white picket fence

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pages: 359 words: 115,701

Educated by Tara Westover

Affordable Care Act / Obamacare, hiring and firing, Mason jar, obamacare, Rosa Parks, white picket fence, Y2K

This would, she believed, shield her daughters from the social contempt that had so wounded her. One result of this was the white picket fence and the closet of handmade clothes. Another was that her eldest daughter married a severe young man with jet-black hair and an appetite for unconventionality. That is to say, my mother responded willfully to the respectability heaped upon her. Grandma wanted to give her daughter the gift she herself had never had, the gift of coming from a good family. But Faye didn’t want it. My mother was not a social revolutionary—even at the peak of her rebellion she preserved her Mormon faith, with its devotion to marriage and motherhood—but the social upheavals of the 1970s did seem to have at least one effect on her: she didn’t want the white picket fence and gabardine dresses. My mother told me dozens of stories of her childhood, of Grandma fretting about her oldest daughter’s social standing, about whether her piqué dress was the proper cut, or her velvet slacks the correct shade of blue.

” * While everyone agrees that there were many years in which my parents did not have a phone, there is considerable disagreement in the family about which years they were. I’ve asked my brothers, aunts, uncles and cousins, but I have not been able to definitively establish a timeline, and have therefore relied on my own memories. My mother, Faye, was a mailman’s daughter. She grew up in town, in a yellow house with a white picket fence lined with purple irises. Her mother was a seamstress, the best in the valley some said, so as a young woman Faye wore beautiful clothes, all perfectly tailored, from velvet jackets and polyester trousers to woolen pantsuits and gabardine dresses. She attended church and participated in school and community activities. Her life had an air of intense order, normalcy, and unassailable respectability.

The dress was perfect for an orphan, and I was relieved at how easy finding the costumes had been, until I remembered that in act two Annie wears beautiful dresses, which Daddy Warbucks buys for her. I didn’t have anything like that. I told Mother and her face sank. We drove a hundred miles round-trip, searching every secondhand shop along the way, but found nothing. Sitting in the parking lot of the last shop, Mother pursed her lips, then said, “There’s one more place we can try.” We drove to my aunt Angie’s and parked in front of the white picket fence she shared with Grandma. Mother knocked, then stood back from the door and smoothed her hair. Angie looked surprised to see us—Mother rarely visited her sister—but she smiled warmly and invited us in. Her front room reminded me of fancy hotel lobbies from the movies, there was so much silk and lace. Mother and I sat on a pleated sofa of pale pink while Mother explained why we’d come. Angie said her daughter had a few dresses that might do.


pages: 349 words: 109,304

American Kingpin: The Epic Hunt for the Criminal Mastermind Behind the Silk Road by Nick Bilton

bitcoin, blockchain, crack epidemic, Edward Snowden, mandatory minimum, Marc Andreessen, Mark Zuckerberg, Ross Ulbricht, Rubik’s Cube, Satoshi Nakamoto, side project, Silicon Valley, Skype, South of Market, San Francisco, Steve Jobs, Ted Kaczynski, the market place, trade route, Travis Kalanick, white picket fence, WikiLeaks

After the bubble had popped a few years earlier, companies that had been built on a wing and a prayer had siphoned people’s retirements into thin air and collapsed, leaving San Francisco a metaphorical no-fly zone. What about going east? Wasn’t there opportunity on Wall Street for someone as clever as Ross? No way. The banks were collapsing from the housing market crash. And he certainly couldn’t settle down and live happily ever after with his girlfriend; his dream of marriage and a white picket fence had been bulldozed by several other men. That left graduate school, or jumping off a cliff. He imagined reality TV fame and a pile of money as a slight detour on the way to some larger accomplishment. Ross was sure he had a grander purpose in life, though he wasn’t sure exactly what it would be. Maybe one day he’d figure out what that purpose was. Just not today. As the daylight faded and the Amazing Race shoot came to an end, Ross and his sister stood in front of the camera along the streets of Austin.

He was helping people, keeping them safe from the streets, where drug deals could get one thrown in jail or, worse, hurt or killed. Didn’t Julia see that? Didn’t she want to be a part of it? As if they were repeatedly reading from the same script, a verbal brawl would ensue, and then one of them would storm out of the apartment or into another room. A few hours later, love would magnetically draw them back together. They would make up and fall asleep in each other’s arms, Julia dreaming of a white picket fence and a couple of giggling children running around in the yard, Ross’s reveries of the Silk Road growing so large that one day he would overturn the drug laws and be lauded for the positive impact he had had on society. The next morning the pugnacious lovers would start all over again. The site had also started to affect other areas of their relationship. Julia wanted to go out dancing or be taken to a nice restaurant with all the money he was now making from his commissions.

Soon afterward a Spanish woman stopped by Julia’s studio to pick up some books, then explained why she was really there. “Jesus told me I need to pray for you.” Julia wept. Her life goals were not that far-fetched. Julia hadn’t wanted to change the world; she had just wanted her world to be changed. Was it so difficult to find a good man to marry, who would give her a child or two, a white picket fence, and, most important, see that those children grew up differently from how she had? There was a dream in her mind where that good man was Ross Ulbricht, and it ended with them both living happily ever after. Sadly, that fairy tale had never materialized. After the Spanish woman who knew Jesus arrived at her studio, the kind lady invited Julia to church. Later that morning Julia sat at the back of the congregation and heard angels in her ears.


pages: 166 words: 52,755

Dignity: Seeking Respect in Back Row America by Chris Arnade

affirmative action, big-box store, clean water, Donald Trump, white flight, white picket fence, working poor

If I spent a day driving around getting someone into detox, I would find them in Hunts Point the next day, having run away or been kicked out. If I showed up to collect someone to make sure they appeared for court, I often ended up hearing nothing but excuses, if I could find them at all. After two years of this, nobody close to me got out or succeeded. Nobody got clean or sober or ended up in a “little home with a white picket fence.” The only way anyone seemed to leave the streets was being sentenced to an upstate prison, or thrown in Rikers, or mandated to rehab, or killed. * * * • • • In the middle of 2015, I stopped going regularly to Hunts Point. I was drinking too much. While I could understand my friends’ drug use as forged from trauma, mine was simply about selfishness. I could no longer be around easily available drugs and daily dramas that made my mistakes seem minor; the contrast unmoored me.

That those gains were mostly in places we lived didn’t hurt either. Jobs are not the only thing that Portsmouth has lost over the last few decades. Those jobs were the backbone of the community. People could walk straight from their graduation onto the factory floor and build a life around it. They would get a chunk of money every two weeks, get health care and pensions, which gave them the stability to get the home with the white picket fence and build a family. Without stable jobs to build a family around, Portsmouth began to fall apart. This happened in other back row towns, too. Whole communities started to fall apart, leaving a void in the center of town. It was the other losses, the ones that followed the job losses—the crumbling town centers, the broken families, the isolation, the pain, the desperation, the drugs, the humiliation and anger—that we in the front row didn’t fully see or understand.

He didn’t treat her right, beat her badly, and started cheating on her. Over the following years she kept falling in love and kept being disappointed. All of her boyfriends did drugs, and all, like her, were homeless. They all also pimped her and some beat her, but that didn’t stop her; she kept hoping and dreaming that eventually one would work out. Beauty wanted nothing more than to be in love. She wanted her version of the white picket fence, the only version she really knew, the only version that she felt was available to her. “Heavy and I are tight. He used to be just my friend, and now it’s all intimate and he wants to get married. That shit is tempting. I mean, he got disability. I don’t know if I should marry Heavy. I mean, he has been good to me. He gave me my own cell phone, he took me to Coney Island; none of my men ever took me to Coney Island.


pages: 83 words: 16,943

The Frugal Life: How a Family Can Live Under $30,000 and Thrive by Kate Singh

"side hustle", dumpster diving, white picket fence

It is a frugal home but you wouldn't know it. It's a beautiful spring day in April as I sit in my overstuffed, red leather recliner (hand-me-down) by the window. I see our lovely yellow roses and the last of the camellias in hot pink and rich reds. Our house is a 1941 stucco cottage painted in vibrant blue (almost too vibrant but the lush gardens surrounding it make it just right). I have my roses and white picket fence in the front yard and a huge kitchen garden in the backyard along with fruit and nut trees. The inside of the home is charming and has been described as shabby chic. In every room you will find lush house plants, colorful rugs, overstuffed furniture, and paintings that take you far away to farmlands and villas. If you wander into my kitchen you'll smell homemade bread baking. You will observe plenty of organic produce along with a fully stocked pantry and shelves.


pages: 58 words: 18,747

The Rent Is Too Damn High: What to Do About It, and Why It Matters More Than You Think by Matthew Yglesias

Edward Glaeser, falling living standards, Home mortgage interest deduction, income inequality, industrial robot, Jane Jacobs, land reform, mortgage tax deduction, New Urbanism, pets.com, rent control, rent-seeking, Robert Gordon, Robert Shiller, Robert Shiller, Saturday Night Live, Silicon Valley, statistical model, transcontinental railway, urban sprawl, white picket fence

Increasing the density of places where land is very expensive means other places will likely become somewhat less dense. America is, on the whole, a very spacious country, and there will and should always be plenty of room for suburban homes and large lots. Viewed correctly, curbing America’s policies of forced suburbanization is not anti-suburb or contrary to the interests of people with a strong preference for detached houses and white picket fences. Research from Jonathan Levine of the University of Michigan and Lawrence Frank of the University of British Columbia indicates that the American population is split evenly between people with a firm preference for walkable urbanism, people with a firm preference for the suburban lifestyle, and people with mixed feelings. But as Christopher Leinberger, a real estate consultant and Brookings Institution fellow, points out, right now, “In most metropolitan areas, only 5 to 10 percent of the housing stock is located in walkable urban places.”


Ugly Americans: The True Story of the Ivy League Cowboys Who Raided the Asian Markets for Millions by Ben Mezrich

index arbitrage, index card, invisible hand, Nick Leeson, profit motive, short selling, white picket fence

But the rules were designed for an outdated Eastern financial system, and we were playing by modern Western principles.” In a way, the juxtaposition made Malcolm seem even more like a robber baron. I reminded myself that he had gone to Japan with nothing and fought his way to the top. His tale was rags to riches, a young man’s search for the American dream. Except somewhere along the way, Malcolm’s American dream had shifted from a white picket fence to a multimillion-dollar portfolio and a glass mansion on the shores of Bermuda. 41 85 29 4161 52 513⁄16 515⁄8- 1⁄16 6624 3 3 Thirty Thousand Feet, September 1992 I t was a dangerous combination. Twenty college football players at thirty thousand feet, with free access to seemingly unlimited quantities of alcohol. Thirteen hours of dead time as the Continental wide-bodied 747 arced over the Arctic Circle, with almost no adult supervision, as the coaches had somehow, fittingly, ended up in coach.

