 16–17, 113–14 Kickstarter 17, 48, 137, 138 KieranTimberlake 196 Kimberly-Clark 25, 145 Kingfisher 86–7, 91, 97, 157, 158–9, 185–6, 192–3, 208 KissKissBankBank 17, 137 Knox, Steve 145 Knudstorp, Jørgen Vig 37, 68, 69 Kobori, Michael 83, 100 KPIs (key performance indicators) 38–9, 67, 91–2, 185–6, 208 Kuhndt, Michael 194 Kurniawan, Arie 151–2 L La Chose 108 La Poste 92–3, 157 La Ruche qui dit Oui 137 “labs on a chip” 52 Lacheret, Yves 173–5 Lada 1 laser cutters 134, 166 Laskey, Alex 119 last-mile challenge 57, 146, 156 L’Atelier 168–9 Latin America 161 lattice organisation 63–4 Laury, Véronique 208 Laville, Elisabeth 91 Lawrence, Jamie 185, 192–3, 208 LCA (life-cycle assessment) 196–7 leaders 179, 203–5, 214, 217 lean manufacturing 192 leanness 33–4, 41, 42, 170, 192 Learnbox 114 learning by doing 173, 179 learning organisations 179 leasing 123 Lee, Deishin 159 Lego 51, 126 Lego Group 37, 68, 69, 144 Legrand 157 Lenovo 56 Leroy, Adolphe 127 Leroy Merlin 127–8 Leslie, Garthen 150–1 Lever, William Hesketh 96 Levi Strauss & Co 60, 82–4, 100, 122–3 Lewis, Dijuana 212 life cycle of buildings 196 see also product life cycle life-cycle assessment (LCA) 196–7 life-cycle costs 12, 24, 196 Lifebuoy soap 95, 97 lifespan of companies 154 lighting 32, 56, 123, 201 “lightweighting” 47 linear development cycles 21, 23 linear model of production 80–1 Link 131 littleBits 51 Livi, Daniele 88 Livi, Vittorio 88 local communities 52, 57, 146, 206–7 local markets 183–4 Local Motors 52, 129, 152 local solutions 188, 201–2 local sourcing 51–2, 56, 137, 174, 181 localisation 56, 137 Locavesting (Cortese, 2011) 138 Logan car 2–3, 12, 179, 198–9 logistics 46, 57–8, 161, 191, 207 longevity 121, 124 Lopez, Maribel 65–6 Lopez Research 65–6 L’Oréal 174 Los Alamos National Laboratory 170 low-cost airlines 60, 121 low-cost innovation 11 low-income markets 12–13, 161, 203, 207 Lowry, Adam 81–2 M m-health 109, 111–12 M-KOPA 201 M-Pesa 57, 201 M3D 48, 132 McDonough Braungart Design Chemistry (MBDC) 84 McDonough, William 82 McGregor, Douglas 63 MacGyvers 17–18, 130, 134, 167 McKelvey, Jim 135 McKinsey & Company 81, 87, 209 mainstream, frugal products in 216 maintenance 66, 75, 76, 124, 187 costs 48–9, 66 Mainwaring, Simon 8 Maistre, Christophe de 187–8, 216 Maker Faire 18, 133–4 Maker platform 70 makers 18, 133–4, 145 manufacturing 20th-century model 46, 55, 80–1 additive 47–9 continuous 44–5 costs 47, 48, 52 decentralised 9, 44, 51–2 frugal 44–54 integration with logistics 57–8 new approaches 50–4 social 50–1 subtractive method 48 tools for 47, 47–50 Margarine Unie 96 market 15, 28, 38, 64, 186, 189, 192 R&D and 21, 26, 33, 34 market research 25, 61, 139, 141 market share 100 marketing 21–2, 24, 36, 61–3, 91, 116–20, 131, 139 and R&D 34, 37, 37–8 marketing teams 143, 150 markets 12–13, 42, 62, 215 see also emerging markets Marks & Spencer (M&S) 97, 215 Plan A 90, 156, 179–81, 183–4, 186–7, 214 Marriott 140 Mars 57, 158–9, 161 Martin Marietta 159 Martin, Tod 154 mass customisation 9, 46, 47, 48, 57–8 mass market 189 mass marketing 21–2 mass production 9, 46, 57, 58, 74, 129, 196 Massachusetts Institute of Technology see MIT massive open online courses see MOOCs materials 3, 47, 48, 73, 92, 161 costs 153, 161, 190 recyclable 74, 81, 196 recycled 77, 81–2, 83, 86, 89, 183, 193 renewable 77, 86 repurposing 93 see also C2C; reuse Mayhew, Stephen 35, 36 Mazoyer, Eric 90 Mazzella, Frédéric 163 MBDC (McDonough Braungart Design Chemistry) 84 MDI 16 measurable goals 185–6 Mechanical Engineer Laboratory (MEL) 52 “MEcosystems” 154–5, 156–8 Medicare 110 medication 111–12 Medicity 211 MedStartr 17 MEL (Mechanical Engineer Laboratory) 52 mental models 2, 193–203, 206, 216 Mercure 173 Merlin, Rose 127 Mestrallet, Gérard 53, 54 method (company) 81–2 Mexico 38, 56 Michelin 160 micro-factories 51–2, 52, 66, 129, 152 micro-robots 52 Microsoft 38 Microsoft Kinect 130 Microsoft Word 24 middle classes 197–8, 216 Migicovsky, Eric 137–8 Mikkiche, Karim 199 millennials 7, 14, 17, 131–2, 137, 141, 142 MindCET 165 miniaturisation 52, 53–4 Mint.com 125 MIT (Massachusetts Institute of Technology) 44–5, 107, 130, 134, 202 mobile health see m-health mobile phones 24, 32, 61, 129–30, 130, 168, 174 emerging market use 198 infrastructure 56, 198 see also smartphones mobile production units 66–7 mobile technologies 16, 17, 103, 133, 174, 200–1, 207 Mocana 151 Mochon, Daniel 132 modular design 67, 90 modular production units 66–7 Modularer Querbaukasten see MQB “mompreneurs” 145 Mondelez 158–9 Money Dashboard 125 Moneythink 162 monitoring 65–6, 106, 131 Monopoly 144 MOOCs (massive open online courses) 60, 61, 112, 113, 114, 164 Morieux, Yves 64 Morocco 207 Morris, Robert 199–200 motivation, employees 178, 180, 186, 192, 205–8 motivational approaches to shaping consumer behaviour 105–6 Motorola 56 MQB (Modularer Querbaukasten) 44, 45–6 Mulally, Alan 70, 166 Mulcahy, Simon 157 Mulliez family 126–7 Mulliez, Vianney 13, 126 multi-nodal innovation 202–3 Munari, Bruno 93 Murray, Mike 48–9 Musk, Elon 172 N Nano car 119, 156 National Geographic 102 natural capital, loss of 158–9 Natural Capital Leaders Platform 158–9 natural resources 45, 86 depletion 7, 72, 105, 153, 158–9 see also resources NCR 55–6 near-shoring 55 Nelson, Simon 113 Nemo, Sophie-Noëlle 93 Nest Labs 98–100, 103 Nestlé 31, 44, 68, 78, 94, 158–9, 194, 195 NetPositive plan 86, 208 networking 152–3, 153 new materials 47, 92 New Matter 132 new technologies 21, 27 Newtopia 32 next-generation customers 121–2 next-generation manufacturing techniques 44–6, 46–7 see also frugal manufacturing Nigeria 152, 197–8 Nike 84 NineSigma 151 Nissan 4, 4–5, 44, 199 see also Renault-Nissan non-governmental organisations 167 non-profit organisations 161, 162, 202 Nooyi, Indra 217 Norman, Donald 120 Norris, Greg 196 North American companies 216–17 North American market 22 Northrup Grumman 68 Norton, Michael 132 Norway 103 Novartis 44–5, 215 Novotel 173, 174 nudging 100, 108, 111, 117, 162 Nussbaum, Bruce 140 O O2 147 Obama, President Barack 6, 8, 13, 134, 138, 208 obsolescence, planned 24, 121 offshoring 55 Oh, Amy 145 Ohayon, Elie 71–2 Oliver Wyman 22 Olocco, Gregory 206 O’Marah, Kevin 58 on-demand services 39, 124 online communities 31, 50, 61, 134 online marketing 143 online retailing 60, 132 onshoring 55 Opel 4 open innovation 104, 151, 152, 153, 154 open-source approach 48, 129, 134, 135, 172 open-source hardware 51, 52, 89, 130, 135, 139 open-source software 48, 130, 132, 144–5, 167 OpenIDEO 142 operating costs 45, 215 Opower 103, 109, 119 Orange 157 Orbitz 173 organisational change 36–7, 90–1, 176, 177–90, 203–8, 213–14, 216 business models 190–3 mental models 193–203 organisational culture 36–7, 170, 176, 177–9, 213–14, 217 efficacy focus 181–3 entrepreneurial 76, 173 see also organisational change organisational structure 63–5, 69 outsourcing 59, 143, 146 over-engineering 27, 42, 170 Overby, Christine 25 ownership 9 Oxylane Group 127 P P&G (Procter & Gamble) 19, 31, 58, 94, 117, 123, 145, 195 packaging 57, 96, 195 Page, Larry 63 “pain points” 29, 30, 31 Palmer, Michael 212 Palo Alto Junior League 20 ParkatmyHouse 17, 63, 85 Parker, Philip 61 participation, customers 128–9 partner ecosystems 153, 154, 200 partners 65, 72, 148, 153, 156–8 sharing data with 59–60 see also distributors; hyper-collaboration; suppliers Partners in Care Foundation 202 partnerships 41, 42, 152–3, 156–7, 171–2, 174, 191 with SMBs 173, 174, 175 with start-ups 20, 164–5, 175 with suppliers 192–3 see also hyper-collaboration patents 171–2 Payne, Alex 124 PE International 196 Pearson 164–5, 167, 181–3, 186, 215 Pebble 137–8 peer-to-peer economic model 10 peer-to-peer lending 10 peer-to-peer sales 60 peer-to-peer sharing 136–7 Pélisson, Gérard 172–3 PepsiCo 38, 40, 179, 190, 194, 215 performance 47, 73, 77, 80, 95 of employees 69 Pernod Ricard 157 personalisation 9, 45, 46, 48, 62, 129–30, 132, 149 Peters, Tom 21 pharmaceutical industry 13, 22, 23, 33, 58, 171, 181 continuous manufacturing 44–6 see also GSK Philippines 191 Philips 56, 84, 100, 123 Philips Lighting 32 Picaud, Philippe 122 Piggy Mojo 119 piggybacking 57 Piketty, Thomas 6 Plan A (M&S) 90, 156, 179–81, 183–4, 186–7, 214 Planet 21 (Accor) 174–5 planned obsolescence 24, 121 Plastyc 17 Plumridge, Rupert 18 point-of-sale data 58 Poland 103 pollution 74, 78, 87, 116, 187, 200 Polman, Paul 11, 72, 77, 94, 203–5, 217 portfolio management tools 27, 33 Portugal 55, 103 postponement 57–8 Potočnik, Janez 8, 79 Prabhu, Arun 25 Prahalad, C.K. 12 predictive analytics 32–3 predictive maintenance 66, 67–8 Priceline 173 pricing 81, 117 processes digitising 65–6 entrenched 14–16 re-engineering 74 simplifying 169, 173 Procter & Gamble see P&G procurement priorities 67–8 product life cycle 21, 75, 92, 186 costs 12, 24, 196 sustainability 73–5 product-sharing initiatives 87 production costs 9, 83 productivity 49, 59, 65, 79–80, 153 staff 14 profit 14, 105 Progressive 100, 116 Project Ara 130 promotion 61–3 Propeller Health 111 prosumers xix–xx, 17–18, 125, 126–33, 136–7, 148, 154 empowering and engaging 139–46 see also horizontal economy Protomax 159 prototypes 31–2, 50, 144, 152 prototyping 42, 52, 65, 152, 167, 192, 206 public 50–1, 215 public sector, working with 161–2 publishers 17, 61 Pullman 173 Puma 194 purchasing power 5–6, 216 pyramidal model of production 51 pyramidal organisations 69 Q Qarnot Computing 89 Qualcomm 84 Qualcomm Life 112 quality 3, 11–12, 15, 24, 45, 49, 82, 206, 216 high 1, 9, 93, 198, 216 measure of 105 versus quantity 8, 23 quality of life 8, 204 Quicken 19–21 Quirky 50–1, 126, 150–1, 152 R R&D 35, 67, 92, 151 big-ticket programmes 35–6 and business development 37–8 China 40, 188, 206 customer focus 27, 39, 43 frugal approach 12, 26–33, 82 global networks 39–40 incentives 38–9 industrial model 2, 21–6, 33, 36, 42 market-focused, agile model 26–33 and marketing 34, 37, 37–8 recommendations for managers 34–41 speed 23, 27, 34, 149 spending 15, 22, 23, 28, 141, 149, 152, 171, 187 technology culture 14–15, 38–9 see also Air Liquide; Ford; GSK; IBM; immersion; Renault; SNCF; Tarkett; Unilever R&D labs 9, 21–6, 70, 149, 218 in emerging markets 40, 188, 200 R&D teams 26, 34, 38–9, 65, 127, 150, 194–5 hackers as 142 innovation brokering 168 shaping customer behaviour 120–2 Raspberry Pi 135–6, 164 Ratti, Carlo 107 raw materials see materials real-time demand signals 58, 59 Rebours, Christophe 157–8 recession 5–6, 6, 46, 131, 180 Reckitt Benckiser 102 recommendations for managers flexing assets 65–71 R&D 34–41 shaping consumer behaviour 116–24 sustainability 90–3 recruiting 70–1 recyclable materials 74, 81, 196 recyclable products 3, 73, 159, 195–6 recycled materials 77, 81–2, 83, 86, 89, 183, 193 recycling 8, 9, 87, 93, 142, 159 e-waste 87–8 electronic and electrical goods (EU) 8, 79 by Tarkett 73–7 water 83, 175 see also C2C; circular economy Recy’Go 92–3 regional champions 182 regulation 7–8, 13, 78–9, 103, 216 Reich, Joshua 124 RelayRides 17 Renault 1–5, 12, 117, 156–7, 179 Renault-Nissan 4–5, 40, 198–9, 215 renewable energy 8, 53, 74, 86, 91, 136, 142, 196 renewable materials 77, 86 Replicator 132 repurposing 93 Requardt, Hermann 189 reshoring 55–6 resource constraints 4–5, 217 resource efficiency 7–8, 46, 47–9, 79, 190 Resource Revolution (Heck, Rogers and Carroll, 2014) 87–8 resources 40, 42, 73, 86, 197, 199 consumption 9, 26, 73–7, 101–2 costs 78, 203 depletion 7, 72, 105, 153, 158–9 reducing use 45, 52, 65, 73–7, 104, 199, 203 saving 72, 77, 200 scarcity 22, 46, 72, 73, 77–8, 80, 158–9, 190, 203 sharing 56–7, 159–61, 167 substitution 92 wasting 169–70 retailers 56, 129, 214 “big-box” 9, 18, 137 Rethink Robotics 49 return on investment 22, 197 reuse 9, 73, 76–7, 81, 84–5, 92–3, 200 see also C2C revenues, generating 77, 167, 180 reverse innovation 202–3 rewards 37, 178, 208 Riboud, Franck 66, 184, 217 Rifkin, Jeremy 9–10 robots 47, 49–50, 70, 144–5, 150 Rock Health 151 Rogers, Jay 129 Rogers, Matt 87–8 Romania 2–3, 103 rookie mindset 164, 168 Rose, Stuart 179–80, 180 Roulin, Anne 195 Ryan, Eric 81–2 Ryanair 60 S S-Oil 106 SaaS (software as a service) 60 Saatchi & Saatchi 70–1 Saatchi & Saatchi + Duke 71–2, 143 sales function 15, 21, 25–6, 36, 116–18, 146 Salesforce.com 157 Santi, Paolo 108 SAP 59, 186 Saunders, Charles 211 savings 115 Sawa Orchards 29–31 Scandinavian countries 6–7 see also Norway Schmidt, Eric 136 Schneider Electric 150 Schulman, Dan 161–2 Schumacher, E.F. 104–5, 105 Schweitzer, Louis 1, 2, 3, 4, 179 SCM (supply chain management) systems 59 SCOR (supply chain operations reference) model 67 Seattle 107 SEB 157 self-sufficiency 8 selling less 123–4 senior managers 122–4, 199 see also CEOs; organisational change sensors 65–6, 106, 118, 135, 201 services 9, 41–3, 67–8, 124, 149 frugal 60–3, 216 value-added 62–3, 76, 150, 206, 209 Shapeways 51, 132 shareholders 14, 15, 76, 123–4, 180, 204–5 sharing 9–10, 193 assets 159–61, 167 customers 156–8 ideas 63–4 intellectual assets 171–2 knowledge 153 peer-to-peer 136–9 resources 56–7, 159–61, 167 sharing economy 9–10, 17, 57, 77, 80, 84–7, 108, 124 peer-to-peer sharing 136–9 sharing between companies 159–60 shipping costs 55, 59 shopping experience 121–2 SIEH hotel group 172–3 Siemens 117–18, 150, 187–9, 215, 216 Sigismondi, Pier Luigi 100 Silicon Valley 42, 98, 109, 150, 151, 162, 175 silos, breaking out of 36–7 Simple Bank 124–5 simplicity 8, 41, 64–5, 170, 194 Singapore 175 Six Sigma 11 Skillshare 85 SkyPlus 62 Small is Beautiful (Schumacher, 1973) 104–5 “small is beautiful” values 8 small and medium-sized businesses see SMBs Smart + Connected Communities 29 SMART car 119–20 SMART strategy (Siemens) 188–9 smartphones 17, 100, 106, 118, 130, 131, 135, 198 in health care 110, 111 see also apps SmartScan 29 SMBs (small and medium-sized businesses) 173, 174, 175, 176 SMS-based systems 42–3 SnapShot 116 SNCF 41–3, 156–7, 167 SoapBox 28–9 social business model 206–7 social comparison 109 social development 14 social goals 94 social learning 113 social manufacturing 47, 50–1 social media 16, 71, 85, 106, 108, 168, 174 for marketing 61, 62, 143 mining 29, 58 social pressure of 119 tools 109, 141 and transaction costs 133 see also Facebook; social networks; Twitter social networks 29, 71, 72, 132–3, 145, 146 see also Facebook; Twitter social pressure 119 social problems 82, 101–2, 141, 142, 153, 161–2, 204 social responsibility 7, 10, 14, 141, 142, 197, 204 corporate 77, 82, 94, 161 social sector, working with 161–2 “social tinkerers” 134–5 socialising education 112–14 Sofitel 173 software 72 software as a service (SaaS) 60 solar power 136, 201 sourcing, local 51–2, 56 Southwest Airlines 60 Spain 5, 6, 103 Spark 48 speed dating 175, 176 spending, on R&D 15, 22, 23, 28, 141, 149, 152, 171, 187 spiral economy 77, 87–90 SRI International 49, 52 staff see employees Stampanato, Gary 55 standards 78, 196 Starbucks 7, 140 start-ups 16–17, 40–1, 61, 89, 110, 145, 148, 150, 169, 216 investing in 137–8, 157 as partners 42, 72, 153, 175, 191, 206 see also Nest Labs; Silicon Valley Statoil 160 Steelcase 142 Stem 151 Stepner, Diana 165 Stewart, Emma 196–7 Stewart, Osamuyimen 201–2 Sto Corp 84 Stora Enso 195 storytelling 112, 113 Strategy& see Booz & Company Subramanian, Prabhu 114 substitution of resources 92 subtractive manufacturing 48 Sun Tzu 158 suppliers 67–8, 83, 148, 153, 167, 176, 192–3 collaboration with 76, 155–6 sharing with 59–60, 91 visibility 59–60 supply chain management see SCM supply chain operations reference (SCOR) model 67 supply chains 34, 36, 54, 65, 107, 137, 192–3 carbon footprint 156 costs 58, 84 decentralisation 66–7 frugal 54–60 integrating 161 small-circuit 137 sustainability 137 visibility 34, 59–60 support 135, 152 sustainability xix, 9, 12, 72, 77–80, 82, 97, 186 certification 84 as competitive advantage 80 consumers and 95, 97, 101–4 core design principle 82–4, 93, 195–6 and growth 76, 80, 104–5 perceptions of 15–16, 80, 91 recommendations for managers 90–3 regulatory demand for 78–9, 216 standard bearers of 80, 97, 215 see also Accor; circular economy; Kingfisher; Marks & Spencer; Tarkett; Unilever sustainable design 82–4 see also C2C sustainable distribution 57, 161 sustainable growth 72, 76–7 sustainable lifestyles 107–8 Sustainable Living Plan (Unilever) 94–7, 179, 203–4 sustainable manufacturing 9, 52 T “T-shaped” employees 70–1 take-back programmes 9, 75, 77, 78 Tally 196–7 Tarkett 73–7, 80, 84 TaskRabbit 85 Tata Motors 16, 119 Taylor, Frederick 71 technical design 37–8 technical support, by customers 146 technology 2, 14–15, 21–2, 26, 27 TechShop 9, 70, 134–5, 152, 166–7 telecoms sector 53, 56 Telefónica 147 telematic monitoring 116 Ternois, Laurence 42 Tesco 102 Tesla Motors 92, 172 testing 28, 42, 141, 170, 192 Texas Industries 159 Textoris, Vincent 127 TGV Lab 42–3 thermostats 98–100 thinking, entrenched 14–16 Thompson, Gav 147 Timberland 90 time 4, 7, 11, 41, 72, 129, 170, 200 constraints 36, 42 see also development cycle tinkerers 17–18, 133–5, 144, 150, 152, 153, 165–7, 168 TiVo 62 Tohamy, Noha 59–60 top-down change 177–8 top-down management 69 Total 157 total quality management (TQM) 11 total volatile organic compounds see TVOC Toyota 44, 100 Toyota Sweden 106–7 TQM (total quality management) 11 traffic 108, 116, 201 training 76, 93, 152, 167, 170, 189 transaction costs 133 transparency 178, 185 transport 46, 57, 96, 156–7 Transport for London 195 TrashTrack 107 Travelocity 174 trial and error 173, 179 Trout, Bernhardt 45 trust 7, 37, 143 TVOC (total volatile organic compounds) 74, 77 Twitter 29, 62, 135, 143, 147 U Uber 136, 163 Ubuntu 202 Uchiyama, Shunichi 50 UCLA Health 202–3 Udacity 61, 112 UK 194 budget cuts 6 consumer empowerment 103 industrial symbiosis 160 savings 115 sharing 85, 138 “un-management” 63–4, 64 Unboundary 154 Unilever 11, 31, 57, 97, 100, 142, 203–5, 215 and sustainability 94–7, 104, 179, 203–4 University of Cambridge Engineering Design Centre (EDC) 194–5 Inclusive Design team 31 Institute for Sustainability Leadership (CISL) 158–9 upcycling 77, 88–9, 93, 159 upselling 189 Upton, Eben 135–6 US 8, 38, 44, 87, 115, 133, 188 access to financial services 13, 17, 161–2 ageing population 194 ageing workforce 13 commuting 131 consumer spending 5, 6, 103 crowdfunding 137–8, 138 economic pressures 5, 6 energy use 103, 119, 196 environmental awareness 7, 102 frugal innovation in 215–16, 218 health care 13, 110, 208–13, 213 intellectual property 171 onshoring 55 regulation 8, 78, 216 sharing 85, 138–9 shifting production from China to 55, 56 tinkering culture 18, 133–4 user communities 62, 89 user interfaces 98, 99 user-friendliness 194 Utopies 91 V validators 144 value 11, 132, 177, 186, 189–90 aspirational 88–9 to customers 6–7, 21, 77, 87, 131, 203 from employees 217 shareholder value 14 value chains 9, 80, 128–9, 143, 159–60, 190, 215 value engineering 192 “value gap” 54–5 value-added services 62–3, 76, 150, 206, 209 values 6–7, 14, 178, 205 Vandebroek, Sophie 169 Vasanthakumar, Vaithegi 182–3 Vats, Tanmaya 190, 192 vehicle fleets, sharing 57, 161 Verbaken, Joop 118 vertical integration 133, 154 virtual prototyping 65 virtuous cycle 212–13 visibility 34, 59–60 visible learning 112–13 visioning sessions 193–4 visualisation 106–8 Vitality 111 Volac 158–9 Volkswagen 4, 44, 45–6, 129, 144 Volvo 62 W wage costs 48 wages, in emerging markets 55 Waitrose, local suppliers 56 Walker, James 87 walking the walk 122–3 Waller, Sam 195 Walmart 9, 18, 56, 162, 216 Walton, Sam 9 Wan Jia 144 Washington DC 123 waste 24, 87–9, 107, 159–60, 175, 192, 196 beautifying 88–9, 93 e-waste 24, 79, 87–8, 121 of energy 119 post-consumer 9, 75, 77, 78, 83 reducing 47, 74, 85, 96, 180, 209 of resources 169–70 in US health-care system 209 see also C2C; recycling; reuse water 78, 83, 104, 106, 158, 175, 188, 206 water consumption 79, 82–3, 100, 196 reducing 74, 75, 79, 104, 122–3, 174, 183 wealth 105, 218 Wear It Share It (Wishi) 85 Weijmarshausen, Peter 51 well-being 104–5 Wham-O 56 Whirlpool 36 “wicked” problems 153 wireless technologies 65–6 Wiseman, Liz 164 Wishi (Wear It Share It) 85 Witty, Andrew 35, 35–6, 37, 39, 217 W.L.