But if Carney had started where Malcolm started, wasn’t it possible that Malcolm could reach similar heights? Was this dream out of reach, or was it different from football, possible, attainable? “You know what they say,” he said, his nervousness replaced by a new ambition, a feeling almost akin to euphoria. “To the vampires go Ugly Americans | 99 the spoils. I like your version of the American dream much better than the white picket fence and the two-car garage.” Carney finished his champagne and began to fill another. “I don’t know about the fence,” he responded, “but did you notice the two Ferraris in the garage downstairs?” Malcolm nodded. Carney grinned at him, raising his glass. “They’re both mine.” 41 85 29 4161 52 513⁄16 5 ⁄8- ⁄16 6624 3 10 Osaka M alcolm’s high school coach used to call it the Flash: the moment when rational thought ended and instinct took over, when the body reacted the way it was born to react.


pages: 320 words: 96,006

The End of Men: And the Rise of Women by Hanna Rosin

affirmative action, call centre, cognitive dissonance, David Brooks, delayed gratification, edge city, facts on the ground, financial independence, hiring and firing, housing crisis, income inequality, informal economy, job satisfaction, low skilled workers, manufacturing employment, meta analysis, meta-analysis, new economy, New Urbanism, Norman Mailer, Northern Rock, post-work, postindustrial economy, purchasing power parity, Results Only Work Environment, Silicon Valley, social intelligence, Stanford prison experiment, Steven Pinker, union organizing, upwardly mobile, white picket fence, women in the workforce, young professional

That week’s lesson, from a workbook called Quenching the Father Thirst, was supposed to involve writing a letter to a hypothetical estranged fourteen-year-old daughter named Crystal, whose father had left when she was a baby. But El-Scari had his own idea about how to get through to this barely awake, skeptical crew, and letters to Crystal had nothing to do with it. Like some of them, he explained, he grew up watching Bill Cosby living behind his metaphorical “white picket fence”—one man, one woman, and a bunch of happy kids. “Well, that check bounced a long time ago,” he says. “Let’s see,” he continues, reading from a worksheet. What are the four kinds of paternal authority? Moral, emotional, social, and physical. “But you ain’t none of those in that house. All you are is a paycheck, and now you ain’t even that. And if you try to exercise your authority, she’ll call 911.

Over the years, researchers have proposed different theories to explain the erosion of marriage in the lower classes: the rise of welfare, the disappearance of work for men, or in the eyes of conservative critics such as Charles Murray, plain old moral decay. But Edin thinks the most compelling theory is that marriage has disappeared because women are now more economically independent and thus able to set the terms for marriage—and usually they set them too high for the men around them to reach. “I want that white-picket-fence dream,” one woman told Edin, and the men she knew just didn’t measure up, so she had become her own one-woman mother/father/nurturer/provider. Or as Edin’s cowriter, the sociologist Maria Kefalas, puts it, “everyone watches Oprah”—or whatever the current Oprah equivalent is. “Everyone wants a big wedding, a soul mate, a best friend.” But among the men they know, they can’t find one. Some small proof for this theory that women don’t marry because they’re on top can be found in a recent study of Florida Lottery winners, called “Lucky in Life, Unlucky in Love?


pages: 112 words: 30,160

The Gated City (Kindle Single) by Ryan Avent

big-box store, carbon footprint, deindustrialization, edge city, Edward Glaeser, income inequality, industrial cluster, labor-force participation, low skilled workers, manufacturing employment, offshore financial centre, profit maximization, rent-seeking, Silicon Valley, Thorstein Veblen, transit-oriented development, Tyler Cowen: Great Stagnation, Veblen good, white picket fence, zero-sum game

We recognize that to stay strong and competitive, businesses must change, sometimes dramatically. A certain fluidity and flexibility is necessary to keep the economy humming, to defend it against stasis and decline. We would prefer to keep ourselves and our homes safely apart from the messiness of the market. Business is a dynamic, volatile arena, we think, but neighborhoods can and should remain a quiet world apart. As much as we’d like to erect an impermeable white picket fence between our tranquil residential streets and the hum of the economy, we can’t. Our neighborhoods are our economy; they’re the people who live in our cities and make them work. When we try too hard to plan out every detail of a city, to control density and limit change, we’re also micromanaging and constraining the workings of the market. We will pay for that in growth, in jobs, and in wages.


pages: 443 words: 123,526

Glasshouse by Charles Stross

cognitive dissonance, experimental subject, gravity well, lateral thinking, loose coupling, peer-to-peer, phenotype, prisoner's dilemma, sensible shoes, theory of mind, white picket fence

Or even worse, he might get dragged in. But he's not around, and I manage to get into the garage and pick up my cordless hammer drill, a bunch of spare bits, and some other handy gadgets I laid aside against a rainy day. I go back to the taxi, and I'm still tightening the belt to hang everything off when it moves away. We cruise up a residential street, low houses set back from the road behind white picket fences, separated by trees. It's hot outside, loud with the background creaking of arthropods. We drive into a tunnel entrance. I take a deep breath. "New orders. Stop right here and wait sixty seconds. Then drive through the tunnel and keep going. Keep your radio turned off. At each road intersection, pick a direction at random and keep driving. Do not stop, other than to avoid obstructions. Accept one thousand units of credit.

Appearances count if you're trying to up your score, and other people pay attention to that kind of thing. And I don't expect Janis would be organizing anything like this if it wasn't important. It's a wonderful day, the sky a deep blue and a warm breeze blowing. Janis is right about one thing—I don't remember ever seeing this neighborhood before. The taxi cruises between rows of clapboard fronted houses with white picket fences and mercilessly laundered grass aprons in front of them, then hangs a left around a taller brick building and drives along a tree-lined downhill boulevard with oddly shaped buildings to either side. There are other taxis about, and people! We drive past a couple out for a stroll along the sidewalk. I thought Sam and I were the only folks who did that. Who am I missing? The taxi stops just before a cul-de-sac where a semicircle of awnings shield white tables and outdoor furniture from the sky.


Northern California Travel Guide by Lonely Planet

Airbnb, Apple II, Asilomar, back-to-the-land, Bay Area Rapid Transit, big-box store, Burning Man, buy and hold, California gold rush, call centre, car-free, carbon footprint, clean water, dark matter, Donald Trump, Donner party, East Village, El Camino Real, Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test, Frank Gehry, friendly fire, glass ceiling, Golden Gate Park, Google bus, Haight Ashbury, haute couture, haute cuisine, housing crisis, Joan Didion, Kickstarter, Loma Prieta earthquake, Lyft, Mahatma Gandhi, Mark Zuckerberg, Mason jar, McMansion, means of production, Port of Oakland, ride hailing / ride sharing, Ronald Reagan, Silicon Valley, Silicon Valley startup, South of Market, San Francisco, stealth mode startup, stem cell, Steve Jobs, Steve Wozniak, Stewart Brand, the built environment, trade route, transcontinental railway, uber lyft, Upton Sinclair, urban sprawl, white picket fence, Whole Earth Catalog, women in the workforce, working poor, Works Progress Administration, young professional

Buster’s Southern BBQBARBECUE$ ( MAP GOOGLE MAP ; %707-942-5605; www.busterssouthernbbq.com; 1207 Foothill Blvd; dishes $8-12; h10am-8pm Mon-Sat, to 7pm Sun; c) The sheriff dines at this indoor-outdoor barbecue joint, which serves smoky ribs, chicken, tri-tip steak and burgers, plus beer and wine. It closes early at dinnertime. oCalistoga KitchenCALIFORNIAN$$$ ( MAP GOOGLE MAP ; %707-942-6500; www.calistogakitchen.com; 1107 Cedar St; mains lunch $12-18, dinner $20-36; h5:30pm-close Thu, 11:30am-3pm & 5:30pm-close Fri & Sat, 9:30am-3pm Sun) A sparsely decorated cottage surrounded by a white picket fence, Calistoga Kitchen is especially good for lunch in the garden. The chef-owner favors simplicity, focusing on quality ingredients in a half-dozen changing dishes, such as a delicious braised rabbit. Reservations advised, especially for the patio. SolbarCALIFORNIAN$$$ ( MAP GOOGLE MAP ; %707-226-0860; www.solage.aubergeresorts.com; 755 Silverado Trail N, Calistoga; lounge menu dishes $4-16, dinner mains $26-38; h7am-11:30am, 11:45am-3pm & 5:30-9pm, to 9:30pm Fri & Sat)S We like the Spartan ag-chic look of this Michelin-starred resort restaurant, the menu of which writing maximizes seasonal produce in elegant dishes, playfully composed.

Sonoma Valley is a 90-minute drive from San Francisco. 8Getting Around Sonoma Hwy/Hwy 12 is lined with wineries and runs from Sonoma to Santa Rosa, then to western Sonoma County; Arnold Dr has less traffic (but few wineries) and runs parallel up the valley’s western side to Glen Ellen. Plan at least five hours to visit the valley from bottom to top. Glen Ellen & Kenwood Sleepy Glen Ellen is a snapshot of old Sonoma, with white picket fences and tiny cottages beside a poplar-lined creek. When downtown Sonoma is jammed, you can wander quiet Glen Ellen and feel far away. It’s ideal for a leg-stretching stopover between wineries or a romantic overnight – the nighttime sky blazes with stars. Glen Ellen's biggest daytime attractions are Jack London State Historic Park and Benziger winery. 1Sights & Activites Jack London State Historic ParkPARK ( MAP GOOGLE MAP ; %707-938-5216; www.jacklondonpark.com; 2400 London Ranch Rd, Glen Ellen; per car $10, cottage adult/child $4/2; h9:30am-5pm; pc)S Napa has Robert Louis Stevenson, but Sonoma has Jack London.

Nine environmental campsites (tent sites $25) lie just a 1¼-mile hike up Fern Canyon; there’s untreated creek water. For sea-cave kayaking tours contact Kayak Mendocino ( GOOGLE MAP ; %707-937-0700; www.kayakmendocino.com; Van Damme Beach State Park, 8001 N Hwy 1, Little River; adult/child $60/40; htours 9am, 11:30am & 2pm). Mendocino Leading out to a gorgeous headland, Mendocino is the North Coast’s salt-washed perfect village, with B&Bs surrounded by rose gardens, white-picket fences and New England–style redwood water towers. Bay Area weekenders walk along the headland among berry bramble and wildflowers, where cypress trees stand over dizzying cliffs. The town itself is full of cute shops – no chains – and has earned the nickname ‘Spendocino,’ for its upscale goods. Built by transplanted New Englanders in the 1850s, Mendocino thrived late into the 19th century, with ships transporting redwood timber from here to San Francisco.


Magical Urbanism: Latinos Reinvent the US City by Mike Davis

affirmative action, Berlin Wall, business cycle, clean water, collective bargaining, deindustrialization, desegregation, edge city, illegal immigration, immigration reform, Internet Archive, invisible hand, job automation, longitudinal study, manufacturing employment, market bubble, mass immigration, new economy, occupational segregation, postnationalism / post nation state, Ronald Reagan, Silicon Valley, strikebreaker, union organizing, upwardly mobile, urban renewal, War on Poverty, white flight, white picket fence, women in the workforce, working poor

aesthetic on purely audio-visual wars have become commonplace as Latino carnivality collides with the psychosexual anxieties of Truman Show white palette of residential culture. Thus the glorious sorbet Mexican and Caribbean house paint - mexicano, azul anil, morado - is perceived as sheer visual terrorism by non-Hispanic homeowners who believe that rectly tels verde limon, rosa their equity di- depends upon a neighborhood color order of subdued pas- and white picket fences. Even upwardly mobile Chicanes have joined in the backlash against "un-American" hues, as in the L.A. suburb of South Gate where the City Council recently weighed an ordinance against tropical house colors, or in San Antonio where writer Sandra Cisneros has long outraged her deeply expressive purple home. And the city fathers same Puritan with spirit that once sent the police to quell all-night "hoolies" in Irish kitch- ens now calls familiares.


pages: 523 words: 129,580

Eternity by Greg Bear

index card, life extension, white flight, white picket fence

Flat grassland surrounded the fenced-in plot, and around and through the grassland a narrow runoff creek curled protectively, its low washing whisper steady above the cool dry wind. The wind made the blades of grass hiss and shiver. Snow-ribboned mountains shawled in gray cloud glowered over the plain. The sun was an hour above the Two Thumb Range to the east, its light bright but not warm. Despite the wind, Garry Lanier was sweating. He helped shoulder the coffin through the leaning white picket fence to the new-dug grave, marked by a casually lumpy mound of black earth, his face a mask to hide the effort and the sharp twinges of pain. Six friends served as pallbearers. The coffin was only a finely shaped and precisely planed pine box, but Lawrence Heineman had weighed a good ninety kilos whc. he died. The widow, Lenore Carrolson, followed two steps behind, face lifted, puzzled eyes staring at something just above the end of the coffin.

“We leave in the morning to visit Oregon, then fly on to Melbourne and back home, New Zealand … Christchurch. We haven’t much time.” From the front porch, they saw the sun decline in splendor beyond the palms and beach, setting the slopes of Barber’s Point aflame with a gentler fire than that area and its Naval Air Station had known during the Death. A Japanese graveyard lay just west of the senator’s property, behind fresh-painted white picket fencing; Suli Ram Kikura stood there now, Karen beside her, examining the carved lava pagoda-shaped headstones and crosses. “There’s something the old Axis City lacked,” Lanier said. “What’s that?” “Graveyards.” “Far too many here,” Kanazawa said quickly. “Many things must be different up there~we have such close ties, and yet, I sometimes think, so little understanding of each other. I wish I were not so afraid of space travel.


pages: 458 words: 134,028

Microtrends: The Small Forces Behind Tomorrow's Big Changes by Mark Penn, E. Kinney Zalesne

addicted to oil, affirmative action, Albert Einstein, Ayatollah Khomeini, Berlin Wall, big-box store, call centre, corporate governance, David Brooks, Donald Trump, extreme commuting, Exxon Valdez, feminist movement, glass ceiling, God and Mammon, Gordon Gekko, haute couture, hygiene hypothesis, illegal immigration, immigration reform, index card, Isaac Newton, job satisfaction, labor-force participation, late fees, life extension, low cost airline, low skilled workers, mobile money, new economy, RAND corporation, Renaissance Technologies, Ronald Reagan, Rosa Parks, Rubik’s Cube, stem cell, Stephen Hawking, Steve Jobs, Superbowl ad, the payments system, Thomas L Friedman, upwardly mobile, uranium enrichment, urban renewal, War on Poverty, white picket fence, women in the workforce, Y2K

According to Valerie Gibson, sex columnist for the Toronto Sun and author of Cougar: A Guide for Older Women Dating Younger Men, the term started in Vancouver, British Columbia, as a put-down for older women who would go to bars and go home at the end of the night with whoever was left. But in recent years, it’s become more positive—signifying an older, single woman who knows what she wants, has the money and confidence to acquire it, and isn’t constrained by desires for babies and a white picket fence. And so now there are at least a half-dozen Web sites devoted to Cougar dating, complete with mugs and T-shirts. Oprah explored “Older Women in Love with Younger Men” in 2003. On the wildly popular Sex and the City, 40-something Samantha Jones dated “boy toy” Smith Jerrod longer than anyone else in the show’s six seasons. In 2005, Fran Drescher, star of the 1990s TV hit The Nanny, launched a new comedy called Living with Fran, a show about a mother of two who falls in love with a man half her age—apparently based on her real-life experience.

But that day in America is not coming soon. Fifty-one percent of Americans still consider homosexuality “morally wrong,” and nearly 60 percent oppose gay marriage. Many Americans (36 percent) think gays should be less accepted, not accepted the same or more. And so as long as homosexuals are second-class in America, a good number of people with gay feelings will shelve those feelings in favor of a heterosexual wedding, a white picket fence, and biological kids. But if, years later, the feelings recur, or arise in whole new ways, there will be Late-Breaking News about their sexual orientation—and a reorientation for everybody else. Dutiful Sons Male Caregivers in America By now, we know well that Americans are living much longer—a person born today can expect to live well past 70, compared to the life expectancy of 47 if you were born in 1900.


pages: 504 words: 129,087

The Ones We've Been Waiting For: How a New Generation of Leaders Will Transform America by Charlotte Alter

"side hustle", 4chan, affirmative action, Affordable Care Act / Obamacare, basic income, Berlin Wall, Bernie Sanders, carbon footprint, clean water, collective bargaining, Columbine, corporate personhood, correlation does not imply causation, Credit Default Swap, crowdsourcing, David Brooks, Donald Trump, double helix, East Village, ending welfare as we know it, Fall of the Berlin Wall, feminist movement, Ferguson, Missouri, financial deregulation, Francis Fukuyama: the end of history, gig economy, glass ceiling, Google Hangouts, housing crisis, illegal immigration, immigration reform, income inequality, Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), job-hopping, Kevin Kelly, knowledge economy, Lyft, mandatory minimum, Marc Andreessen, Mark Zuckerberg, mass incarceration, McMansion, medical bankruptcy, move fast and break things, move fast and break things, Nate Silver, obamacare, Occupy movement, passive income, pre–internet, race to the bottom, RAND corporation, Ronald Reagan, sexual politics, Silicon Valley, single-payer health, Snapchat, TaskRabbit, too big to fail, Uber and Lyft, uber lyft, universal basic income, unpaid internship, We are the 99%, white picket fence, working poor, Works Progress Administration

Because they were marrying later, having fewer kids, and trying to reduce their carbon footprint, millennials wanted to live someplace dense and walkable, with public transportation: boomers’ exurban McMansions held little appeal for them. Once he was elected, Frey eliminated single-family exclusive zoning in Minneapolis, allowing more duplexes and triplexes to be built as part of a $40 million affordable housing plan for the city. “This is not the American dream of the 1950s, where the whole goal was that white picket fence out in the suburbs with a forty-five-minute commute to work,” Frey told me. Millennials “want to sleep at home, but they want to live in a great city and experience diversity and activity around them. That’s a big change.” * * * Since Keith Lamont Scott’s death in 2016, Braxton Winston had decided that if he really wanted anything to change in the police department, he would have to run for office himself.

” * * * Leah Greenberg and Ezra Levin had been married almost two years and had already written all the thank-you notes for wedding gifts they were ever going to write. They had spent the days before the election persuading about fifteen friends to go from DC to Philadelphia to knock on doors for Clinton, and on election night they had their friends over to watch the returns on a big projector in their living room. They lived in a small cream-colored row house in Columbia Heights, with a white picket fence and a Black Lives Matter sign in the window. Leah had kept an extra “I Voted” sticker as a memento of the time she voted for the first woman president. The screen was projected onto the wall near the framed front page of The Washington Post from the day the Affordable Care Act was passed, which also happened to be the day Leah and Ezra started dating. They had flirted for months as young Congressional staffers—Leah worked for Rep.


pages: 152 words: 49,529

The 5 Love Languages: The Secret to Love That Lasts by Gary Chapman

white picket fence

When you are given public honor for an accomplishment, be sure to share the credit with your spouse. You may also try your hand at writing words of affirmation. Written words have the benefit of being read over and over again. I learned an important lesson about words of affirmation and love languages in Little Rock, Arkansas. My visit with Bill and Betty Jo was on a beautiful spring day. They lived in a cluster home with white picket fence, green grass, and spring flowers in full bloom. It was idyllic. Once inside, however, I discovered that the idealism ended. Their marriage was in shambles. Twelve years and two children after the wedding day, they wondered why they had married in the first place. They seemed to disagree on everything. The only thing they really agreed on was that they both loved the children. As the story unraveled, my observation was that Bill was a workaholic who had little time left over for Betty Jo.


pages: 142 words: 47,993

The Partly Cloudy Patriot by Sarah Vowell

Columbine, cuban missile crisis, financial independence, Ralph Nader, Rosa Parks, Saturday Night Live, slashdot, stem cell, Upton Sinclair, white picket fence

And I pine for that, that single name, especially now that my sister and I live so far apart. I miss the way I was never Sarah and my sister was never Amy, but we were together AmyandSarah. Unlike the identicals, who act as photocopies of each other, we’re fraternal. Which means that we’re not doubles so much as halves. We’re split down the middle. I’m a single careerist with a walk-up apartment in New York City; she’s a married, dog-owning mother in Montana with a, swear to God, white picket fence. People love that about us, love that I can’t sew on a button but she makes quilts. That’s why people respond to the Luther and Johnny picture. They adore the contrast between the pretty, girlish Johnny and the hyena-faced Luther. Meet Joan of Arc and her brother Genghis Khan. Will Luther and Johnny’s memories meld? Up until around the age of ten, my sister and I often cannot remember who was doing what and who was watching, who got thrown from what horse, who got spanked for what trespass, who committed the trespass that led to the spanking.


pages: 177 words: 56,657

Be Obsessed or Be Average by Grant Cardone

Albert Einstein, Elon Musk, fear of failure, job-hopping, Mark Zuckerberg, Silicon Valley, Snapchat, Steve Jobs, telemarketer, white picket fence

No matter what’s going on in the outside world, with the media, with politics, your obsession will have to continue to fuel you long after the disappointments, and even long after the successes are yours. Day after day, week after week, quarter after quarter, year after year your obsessions can continue to fuel you. Use this book to undo the average thinking of those you live with, those you work with, and even your customers. Because after seriously resolving to be obsessed and clarifying your obsession, it is vital you get those around you to support you. Your partner might want the white picket fence, the golden retriever, and you home at 5:00 p.m. to watch weekend television marathons, and may talk constantly about simply being happy. Getting your partner on the road to obsession is tough. It requires a plan and a sit-down talk with this person. This may be the biggest challenge of being obsessed, and you must prepare for the sale of your life. Obsession isn’t just a mental game, either; it’s a total game involving the physical, spiritual, emotional, familial, and financial.


Coastal California by Lonely Planet

1960s counterculture, airport security, Albert Einstein, Asilomar, back-to-the-land, Bay Area Rapid Transit, Berlin Wall, buy and hold, California gold rush, call centre, car-free, carbon footprint, centre right, Chuck Templeton: OpenTable:, Donner party, East Village, El Camino Real, Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test, Frank Gehry, global village, Golden Gate Park, Haight Ashbury, haute cuisine, illegal immigration, Joan Didion, Khyber Pass, Kickstarter, Loma Prieta earthquake, low cost airline, Mason jar, McMansion, Ronald Reagan, Silicon Valley, South of Market, San Francisco, stealth mode startup, Steve Wozniak, trade route, transcontinental railway, Upton Sinclair, urban sprawl, white picket fence, women in the workforce, working poor, Works Progress Administration, young professional, Zipcar

Information Sonoma Post Office ( 800-275-8777; www.usps.com; 617 Broadway; Mon-Fri) Sonoma Valley Hospital ( 707-935-5000; 347 Andrieux St) Sonoma Valley Visitors Bureau ( 707-996-1090; www.sonomavalley.com; 453 1st St E; 9am-6pm Jul-Sep, to 5pm Oct-Jun) Arranges accommodations; has a good walking-tour pamphlet and information on events. There’s another location at Cornerstone Gardens ( Click here ). Glen Ellen & Around Sleepy Glen Ellen is a snapshot of old Sonoma, with white picket fences, tiny cottages and 19th-century brick buildings beside a poplar-lined creek. When downtown Sonoma is jammed, you can wander quiet Glen Ellen and feel far away. It’s ideal for a leg-stretching stopover between wineries or a romantic overnight – the nighttime sky blazes with stars. Arnold Dr is the main drag and the valley’s back-way route. Kenwood is just north, along Hwy 12, but has no town center like Glen Ellen’s.