 

pages: 186 words: 49,251

The Automatic Customer: Creating a Subscription Business in Any Industry by John Warrillow

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Airbnb, airport security, Amazon Web Services, asset allocation, barriers to entry, call centre, cloud computing, discounted cash flows, high net worth, Jeff Bezos, Network effects, passive income, rolodex, sharing economy, side project, Silicon Valley, Silicon Valley startup, software as a service, statistical model, Steve Jobs, Stewart Brand, subscription business, telemarketer, time value of money, Zipcar

By 2011, the Wall Street Journal eclipsed 1 million paying online subscribers, and the New York Times—arguably the most influential media outlet in the world—erected a metered paywall, which by 2013 had 700,000 subscribers for the online product.9 Around the same time that the Wall Street Journal put up its paywall, Silicon Valley fell in love with the subscription business model. In the late 1990s, application service providers such as Onvia offered access to computer applications on a subscription basis rather than requiring users to load up their software from a CD. While some of the early players were weeded out during the “tech wreck” of 2001, the business model lived on in software as a service (SaaS) businesses and in “cloud-based” companies such as Salesforce.com and Constant Contact. The Subscription Model Renaissance Basically, while the subscription business model has been around for centuries, over the last two decades it has been revitalized by technology and media companies. Most recently, a confluence of four factors has ushered in a subscription model renaissance across all industries.

It offers small businesses a platform to keep in touch with its customers through e-mail marketing and social media. Constant Contact has been trying to optimize its metrics since its start in 1995. In January 2014, the company announced that its revenue was up to $285.4 million per year. It went from $100,000 MRR in 2002 to almost $24 million in MRR in 2014, but it has been what CEO Gail Goodman calls a “long, slow SaaS [software as a service] ramp of death.” Far from an overnight success, Constant Contact has been tweaking its approach to optimize its numbers for almost two decades. It has tried virtually every marketing tactic there is, from TV and radio advertising to search engine optimization (SEO), direct mail, and sending salespeople out into a community to cold-call by knocking on doors. Constant Contact has tried hundreds of campaigns over the years, and one of the most successful had nothing at all to do with the Internet.