They both have hot showers: one is just off Hwy 1, the other is in a highland meadow, which has lots of space for kids to run around. Nine environmental campsites (tent sites $25) lie just a 1¼-mile hike up Fern Canyon; there’s untreated creek water. For sea-cave kayaking tours ($50), contact Lost Coast Kayaking ( 707-937-2434; www.lostcoastkayaking.com). Mendocino Leading out to a gorgeous headland, Mendocino is the North Coast’s salt-washed gem, with B&Bs surrounded by rose gardens, white-picket fences and New England–style redwood water towers. Bay Area weekenders walk along the headland among berry bramble and wildflowers, where cypress trees stand over dizzying cliffs. Nature’s power is evident everywhere, from driftwood-littered fields and cave tunnels to the raging surf. The town itself is full of cute shops – no chains – and has earned the nickname ‘Spendocino,’ for its upscale goods.

Sea View Inn B&B $$ ( 831-624-8778; www.seaviewinncarmel.com; Camino Real btwn 11th & 12th Aves; r incl breakfast $135-265; ) At the Sea View – an intimate retreat away from downtown’s hustle – fireside nooks are tailor-made for reading or taking afternoon tea. The cheapest rooms with slanted ceilings are short on cat-swinging space, but the beach is nearby. Carmel River Inn INN $$$ ( 831-624-1575, 800-966-6490; www.carmelriverinn.com; 26600 Oliver Rd; d $159-319; ) Tucked off Hwy 1, this peaceful garden retreat south of Carmel’s mission rents white-picket-fenced honeymooner and family cottages, many with fireplaces and kitchenettes, and simple country-style rooms. Pet fee $20. Carmel Village Inn MOTEL $$ ( 831-624-3864, 800-346-3864; www.carmelvillageinn.com; cnr Ocean & Junípero Aves; d incl breakfast buffet $80-250; ) With cheerful flowers decorating its exterior, this centrally located motel across from Devendorf Park has pleasant rooms, some with gas fireplaces, and nightly quiet hours.


Coastal California Travel Guide by Lonely Planet

1960s counterculture, Airbnb, airport security, Albert Einstein, anti-communist, Apple II, Asilomar, back-to-the-land, Bay Area Rapid Transit, Burning Man, buy and hold, California gold rush, call centre, car-free, carbon footprint, Donner party, East Village, El Camino Real, Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test, flex fuel, Frank Gehry, glass ceiling, Golden Gate Park, Haight Ashbury, haute couture, haute cuisine, income inequality, intermodal, Joan Didion, Kickstarter, Loma Prieta earthquake, low cost airline, Lyft, Mason jar, New Journalism, ride hailing / ride sharing, Ronald Reagan, Rosa Parks, Saturday Night Live, Silicon Valley, Silicon Valley startup, South of Market, San Francisco, starchitect, stealth mode startup, stem cell, Steve Jobs, Steve Wozniak, Stewart Brand, trade route, transcontinental railway, uber lyft, Upton Sinclair, upwardly mobile, urban sprawl, Wall-E, white picket fence, Whole Earth Catalog, women in the workforce, working poor, Works Progress Administration, young professional, Zipcar

Buster’s Southern BBQBARBECUE$ ( MAP GOOGLE MAP ; %707-942-5605; www.busterssouthernbbq.com; 1207 Foothill Blvd; dishes $8-12; h10am-8pm Mon-Sat, to 7pm Sun; c) The sheriff dines at this indoor-outdoor barbecue joint, which serves smoky ribs, chicken, tri-tip steak and burgers, plus beer and wine. It closes early at dinnertime. oCalistoga KitchenCALIFORNIAN$$$ ( MAP GOOGLE MAP ; %707-942-6500; www.calistogakitchen.com; 1107 Cedar St; mains lunch $12-18, dinner $20-36; h5:30pm-close Thu, 11:30am-3pm & 5:30pm-close Fri & Sat, 9:30am-3pm Sun) A sparsely decorated cottage surrounded by a white picket fence, Calistoga Kitchen is especially good for lunch in the garden. The chef-owner favors simplicity, focusing on quality ingredients in a half-dozen changing dishes, such as a delicious braised rabbit. Reservations advised, especially for the patio. SolbarCALIFORNIAN$$$ ( MAP GOOGLE MAP ; %707-226-0860; www.solage.aubergeresorts.com; 755 Silverado Trail N, Calistoga; lounge menu dishes $4-16, dinner mains $26-38; h7am-11:30am, 11:45am-3pm & 5:30-9pm, to 9:30pm Fri & Sat)S We like the Spartan ag-chic look of this Michelin-starred resort restaurant, the menu of which writing maximizes seasonal produce in elegant dishes, playfully composed.

Sonoma Valley is a 90-minute drive from San Francisco. 8Getting Around Sonoma Hwy/Hwy 12 is lined with wineries and runs from Sonoma to Santa Rosa, then to western Sonoma County; Arnold Dr has less traffic (but few wineries) and runs parallel up the valley’s western side to Glen Ellen. Plan at least five hours to visit the valley from bottom to top. Glen Ellen & Kenwood Sleepy Glen Ellen is a snapshot of old Sonoma, with white picket fences and tiny cottages beside a poplar-lined creek. When downtown Sonoma is jammed, you can wander quiet Glen Ellen and feel far away. It’s ideal for a leg-stretching stopover between wineries or a romantic overnight – the nighttime sky blazes with stars. Glen Ellen's biggest daytime attractions are Jack London State Historic Park and Benziger winery. 1Sights & Activites Jack London State Historic ParkPARK ( MAP GOOGLE MAP ; %707-938-5216; www.jacklondonpark.com; 2400 London Ranch Rd, Glen Ellen; per car $10, cottage adult/child $4/2; h9:30am-5pm; pc)S Napa has Robert Louis Stevenson, but Sonoma has Jack London.

Nine environmental campsites (tent sites $25) lie just a 1¼-mile hike up Fern Canyon; there’s untreated creek water. For sea-cave kayaking tours contact Kayak Mendocino ( GOOGLE MAP ; %707-937-0700; www.kayakmendocino.com; Van Damme Beach State Park, 8001 N Hwy 1, Little River; adult/child $60/40; htours 9am, 11:30am & 2pm). Mendocino Leading out to a gorgeous headland, Mendocino is the North Coast’s salt-washed perfect village, with B&Bs surrounded by rose gardens, white-picket fences and New England–style redwood water towers. Bay Area weekenders walk along the headland among berry bramble and wildflowers, where cypress trees stand over dizzying cliffs. The town itself is full of cute shops – no chains – and has earned the nickname ‘Spendocino,’ for its upscale goods. Built by transplanted New Englanders in the 1850s, Mendocino thrived late into the 19th century, with ships transporting redwood timber from here to San Francisco.


pages: 288 words: 64,771

The Captured Economy: How the Powerful Enrich Themselves, Slow Down Growth, and Increase Inequality by Brink Lindsey

"Robert Solow", Airbnb, Asian financial crisis, bank run, barriers to entry, Bernie Sanders, Build a better mousetrap, Capital in the Twenty-First Century by Thomas Piketty, Carmen Reinhart, Cass Sunstein, collective bargaining, creative destruction, Credit Default Swap, crony capitalism, Daniel Kahneman / Amos Tversky, David Brooks, diversified portfolio, Donald Trump, Edward Glaeser, endogenous growth, experimental economics, experimental subject, facts on the ground, financial innovation, financial intermediation, financial repression, hiring and firing, Home mortgage interest deduction, housing crisis, income inequality, informal economy, information asymmetry, intangible asset, inventory management, invisible hand, Jones Act, Joseph Schumpeter, Kenneth Rogoff, Kevin Kelly, knowledge worker, labor-force participation, Long Term Capital Management, low skilled workers, Lyft, Mark Zuckerberg, market fundamentalism, mass immigration, mass incarceration, medical malpractice, Menlo Park, moral hazard, mortgage debt, Network effects, patent troll, plutocrats, Plutocrats, principal–agent problem, regulatory arbitrage, rent control, rent-seeking, ride hailing / ride sharing, Robert Metcalfe, Ronald Reagan, Silicon Valley, Silicon Valley ideology, smart cities, software patent, too big to fail, total factor productivity, trade liberalization, transaction costs, tulip mania, Uber and Lyft, uber lyft, Washington Consensus, white picket fence, winner-take-all economy, women in the workforce

These elements of cultural capture help explain why financiers can be pilloried by the broad public while still holding powerful sway over the mindset of those tasked with regulating them. Meanwhile, subsidies for mortgage finance as well as increasingly restrictive land-use regulations benefit from the overwhelmingly positive image of home ownership. Home ownership is associated with family life, roots in the community, and the sturdy bourgeois virtues. Indeed, there is no image more readily associated with the “American dream” than a house with a white picket fence. Any policies that plausibly promise to extend more broadly the blessings of home ownership will thus benefit from enormously powerful emotional associations with love of family and love of country. In some cases, the power of affluent rent-seekers resides in the fact that their resources allow them to hire lobbyists with networks on both left and right to project different images to the two parties in our polarized system.


pages: 208 words: 69,863

Assassination Vacation by Sarah Vowell

airport security, Bob Geldof, City Beautiful movement, desegregation, Frank Gehry, gun show loophole, Ralph Nader, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Ronald Reagan, Upton Sinclair, white picket fence

Back then, the ritzy neighborhood was called Elberon. Garfield’s cottage, along with Grant’s, has long since disappeared. But the homes that are here are more gracious and livable than the melancholy slabs up the beach. The marker about Garfield’s death is clearly an afterthought, a little tombstone next to a hedge on the side of a garage. It’s possible to see what Garfield saw from his window. You just have to look past a white picket fence. Across the way, Joan Schnorbus from the Long Branch Historical Association is waiting for us in front of St. James Chapel, where Garfield and the six other vacationing presidents went to church. For that reason, it is known as the Church of the Presidents. It was deconsecrated in 1953 and turned into a historical museum. It’s currently closed for renovations, though “renovations” seems too cosmetic a word for what’s going on here.


pages: 217 words: 69,892

My Year of Rest and Relaxation: A Novel by Ottessa Moshfegh

East Village, illegal immigration, index card, out of africa, Pepto Bismol, rent control, white picket fence

“You can take a nap in my room,” she said. “It should be quiet down there. My relatives are over, but they won’t think you’re being rude or anything. We don’t have to be at the funeral home until two.” We passed a high school, a library, a strip mall. Why anyone would want to live in a place like that was beyond me. Farmingdale State College, a Costco, five cemeteries in a row, a golf course, block after block of white picket fences with perfectly snowblown driveways and walkways. It made sense that Reva had come from a place as lame as this. It explained why she slaved away to fit in and make a home for herself in New York City. Her father, she’d told me, was an accountant. Her mother had been a secretary at a Jewish day school. Reva was, like me, an only child. “This is it,” she said as we pulled into the driveway of a tan-colored brick house.


pages: 270 words: 71,659

The Right Side of History by Ben Shapiro

Bernie Sanders, Donald Trump, Filter Bubble, illegal immigration, income inequality, Internet Archive, Isaac Newton, Johannes Kepler, labor-force participation, longitudinal study, means of production, Peace of Westphalia, Ronald Reagan, Steven Pinker, the scientific method, The Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith, Thomas L Friedman, white picket fence, women in the workforce

Furthermore, America was hardly a cultural desert. The attempt to paint the American dream as an American nightmare had common currency on the American Left; Sinclair Lewis’s Babbitt (1922) painted a businessman as an unfulfilled dreamer, coining the term Babbitt as an insult for everyday Americans. But in the aftermath of World War II, the American dream was still very much alive. And that dream was never merely a white picket fence, a dog, and two kids out in suburbia. It was a dream of cultural enrichment and common purpose. As Fred Siegel reports, between 1940 and 1955, local symphony orchestras increased 250 percent; in 1955, thirty-five million people paid to attend symphonies as opposed to fifteen million paying to attend baseball games. Even early television became part of the cultural education of the public: NBC presented a three-hour production of Laurence Olivier’s Richard III; as of 1951, there were twenty-five thousand members of the Great Books discussion groups, with “50,000 Americans a year . . . buying collections of the writings of Plato, Aristotle, the Founding Fathers, and Hegel” at serious cost to themselves.6 But the American Left could not accept that a capitalistic America could produce a more cultured America—and a more tolerant America.


pages: 603 words: 182,781

Aerotropolis by John D. Kasarda, Greg Lindsay

3D printing, air freight, airline deregulation, airport security, Akira Okazaki, Asian financial crisis, back-to-the-land, barriers to entry, Berlin Wall, big-box store, blood diamonds, borderless world, Boris Johnson, British Empire, business cycle, call centre, carbon footprint, Cesare Marchetti: Marchetti’s constant, Charles Lindbergh, Clayton Christensen, cleantech, cognitive dissonance, commoditize, conceptual framework, credit crunch, David Brooks, David Ricardo: comparative advantage, Deng Xiaoping, deskilling, digital map, disruptive innovation, edge city, Edward Glaeser, failed state, food miles, Ford paid five dollars a day, Frank Gehry, fudge factor, full employment, future of work, Geoffrey West, Santa Fe Institute, George Gilder, global supply chain, global village, gravity well, Haber-Bosch Process, Hernando de Soto, hive mind, if you build it, they will come, illegal immigration, inflight wifi, intangible asset, interchangeable parts, Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), intermodal, invention of the telephone, inventory management, invisible hand, Jane Jacobs, Jeff Bezos, Joan Didion, Kangaroo Route, Kickstarter, knowledge worker, kremlinology, low cost airline, Marchetti’s constant, Marshall McLuhan, Masdar, mass immigration, McMansion, megacity, Menlo Park, microcredit, Network effects, New Economic Geography, new economy, New Urbanism, oil shale / tar sands, oil shock, peak oil, Pearl River Delta, Peter Calthorpe, Peter Thiel, pets.com, pink-collar, pre–internet, RFID, Richard Florida, Ronald Coase, Ronald Reagan, Rubik’s Cube, savings glut, Seaside, Florida, Shenzhen was a fishing village, Silicon Valley, Silicon Valley startup, Skype, smart cities, smart grid, South China Sea, South Sea Bubble, sovereign wealth fund, special economic zone, spice trade, spinning jenny, starchitect, stem cell, Steve Jobs, supply-chain management, sustainable-tourism, telepresence, the built environment, The Chicago School, The Death and Life of Great American Cities, The Nature of the Firm, thinkpad, Thomas L Friedman, Thomas Malthus, Tony Hsieh, trade route, transcontinental railway, transit-oriented development, traveling salesman, trickle-down economics, upwardly mobile, urban planning, urban renewal, urban sprawl, walkable city, white flight, white picket fence, Yogi Berra, zero-sum game

Burt, Linda, and Co. quickly agreed to terms, and the airport closed on 287 acres of farmland ten miles to the southeast that it had already been eyeing. This became the core of what is today called Heritage Creek, the aerotropolis’s first purpose-built suburb. The setting is bucolic. We wended our way down country roads, past Erector-set subdivisions with names like Woodridge Crossing and Cedar Brook (“New homes from the 150s!”) until we reached a white picket fence bearing “HC” heraldry. “They designed the city the way they wanted it,” Burt said. “The chairman of the planning commission said, ‘This looks like it came out of a 1950s subdivision!’ Well, duh! These people came out of a 1950s subdivision; it’s all they know!” And sure enough, it was. They had used their walkaway money to buy lots and choose homes from a handful of specs. The houses were handsome by Midwest standards—faux colonials and brick homes garnished with tiny colonnades and porches.

By now the locals had accepted it as their symbol of Stapleton’s hard-earned sense of place. I found Brian’s house later while roaming on foot. His was one in a cluster of Spanish Mission revivals, replete with clay tiles, stucco walls, and a corredor for a porch. It sat across the street from a grassy postage stamp of a yard, shared equally by a square of cottages and Victorians, their porches offset neatly from the sidewalks with a white picket fence. Down the block, an otherwise boring brick mansion with a wraparound porch boasted a sign proclaiming it one of LEED’s pilots. But the strangest sight lay not far away. Turning a corner, I came face-to-face with a quarter mile of brownstones lining Stapleton’s grand boulevard, looking exactly like my own back in Brooklyn. They were new, of course—so clean they’d obviously never seen a pigeon—but otherwise packed shoulder to shoulder like the loveliest stretches of my borough, where Jane Jacobs’s “sidewalk ballet” of people endlessly dances arabesques below our windows.


pages: 260 words: 76,223

Ctrl Alt Delete: Reboot Your Business. Reboot Your Life. Your Future Depends on It. by Mitch Joel

3D printing, Amazon Web Services, augmented reality, call centre, clockwatching, cloud computing, Firefox, future of work, ghettoisation, Google Chrome, Google Glasses, Google Hangouts, Khan Academy, Kickstarter, Kodak vs Instagram, Lean Startup, Marc Andreessen, Mark Zuckerberg, Network effects, new economy, Occupy movement, place-making, prediction markets, pre–internet, QR code, recommendation engine, Richard Florida, risk tolerance, self-driving car, Silicon Valley, Silicon Valley startup, Skype, social graph, social web, Steve Jobs, Steve Wozniak, Thomas L Friedman, Tim Cook: Apple, Tony Hsieh, white picket fence, WikiLeaks, zero-sum game

The startup mentality is one where you are actively taking a hands-on approach to your own professional outcome. Lesson #3—Sorry, no gold watch. There are countless lessons to be learned from looking at the type of people and companies that were featured in Fast Company magazine’s Generation Flux cover story. And that was only the tip of the iceberg. In your current role, do you have faith that after twenty years of solid service you will retire with benefits to that white-picket-fenced house out in the country? Are you really counting on the send-off dinner where you will be given a plaque commemorating your service… or that gold watch? I think (hope) that you now realize there’s no gold watch in your future. Lesson #4—Embrace the mindset. You don’t have to run a startup to run your career like a startup, but you do have to embrace and embody the mindset. Startups are not from the top down; rather, the attitude comes from the edges.


pages: 296 words: 76,284

The End of the Suburbs: Where the American Dream Is Moving by Leigh Gallagher

Airbnb, big-box store, Burning Man, call centre, car-free, Celebration, Florida, clean water, collaborative consumption, Columbine, commoditize, crack epidemic, East Village, edge city, Edward Glaeser, extreme commuting, helicopter parent, Home mortgage interest deduction, housing crisis, Jane Jacobs, Kickstarter, low skilled workers, Mark Zuckerberg, McMansion, Menlo Park, mortgage tax deduction, negative equity, New Urbanism, peak oil, Peter Calthorpe, Ponzi scheme, Richard Florida, Robert Shiller, Robert Shiller, Sand Hill Road, Seaside, Florida, Silicon Valley, Steve Jobs, Stewart Brand, the built environment, The Death and Life of Great American Cities, Tony Hsieh, transit-oriented development, upwardly mobile, urban planning, urban sprawl, Victor Gruen, walkable city, white flight, white picket fence, young professional, Zipcar

Suburbs look different depending where you are: in Las Vegas front yards are filled with pebbles and cacti, in California Mediterranean red-tiled roofs rule the day, and in wealthy suburbs throughout the Northeast regal old homes line leafy streets. Despite their differences, the American suburbs share one thing in common—they evoke a certain way of life, one of tranquil, curving streets and cul-de-sacs; marching bands and soccer leagues; bake sales and PTA meetings and center hall colonials. The phrase “the American Dream” immediately brings to mind images of the single-family home with a white picket fence; the suburbs have also provided the setting for so many of our iconic cinematic moments. They are where Macaulay Culkin got left home alone; where Ferris Bueller took the day off; where Jake kissed Samantha in Sixteen Candles; and where Joel Goodsen, therefter remembered only as Tom Cruise, first strutted his stuff in Risky Business. The suburbs are innately connected to America because they are a uniquely American phenomenon.


Bringing Down the House: The Inside Story of Six M.I.T. Students Who Took Vegas for Millions by Ben Mezrich

airport security, beat the dealer, Edward Thorp, Silicon Valley, upwardly mobile, white picket fence

Loud music exploded from speakers embedded in the walls, and the entire arena shook as the hungry crowd leaped to its feet. The fight was about to begin. Eleven Weston, MA, Thanksgiving 1994 T here’s no neon in Weston, Massachusetts. Twenty minutes from Boston by Mercedes-Benz, Weston was an uppermiddle-class enclave separated from the real world by a tree-lined stretch of the Mass Pike. The sleepy New England town was suburbia incarnate: white picket fences, yellow school buses with blinking red lights, colonial homes, lush green lawns, lemonade stands, tennis courts, basketball hoops, tree houses, porch swings, dogs on leashes, kickball and flashlight tag, public schools that looked like prep schools and prep schools that looked like Ivy League universities. On a bright Thursday afternoon, Kevin sat next to Felicia on a porch swing, watching the leaves swirl across the back lawn of his parents’ two-story colonial-style house.


pages: 276 words: 78,061

Worth Dying For: The Power and Politics of Flags by Tim Marshall

anti-communist, Ayatollah Khomeini, Berlin Wall, British Empire, colonial rule, Donald Trump, drone strike, European colonialism, failed state, Fall of the Berlin Wall, Francis Fukuyama: the end of history, full employment, Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, Mahatma Gandhi, Malacca Straits, mass immigration, megacity, Nelson Mandela, Ronald Reagan, sceptred isle, Scramble for Africa, South China Sea, sovereign wealth fund, trade route, white picket fence

Charles Evans Hughes, US Secretary of State 1921–5 Supporters of the banned organization Jamaat-ud-Dawa burn the Stars and Stripes in Quetta, Pakistan, in May 2016, protesting against a US drone strike on Pakistani soil. O SAY, CAN YOU SEE, BY THE DAWN’S EARLY LIGHT? IN THE USA the answer is an emphatic yes. From dawn to dusk America is a riot of red, white and blue. The flag flies from government buildings, atop supermarkets and car showrooms, from the roof of the grandest mansion to the humblest white-picket-fenced homestead, and from the log cabin to the White House. In the morning it rises, hoisted onto a million flagpoles, as ‘God’s Own Country’ sets about creating anew each day the most successful nation yet seen on earth. This is the Star-Spangled Banner. The most recognizable, loved, hated, respected, feared and admired flag in the world. The flag flies above well over 700 military bases in more than sixty countries around the globe, with over a quarter of a million US personnel serving overseas.