 

pages: 183 words: 49,460

Start Small, Stay Small: A Developer's Guide to Launching a Startup by Rob Walling

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8-hour work day, en.wikipedia.org, inventory management, Lean Startup, Network effects, Paul Graham, rolodex, side project, Silicon Valley, software as a service, SpamAssassin, Superbowl ad, web application

A Look at the Self-Funded Startup Entrepreneur There are many definitions of entrepreneur, but since we’ll be discussing self-funded tech startups we are going to focus our definition on a few key points: Point 1: An entrepreneur is a technical visionary who creates software for a niche market. Niche markets are critical. If you want to self-fund a startup you have to choose a niche. Building an online invoicing software as a service (SaaS) application? Good luck. Building an online invoicing application targeted at landscape architects? Now you’re talking. The genius of niches is they are too small for large competitors, allowing a nimble entrepreneur the breathing room to focus on an underserved audience. Once you’ve succeeded in that niche, you can leverage your success to establish credibility for your business to move into larger markets.

You can move back to the old pricing a week or two later if sales do not increase. If you receive emails from existing customers, offer to refund the difference for them. Product Types Six major product types are described below, including the typical pricing structure, benefits, downsides and when to use each. Type #1 – Hosted Web Applications These days hosted web applications are called Software as a Service applications (SaaS), but you may know them by their previous name, ASP Applications (for Application Service Provider), or the new name the media seems to be misusing more and more, “Cloud-based Applications.” Most new business or productivity applications are hosted web applications. Examples abound, but here are some of the more popular options: FreshBooks 39 (hosted invoicing) Basecamp 40 (hosted project management software) FogBugz on Demand 41 (hosted bug tracking / project management) Pricing Structure Typically a monthly or annual recurring fee Benefits for the Entrepreneur Steady, recurring revenue Support is much easier than software installed on a user’s machine since you are in control of every aspect of the deployment and are only maintaining a single version of the application Documentation can be updated as you add features Customer feedback can be incorporated immediately into the product, thus providing incremental improvements on a shorter release schedule Benefits for the Customer Customers do not make a large, up-front capital investment to pay for software licenses Customers do not have to maintain their own servers, install or upgrade software, or open a shared hosting account Upgrades are free, seamless, and require no effort on the part of the customer Customers can try your product with little effort The Downside Developing for the web can be challenging and you have to learn a number of technologies to build an application (HTML/CSS/AJAX/JS/Server Side Code) Browser compatibility issues can be cumbersome, especially with browser market share becoming more and more splintered Some customers, typically enterprise clients, will not allow their data to live outside of company walls and thus will not use hosted web applications It requires you to maintain a 24/7 uptime hosting solution, plus security and backups When to Use When thinking about a new application aimed at businesses, start with the position of a hosted web application.

 

pages: 138 words: 40,787

The Silent Intelligence: The Internet of Things by Daniel Kellmereit, Daniel Obodovski

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3D printing, Airbnb, Amazon Web Services, Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic, autonomous vehicles, barriers to entry, business intelligence, call centre, Clayton Christensen, cloud computing, connected car, crowdsourcing, data acquisition, en.wikipedia.org, Erik Brynjolfsson, first square of the chessboard, first square of the chessboard / second half of the chessboard, Freestyle chess, Google X / Alphabet X, Internet of things, Network effects, Paul Graham, Ray Kurzweil, RFID, self-driving car, Silicon Valley, smart cities, smart grid, software as a service, Steve Jobs, web application, Y Combinator, yield management

Why has it taken so long for the world to catch on to what some of us have known for over a decade? It is because in the majority of cases, new technologies that can disrupt business models take much more time to be accepted than anyone in that market wants or expects. In the U.S. market, it took cell phones about twenty years to get to major mass-market penetration. Cloud computing (think Software as a Service, timesharing) can trace its origins back many, many years. With a handful of exceptions, tablets being possibly the best-known outlier, technology adoption takes years. I think we were fooled, like many early market entrants, into thinking we would move right from the visionary customers and early adopters directly into mainstream adoption. The reality, well explained in Geoffrey Moore’s book Crossing the Chasm, is that in order to get across that chasm between the early adopters and the early majority, you need to package that technology into something that is easy for companies to consume.

Now, you put the same SIM in every single device you build and you have one carrier to work with to have coverage in two hundred countries around the world. So the single SIM simplifies device manufacturing, the single SIM allows you to ship that automotive device anywhere you want to go, and when it lands it gets turned on automatically. On the data analysis side of things, one of the major trends is Software as a Service, or SaaS, provided over the cloud. This means that in many cases, M2M solutions don’t have to be integrated into the Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) system right away. Employees and management can access the data in the cloud from their desktops, laptops, tablets, and smartphones. As we have recently seen, IT departments cannot keep up with the innovation happening in the marketplace that is provided by new SaaS companies and application start-ups.

 

pages: 56 words: 16,788

The New Kingmakers by Stephen O'Grady

Amazon: amazon.comamazon.co.ukamazon.deamazon.fr

Amazon Web Services, barriers to entry, cloud computing, correlation does not imply causation, crowdsourcing, DevOps, Jeff Bezos, Khan Academy, Kickstarter, Mark Zuckerberg, Netflix Prize, Paul Graham, Silicon Valley, Skype, software as a service, software is eating the world, Steve Ballmer, Steve Jobs, Tim Cook: Apple, Y Combinator

If you’re selling mobile applications, Apple’s App Store has already distributed 25 billion applications. Android developers, meanwhile, can count on an addressable market that’s activating 1.3 million new devices per day. Amazon, Microsoft, and RIM all have their own equivalents as well. Over on the desktop, Apple, Canonical, and Microsoft are or will soon be offering the ability to sell applications to users. The same is true for Software-as-a-Service; platforms like Google or Jive are increasingly offering their own “app stores,” giving developers or third parties the opportunity to sell to their customers. Marketing and selling yourself or the applications you’ve built requires training, obviously. Historically, this has been a challenge. While motivated individuals could learn through texts and manuals or, if they could afford it, computer-based training, none duplicated the experience of being taught by your peers, on the job, in part because few of the available learning mechanisms were interactive.

 

pages: 302 words: 73,581

Platform Scale: How an Emerging Business Model Helps Startups Build Large Empires With Minimum Investment by Sangeet Paul Choudary

Amazon: amazon.comamazon.co.ukamazon.deamazon.fr

3D printing, Airbnb, Amazon Web Services, barriers to entry, bitcoin, blockchain, business process, Clayton Christensen, collaborative economy, crowdsourcing, cryptocurrency, data acquisition, frictionless, game design, hive mind, Internet of things, invisible hand, Kickstarter, Lean Startup, Lyft, M-Pesa, Mark Zuckerberg, means of production, multi-sided market, Network effects, new economy, Paul Graham, recommendation engine, ride hailing / ride sharing, shareholder value, sharing economy, Silicon Valley, Skype, Snapchat, social graph, social software, software as a service, software is eating the world, Spread Networks laid a new fibre optics cable between New York and Chicago, TaskRabbit, the payments system, too big to fail, transport as a service, two-sided market, Uber and Lyft, Uber for X, Wave and Pay

Our education system often works like a pipe where teachers push “knowledge” to receptive students. There is a linear movement of value from a producer to one or many consumers in all examples of pipe businesses. Early digital business models also followed the pipe design. The first media companies on the Internet worked like pipes. Amazon’s e-commerce store started as a pipe. Single-user software-as-a-service runs like a pipe, where the software is created by the business and delivered to the consumer. Even today, many businesses continue to see the Internet as a pipe, one of many delivery channels. However, three forces today – increasing connectedness, decentralized production, and the rise of artificial intelligence – are driving a whole new design for business. The emerging design of business is that of a platform.

Several startups, providing invoicing, payments, procurement management, and accounting tools to small businesses, are trying to take a similar approach to go beyond the tools and build out a ‘commercial graph’. Much like Facebook’s social graph, which maps out the social relationships between its users, a commercial graph would map out the nature of commercial relationships between businesses. Software as a service (SAAS) providers like Tradeshift, SPS Commerce, and Procurify are powering the first few instances of the commercial graph today. These providers follow a four-step strategy to build out the commercial graph. 1.Provision Of Tools. At the outset, they provide invoicing and procurement software to enable companies to manage their network interactions better. As the companies interact through the software, interaction data is captured.

 

pages: 103 words: 24,033

The Immigrant Exodus: Why America Is Losing the Global Race to Capture Entrepreneurial Talent by Vivek Wadhwa

Amazon: amazon.comamazon.co.ukamazon.deamazon.fr

3D printing, card file, corporate governance, crowdsourcing, Elon Musk, immigration reform, labour mobility, open economy, pattern recognition, Ray Kurzweil, Sand Hill Road, Silicon Valley, Silicon Valley startup, software as a service, Y2K

The early foreign startup participants pulled in $8 million in venture capital financing from venture capital funds in Argentina, Brazil, France, the United States, and Uruguay. The program has sparked a spread of Silicon Valley–style entrepreneurship around Chile. There are now tribes of entrepreneurs and locals to build expertise on diverse topics, from biotech to consumer products to software-as-a-service to social media. The pairing of locals wanting to broaden their horizons with Start-Up Chile participants made such an impression that many of the Chileans I spoke to after the program started became interested in launching their own high-growth startups. In a nod to this development, the government of Chile opened the program to local entrepreneurs in July 2011. In short order they received a flood of 600 applications.

 

pages: 89 words: 24,277

Designing for Emotion by Aarron Walter

Amazon: amazon.comamazon.co.ukamazon.deamazon.fr

big-box store, en.wikipedia.org, game design, John Gruber, Kickstarter, Skype, software as a service, Steve Jobs, Superbowl ad, Wall-E, web application

To get started with Dropbox you have to install software on at least one computer—more if you’re syncing between machines—plus you must install the mobile app to access files on your phone. The getting started task sequence is disjointed. Though the individual workflow steps are relatively straightforward, you must jump from device to device to complete the setup process, so it’s easy for Dropbox to lose people along the way. As a new customer invests more time into getting started, the costs can start to seem greater than the benefits. Dropbox is also not your typical software as a service. It’s a web app, but it’s also a desktop and mobile app at the same time. That’s new territory for a lot of people, and there’s a learning curve to using the service as well as understanding how it will make your life easier. Getting people in the door is easy for Dropbox. It’s retaining users and getting them invested that’s tricky. Dropbox has a novel approach to getting their audience invested immediately on sign up.

 

pages: 329 words: 95,309

Digital Bank: Strategies for Launching or Becoming a Digital Bank by Chris Skinner

Amazon: amazon.comamazon.co.ukamazon.deamazon.fr

algorithmic trading, Amazon Web Services, Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic, augmented reality, bank run, Basel III, bitcoin, business intelligence, business process, business process outsourcing, call centre, cashless society, clean water, cloud computing, corporate social responsibility, credit crunch, crowdsourcing, cryptocurrency, demand response, disintermediation, don't be evil, en.wikipedia.org, fault tolerance, fiat currency, financial innovation, Google Glasses, high net worth, informal economy, Infrastructure as a Service, Internet of things, Jeff Bezos, Kevin Kelly, Kickstarter, M-Pesa, margin call, mass affluent, mobile money, Mohammed Bouazizi, new economy, Northern Rock, Occupy movement, platform as a service, Ponzi scheme, prediction markets, pre–internet, quantitative easing, ransomware, reserve currency, RFID, Satoshi Nakamoto, Silicon Valley, smart cities, software as a service, Steve Jobs, strong AI, Stuxnet, trade route, unbanked and underbanked, underbanked, upwardly mobile, We are the 99%, web application, Y2K

A slightly confusing and technical discussion, so let’s start with the idea of cloud computing in banking. Cloud Computing is a wide and diverse operation that has gained a panacea status of being all things to all people. It’s Salesforce.com, Azure, Exalogic, Amazon and more. Put in “Cloud Computing” to Google, who also provide clouds, and you get sponsored adverts from HP, Intel, Siemens and more all talking about clouds. It’s Software as a Service, Platform as a Service, and Infrastructure as a Service. It’s public clouds, private clouds, hybrid clouds. It’s every and any darned thing you want and, as a result, it’s lost its meaning. As a result, bank CIO’s have heard about Cloud Computing, but have no idea how to articulate what it is to their Board and CEO, how to justify it, how to present it as meaningful and how to get a decision.

The Currency Cloud is, therefore, built as a technology platform that will bring a world of currencies with simplicity and low-cost to a whole range of businesses that did not have it before. We have around a hundred clients accessing our payments platform through our API, and interfacing their business applications directly into the currency markets through our platform. I assume you are a cloud-based service, with a name like Currency Cloud? We are a Software-as-a-Service (SaaS) based platform, and make a distinction between online platforms that you might get from your bank, where you are connected through a screen to the banks’ platform, and what we are doing. We are enabling online applications, including payroll, ERP, invoicing, corporate treasury and more, through a connection to ourselves. We are then connected to multiple liquidity providers, banks, who provide us with sources of hedging and currency pools, as well as multiple payment networks.

 

pages: 407 words: 103,501

The Digital Divide: Arguments for and Against Facebook, Google, Texting, and the Age of Social Netwo Rking by Mark Bauerlein

Amazon: amazon.comamazon.co.ukamazon.deamazon.fr

Amazon Mechanical Turk, Andrew Keen, centre right, citizen journalism, collaborative editing, computer age, computer vision, corporate governance, crowdsourcing, David Brooks, disintermediation, Frederick Winslow Taylor, Howard Rheingold, invention of movable type, invention of the steam engine, invention of the telephone, Jaron Lanier, Jeff Bezos, jimmy wales, Kevin Kelly, knowledge worker, late fees, Mark Zuckerberg, Marshall McLuhan, means of production, meta analysis, meta-analysis, Network effects, new economy, Nicholas Carr, PageRank, pets.com, Results Only Work Environment, Saturday Night Live, search engine result page, semantic web, Silicon Valley, slashdot, social graph, social web, software as a service, speech recognition, Steve Jobs, Stewart Brand, technology bubble, Ted Nelson, The Wisdom of Crowds, Thorstein Veblen, web application

While both Netscape and Google could be described as software companies, it’s clear that Netscape belonged to the same software world as Lotus, Microsoft, Oracle, SAP, and other companies that got their start in the 1980s software revolution, while Google’s fellows are other Internet applications like eBay, Amazon, Napster, and, yes, DoubleClick and Akamai. DoubleClick vs. Overture and AdSense Like Google, DoubleClick is a true child of the Internet era. It harnesses software as a service, has a core competency in data management, and, as noted above, was a pioneer in Web services long before Web services even had a name. However, DoubleClick was ultimately limited by its business model. It bought into the ’90s notion that the Web was about publishing, not participation; that advertisers, not consumers, ought to call the shots; that size mattered; and that the Internet was increasingly being dominated by the top websites as measured by MediaMetrix and other Web ad scoring companies.