California by Sara Benson

airport security, Albert Einstein, Apple II, Asilomar, back-to-the-land, Bay Area Rapid Transit, Berlin Wall, Burning Man, buy and hold, California gold rush, call centre, car-free, carbon footprint, Columbine, dark matter, desegregation, Donald Trump, Donner party, East Village, El Camino Real, Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test, Frank Gehry, global village, Golden Gate Park, Haight Ashbury, haute cuisine, Joan Didion, Khyber Pass, Loma Prieta earthquake, low cost airline, McMansion, means of production, Menlo Park, planetary scale, RFID, ride hailing / ride sharing, Ronald Reagan, Silicon Valley, South of Market, San Francisco, stem cell, Steve Jobs, Steve Wozniak, Stewart Brand, the new new thing, trade route, transcontinental railway, Upton Sinclair, urban sprawl, Wall-E, white picket fence, Whole Earth Catalog, working poor, Works Progress Administration, young professional

Wine Exchange of Sonoma ( 800-938-1794; Suite C, 452 1st St E; 10am-6pm) If you can’t make it to the wineries, sample local vintages for $1 to $2 per ounce at this wine shop, which also carries international beers. Earthworks ( 707-935-0290; 403 1st St W) Cool consignment jewelry and art glass. Artifax ( 707-996-9494; 450c 1st St E) Unusual Asian artifacts, rare beads and spiritual objects. Return to beginning of chapter GLEN ELLEN pop 990 Sleepy Glen Ellen is a snapshot of old Sonoma, with white picket fences, tiny cottages and ramshackle 19th-century brick buildings beside a poplar-lined creek. When downtown Sonoma is jammed, you can wander quiet Glen Ellen and feel far from civilization. It’s ideal for a leg-stretching stopover between wineries or a romantic overnight – the nighttime sky blazes with stars. Arnold Dr is the main drag and the valley’s back-way route. Kenwood is just north, along Hwy 12, but has no town center like Glen Ellen’s.

Strawberry Valley Inn ( 530-926-2052; http://strawberryvalleysuites.com;1142 S Mt Shasta Blvd; d from $90; ) The serenely understated rooms surround a garden courtyard. Enjoy all the intimate feel of a B&B without the have-to-chat-with-the-newlyweds-in-the-hall social pressure. A full vegetarian breakfast is included. In the evenings there’s complimentary wine. Strawberry Valley Court ( 530-926-2052; 305 Old McCloud Rd; cabins from $90) The Inn’s equally cute sister property has a white picket fence and shady brick cabins with private garages. Several modest motels stretch along S Mt Shasta Blvd. All have hot tubs and rooms cost between $60 and $140 in peak season: Swiss Holiday Lodge ( 530-926-3446; www.snowcrest.net/swissholidaylge; 2400 S Mt Shasta Blvd; ) Quiet. Evergreen Lodge ( 530-926-2143; www.snowcrest.net/evergreenlodge; 1312 S Mt Shasta Blvd; ) Friendly. Mountain Air Lodge & Ski House ( 530-926-3411; 1121 S Mt Shasta Blvd) Old-fashioned, with a recreation room and complimentary breakfast.

Getting There & Away Calaveras Transit ( 209-754-4450; www.calaverastransit.com) operates the most reliable public transportation system in the region from the Government Center (891 Mountain Ranch Rd) in downtown San Andreas. You can use it to connect to Angels Camp ($1.50, 30 minutes, several times daily) and other surrounding towns. Take the bus to Lodi ($3, 45 minutes, several times daily), where you can connect through Amtrak and Greyhound to Sacramento. Return to beginning of chapter MURPHYS pop 3400 / elev 2171ft With its white picket fences and old world charm, Murphys is one of the most picturesque towns along the southern stretch of Gold Country, befitting its nickname as ‘Queen of the Sierra.’ It lies 8 miles east of Hwy 49 on Murphys Grade Rd, and is named for Daniel and John Murphy, who founded a trading post and mining operation on Murphy Creek in 1848, in conjunction with the local Maidu people. John was apparently very friendly with the tribe and eventually married the chief’s daughter.


pages: 263 words: 81,542

Drinking in America: Our Secret History by Susan Cheever

British Empire, George Santayana, Howard Zinn, nuclear winter, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Ronald Reagan, trade route, white picket fence

Stone condemned the tendency to turn a whole generation of Americans into “stool pigeons.”223 Although McCarthy also targeted homosexuals—he was an equal-opportunity bully—it was his undocumented attack on communism that made him famous. In the 1950s the threat of communism was both horribly real and entirely imaginary. The Russians were armed and ready to attack us. The Russians would come marching down Main Street past our white picket fences. The Russians were in submarines just off the Atlantic Coast waiting to take over our suburbs. Drew Pearson reported that President Harry Truman’s secretary of defense, James Forrestal, stoked on pills and alcohol, was discovered in the street in his pajamas in a state of terror because he believed the Russians had invaded Bethesda. “The Russians were coming!” yelled Forrestal until the police came and took him away.


pages: 342 words: 86,256

Walkable City: How Downtown Can Save America, One Step at a Time by Jeff Speck

A Pattern Language, active transport: walking or cycling, car-free, carbon footprint, congestion charging, David Brooks, edge city, Edward Glaeser, Enrique Peñalosa, food miles, Frank Gehry, Guggenheim Bilbao, if you build it, they will come, Induced demand, intermodal, invisible hand, Jane Jacobs, meta analysis, meta-analysis, New Urbanism, peak oil, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Richard Florida, skinny streets, smart cities, starchitect, Stewart Brand, the built environment, The Death and Life of Great American Cities, transit-oriented development, Upton Sinclair, urban planning, urban renewal, urban sprawl, walkable city, white flight, white picket fence, young professional, zero-sum game, Zipcar

“What the data clearly shows,” West notes, “is that when people come together they become much more productive.”34 Do the same physical laws work in reverse? Writing about West’s research in The New York Times Magazine, Jonah Lehrer notes: In recent decades, though, many of the fastest-growing cities in America, like Phoenix and Riverside, Calif., have given us a very different urban model. These places have traded away public spaces for affordable single-family homes, attracting working-class families who want their own white picket fences. West and Bettencourt point out, however, that cheap suburban comforts are associated with poor performance on a variety of urban metrics. Phoenix, for instance, has been characterized by below-average levels of income and innovation (as measured by the production of patents) for the last 40 years.35 These findings align with a recent Environmental Protection Agency study that found, state by state, an inverse relationship between vehicle travel and productivity: the more miles that people in a given state drive, the weaker it performs economically.● Apparently, the data are beginning to support the city planners’ bold contention that time wasted in traffic is unproductive.


pages: 312 words: 84,421

This Chair Rocks: A Manifiesto Against Ageism by Ashton Applewhite

affirmative action, Affordable Care Act / Obamacare, Airbnb, Albert Einstein, Atul Gawande, Buckminster Fuller, clean water, cognitive dissonance, crowdsourcing, desegregation, Downton Abbey, fixed income, follow your passion, ghettoisation, Google Hangouts, hiring and firing, income inequality, informal economy, Internet of things, invention of the printing press, job satisfaction, labor-force participation, life extension, longitudinal study, Mark Zuckerberg, Naomi Klein, obamacare, old age dependency ratio, RAND corporation, Ronald Reagan, Rosa Parks, sensible shoes, Silicon Valley, Skype, smart cities, Snapchat, stem cell, the built environment, urban decay, urban planning, white picket fence, women in the workforce

Mightn’t it be nice to have chicken-soup duty only on Tuesdays, because others are also on the job? To share the worry and apportion the logistics? To bail on the standard all-or-nothing proposition, and contribute to a network that will support you in turn, should the need arise? And to not have to relinquish those solitary pleasures? There are many different frameworks for friendship, intimacy, and love besides the mainstream, white-picket-fence, King Charming, Hollywood scenario. Longer lives offer the opportunity to explore them. Wherever we fall on the spectrum—men and women, trans men and trans women, straight and gay, bi and bi-curious, monogamous and polyamorous, older and younger, “imperfect” and way beyond perfect—take heart! Let’s use not just what’s between our legs but our brains and imaginations to explore new ways of being intimate and giving pleasure to each other.


pages: 273 words: 85,195

Nomadland: Surviving America in the Twenty-First Century by Jessica Bruder

Affordable Care Act / Obamacare, back-to-the-land, big-box store, Burning Man, cognitive dissonance, crowdsourcing, full employment, game design, gender pay gap, Gini coefficient, income inequality, Jeff Bezos, job automation, Mars Rover, new economy, off grid, payday loans, Pepto Bismol, precariat, Ronald Reagan, Saturday Night Live, sharing economy, six sigma, supply-chain management, union organizing, urban sprawl, white picket fence, Y2K

Bob sold his land in Wasilla, along with the shell of the house he’d continued to build there on credit cards. Part of the proceeds went to fixing his engine. “I honestly don’t know if I would have been brave enough to do it if I hadn’t been forced into it,” Bob admits on his website. But in retrospect, he’s glad the change happened. “When I moved into the van, I realized that everything that society had told me was a lie—that I had to get married and live in a house with a white picket fence and go to work, and then be happy at the very end of my life, but be miserable until then,” he told me in an interview. “I was happy for the first time ever living in my van.” In 2005, Bob started CheapRVLiving.com. The website began as a modest collection of how-to articles for readers hoping to live in a vehicle on a shoestring budget. The key was “boondocking”: going off the grid rather than relying on the kind of hookups for water, sewage, and electricity that come with a paid spot in an RV park.


The Buddha and the Badass: The Secret Spiritual Art of Succeeding at Work by Vishen Lakhiani

Buckminster Fuller, Burning Man, call centre, Colonization of Mars, crowdsourcing, deliberate practice, Elon Musk, fundamental attribution error, future of work, Google Glasses, Google X / Alphabet X, iterative process, Jeff Bezos, meta analysis, meta-analysis, microbiome, performance metric, Peter Thiel, profit motive, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Silicon Valley, Silicon Valley startup, skunkworks, Skype, Steve Jobs, Steven Levy, web application, white picket fence

Oddly, I now saw the same situations that had been keeping me up at night for months through a lens of appreciation. The entire model most societies have for success and happiness is flawed. Most people learn that to attain life fulfillment, you must acquire three things: A certain role or title (which gives you prestige) A certain balance in your bank account (which gives you wealth) Acquisition of specific material positions like a car or a house with a white picket fence The result: Success. Right? Nope. Rao would call that an “if/then life.” He says you have to stop hanging your happiness on your title and your money and your stuff. Stop thinking, “I need X to be successful or happy.” (How many times have you gotten X and still not felt happy?) The Rao formula to reclaim your happiness is simply…Growth. The only point of life is to grow.


pages: 388 words: 211,314

Frommer's Washington State by Karl Samson

airport security, British Empire, California gold rush, centre right, Frank Gehry, glass ceiling, global village, place-making, sustainable-tourism, Tacoma Narrows Bridge, transcontinental railway, white picket fence

In less time than it takes to smoke a ham, both sides were calling in reinforcements. Luckily, this pigheadedness was defused, and a more serious confrontation was avoided. The English Camp unit of the historical park is set on picturesque Garrison Bay, and, with its huge old shade trees, wide lawns, and white wooden buildings, it’s the epitome of British civility. There’s even a formal garden surrounded by a white picket fence. You can look inside the reconstructed buildings and imagine the days when this was one of the most far-flung corners of the British Empire. If you’re full of energy, hike the 1.25-mile trail to the top of 650-foot Mount Young for a beautiful panorama of the island. An easier 1-mile hike hugs the shoreline out to the end of Bell Point. The grounds are open daily from dawn to 11pm, and the visitor center is open from late May through early September daily from 9am to 5pm.

Flanking the state park are Deadman Bay Nature Preserve and Lime Kiln Nature Preserve, two properties acquired for public use by the San Juan County Land Bank. Together the state park and the two preserves have more than 3 miles of hiking trails, making this the best hiking area on the island. As Westside Road moves inland, it becomes Bailer Hill Road. As you cross the island, watch for the picture-perfect Shepherd’s Croft, 2575 Bailer Hill Rd. (& 360/378-6372), a sheep farm set behind a white picket fence. A small store here sells sheepskins, yarn, baby sweaters, and a variety of other products. Tours of the farm can be arranged. From here, take a left onto Wold Road, and you will come to Pelindaba Lavender Farms, 33 Hawthorne Lane (& 866/819-1911 or 360/ 378-4248; www.pelindaba.com). The farm has roughly 20 acres of lavender plants, including a cutting field where visitors can cut their own lavender stems.