In our first program, we asked why some companies survived the dot-com bust while others had failed so miserably. We also studied a burgeoning group of start–ups and asked why they were growing so quickly. The answers helped us understand the rules of business on this new platform. Chief among our insights was that “the network as platform” means far more than just offering old applications via the network (“software as a service”); it means building applications that literally get better the more people use them, harnessing network effects not only to acquire users, but also to learn from them and build on their contributions. From Google and Amazon to Wikipedia, eBay, and craigslist, we saw that the value was facilitated by the software, but was cocreated by and for the community of connected users. Since then, powerful new platforms like YouTube, Facebook, and Twitter have demonstrated that same insight in new ways.

 

pages: 102 words: 29,596

The Alliance: Managing Talent in the Networked Age by Reid Hoffman, Ben Casnocha, Chris Yeh

Amazon: amazon.comamazon.co.ukamazon.deamazon.fr

Airbnb, Amazon Web Services, centralized clearinghouse, cloud computing, Jeff Bezos, Jony Ive, new economy, pre–internet, Silicon Valley, Silicon Valley startup, software as a service, Steve Jobs

Too often, the business world conflates all nonpublic information into a single category. Perhaps this is due to the hard line that the finance world draws between “public” and “insider” information. But outside the world of financial exchanges and markets, nonpublic information comes in two very different flavors. For example, entrepreneurs often contact Chris for his advice on how to price Software-as-a-Service (SaaS) business software. Through his work with PBworks and other start-ups, he has direct operational experience in increasing revenues by introducing new pricing schemes. In the case of PBworks, for example, he was able to increase the size of the company’s largest customer from less than $100 to nearly $1 million over the course of four years. Chris’s pricing advice rests on “hidden” data that is nonpublic information, but he doesn’t reveal any secrets about specific customers or future plans.

 

pages: 302 words: 82,233

Beautiful security by Andy Oram, John Viega

Amazon: amazon.comamazon.co.ukamazon.deamazon.fr

Albert Einstein, Amazon Web Services, business intelligence, business process, call centre, cloud computing, corporate governance, credit crunch, crowdsourcing, defense in depth, en.wikipedia.org, fault tolerance, Firefox, loose coupling, market design, Monroe Doctrine, new economy, Nicholas Carr, Nick Leeson, Norbert Wiener, optical character recognition, packet switching, performance metric, pirate software, Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence, security theater, SETI@home, Silicon Valley, Skype, software as a service, statistical model, Steven Levy, The Wisdom of Crowds, Upton Sinclair, web application, web of trust, x509 certificate, zero day, Zimmermann PGP

Cloud Computing and Web Services: The Single Machine Is Here Civilization advances by extending the number of important operations which we can perform without thinking of them. —Alfred North Whitehead An Introduction to Mathematics (1911) Today, much is being made of “cloud computing” in the press. For at least the past five years, the computer industry has also expressed a lot of excitement about web services, which can range from Software as a Service (SaaS) to various web-based APIs and service-oriented architecture (SOA, pronounced “so-ah”). Cloud computing is really nothing more than the abstraction of computing infrastructure (be it storage, processing power, or application hosting) from the hardware system or users. Just as you don’t know where your photo is stored physically after you upload it to Flickr, you can run an entire business on a service that is free to run it on any system it chooses.

John received his Ph.D. and M.S. in computer science from the College of William and Mary and his B.A. from Randolph-Macon College. 262 CONTRIBUTORS E LIZABETH (B ETSY ) A. N ICHOLS is a serial entrepreneur who has applied mathematics to develop solutions in satellite mission optimization, industrial process control, war gaming, economic modeling, enterprise systems and network management, and most recently, security metrics. In 2007, with her husband, Joseph, she cofounded PlexLogic LLC, a firm that offers metrics on-demand using the Software as a Service delivery model. She is the CTO and VP of engineering. Prior to starting PlexLogic, Betsy cofounded two other software companies in the role of CTO and VP of engineering. The first company, Digital Analysis Corporation (DAC), implemented network and systems management software. DAC was acquired by Legent Corporation, which was in turn acquired by Computer Associates (CA) during the Internet bubble in the mid-1990s when Unix, the Web, and networks were booming.

 

The Future of Technology by Tom Standage

Amazon: amazon.comamazon.co.ukamazon.deamazon.fr

air freight, barriers to entry, business process, business process outsourcing, call centre, Clayton Christensen, computer vision, connected car, corporate governance, disintermediation, distributed generation, double helix, experimental economics, full employment, hydrogen economy, industrial robot, informal economy, interchangeable parts, job satisfaction, labour market flexibility, market design, Menlo Park, millennium bug, moral hazard, natural language processing, Network effects, new economy, Nicholas Carr, optical character recognition, railway mania, rent-seeking, RFID, Silicon Valley, Silicon Valley ideology, Silicon Valley startup, six sigma, Skype, smart grid, software as a service, spectrum auction, speech recognition, stem cell, Steve Ballmer, technology bubble, telemarketer, transcontinental railway, Y2K

Fortunately for shareholders, they probably won’t, at least in the foreseeable future – for the simple reason that they will make active efforts to prevent such a calamity. In fact, vendors are already changing their business models, mostly by moving up the technology stack. Sun, which made a killing during the dotcom boom by selling high-end servers, is trying to become more of a software firm and a builder of power plants 37 THE FUTURE OF TECHNOLOGY for computing utilities. And much of Microsoft’s .net effort is about software as a service. Yet it is ibm that is betting most on the prediction that the it industry will follow historic patterns of evolution. Big Blue expects profits to migrate to software and services (see Chart 1.9), and is managing its product portfolio accordingly. For example, it has sold its hard-drive business and acquired the consulting arm of PricewaterhouseCoopers, an accountancy firm. Slowly but surely, ibm is morphing from a technology vendor with a strong it-services arm into a business consulting firm that also sells software and hardware.

This is a fairly new idea in the it industry, although in many established industries it has been around for a long time. People do not put safes into their basements but open bank accounts. Similarly, “most people shouldn’t build their own aeroplanes,” says Sun’s Mr Papadopoulos. “They shouldn’t even own them; in fact, they shouldn’t even rent them; what they should do is rent a seat on one.” In it, the equivalent of renting a seat on an aircraft is to rent software as a service from specialised firms called “application service providers”, or asps. These companies build huge datacentres so that other companies do not have to. The best-known asp today is Salesforce.com, a San Francisco firm that made its debut on the stockmarket in June 2004. As the name suggests, Salesforce.com specialises in software that salespeople use to keep track of their marketing leads and client information.

 

pages: 201 words: 63,192

Graph Databases by Ian Robinson, Jim Webber, Emil Eifrem

Amazon: amazon.comamazon.co.ukamazon.deamazon.fr

Amazon Web Services, anti-pattern, bioinformatics, corporate governance, create, read, update, delete, data acquisition, en.wikipedia.org, fault tolerance, linked data, loose coupling, Network effects, recommendation engine, semantic web, sentiment analysis, social graph, software as a service, SPARQL, web application

See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Complex_event_processing 98 | Chapter 5: Graphs in the Real World • Which resource can an end-user access? • Given a particular resource, who can modify its access settings? (Bottom-up) Graph database access control and authorization solutions are particularly applicable in the areas of content management, federated authorization services, social networking preferences, and software as a service offerings, where they realizing minutes to milli‐ seconds increases in performance over their hand-rolled, relational predecessors. Real-World Examples In this section we describe three example use cases in detail: social and recommenda‐ tions, authorization and access control, and logistics. Each use case is drawn from one or more production applications of a graph database (specifically in these cases, Neo4j).

 

pages: 271 words: 52,814

Blockchain: Blueprint for a New Economy by Melanie Swan

Amazon: amazon.comamazon.co.ukamazon.deamazon.fr

23andMe, Airbnb, altcoin, Amazon Web Services, asset allocation, banking crisis, bioinformatics, bitcoin, blockchain, capital controls, cellular automata, central bank independence, clean water, cloud computing, collaborative editing, Conway's Game of Life, crowdsourcing, cryptocurrency, disintermediation, Edward Snowden, en.wikipedia.org, ethereum blockchain, fault tolerance, fiat currency, financial innovation, Firefox, friendly AI, Hernando de Soto, Internet Archive, Internet of things, Khan Academy, Kickstarter, litecoin, Lyft, M-Pesa, microbiome, Network effects, new economy, peer-to-peer lending, personalized medicine, post scarcity, prediction markets, ride hailing / ride sharing, Satoshi Nakamoto, Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence, SETI@home, sharing economy, Skype, smart cities, smart contracts, smart grid, software as a service, technological singularity, Turing complete, unbanked and underbanked, underbanked, web application, WikiLeaks

Looking ahead, reconfiguring all of business and commerce with smart contracts in the Bitcoin 2.0 era could likely be complicated and difficult to implement, with many opportunities for service providers to offer implementation services, customer education, standard setting, and other value-added facilitations. Some of the many types of business models that have developed with enterprise software and cloud computing might be applicable, too, for the Bitcoin economy—for example, the Red Hat model (fee-based services to implement open source software), and SaaS, providing Software as a Service, including with customization. One possible job of the future could be smart contract auditor, to confirm that AI smart contracts running on the blockchain are indeed doing as instructed, and determining and measuring how the smart contracts have self-rewritten to maximize the issuing agent’s utility. Scandals and Public Perception One of the biggest barriers to further Bitcoin adoption is its public perception as a venue for (and possible abettor of) the dark net’s money-laundering, drug-related, and other illicit activity—for example, illegal goods online marketplaces such as Silk Road.

 

pages: 169 words: 56,250

Startup Communities: Building an Entrepreneurial Ecosystem in Your City by Brad Feld

Amazon: amazon.comamazon.co.ukamazon.deamazon.fr

barriers to entry, cleantech, cloud computing, corporate social responsibility, Grace Hopper, job satisfaction, Kickstarter, labour mobility, Lean Startup, minimum viable product, Network effects, Peter Thiel, place-making, pre–internet, Richard Florida, Silicon Valley, Silicon Valley startup, smart cities, software as a service, Steve Jobs, text mining, Y Combinator, Zipcar

I bumped into Fred Wilson’s blog (http://startuprev.com/l4) and Brad Feld’s blog (http://startuprev.com/o4 and http://startuprev.com/h1) and was amazed at the wealth of knowledge and wisdom that these two individuals were sharing freely on the Internet. I met this small team sitting in the old fishing factory in the Reykjavik Harbor, working on text mining. They were each younger than 25 years old and called their company CLARA. They wanted to build a software-as-a-service company that helped gaming companies understand their communities. I was startled. These kids were not worried about the ISK or the government or the global financial crisis or anything. They were building something and wanted to sell it to create value. I was impressed. I found out that they needed capital to get their minimum viable product onto the market. There was a slight problem, as I had no money, so I reached out to my family and friends, convinced them to invest in Iceland and this young team called CLARA.

 

pages: 161 words: 44,488

The Business Blockchain: Promise, Practice, and Application of the Next Internet Technology by William Mougayar

Amazon: amazon.comamazon.co.ukamazon.deamazon.fr

Airbnb, airport security, Albert Einstein, altcoin, Amazon Web Services, bitcoin, Black Swan, blockchain, business process, centralized clearinghouse, Clayton Christensen, cloud computing, cryptocurrency, disintermediation, distributed ledger, Edward Snowden, en.wikipedia.org, ethereum blockchain, fault tolerance, fiat currency, global value chain, Innovator's Dilemma, Internet of things, Kevin Kelly, Kickstarter, market clearing, Network effects, new economy, peer-to-peer lending, prediction markets, pull request, ride hailing / ride sharing, Satoshi Nakamoto, sharing economy, smart contracts, social web, software as a service, too big to fail, Turing complete, web application

Contractual Law is being sliced off, for example via Ricardian contracts that track the liability of one party to another (for example, OpenBazaar is implementing them in their peer-to-peer e-commerce protocol). Here is a profound implication for large enterprises. Business users will also be able to run their own smart contracts, P2P apps, and other Dapps on open blockchains without seeking permission from IT departments, in the same way that Software-as-a-Service (SaaS) was a Trojan horse that enabled employees to sign up for services on their own without disturbing the company infrastructures (until it was time to perform some integrations). This new form of SaaS will be possible because a new infrastructure layer can emerge by being supported on a peer-to-peer and shared-cost basis. And it is very possible that the costs of this new computing infrastructure will be as cheap as Internet access today, on a relative per-user basis.

 

pages: 189 words: 52,741

Lifestyle Entrepreneur: Live Your Dreams, Ignite Your Passions and Run Your Business From Anywhere in the World by Jesse Krieger

Amazon: amazon.comamazon.co.ukamazon.deamazon.fr

Airbnb, bounce rate, call centre, carbon footprint, Deng Xiaoping, financial independence, follow your passion, income inequality, iterative process, Ralph Waldo Emerson, search engine result page, Skype, software as a service, South China Sea, Steve Jobs

You can set up a CRM system in a few ways. Sites like Alibaba.com have vendors in their Software section that have ready-made, easily customizable CRM solutions that are geared specifically for e-commerce of various goods. You can also hire programming firms from sites such as Elance.com or Guru.com to customize free open-source CRM software such as SugarCRM. Perhaps the easiest solution, however, is using off-the-shelf software-as-a-service (SaaS) CRM platforms such as Salesforce.com, crm.zoho.com, or vtiger.com. My recommendation: Use Zoho.com to start with. It’s free for up to three uses and very affordable thereafter. Their CRM setup already includes all the forms and modules you will need for your business (Sales Order, Invoice, Purchase Order, etc.). If you want a full-featured, very robust solution, take a look at www.InfusionSoft.com - this is the top-of-the-line small business solution for e-commerce, CRM and email marketing, but it costs a few hundred dollars per month.

 

pages: 169 words: 43,906

The Website Investor: The Guide to Buying an Online Website Business for Passive Income by Jeff Hunt

Amazon: amazon.comamazon.co.ukamazon.deamazon.fr

buy low sell high, Donald Trump, frictionless, frictionless market, medical malpractice, passive income, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Skype, software as a service

Most apps are sold based on their “potential earnings,” which are suspect. Free apps far outnumber purchased apps. There are successful monetization methods for free apps, but free apps need to have a large install base to pay off. I expect to see a merger of the kind of tools and functions offered by current apps and the easy accessibility of websites in the future. An “App as a Service” model similar to the “Software as a Service” model will emerge. Apps have to be independently downloaded. Websites can all be accessed from a single browser. The new model will provide app functionality delivered through a generic, browser-like service. You read it here first. As an example of how unpredictable the ROI with apps is, consider my friend Joel Comm. He created the iFart app that sold over 800,000 copies at $0.99 each.

 

pages: 179 words: 43,441

The Fourth Industrial Revolution by Klaus Schwab

Amazon: amazon.comamazon.co.ukamazon.deamazon.fr

3D printing, additive manufacturing, Airbnb, Amazon Mechanical Turk, Amazon Web Services, augmented reality, autonomous vehicles, barriers to entry, Baxter: Rethink Robotics, bitcoin, blockchain, Buckminster Fuller, call centre, clean water, collaborative consumption, conceptual framework, continuous integration, crowdsourcing, disintermediation, distributed ledger, Edward Snowden, Elon Musk, epigenetics, Erik Brynjolfsson, future of work, global value chain, Google Glasses, income inequality, Internet Archive, Internet of things, invention of the steam engine, job automation, job satisfaction, John Maynard Keynes: Economic Possibilities for our Grandchildren, John Maynard Keynes: technological unemployment, life extension, Lyft, megacity, meta analysis, meta-analysis, more computing power than Apollo, mutually assured destruction, Narrative Science, Network effects, Nicholas Carr, personalized medicine, precariat, precision agriculture, Productivity paradox, race to the bottom, randomized controlled trial, reshoring, RFID, rising living standards, Second Machine Age, secular stagnation, self-driving car, sharing economy, Silicon Valley, smart cities, smart contracts, software as a service, Stephen Hawking, Steve Jobs, Steven Levy, Stuxnet, The Spirit Level, total factor productivity, transaction costs, Uber and Lyft, Watson beat the top human players on Jeopardy!, WikiLeaks, winner-take-all economy, women in the workforce, working-age population, Y Combinator, Zipcar

Figure V: Distribution of US Occupational Employment* over the Probability of Computerization * Distribution based on 2010 job mix. Source: Frey, C.B. and M.A. Osborne, “The Future of Employment: How Susceptible Are Jobs to Computerisation?”, 17 September 2013 Positive impacts – Cost reductions – Efficiency gains – Unlocking innovation, opportunities for small business, start-ups (smaller barriers to entry, “software as a service” for everything) Negative impacts – Job losses – Accountability and liability – Change to legal, financial disclosure, risk – Job automation (refer to the Oxford Martin study) The shift in action Advances in automation were reported on by FORTUNE: “IBM’s Watson, well known for its stellar performance in the TV game show Jeopardy!, has already demonstrated a far more accurate diagnosis rate for lung cancers than humans – 90% versus 50% in some tests.

 

pages: 326 words: 74,433

Do More Faster: TechStars Lessons to Accelerate Your Startup by Brad Feld, David Cohen

Amazon: amazon.comamazon.co.ukamazon.deamazon.fr

augmented reality, computer vision, corporate governance, crowdsourcing, disintermediation, hiring and firing, Inbox Zero, Jeff Bezos, knowledge worker, Lean Startup, Ray Kurzweil, recommendation engine, risk tolerance, Silicon Valley, Skype, slashdot, social web, software as a service, Steve Jobs

Appendix: The TechStars Companies AccelGolf (2009)—offers mobile and online apps to golfers that improve their game through personalized content.—accelgolf.com ADstruc (2010)—is an online buying platform for outdoor advertising that enables an auction and listing-based marketplace and makes the process of buying and selling faster and more profitable.—adstruc.com AmpIdea (2009)—is helping new parents by offering services through a web-enabled baby monitor.—ampidea.com AppX (2008)—provides software as a service to parties that invest in venture capital and private equity.—app-x.com Appswell (2010)—is a mobile crowd-sourcing platform that allows people, companies, and brands to harness the wisdom of their crowds.—appswell.com Baydin (2009)—creates e-mail utilities and collaboration catalysts that make e-mail even more valuable.—baydin.com BlipSnips (2010)—makes it easy for users anywhere on the web to tag, share, and collaborate around memorable video moments.

 

pages: 677 words: 206,548

Future Crimes: Everything Is Connected, Everyone Is Vulnerable and What We Can Do About It by Marc Goodman

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23andMe, 3D printing, additive manufacturing, Affordable Care Act / Obamacare, Airbnb, airport security, Albert Einstein, algorithmic trading, artificial general intelligence, augmented reality, autonomous vehicles, Baxter: Rethink Robotics, Bill Joy: nanobots, bitcoin, Black Swan, blockchain, borderless world, Brian Krebs, business process, butterfly effect, call centre, Chelsea Manning, cloud computing, cognitive dissonance, computer vision, connected car, corporate governance, crowdsourcing, cryptocurrency, data acquisition, data is the new oil, Dean Kamen, disintermediation, don't be evil, double helix, Downton Abbey, Edward Snowden, Elon Musk, Erik Brynjolfsson, Filter Bubble, Firefox, Flash crash, future of work, game design, Google Chrome, Google Earth, Google Glasses, Gordon Gekko, high net worth, High speed trading, hive mind, Howard Rheingold, hypertext link, illegal immigration, impulse control, industrial robot, Internet of things, Jaron Lanier, Jeff Bezos, job automation, John Harrison: Longitude, Jony Ive, Julian Assange, Kevin Kelly, Khan Academy, Kickstarter, knowledge worker, Kuwabatake Sanjuro: assassination market, Law of Accelerating Returns, Lean Startup, license plate recognition, litecoin, M-Pesa, Mark Zuckerberg, Marshall McLuhan, Menlo Park, mobile money, more computing power than Apollo, move fast and break things, Nate Silver, national security letter, natural language processing, obamacare, Occupy movement, Oculus Rift, offshore financial centre, optical character recognition, pattern recognition, personalized medicine, Peter H. Diamandis: Planetary Resources, Peter Thiel, pre–internet, RAND corporation, ransomware, Ray Kurzweil, refrigerator car, RFID, ride hailing / ride sharing, Rodney Brooks, Satoshi Nakamoto, Second Machine Age, security theater, self-driving car, shareholder value, Silicon Valley, Silicon Valley startup, Skype, smart cities, smart grid, smart meter, Snapchat, social graph, software as a service, speech recognition, stealth mode startup, Stephen Hawking, Steve Jobs, Steve Wozniak, strong AI, Stuxnet, supply-chain management, technological singularity, telepresence, telepresence robot, Tesla Model S, The Wisdom of Crowds, Tim Cook: Apple, trade route, uranium enrichment, Wall-E, Watson beat the top human players on Jeopardy!, Wave and Pay, We are Anonymous. We are Legion, web application, WikiLeaks, Y Combinator, zero day

The cloud refers to the massive network of computing resources available online and the practice of using these remote servers to store, manage, and process the world’s information. The changing paradigm in computing means that less information is stored locally on our machines and is instead being hosted elsewhere on earth. We mostly do not buy software anymore; we just rent it or receive it for free using a new business model known as Software as a Service (SaaS). On the personal front, cloud computing means Google is storing our mail, Instagram our photographs, and Dropbox our documents—not to mention what mobile phones are automatically uploading to the cloud for us. In the corporate world, enterprise customers not only are using Dropbox but also have outsourced primary business functions that would have previously been handled inside the company to SaaS providers such as Salesforce.​com, Zoho.com, and Box.com.

Crime as a Service With an untraceable illicit monetary system in place, crime is no longer something that you just commit; it is something you can buy. Crime as a Service (CaaS) is the new business model and allows all or part of an offense to be carried out by others, while the crime-trepreneur who organized and invested in the scheme is ensured the profit. Just as large corporations are increasingly using Software as a Service to carry out their enterprise operations beyond their core competencies, so too are criminals. One of the most oft-purchased services is that of IT infrastructure—the technological guts and pipes required to run any successful modern enterprise. But Crime, Inc. has special technological infrastructure needs, specifically for what has become an exceeding rare commodity these days: privacy and anonymity.

 

pages: 319 words: 89,477

The Power of Pull: How Small Moves, Smartly Made, Can Set Big Things in Motion by John Hagel Iii, John Seely Brown

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Albert Einstein, Andrew Keen, barriers to entry, Black Swan, business process, call centre, Clayton Christensen, cleantech, cloud computing, corporate governance, Elon Musk, en.wikipedia.org, future of work, game design, George Gilder, Isaac Newton, job satisfaction, knowledge economy, knowledge worker, loose coupling, Louis Pasteur, Malcom McLean invented shipping containers, Maui Hawaii, medical residency, Network effects, packet switching, pattern recognition, pre–internet, profit motive, recommendation engine, Ronald Coase, shareholder value, Silicon Valley, Skype, smart transportation, software as a service, supply-chain management, The Nature of the Firm, too big to fail, trade liberalization, transaction costs

And if you understood that your success in doing this could be enhanced by persuading many other individuals and institutions to follow your lead, how confident would you be that you could prevail? In the business world, it has been exceptional individuals who have managed to reshape the terms of competition in markets, industries, and even entire economic sectors. In Salesforce.com’s early years, for example, founder and CEO Marc Benioff painted a compelling view of how to reshape the software industry around a new form of delivery: software as a service. The Fung brothers revolutionized supply-chain practice in the apparel industry. Malcom McLean led Sea-Land to a preeminent position in the containerized shipping business by driving standardization around his innovative container designs. And Dee Hock helped Visa make an exemplary shaping move in the 1970s at a time when banks had gotten into difficulty by aggressively sending out preapproved credit cards (even to newborns and family pets) without the infrastructure needed to support such large-scale transactions, or to sufficiently guard against fraud.

 

pages: 540 words: 103,101

Building Microservices by Sam Newman

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airport security, Amazon Web Services, anti-pattern, business process, call centre, continuous integration, create, read, update, delete, defense in depth, Edward Snowden, fault tolerance, index card, information retrieval, Infrastructure as a Service, inventory management, job automation, load shedding, loose coupling, platform as a service, premature optimization, pull request, recommendation engine, social graph, software as a service, the built environment, web application, WebSocket, x509 certificate

Avoiding the trap of putting too much behavior into any intermediate layers is a tricky balancing act. Integrating with Third-Party Software We’ve looked at approaches to breaking apart existing systems that are under our control, but what about when we can’t change the things we talk to? For many valid reasons, the organizations we work for buy commercial off-the-shelf software (COTS) or make use of software as a service (SaaS) offerings over which we have little control. So how do we integrate with them sensibly? If you’re reading this book, you probably work at an organization that writes code. You might write software for your own internal purposes or for an external client, or both. Nonetheless, even if you are an organization with the ability to create a significant amount of custom software, you’ll still use software products provided by external parties, be they commercial or open source.

 

pages: 315 words: 85,791

Technical Blogging: Turn Your Expertise Into a Remarkable Online Presence by Antonio Cangiano

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Albert Einstein, anti-pattern, bitcoin, bounce rate, cloud computing, en.wikipedia.org, John Gruber, Lean Startup, Network effects, revision control, search engine result page, slashdot, software as a service, web application

Make your blog ultra-technical, with scores of behind-the-scene details regarding how you develop the software that you sell, and you’ll attract the attention of fellow developers. If your ideal customer base is developers or if you’re trying to hire some new talent, this could be a solid strategy. If that’s not the case, however, the explanation of your fancy continuous deployment setup for your SaaS (software as a service) won’t mean a thing to your customers. Likewise, taking an all-business approach in which you either share the details of how you run your startup or go into business topics at great length will tend to attract fellow entrepreneurs. Again, if they are your potential customers (e.g., your product is B2B), this approach can pay off. The aforementioned 37signals produces web applications that are aimed at helping companies better handle communication and collaboration.

 

pages: 372 words: 89,876

The Connected Company by Dave Gray, Thomas Vander Wal

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A Pattern Language, Albert Einstein, Amazon Mechanical Turk, Amazon Web Services, Atul Gawande, Berlin Wall, business process, call centre, Clayton Christensen, complexity theory, en.wikipedia.org, factory automation, Googley, index card, interchangeable parts, inventory management, Jeff Bezos, Kevin Kelly, loose coupling, market design, minimum viable product, more computing power than Apollo, profit maximization, Richard Florida, self-driving car, shareholder value, side project, Silicon Valley, skunkworks, software as a service, South of Market, San Francisco, Steve Jobs, Steven Levy, Stewart Brand, The Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith, Tony Hsieh, Toyota Production System, Vanguard fund, web application, WikiLeaks, Zipcar

Maneuver warfare requires that central commanders trust their forces to make tactical decisions in the field, within the context of a larger strategy. Thus, a central tenet of a maneuver strategy is distributed control. You can see maneuver strategies employed today by companies such as Amazon, which operates at a faster strategic pace than traditional booksellers and publishers, and software-as-a-service companies like Salesforce, which can run circles around traditional enterprise software vendors by making their software so easy to buy and start using that their sales cycles move much faster than competitors. Moral: Boyd said “People, not weapons, win wars.” Moral warfare concentrates on the people factor, focusing on winning the hearts and minds of the people while undermining the adversary’s efforts.