Saving America's Cities: Ed Logue and the Struggle to Renew Urban America in the Suburban Age by Lizabeth Cohen

activist lawyer, affirmative action, Albert Einstein, anti-communist, British Empire, Buckminster Fuller, car-free, charter city, deindustrialization, desegregation, Edward Glaeser, garden city movement, ghettoisation, Henry Ford's grandson gave labor union leader Walter Reuther a tour of the company’s new, automated factory…, hiring and firing, housing crisis, income inequality, indoor plumbing, Jane Jacobs, land reform, megastructure, new economy, New Urbanism, Peter Eisenman, postindustrial economy, race to the bottom, rent control, Robert Gordon, rolodex, Ronald Reagan, the built environment, The Death and Life of Great American Cities, union organizing, upwardly mobile, urban decay, urban planning, urban renewal, Victor Gruen, Vilfredo Pareto, walkable city, War on Poverty, white flight, white picket fence, young professional

Not surprisingly, it was in the area of housing that the SBDO would make its most significant contribution to turning around the South Bronx. MAKING CHARLOTTE GARDENS GROW It was such a startling idea that it made headlines not just in New York City but nationally and even internationally. In the middle of decimated Charlotte Street—President Carter’s stomping ground—Logue’s SBDO constructed Charlotte Gardens, a new neighborhood of ninety freestanding single-family homes with white picket fences that were heavily subsidized for purchase. It was nothing less than the suburban American dream plopped down in the middle of one of the worst neighborhoods in the city, if not the nation. As Logue had familiarized himself with the South Bronx, he had noticed that amid ravaged blocks, a few homeowners persisted in caring lovingly for their homes. He had also learned, as he told Mayor Koch, that many new arrivals to New York, “Southern Blacks, Island Blacks and Island Hispanics[,] do not consider a row house a home!

Logue grew to admire the parish-level priests like Gigante and Smith, who devoted themselves to neighborhood improvement, displaying a more grassroots level of Catholic Church commitment to urban renewal than seen in Boston, where the Archbishop had taken the lead. (PHOTO BY BETTMANN ARCHIVE / GETTY IMAGES) THE (PHOTO) SHOT SEEN 'ROUND THE WORLD. When this image of Logue standing behind the white picket fence of a Charlotte Gardens home appeared in New York magazine in June 1984, it was just one of hundreds of photos publicizing this unique project. Charlotte Gardens helped to turn around the South Bronx, inspiring many of the strategies that would bring thousands of new and rehabbed housing units to New York City through Mayor Koch’s ten-year plan, more than sixty-five thousand to the Bronx alone. (© JON LOVE, 2018) VELEZ BEATS OUT LOGUE FOR SCARCE HUD DOLLARS.


pages: 218 words: 83,794

Frommer's Portable California Wine Country by Erika Lenkert

Louis Pasteur, Maui Hawaii, place-making, sensible shoes, Silicon Valley, white picket fence

(off the Silverado Trail), Calistoga, CA 94515. & 800/995-9381 or 707/942-9581. www.silverrose.com. 20 units. $165–$255 double weekdays; $195–$300 double weekends. Rates include continental breakfast. AE, DISC, MC, V. Amenities: 2 pools; spa; 2 Jacuzzis. In room: A/C, dataport, hair dryer, iron upon request. INEXPENSIVE Brannan Cottage Inn This cute little 1860 cottage, complete with the requisite white picket fence, sits on a quiet side street. One of Sam Brannan’s original resort cottages, the inn was restored through a community effort to salvage an important piece of Calistoga’s heritage; it’s now on the National Register of Historic Places. The six spacious rooms are decorated with down comforters and white lace curtains; each room also has a ceiling fan, private bathroom, and its own entrance; three rooms have four-poster beds.


pages: 384 words: 89,250

Made to Break: Technology and Obsolescence in America by Giles Slade

Albert Einstein, Alexey Pajitnov wrote Tetris, American ideology, Apple's 1984 Super Bowl advert, Buckminster Fuller, business cycle, Cass Sunstein, Charles Lindbergh, creative destruction, Douglas Engelbart, Douglas Engelbart, global village, housing crisis, indoor plumbing, invention of radio, Joseph Schumpeter, Marshall McLuhan, Mikhail Gorbachev, more computing power than Apollo, mutually assured destruction, Ralph Nader, rent control, Ronald Reagan, Silicon Valley, Steve Jobs, the market place, the medium is the message, Thorstein Veblen, unemployed young men, upwardly mobile, Vladimir Vetrov: Farewell Dossier, white picket fence, women in the workforce

Calculator manufacturers were producing fif y million units a year, and competitive pricing had made them universally affordable. SR calculators, too, were becoming ridiculously cheap. In his fina book, The Green Imperative, Frank Lloyd Wright’s most famous apprentice, Victor Papanek, shared this recollection from the 1970s: “One of my favorite photographs . . . showed more than 600 engineers’ slide rules stuck into the ground around a neighbor’s lawn, forming a tiny, sardonic, white picket fence. When I asked about it my neighbor’s wife said, ‘We bought these slide rules for one dollar a barrel . . . and used all six hundred.’”27 Of more interest than the diminishing cost of calculators and the demise of the slide rule is the obsolescence of the skill set that older-generation engineers possessed. Tom West and Carl Alsing recalled promising each other not to “turn away candidates” at Data General in 1978 “just because the youngsters made them feel old and obsolete.”


pages: 309 words: 92,177

The Ghost by Robert Harris

airport security, carbon footprint, en.wikipedia.org, Nelson Mandela, stakhanovite, white picket fence

“Where I come from it’s after midnight.” He shook his head. At first I couldn’t make out whether he was sympathetic or disapproving; then I realized he was trying to tell me it was no use talking to him: he was deaf. I went back to staring out the window. After a while we came to a crossroads and turned left into what I guessed must be Edgartown, a settlement of white clapboard houses with white picket fences, small gardens, and verandas, lit by ornate Victorian street lamps. Nine out of ten were dark, but in the few windows that shone with yellow light I glimpsed oil paintings of sailing ships and whiskered ancestors. At the bottom of the hill, past the Old Whaling Church, a big misty moon cast a silvery light over shingled roofs and silhouetted the masts in the harbor. Curls of wood smoke rose from a couple of chimneys.


pages: 262 words: 93,987

The Buy Side: A Wall Street Trader's Tale of Spectacular Excess by Turney Duff

asset-backed security, Berlin Wall, buy low sell high, collateralized debt obligation, fixed income, Gordon Gekko, high net worth, urban sprawl, white picket fence

Jenn has the porch decorated in friendly ghosts, jack-o’-lanterns, and a life-size witch, one with a happy smile so as not to spook Lola. The witch hangs from the porch roof and sways in the light breeze. As we sit, I can’t take my eyes off my little princess: the plastic diamond tiara in her dark hair, her skin the color of pearls. She pushes the meat out of the way; she’s much more interested in the potato chips and orange soda. After a few bites, she’s off to the yard to chase the dogs. Inside the white picket fence, the lawn is a carpet of red leaves from the Japanese maple trees. Lola and the dogs run back and forth. Jenn sits across from me wearing a designer jean jacket with a fur collar. “I’m getting nervous,” I say. She tilts her head sideways, curious, and puts a little more salad on her plate. “We’re spending like twelve grand a month before we even put food on the table.” “So we’ll cut our expenses,” she says.


pages: 340 words: 92,904

Street Smart: The Rise of Cities and the Fall of Cars by Samuel I. Schwartz

2013 Report for America's Infrastructure - American Society of Civil Engineers - 19 March 2013, active transport: walking or cycling, Affordable Care Act / Obamacare, American Society of Civil Engineers: Report Card, autonomous vehicles, car-free, City Beautiful movement, collaborative consumption, congestion charging, crowdsourcing, desegregation, Enrique Peñalosa, Ford paid five dollars a day, Frederick Winslow Taylor, if you build it, they will come, Induced demand, intermodal, invention of the wheel, lake wobegon effect, Loma Prieta earthquake, longitudinal study, Lyft, Masdar, megacity, meta analysis, meta-analysis, moral hazard, Nate Silver, oil shock, Productivity paradox, Ralph Nader, rent control, ride hailing / ride sharing, Rosa Parks, self-driving car, skinny streets, smart cities, smart grid, smart transportation, the built environment, the map is not the territory, transportation-network company, Uber and Lyft, Uber for X, uber lyft, Unsafe at Any Speed, urban decay, urban planning, urban renewal, walkable city, Wall-E, white flight, white picket fence, Works Progress Administration, Yogi Berra, Zipcar

I don’t know what the discipline of economics finds so fascinating about commuting, but in 2006, two Princeton economists asked nine hundred women to rank the well-being produced by nineteen different activities. Having sex (the researchers call it “intimate relations,” but they’re not fooling anybody) came in first. Socializing after work came in second. The “morning commute” was dead last, just a little worse than “evening commute.” And the effect of the commute on the ideal home in the suburbs, with or without the white picket fence, was damaging too. The comfortable suburban home that persuaded them to take on the commute in the first place might appreciate in value over time, but the enjoyment of it doesn’t. People who move to larger houses adapt to the larger size almost immediately, at which point it offers essentially no increase in gratification. The stress of the commute itself, on the other hand, is cumulative: the more years it goes on, the worse its effects.


pages: 299 words: 88,375

Gray Day: My Undercover Mission to Expose America's First Cyber Spy by Eric O'Neill

active measures, autonomous vehicles, Berlin Wall, bitcoin, computer age, cryptocurrency, Dissolution of the Soviet Union, Edward Snowden, Fall of the Berlin Wall, fear of failure, full text search, index card, Internet of things, Kickstarter, Mikhail Gorbachev, ransomware, rent control, Robert Hanssen: Double agent, Ronald Reagan, Skype, thinkpad, web application, white picket fence, WikiLeaks, young professional

Their two children, born in Canada but raised in the United States, did not learn of their parents’ true identity until the FBI kicked in the door to their Cambridge, Massachusetts, home to arrest Mom and Dad. The Heathfield-Foleys and Chapman blindsided the FBI by embracing new spy technology to communicate with Moscow. Anna would sit in a coffeehouse in the middle of the day like so many other young professionals, clicking through her laptop over a latte. Donald and Tracey would upload pictures of their beautiful family and white-picket-fenced home to a file-sharing site. Covertly, as Anna sat in the coffeehouse, her laptop would directly pair with the laptop of a Russian intelligence officer parked nearby. A different intelligence officer in Moscow would download and decrypt the Cambridge couple’s pictures, revealing through digital steganography the secrets hidden within. As the US government defunded its peacetime counterintelligence programs, the careful and methodical spies had infiltrated our business, politics, and communities.


pages: 309 words: 96,434

Ground Control: Fear and Happiness in the Twenty First Century City by Anna Minton

Albert Einstein, Berlin Wall, Big bang: deregulation of the City of London, Boris Johnson, Broken windows theory, call centre, crack epidemic, credit crunch, deindustrialization, East Village, energy security, Francis Fukuyama: the end of history, ghettoisation, hiring and firing, housing crisis, illegal immigration, invisible hand, Jane Jacobs, Jaron Lanier, Kickstarter, moral panic, new economy, New Urbanism, race to the bottom, rent control, Richard Florida, Right to Buy, Silicon Valley, Steven Pinker, the built environment, The Death and Life of Great American Cities, The Spirit Level, trickle-down economics, University of East Anglia, urban decay, urban renewal, white flight, white picket fence, World Values Survey, young professional