 

pages: 364 words: 99,897

The Industries of the Future by Alec Ross

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23andMe, 3D printing, Airbnb, algorithmic trading, AltaVista, Anne Wojcicki, autonomous vehicles, banking crisis, barriers to entry, Bernie Madoff, bioinformatics, bitcoin, blockchain, Brian Krebs, British Empire, business intelligence, call centre, carbon footprint, cloud computing, collaborative consumption, connected car, corporate governance, Credit Default Swap, cryptocurrency, David Brooks, disintermediation, Dissolution of the Soviet Union, distributed ledger, Edward Glaeser, Edward Snowden, en.wikipedia.org, Erik Brynjolfsson, fiat currency, future of work, global supply chain, Google X / Alphabet X, industrial robot, Internet of things, invention of the printing press, Jaron Lanier, Jeff Bezos, job automation, knowledge economy, knowledge worker, litecoin, M-Pesa, Mark Zuckerberg, Mikhail Gorbachev, mobile money, money: store of value / unit of account / medium of exchange, new economy, offshore financial centre, open economy, peer-to-peer lending, personalized medicine, Peter Thiel, precision agriculture, pre–internet, RAND corporation, Ray Kurzweil, recommendation engine, ride hailing / ride sharing, Satoshi Nakamoto, self-driving car, sharing economy, Silicon Valley, Silicon Valley startup, Skype, smart cities, social graph, software as a service, special economic zone, supply-chain management, supply-chain management software, technoutopianism, underbanked, Vernor Vinge, Watson beat the top human players on Jeopardy!, women in the workforce, Y Combinator, young professional

I also think that small farmers are likely to derive as much benefit from precision agriculture as larger farmers with thousands of acres. Precision agriculture is not based on huge enterprise software systems that take up half the barn. That expensive software is in the cloud and accessible on cheap devices like smartphones and the tablets I saw in the tractor’s “cockpit.” The costs on the hardware side, including the sensors, will continue to decline, and the real costs will come from subscriptions to the software as a service—the precision agriculture content. This is the business model the big agribusinesses are already pushing, and it will spread from the highest-tech farmers working huge fields to the small family farm. It will still take years for this kind of technology to mainstream in wealthy parts of the world, but it will happen. Not long thereafter, it will come to the developing and frontier parts of the globe.

 

The Data Revolution: Big Data, Open Data, Data Infrastructures and Their Consequences by Rob Kitchin

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business intelligence, business process, cellular automata, Celtic Tiger, cloud computing, collateralized debt obligation, conceptual framework, congestion charging, corporate governance, correlation does not imply causation, crowdsourcing, discrete time, George Gilder, Google Earth, Infrastructure as a Service, Internet Archive, Internet of things, invisible hand, knowledge economy, late capitalism, linked data, Masdar, means of production, Nate Silver, natural language processing, openstreetmap, pattern recognition, platform as a service, recommendation engine, RFID, semantic web, sentiment analysis, slashdot, smart cities, Smart Cities: Big Data, Civic Hackers, and the Quest for a New Utopia, smart grid, smart meter, software as a service, statistical model, supply-chain management, the scientific method, The Signal and the Noise by Nate Silver, transaction costs

Cloud computing takes two forms that often work cooperatively: utility clouds and data clouds (Farber et al. 2011). Utility clouds provide IT capabilities as locationindependent, on-demand services accessible via the Internet, including ‘infrastructure as a service’ (IaaS) such as storage, servers and networks, ‘platform as a service’ (PaaS) comprising an execution environment for the development of custom applications and databases, and ‘software as a service’ (SaaS) that enables users to access their applications and to process data remotely (Farber et al. 2011; Hancke et al. 2012). Data clouds enable massive volumes of data, that might be generated across an enterprise, to be linked, stored and processed remotely, drawing on the computational power of hundreds of machines, and analysed via utility services (Farber et al. 2011). Individuals and companies can thus utilise storage and computing capacity without the need to make large capital investments, as well as being able to avail themselves of such resources from anywhere there is network access (Bryant et al. 2008).

 

pages: 502 words: 107,657

Predictive Analytics: The Power to Predict Who Will Click, Buy, Lie, or Die by Eric Siegel

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Albert Einstein, algorithmic trading, Amazon Mechanical Turk, Apple's 1984 Super Bowl advert, backtesting, Black Swan, book scanning, bounce rate, business intelligence, business process, call centre, computer age, conceptual framework, correlation does not imply causation, crowdsourcing, dark matter, data is the new oil, en.wikipedia.org, Erik Brynjolfsson, experimental subject, Google Glasses, happiness index / gross national happiness, job satisfaction, Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, Machine translation of "The spirit is willing, but the flesh is weak." to Russian and back, Moneyball by Michael Lewis explains big data, Nate Silver, natural language processing, Netflix Prize, Network effects, Norbert Wiener, personalized medicine, placebo effect, prediction markets, Ray Kurzweil, recommendation engine, risk-adjusted returns, Ronald Coase, Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence, self-driving car, sentiment analysis, software as a service, speech recognition, statistical model, Steven Levy, text mining, the scientific method, The Signal and the Noise by Nate Silver, The Wisdom of Crowds, Turing test, Watson beat the top human players on Jeopardy!, X Prize, Yogi Berra

More and more, each move you make, online and offline, is recorded, including transactions conducted, websites visited, movies watched, links clicked, friends called, opinions posted, dental procedures endured, sports games won (if you’re a professional athlete), traffic cameras passed, flights taken, Wikipedia articles edited, and earthquakes experienced. Countless sensors deploy daily. Mobile devices, robots, and shipping containers record movement, interactions, inventory counts, and radiation levels. Personal health monitors watch your vital signs and exercise routine. The mass migration of online applications from your desktop up into the cloud (aka software as a service) makes even more of your computer use recordable by organizations. Free public data is also busting out, so a wealth of knowledge sits at your fingertips. Following the open data movement, often embracing a not-for-profit philosophy, many data sets are available online from fields like biodiversity, business, cartography, chemistry, genomics, and medicine. Look at one central index, www.kdnuggets.com/datasets, and you’ll see what amounts to lists of lists of data resources.

 

pages: 324 words: 93,175

The Upside of Irrationality: The Unexpected Benefits of Defying Logic at Work and at Home by Dan Ariely

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Burning Man, business process, cognitive dissonance, corporate governance, Daniel Kahneman / Amos Tversky, endowment effect, Exxon Valdez, first-price auction, Frederick Winslow Taylor, George Akerlof, happiness index / gross national happiness, Jean Tirole, job satisfaction, knowledge economy, knowledge worker, loss aversion, Peter Singer: altruism, placebo effect, Richard Thaler, Saturday Night Live, second-price auction, software as a service, The Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith, ultimatum game, Upton Sinclair, young professional

.* If we think about organizational culture as an important component of the Not-Invented-Here mentality, one way to track this tendency might be to look at the speed in which acronyms blossom inside companies, industries, and professions. (For example, ICRM stands for Innovative Customer Relationship Management; KPI for Key Performance Indicator; OPR for Other People’s Resources; QSC for Quality, Service, Cleanliness; GAAP for Generally Accepted Accounting Principles; SAAS for Software as a Service; TCO for Total Cost of Ownership; and so on). Acronyms confer a kind of secret insider knowledge; they give people a way to talk about an idea in shorthand. They increase the perceived importance of ideas, and at the same time they also help keep other ideas from entering the inner circle. Acronyms are not particularly harmful, but problems arise when companies become victims of their own mythologies and adopt a narrow internal focus.

 

pages: 298 words: 43,745

Understanding Sponsored Search: Core Elements of Keyword Advertising by Jim Jansen

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AltaVista, barriers to entry, Black Swan, bounce rate, business intelligence, butterfly effect, call centre, Claude Shannon: information theory, complexity theory, correlation does not imply causation, en.wikipedia.org, first-price auction, information retrieval, inventory management, life extension, linear programming, megacity, Nash equilibrium, Network effects, PageRank, place-making, price mechanism, psychological pricing, random walk, Schrödinger's Cat, sealed-bid auction, search engine result page, second-price auction, second-price sealed-bid, sentiment analysis, social web, software as a service, stochastic process, telemarketer, the market place, The Present Situation in Quantum Mechanics, the scientific method, The Wisdom of Crowds, Vickrey auction, yield management

SMEs: subject matter experts (see Chapter 6 BAM!). Social media: a category of sites that is based on user participation and user-generated content. They include social networking sites like LinkedIn or Facebook, social bookmarking sites like Del.icio.us, social news sites like Digg or Reddit, and other sites that are centered on user interaction (Source: Search Engine Watch) (see Chapter 10 future). Software as a service (SaaS): sometimes referred to as “software on demand,” it is software that is deployed over the Internet and/or is deployed to run behind a firewall on a local area network (LAN) or personal computer. With SaaS, a provider licenses an application to customers either as a service on-demand, through a subscription, on a “pay-as-you-go” basis, or (increasingly) at no charge. This approach to application delivery is part of the utility-computing model where all of the technology is in the “cloud” accessed over the Internet as a service (Source: Wikipedia).

 

pages: 598 words: 134,339

Data and Goliath: The Hidden Battles to Collect Your Data and Control Your World by Bruce Schneier

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23andMe, Airbnb, airport security, AltaVista, Anne Wojcicki, augmented reality, Benjamin Mako Hill, Black Swan, Brewster Kahle, Brian Krebs, call centre, Cass Sunstein, Chelsea Manning, citizen journalism, cloud computing, congestion charging, disintermediation, Edward Snowden, experimental subject, failed state, fault tolerance, Ferguson, Missouri, Filter Bubble, Firefox, friendly fire, Google Chrome, Google Glasses, hindsight bias, informal economy, Internet Archive, Internet of things, Jacob Appelbaum, Jaron Lanier, Julian Assange, Kevin Kelly, license plate recognition, linked data, Lyft, Mark Zuckerberg, Nash equilibrium, Nate Silver, national security letter, Network effects, Occupy movement, payday loans, pre–internet, price discrimination, profit motive, race to the bottom, RAND corporation, recommendation engine, RFID, self-driving car, Silicon Valley, Skype, smart cities, smart grid, Snapchat, social graph, software as a service, South China Sea, stealth mode startup, Steven Levy, Stuxnet, TaskRabbit, telemarketer, Tim Cook: Apple, transaction costs, Uber and Lyft, urban planning, WikiLeaks, zero day

You might expect users to respond by favoring secure services over insecure ones— after all, they’re making their own buying decisions on the basis of the same market model. But that’s not generally possible. In some cases, software monopolies limit the available product choice. In other cases, the “lock-in effect” created by proprietary file formats, existing infrastructure, compatibility requirements, or software-as-a-service makes it harder to switch. In many cases, we don’t know who is collecting our data; recall the discussion of hidden surveillance in Chapter 2. In all cases, it’s hard for buyers to assess the security of any data service. And it’s not just nontechnical buyers; even I can’t tell you whether or not to entrust your privacy to any particular service provider. Liabilities change this. By raising the cost of privacy breaches, we can make companies accept the costs of the externality and force them to expend more effort protecting the privacy of those whose data they have acquired.

 

pages: 565 words: 151,129

The Zero Marginal Cost Society: The Internet of Things, the Collaborative Commons, and the Eclipse of Capitalism by Jeremy Rifkin

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3D printing, additive manufacturing, Airbnb, autonomous vehicles, back-to-the-land, big-box store, bioinformatics, bitcoin, business process, Chris Urmson, clean water, cleantech, cloud computing, collaborative consumption, collaborative economy, Community Supported Agriculture, computer vision, crowdsourcing, demographic transition, distributed generation, en.wikipedia.org, Frederick Winslow Taylor, global supply chain, global village, Hacker Ethic, industrial robot, informal economy, intermodal, Internet of things, invisible hand, Isaac Newton, James Watt: steam engine, job automation, John Maynard Keynes: Economic Possibilities for our Grandchildren, John Maynard Keynes: technological unemployment, Julian Assange, Kickstarter, knowledge worker, labour mobility, Mahatma Gandhi, manufacturing employment, Mark Zuckerberg, market design, means of production, meta analysis, meta-analysis, natural language processing, new economy, New Urbanism, nuclear winter, Occupy movement, oil shale / tar sands, pattern recognition, peer-to-peer lending, personalized medicine, phenotype, planetary scale, price discrimination, profit motive, RAND corporation, randomized controlled trial, Ray Kurzweil, RFID, Richard Stallman, risk/return, Ronald Coase, search inside the book, self-driving car, shareholder value, sharing economy, Silicon Valley, Skype, smart cities, smart grid, smart meter, social web, software as a service, spectrum auction, Steve Jobs, Stewart Brand, the built environment, The Nature of the Firm, The Structural Transformation of the Public Sphere, The Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith, The Wisdom of Crowds, Thomas Kuhn: the structure of scientific revolutions, Thomas L Friedman, too big to fail, transaction costs, urban planning, Watson beat the top human players on Jeopardy!, web application, Whole Earth Catalog, Whole Earth Review, WikiLeaks, working poor, Zipcar

The best translators are artists who are able to live in two different cognitive personas simultaneously. I have long been a skeptic when it comes to the prospect of AI besting world-class translators. Still, recent advances in AI are bringing that day ever closer. Lionbridge is a company that provides real-time translation for online customer support, allowing consumers to speak across languages via instant translation of user-generated content. Its GeoFluent plug-in software-as-a-service solution, which uses Microsoft translation technology, provides translations between 39 languages. While not yet as proficient as the best translators, GeoFluent is good enough to break the language barrier and bring one-third of the human race already online together in the first truly shared global conversation in all of history, speeding the transition into a universal Commons and Collaborative Age.41 Within a decade or so, businesspeople, workers, and travelers will be equipped with mobile apps allowing them to effortlessly have conversations online or face to face with someone who speaks a different language.

 

pages: 310 words: 34,482

Makers at Work: Folks Reinventing the World One Object or Idea at a Time by Steven Osborn

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3D printing, A Pattern Language, additive manufacturing, air freight, Airbnb, augmented reality, autonomous vehicles, barriers to entry, Baxter: Rethink Robotics, c2.com, computer vision, crowdsourcing, dumpster diving, en.wikipedia.org, Firefox, future of work, Google Chrome, Google Glasses, Google Hangouts, Hacker Ethic, Internet of things, Iridium satellite, Khan Academy, Kickstarter, Mason jar, means of production, Minecraft, minimum viable product, Network effects, Oculus Rift, patent troll, popular electronics, Rodney Brooks, Shenzhen was a fishing village, side project, Silicon Valley, Skype, slashdot, social software, software as a service, special economic zone, speech recognition, subscription business, telerobotics, urban planning, web application, Y Combinator

I think once you actually have a working prototype, the way the economics of starting a hardware company or launching a hardware product, just now with Kickstarter, with all the clones of Kickstarter, is once you have a prototype, you can test your market really fast, which is amazing, because you don’t have to invest the tons of money that I’m sure Arduino invested before they launched their product, and then all the money they invested to get their product out there and get it known, and how many years that took. Now you can do it in thirty days. I think it’s important to not spend too much time building that first prototype, to not make it perfect, because the laws of business still apply: most things will fail. I actually had a Kickstarter project before the Digispark that failed. It fell flat. Nobody was interested in it. And it was a software project. It was a software as a service dashboarding application, intended to provide real-time metrics. And I thought it was such a great idea. I thought it would be a big hit, and it fell completely flat. With the Digispark, I thought maybe I could sell one hundred of them, and it took off. So I think you’ve got to build it and test it, and test the waters and not spend too much time on the details until you do that. Osborn: Great advice.

 

pages: 351 words: 123,876

Beautiful Testing: Leading Professionals Reveal How They Improve Software (Theory in Practice) by Adam Goucher, Tim Riley

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Albert Einstein, barriers to entry, Black Swan, call centre, continuous integration, Debian, en.wikipedia.org, Firefox, Grace Hopper, index card, Isaac Newton, natural language processing, p-value, performance metric, revision control, six sigma, software as a service, software patent, the scientific method, Therac-25, Valgrind, web application

I found that I could add 250 characters of text with no spaces and cause serious scrollbar and margin issues in the revision history page. After a quick huddle, we decided that a) you don’t see this issue using the largest words in the English dictionary, b) it should probably be fixed, but perhaps not today, and c) I would create a bug report. That tests the story once, but we release out to our Software-as-a-Service production server every two weeks, and a minor change to something else can easily ripple. If we retested every acceptance test on every browser every two weeks, the burden would eventually cripple the team. So we do some test automation using a framework we developed called wikitests. Wikitests‡ A wikitest is a keyword-driven test that drives the browser. With wikitests, each test is expressed as a series of commands in a table, one command per table row.

 

pages: 309 words: 114,984

The Digital Doctor: Hope, Hype, and Harm at the Dawn of Medicine’s Computer Age by Robert Wachter

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Affordable Care Act / Obamacare, AI winter, Airbnb, Atul Gawande, Captain Sullenberger Hudson, Checklist Manifesto, Clayton Christensen, collapse of Lehman Brothers, computer age, crowdsourcing, deskilling, en.wikipedia.org, Erik Brynjolfsson, everywhere but in the productivity statistics, Firefox, Frank Levy and Richard Murnane: The New Division of Labor, Google Glasses, Ignaz Semmelweis: hand washing, Internet of things, job satisfaction, Joseph Schumpeter, knowledge worker, medical malpractice, medical residency, Menlo Park, minimum viable product, natural language processing, Network effects, Nicholas Carr, obamacare, pattern recognition, personalized medicine, pets.com, Productivity paradox, Ralph Nader, RAND corporation, Second Machine Age, self-driving car, Silicon Valley, Silicon Valley startup, six sigma, Skype, Snapchat, software as a service, Steve Jobs, Steven Levy, the payments system, The Wisdom of Crowds, Toyota Production System, Uber for X, Watson beat the top human players on Jeopardy!, Yogi Berra

Every other American vertical market is migrating away from centralized, client-server, hub-and-spoke architecture toward distributed, SaaS-based applications and open architecture.” This is techno-speak for the difference between using a suite of the old Microsoft Office programs (all of which lived on physical servers in your company’s closets and required lots of training, legions of on-site IT staff, and insertion of new disks for program upgrades) to the modern cloud-based architecture (software as a service, or SaaS) of products like Gmail and Dropbox. After stints as a New Orleans EMT, an army medic, and a Booz Allen consultant (“I was a misfit as a consultant,” he said. “I couldn’t even spell well”), in 1997, Bush and Todd Park,35 a fellow consultant, launched a birthing center in San Diego (“we would be the Starbucks of obstetrics, a no-nonsense moneymaker that’s warm on the outside and knows the customers’ needs, tastes, and phobias,” he wrote in 2014).

 

pages: 496 words: 174,084

Masterminds of Programming: Conversations With the Creators of Major Programming Languages by Federico Biancuzzi, Shane Warden

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business intelligence, business process, cellular automata, cloud computing, complexity theory, conceptual framework, continuous integration, data acquisition, domain-specific language, Douglas Hofstadter, Fellow of the Royal Society, finite state, Firefox, follow your passion, Frank Gehry, general-purpose programming language, HyperCard, information retrieval, iterative process, John von Neumann, linear programming, loose coupling, Mars Rover, millennium bug, NP-complete, Paul Graham, performance metric, QWERTY keyboard, RAND corporation, randomized controlled trial, Renaissance Technologies, Silicon Valley, slashdot, software as a service, software patent, sorting algorithm, Steve Jobs, traveling salesman, Turing complete, type inference, Valgrind, Von Neumann architecture, web application

Robin Milner from ML wants to have lots of very tiny, very stupid machines working in parallel. Is that similar to your goal? Brad: It’s an interesting idea. I’ve spent a lot of time in military simulations and it’s very attractive for that kind of problem. There may be other applicable problems that I haven’t thought about. Quality As an Economic Phenomenon How can we improve the quality of software? Brad: One way is to keep software on servers, as we see in Software as a Service (SaaS). There may be hope for an economic answer there, although that approach also has obvious tradeoffs (privacy, security, performance, etc.). I spent a number of years working on the opposite approach, creating an economic system around components that run locally on the end user’s machine, but I have grown pessimistic about this approach because the discussion ends up in digital rights management fight and that could go on forever.

 

pages: 999 words: 194,942

Clojure Programming by Chas Emerick, Brian Carper, Christophe Grand

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Amazon Web Services, Benoit Mandelbrot, cloud computing, continuous integration, database schema, domain-specific language, en.wikipedia.org, failed state, finite state, Firefox, game design, general-purpose programming language, mandelbrot fractal, Paul Graham, platform as a service, premature optimization, random walk, Schrödinger's Cat, semantic web, software as a service, sorting algorithm, Turing complete, type inference, web application

[243] Pure functions are critical to the successful and effective application of functional programming, a cornerstone of designing idiomatic Clojure libraries and applications. Read about functional programming in Chapter 2, and pure functions specifically in Pure Functions. Build “Build” is an umbrella term that has come to encompass more and more of the things we do after we’ve written the code but before the code has been delivered (another loaded term, given the complications of software as a service, cloud computing, and so on). For our purposes here, we’ll consider build to mean: Compilation Dependency management, which allows you to systematically use external libraries Packaging the results of compilation and other project assets into artifacts Distribution of those artifacts within a dependency management context That overly formal description sounds more complicated than the activities it describes.

 

pages: 348 words: 39,850

Data Scientists at Work by Sebastian Gutierrez

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Albert Einstein, algorithmic trading, bioinformatics, bitcoin, business intelligence, chief data officer, clean water, cloud computing, computer vision, continuous integration, correlation does not imply causation, crowdsourcing, data is the new oil, DevOps, domain-specific language, follow your passion, full text search, informal economy, information retrieval, Infrastructure as a Service, inventory management, iterative process, linked data, Mark Zuckerberg, microbiome, Moneyball by Michael Lewis explains big data, move fast and break things, natural language processing, Network effects, nuclear winter, optical character recognition, pattern recognition, Paul Graham, personalized medicine, Peter Thiel, pre–internet, quantitative hedge fund, quantitative trading / quantitative finance, recommendation engine, Renaissance Technologies, Richard Feynman, Richard Feynman, self-driving car, side project, Silicon Valley, Skype, software as a service, speech recognition, statistical model, Steve Jobs, stochastic process, technology bubble, text mining, the scientific method, web application

., 139 UMSI, 148 Wall Street, 131 Wilson, Fred (investors), 141 Electrical engineering and computer science (EECS), 295 Embedding, 52 F www.it-ebooks.info Index G Galene, 87 Global Bay Mobile Technologies, 131 Google, 89, 91, 311 LeCun,Yann, 58 Lenaghan, Jonathan, 185, 197 Smallwood, Caitlin, 27 Tunkelang, Daniel, 89, 91 Grameen Foundation, 319 H Hadoop Distributed File System (HDFS), 195 Hadoop software, 103 Heineike, Amy advice to fresher, 254 Cambridge University, 239 career, 240 Crawford, Kate (researcher), 250 Cukier, Kenneth (big data editor), 250 data exploration, 251 data science colleagues, 257 data visualization, 239, 245 Director of Mathematics, 239, 241 economic consultancy work, 246 engineering team, 242 first data set, 247 government agencies, 239 The Guardian, 249 hedge funds, 239 hiring people, 255 machine learning, 239, 245 math and programming interest, 246 natural language processing, 239 network diagram, 251 network science, 239, 245 new data streams, 244 news sources, 244 next challenges, 249 NLP, 245 optimize user experience, 255 Ormerod, Paul (director), 247 own success measurement, 252 Quid’s product, 242 research and strategy analysis, 248 Rosewell, Bridget (director), 248 scaling up, 244 Software-as-a-Service platform, 242 software development toolkit, 249 spreadsheet/PowerPoint slide, 245 Strata conference, 250 study and analyze, 252 tools/techniques, 256 Twitter feed/posts, 249, 253 typical day, 251 users, 253 Volterra Consulting, 247 Hu,Victor advanced machine learning, 272 advice to fresher, 269 artist evolution, 267 Billboard 200, 266 book division, 264 Chief Data Scientist, (Next Big Sound), 259 college life, 260 cross-sectional analyses, 271 D3.js visualizations, 268 DataKind Data Dive, 269 data management track, 262 data team structure, 265 effective data visualization, 262 effective writing, 262 first project, 264 forecasting album sales, 263 hiring data scientists, 268 impactful feedback, 270 Java and PHP, 268 machine learning techniques, 262, 264 modeling process, 268 new skills, 262 NLP projects, 270 nonwork data sets, 270 personal believe, 272 PrestoDB, 268 product team and customer team, 266 record label deal, 264 R/Python, 268 skill acquisition, 261 social and music industry data, 263 social media, 263 SoundCloud, 263 theoretical techniques, 266 traditional industries, 260 Twitter profile, 265 two-week project cycles, 265 Yankees experience, 261 www.it-ebooks.info 337 338 Index I new BRAIN initiative, 295 nontechnical advice, 317 other people’s work expedition, 309 Palantir, 300–301 Peter Norvig philosophy, 311 Peter Thiel’s group, 294 Peter Thiel’s venture capital firm, 293 as PhD student, 303 PhD theses, 300 predictive analytics, 311 Prior Knowledge (PK), 294, 302 “Probability Theory: The Logic of Science”, 316 problem solving, 308 Python, 306 quantitative and computational science, 316 research scientist, 293 Salesforce, 302 science tool companies, 301 Sebastian Seung’s group, 296 as startup CEO, 303 study and analyze, 295, 297, 305 TechCrunch Disrupt, 294 VC money, 307 IA Ventures, 131 Institute for Data Sciences and Engineering (IDSE), 1 International Conference on Learning Representation (ICLR), 51 Invite Media, 131, 137 J Jonas, Eric advice to fresher, 313 Bayesian models, 306 Bayesian nonparametric models, 315 Bayesian statistical community, 294 Berkeley’s AMPLab, 312 biological systems, 299 Brown, Scott (CEO of Vicarious and Bob Mcgrew), 300 C++, 306 Chief Predictive Scientist, 293 C++ numerical methods, 317 computational neuroscience, 298, 311 COSYNE conference, 296, 303 DARPA, 307 data sets, 312 dating spread sheet, 310 EECS and BCS sciences, 297 experiences, 300 Founders Fund, 294 funding agencies, 298 Grande Data problems, 312 Hadoop, 307 Harvard Business Review, 311 hiring people, 314 as independent researcher, 304 Kording, Konrad (scientist), 296 LASSO-based linear regression system, 316 Levie, Aaron (Box CEO), 295 machine learning models, 293 Markov chain Monte Carlo, 315 Matplotlib, 309 Nature Reviews Genetics, 300 Nature Reviews Neuroscience, 300 Navia Systems, 293 neuroscience research, 294 neuroscience tools, 301 K Karpištšenko, André ADCP, 223 advice to starter, 235 atmosphere capturing data, 221 Brute-force analytics, 231 career, 222 challenges, 234 climate changes, 226 co-founder and research lead (Planet OS), 221 co-founder (ASA Quality Services), 221 communication patterns, 225 Cornell and Rutgers (partners), 227 create models, 237 creating and writing software, 237 daily operation decisions, 222 data mining methods, 225 data privacy and trust, 223 data science, future of, 234 engineering and calibration tools, 225 engineering, data, and technology side, 222 www.it-ebooks.info Index European environmental agency, 224 FuturICT program, 224 Gephi, 231 Greenplum, 231 hiring, 232 insurance companies, 227 investment decisions, 222 IPCC reports, 237 Kaggle data science community, 228 machine learning methods, 225 model-driven development, 224 music generation algorithms, 237 NASA, 227 National Data Buoy Center profilers, 223 NOAA, 227 ocean infrastructure, 223 oceanography, 222 OPeNDAP data exchange protocol, 228 past year project, 233 people’s work, expectation, 234 personal operational things, 229 physical world, 226 problem solving, 230 public transport ticketing system, 224 Python, 231 R, 231 Sharemind, 236 shipping, oil, and gas industries, 226 success and measure success, 229 team building, 232 team members, 223 Vowpal Wabbit, 232 Weka, 232 Keyhole Markup Language (KML), 166 Knight Foundation, 319 L LASSO-based linear regression system, 316 LeCun,Yann academic scientific disciplines, 63 AI research materials, 50 artificial neural networks with back-propagation, 45 check-reading/check-recognition system, 52 content analysis and understanding users, 57 convolutional net, 53 CVPR 2014 conference papers, 57 daily work, 54 data sets, 50 deep learning, 45, 47, 52 Director of AI Research, Facebook, 45–46 DjVu system, 54 educational courses, 64 EMNLP 2014 papers, 57 experimental work, 60 first data set, 49 future of data science, 62 grad school, 48 graduation,VLSI integrated circuit design and automatic control, 48 graphical models, 51 Hinton,Geoff, 48 hiring research scientists and exceptional engineers, 65 ICML conference, 51 Image Processing Research Department head, AT&T Bell Labs, 45–46 image recognition, 57 industry impacts deployed things, 55 intellectual impact, 54 research projects, 55 initial understanding of data science, 65 innovative and creative work, 60 inspired work, 59 interest in AI, 48 kernel methods, 51 language translation, 64 long-term goal, understanding intelligence, 47 machine learning, 51–52 mathematical virtuosity, 60 Memory Networks, 57 multi-layer neural nets learning, 48 natural language, 52, 57 NEC Research Institute, 45 opportunities for data science, 65 opportunity at Facebook, 46 organizing research lab, 55 radar techniques, 51 www.it-ebooks.info 339 340 Index LeCun,Yann (cont.) robotics, Google, 58 Sejnowski, Terry, 48 shorter-term goal, understanding content, 47 Silver Professor of Computer Science, New York University, 45–46 solving right problem, 58 supervised and unsupervised learning, 46 support vector machines, 51 team members, 46 tools Lush project, 56 Torch 7, 56 undergrad, electrical engineering, 47 unsupervised learning, 61 Lenaghan, Jonathan career, 179, 182 engineering practices, 198 financial vs. ad tech industry, 184 Google, 197 high-frequency algorithmic trading, 183 mathematical consistency, 183 overfitting models, 183 packages and libraries, 196 Physical Review in Brookhaven, 183 PlaceIQ academic literature, 185 academic research, 185 ad-request logs, 181 ad-supported apps, 189 Air Traveler audience, 192 algorithmic trading, 180 Amazon’s S3 service, 194 ambient background location app, 184 architecture and long-term planning, 186 augmented intelligence service, 190 building models, 186 campaigns, 186 C++ and Perl, 190 Clojure projects, 195 data science team, 186 data scientist, 180 data sets, 180 data volume, 183 demographic results, 193 device IDs, 194 discussions with account managers, 187 domain, 190 explosive growth, 186 final output and functionality, 187 financial services, 180 geography, 185 geospatial layer, 182 geospatial location analytics, 181 geospatial visualization, 191 Google, 185 high-QPS and low-latency environment, 196 human behavior, 185 identifier, 194 ingest, transformation, and contextualization, 182 initial prototype, 188 interview process, 195 Julia, 195 location targeting, 192 matplotlib, 191 meetup, 180 mobile ads and location intelligence, 179 munging data, 191 ontology/taxonomy, 192 potential APIs, 190 problem solving, 187, 194 product/troubleshooting meetings, 187 prototype code, 188 prototype performs, 188 Python, 190 qualitative terms, 182 query language, 192–193 real-time processing and computation affects, 196 residential/nonresidential classifiers, 193 scaling test, 188 self-critical, 195 smartphones, 189 social anthropology, 189 spatial dimension testing, 188 temporal data, 191 tile level, 192 www.it-ebooks.info Index time periods, 180 urgency, 184 quantitative fields, 197 quantitative finance industry, 183 quantum chromodynamics, 182 relational queries, 196 software engineering skills, 198 Starbucks, 197 statistical analyses, 196 tech ad space, 181 testing, 198 LinkedIn, 34, 83 Lua programming language, 56 M Magnetic, 131 MailChimp.com, 108 Mandrill, 111–112 Media6Degrees, 151 Moneyball, 260 N National Data Buoy Center profilers, 223 National Security Agency, 107 Natural language, 52, 57 Natural Language Processing (NLP), 245 Netflix Culture, 20 Network operations Center (NOC), 120 The New York Times (NYT), 1 Neural net version 1.0, 48 Neural net winter, 48 Next Big Sound, 259 O O’Reilly Strata, 95 P, Q PANDA, 57 Perlich, Claudia AAAI, 162 advertising exchanges, 154 algorithm sorts list, 167 appreciation, 168 artificial neural networks, 152 Bayesian theory, 172 career, 151 challenges, 158 chief scientist (Dstillery), 151 communication, 171 Dstillery’s history and focus, 153 engineering team, 167 first data set, 158 fraud problem, 160 Hadoop cluster, 165 hire data scientists, 173 IBM’s Watson Research Center, 152 insight translate, 158 interview, 172 Journal of Advertising Research and American Marketing Association, 161 Kaggle website, 177 KML, 166 learning lessons, 166–167 long-tailed distributions, 170 machine learning techniques, 177 managerial responsibilities, 154 marksmanship, 167 matchmaking, 169 medical field, 175–176 Melinda approach, 172 Nielsen reports, 172 nonwork data puzzles, 157 NoSQL, 165 NYU Stern Business School, 152 PhD program, 152 photo-sharing URL, 154 present and future, data science, 174 prototype building tasks, 164 Provost, Foster (PhD advisor), 153 puzzles, 156 responsibilities, 155 routine tasks, 163 single-numbered aggregates, 170 statistical measures, 170 SVMlight, 165 teach data mining, 151 team members, 154 typical day, 161 www.it-ebooks.info 341 342 Index Perlich, Claudia (cont.) typical intellectual leadership day, 162 typical modeling and analysis day, 162 Personally identifiable information (PII), 181 Porway, Jake academia/government labs, 331 Amnesty International, 323–324 artificial intelligence, 325 career, 319 communication/translation challenges, 322 computer vision course, 325 data science, future of, 330 ethical responsibility, 331 founder and executive director (DataKind), 319 global chapter network, 323 Grameen Foundation’s Community Knowledge Program, 327 “The Human Face of Big Data”, 326 hunger alleviation experts, 321 Kenyan village, 322 Kirkpatrick, Robert (UN Global Pulse), 332 “The Macroscope”, 329 measure success, 330 Netflix, 325 New York Times, 324 OkCupid, 332 personal philosophies, 332 PhD program, 326 playbook, 322 problem solving, 325 pro bono service, 324 Rees, Kim, 329 Stanford Social Innovation Review, 327 statistical background, 331 statistics department, 326 team and organization, 320 Thorp, Jer, 329 typical workday, 327 volunteer, 325 volunteer data scientists, 322 Predictive Analytics Innovation Summit Chicago 2013 conference, 262 Prior Knowledge (PK), 293 R Radinsky, Kira computer science bioinformatics, 280 causality graph, 282 causes and effects, 283 cholera outbreaks, 284 computer games, 280 earthquakes, 282–283 Google Trends, 281 history patterns, 283 iPad, 283 Mayan calendar, 281 Microsoft research, 284–285 oxygen depletion, 281–282 Russian language, 280 storylines, 283 Technion External Studies program, 281 workshops, 285 data scientists hiring data science skills, 288 data stack, 289–290 government-backed research data sets, 290 medical data sets, 290 personal philosophy, 289 problem domain, 288 problem perception, 288 self-building algorithms, 290 smartphones, 290 team building, 288 toolkits and techniques, 288 data structures, 291 genetic hardware, 291 learning resources, 291 problem solving data science, and big data, 286 engineers, 286 lectures, 286 passion, 292 SalesPredict artificial intelligence, 285 buyer persona, 279 cloud-based solution, 275 customer based challenges, 276 customer’s perception, 279 www.it-ebooks.info Index customer’s website data, 276 data distributors, 279 data-specific challenges, 277 decision making, 274 engineering task, 287 engineering team, 275 global data changes, 280 hiring people, 287–288 HR department, tackling, 274 issues, 278 Java and Scala, 286 money spending, 274 MySQL and NoSQL, 286 ontology, 280 performance, 278 pilot customer, 274 problem solving, 287 salesperson, 278 sales process, 277 senior engineer, 279 statistical model, 277 web crawlers, 276 S Shellman, Erin advice to data scientists, 81 advice to undergrads, 70 beauty replenishment project, 77 beauty stylists, 73 company-wide open-door policy, 72 Confluence, 79 cost-benefit conversation, 78 data lab structure, 68 develop ideas, 76 experiment, 73 fashion retail industry, 74 freeing data scientists, 80 HauteLook and Trunk Club, 74 internal customers, 72 kanban board, 75 Lancôme and M•A•C, 78 machine learning class, 81 measuring success, 75 NIH internship, 70 other companies, 73 pair programing, 68 people relationship, 72 predictive modeling, 80 presentation skills, 80 programming and computer science, 70 quantitative and computational skills, 71 recommendations, 71 recommendation strategy, 78 Recommendo, 71, 75 Recommendo API, 77 R programmer, 69 Segmento, 71 SKU turnover, 77 STEM subject, 81 under graduation, 69 Wickham’s, Hadley work, 79 work area, 68 SIGIR conferences, 95 Skype, 221–222, 225, 230–231 Smallwood, Caitlin A/B test, 37 algorithm, 23, 42 Amazon, 34 analytics meeting, 28 analytics pre-Internet, 20 appreciation change, 36 basic data, 42 brainstorming meeting, 27 business priorities, 32 camaraderie, 35 collaborative environment, 42 company strategies, 21 content acquiring model, 29 custom model implementation, 31 data capture, 32 data-centric organizations, 20 data culture, 21 egoless attitude, 40 experience, 39, 42 experimentation, 23, 28, 30 experimentation-heavy culture, 28 Gomez-Uribe, Carlos (colleague), 34 Google search, 27 health care data sharing, 39 HiQ Labs, 34 hunger and insatiable curiosity, 36 Hunt, Neil (manager), 20 incredibly creative and innovative, 43 interesting insights, 35 internet data products, 19 internet entertainment, 24 www.it-ebooks.info 343 344 Index Smallwood, Caitlin (cont.)

 

pages: 669 words: 210,153

Tools of Titans: The Tactics, Routines, and Habits of Billionaires, Icons, and World-Class Performers by Timothy Ferriss

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Airbnb, artificial general intelligence, asset allocation, Atul Gawande, augmented reality, back-to-the-land, Bernie Madoff, Bertrand Russell: In Praise of Idleness, Black Swan, blue-collar work, Buckminster Fuller, business process, Cal Newport, call centre, Checklist Manifesto, cognitive bias, cognitive dissonance, Colonization of Mars, Columbine, correlation does not imply causation, David Brooks, David Graeber, diversification, diversified portfolio, Donald Trump, effective altruism, Elon Musk, fault tolerance, fear of failure, Firefox, follow your passion, future of work, Google X / Alphabet X, Howard Zinn, Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall, Jeff Bezos, job satisfaction, Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, Kevin Kelly, Kickstarter, Lao Tzu, life extension, Mahatma Gandhi, Mark Zuckerberg, Mason jar, Menlo Park, Mikhail Gorbachev, Nicholas Carr, optical character recognition, PageRank, passive income, pattern recognition, Paul Graham, Peter H. Diamandis: Planetary Resources, Peter Singer: altruism, Peter Thiel, phenotype, post scarcity, premature optimization, QWERTY keyboard, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Ray Kurzweil, recommendation engine, rent-seeking, Richard Feynman, Richard Feynman, risk tolerance, Ronald Reagan, sharing economy, side project, Silicon Valley, skunkworks, Skype, Snapchat, social graph, software as a service, software is eating the world, stem cell, Stephen Hawking, Steve Jobs, Stewart Brand, superintelligent machines, Tesla Model S, The Wisdom of Crowds, Thomas L Friedman, Wall-E, Washington Consensus, Whole Earth Catalog, Y Combinator

“That you should prioritize growing your social following (Instagram, FB, Twitter, Snapchat, YouTube). Grow things that you can fully control that directly affect sales, like your email list. ‘Likes’ don’t pay the bills. Sales do.” ✸ Who are three people or sources you’ve learned from—or followed closely—in the last year? Andrew Chen (Growth team at Uber), Tomasz Tunguz (venture capitalist and software as a service [SaaS] expert), Jonathan Siegel (chairman of Earth Class Mail) For Hiring Well—“Who?” Is Often More Important Than “What?” “The Who book [by Geoff Smart, Randy Street] is a condensed version of Topgrading, and I learned of it at Mint, where the founder was using it.” TF: I now recommend this book to all of my startup founders, who have, in turn, recommended it to others. The Classics for Copywriting Noah is known for his copywriting skills, and he recommends two resources: The Gary Halbert Letter (also The Boron Letters) and Ogilvy on Advertising

 

pages: 898 words: 266,274

The Irrational Bundle by Dan Ariely

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accounting loophole / creative accounting, air freight, Albert Einstein, banking crisis, Bernie Madoff, Black Swan, Broken windows theory, Burning Man, business process, cashless society, Cass Sunstein, clean water, cognitive dissonance, computer vision, corporate governance, credit crunch, Credit Default Swap, Daniel Kahneman / Amos Tversky, delayed gratification, Donald Trump, endowment effect, Exxon Valdez, first-price auction, Frederick Winslow Taylor, fudge factor, George Akerlof, Gordon Gekko, greed is good, happiness index / gross national happiness, Jean Tirole, job satisfaction, knowledge economy, knowledge worker, lake wobegon effect, late fees, loss aversion, Murray Gell-Mann, new economy, Peter Singer: altruism, placebo effect, price anchoring, Richard Feynman, Richard Feynman, Richard Thaler, Saturday Night Live, Schrödinger's Cat, second-price auction, shareholder value, Silicon Valley, Skype, software as a service, Steve Jobs, The Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith, The Wisdom of Crowds, ultimatum game, Upton Sinclair, Walter Mischel, young professional

.* If we think about organizational culture as an important component of the Not-Invented-Here mentality, one way to track this tendency might be to look at the speed in which acronyms blossom inside companies, industries, and professions. (For example, ICRM stands for Innovative Customer Relationship Management; KPI for Key Performance Indicator; OPR for Other People’s Resources; QSC for Quality, Service, Cleanliness; GAAP for Generally Accepted Accounting Principles; SAAS for Software as a Service; TCO for Total Cost of Ownership; and so on). Acronyms confer a kind of secret insider knowledge; they give people a way to talk about an idea in shorthand. They increase the perceived importance of ideas, and at the same time they also help keep other ideas from entering the inner circle. Acronyms are not particularly harmful, but problems arise when companies become victims of their own mythologies and adopt a narrow internal focus.