One particularly draconian lease prohibited dogs over 30 lbs, while according to the rules of another, plants and flowers, not only in front gardens but also in back gardens, have to be approved. ‘If I want to plant my tulips, I have to get it approved first by the committee,’ a resident in one gated community said.26 In Hidden Hills, a private gated community in California, which is entirely independent of local government, white picket fences are mandatory. The long lists of rules are similar in Britain, although some residents fail to realize this, buying their homes without reading the fine print of incredibly long and complex leases. In John’s gated development, on the site of the former Victorian poorhouse, all the houses look exactly the same, with the same navy-blue front doors, identical front porches and the same leading on the windows.


pages: 322 words: 88,197

Wonderland: How Play Made the Modern World by Steven Johnson

Ada Lovelace, Alfred Russel Wallace, Antoine Gombaud: Chevalier de Méré, Berlin Wall, bitcoin, Book of Ingenious Devices, Buckminster Fuller, Claude Shannon: information theory, Clayton Christensen, colonial exploitation, computer age, conceptual framework, crowdsourcing, cuban missile crisis, Drosophila, Edward Thorp, Fellow of the Royal Society, game design, global village, Hedy Lamarr / George Antheil, HyperCard, invention of air conditioning, invention of the printing press, invention of the telegraph, Islamic Golden Age, Jacquard loom, Jacques de Vaucanson, James Watt: steam engine, Jane Jacobs, John von Neumann, joint-stock company, Joseph-Marie Jacquard, land value tax, Landlord’s Game, lone genius, mass immigration, megacity, Minecraft, moral panic, Murano, Venice glass, music of the spheres, Necker cube, New Urbanism, Oculus Rift, On the Economy of Machinery and Manufactures, pattern recognition, peer-to-peer, pets.com, placebo effect, probability theory / Blaise Pascal / Pierre de Fermat, profit motive, QWERTY keyboard, Ray Oldenburg, spice trade, spinning jenny, statistical model, Steve Jobs, Steven Pinker, Stewart Brand, supply-chain management, talking drums, the built environment, The Great Good Place, the scientific method, The Structural Transformation of the Public Sphere, trade route, Turing machine, Turing test, Upton Sinclair, urban planning, Victor Gruen, Watson beat the top human players on Jeopardy!, white flight, white picket fence, Whole Earth Catalog, working poor, Wunderkammern

Design for Brooklyn’s Prospect Park, circa 1868 No doubt such a scene would have appalled the authorities that condemned John Hughson to death for daring to create establishments where whites and blacks could enjoy their leisure time together; no doubt Charles II would only see “idle and disaffected persons” escaping their “lawful calling and affairs.” But most of us today can appreciate that holiday scene for the extraordinary achievement it is. Once you get past the Macy’s fireworks display, Fourth of July imagery and rhetoric is usually full of old-time Americana: the small town’s one fire truck decked out for the main-street parade, the Little League game, the white picket fences with their patriotic bunting. There is plenty to celebrate about the joys of small communities, but in a way, there is nothing particularly original about that story. World history is teeming with small, successful communities united by a common culture and worldview, after all. What is much rarer is that Fourth of July scene in Prospect Park, and in most urban parks in metropolitan centers around the world.


pages: 287 words: 86,870

The Glass Hotel by Emily St. John Mandel

Bernie Madoff, big-box store, discrete time, East Village, high net worth, McMansion, Panamax, Pepto Bismol, Ponzi scheme, sovereign wealth fund, white picket fence, Y2K

They’d just spent the pre-Christmas season at a warehouse in Arizona, ten-hour days of walking quickly over concrete floors with a handheld scanner, bending and lifting, and had retreated to a campground outside Santa Fe to recuperate. Difficult work, and it got harder every year, but they’d made enough money to get the engine repaired and add to their emergency fund, and now they were resting in the high desert. Across the road was a tiny graveyard of wood and concrete crosses, a white picket fence sagging around the perimeter. “We could do a lot worse,” Leon said. They were sitting at a picnic bench by the RV, looking at a view of distant mountains turning violet in the sunset, and he felt at that moment that all was well with the world. “We move through this world so lightly,” said Marie, misquoting one of Leon’s favorite songs, and for a warm moment he thought she meant it in a general sense, all of humanity, all these individual lives passing over the surface of the world with little trace, but then he understood that she meant the two of them specifically, Leon and Marie, and he couldn’t blame his chill on the encroaching night.


Microserfs by Douglas Coupland

car-free, computer age, El Camino Real, game design, hive mind, Kevin Kelly, Maui Hawaii, means of production, Menlo Park, postindustrial economy, RAND corporation, Ronald Reagan, Sand Hill Road, Silicon Valley, Stephen Hawking, Steve Ballmer, Steve Jobs, telemarketer, Watson beat the top human players on Jeopardy!, white picket fence

This universe he had built was a Guggenheim and a Toys-R-Us squished into one. We were having seizures, all of us. Susan was livid. She said, "You spent my vested stock money on . . . Lego?" She was purple. Ethan looked at me: "Michael's addiction." I, too, was flubbered. In the magic of the moment I looked up into the corner - and I caught Mom looking, too - at a small white house in the far back corner, sprouting from a wall, with a little white picket fence around it, the occupant inside no doubt surveying all that transpired beneath its windows, and I said, "Oh, Dad, this is - the most real thing I've ever seen." * * * And I wondered then, how do we ever know what beauty lies inside of people, and the strange ways this world works to lure that beauty outward? * * * What follows I will write only because it's what happened, and I'm sick, and I don't want to lose it - I might accidentally erase the memory.


pages: 301 words: 100,599

The Hot Zone by Richard Preston

British Empire, Louis Pasteur, out of africa, white picket fence

He performed research on defenses against hot viruses—vaccines, drug treatments—and he did basic medical research on rain-forest viruses. The killers and the unknowns were his specialty. He deliberately kept his mind off the effects of hot agents. He told himself, If you did think about it, you might decide to make a living another way. Jahrling, his wife, and their three children lived in Thurmont, not far from Nancy and Jerry Jaax, in a brick ranch house with a white picket fence out front. The fence surrounded a treeless yard, and there was a large brown car parked in the garage. Although they lived near each other, the Jahrlings did not socialize with the Jaaxes, since their children were of different ages and since the families had different styles. Peter Jahrling mowed his lawn regularly to keep the grass neat, so that his neighbors wouldn’t think he was a slob.


pages: 327 words: 102,361

Among Schoolchildren by Tracy Kidder

always be closing, desegregation, index card, pattern recognition, Ronald Reagan, upwardly mobile, urban renewal, white picket fence

The Towne house, a white federalist mansion that once belonged to a successful New England merchant of Charlton, Massachusetts, sits at one end of the green. At the other, on a little rise, the tall, porticoed Center Meetinghouse, a Baptist church in its former life, presides over the town common. The village gleamed in spring sunshine. The hardwoods were in leaf, the flowers blooming in the gardens behind white picket fences. People in period costume, the living mannequins of the village, passed by Mrs. Zajac's class. A young man in a straw hat and breeches with suspenders walked along an edge of the common beside a pair of perfect oxen, groomed as if they were racehorses. Young women walked by in long dresses and white bonnets. Judith gazed after them. She looked down at the wool tights she wore under her skirt—the nearest thing to pants she was allowed to wear, being a proper Pentecostal daughter—and, laughing, Judith said, "I got these at K Mart."


pages: 305 words: 101,743

Trick Mirror: Reflections on Self-Delusion by Jia Tolentino

4chan, Affordable Care Act / Obamacare, Airbnb, Alexander Shulgin, big-box store, cloud computing, crowdsourcing, Donald Trump, financial independence, game design, Jeff Bezos, Kickstarter, knowledge worker, late capitalism, Lyft, Mark Zuckerberg, Mason jar, Norman Mailer, obamacare, pattern recognition, Peter Thiel, Ponzi scheme, QR code, rent control, Saturday Night Live, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI), Silicon Valley, Snapchat, Steve Jobs, uber lyft, upwardly mobile, wage slave, white picket fence

The Obama administration nationalized most of the student loan industry as part of the 2010 Affordable Care Act legislation, and so this web of securitized debt is government business, and it is expanding rapidly—student debt ballooned to over $1.5 trillion in 2018. But there’s one major difference between housing debt and education debt: at least for now, if you hope to improve your life in America, you can’t quite turn away from a diploma the way you can a white picket fence. In the meantime, tuition increases have done little to improve the education students receive. Faculty jobs, like most jobs, have become unstable and precarious. Salaries are stagnant. In 1970, nearly 80 percent of college faculty were employed full-time; now less than half are full-time. Colleges, competing for tuition dollars, spend their money on stadiums, state-of-the-art gyms, fancy dining halls—the cost of which is reflected in tuition.


pages: 404 words: 95,163

Amazon: How the World’s Most Relentless Retailer Will Continue to Revolutionize Commerce by Natalie Berg, Miya Knights

3D printing, Airbnb, Amazon Web Services, augmented reality, Bernie Sanders, big-box store, business intelligence, cloud computing, Colonization of Mars, commoditize, computer vision, connected car, Donald Trump, Doomsday Clock, Elon Musk, gig economy, Internet of things, inventory management, invisible hand, Jeff Bezos, market fragmentation, new economy, pattern recognition, Ponzi scheme, pre–internet, QR code, race to the bottom, recommendation engine, remote working, sensor fusion, sharing economy, Skype, supply-chain management, TaskRabbit, trade route, underbanked, urban planning, white picket fence

Carrefour describes the store, which also features a meeting room and lounge bar serving more than 200 Italian and international beers, as an innovative solution for busy city dwellers ‘who seek more than ever to combine pleasure, work and socialization’.13 In the future, we believe hybrid store concepts like Carrefour’s will become a common sight in urban areas around the globe. According to the UN, two-thirds of the world’s population will live in cities by 2050,14 and in the US today, many cities are growing faster than their suburbs as millennials forgo the white picket fence dream in favour of a no-strings-attached urban lifestyle. As urbanization takes hold, physical spaces must adapt by becoming smaller, more convenient and multi-dimensional. ‘The trend of urbanization is something we must all recognize and understand’, says Adam Neumann, CEO and co-founder of shared office space provider WeWork. ‘People from every walk of life are seeking spaces in big cities that allow for human connections.


pages: 325 words: 97,162

The 5 AM Club: Own Your Morning. Elevate Your Life. by Robin Sharma

Albert Einstein, dematerialisation, epigenetics, Grace Hopper, hedonic treadmill, impulse control, index card, invisible hand, Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, Kickstarter, Lao Tzu, large denomination, Mahatma Gandhi, Menlo Park, Nelson Mandela, New Journalism, Rosa Parks, telemarketer, white picket fence

The tangled yet lovingly arranged vines on wooden stakes spoke of an enchantment that nature alone affords while a mystical wisp of fog slowly migrated from Franschhoek Valley up toward the surrounding mountains. A little earlier, at 5 AM, the billionaire had taken the entrepreneur and the artist on a mountain bike ride that began on the wine farm, then meandered down Daniel Hugo Street and into the village—past well-used horse stables, lazy dogs that moved as slow as snails on Prozac and rose bushes that had twisted along the white picket fences that had been erected along both sides of the rough dirt road. It really was a near-perfect little place the billionaire had selected as the setting for his second-to-last mentoring session. The lesson that the billionaire had presented as the three of them rode together centered on the vital importance of balancing elite personal performance with deep self-renewal for sustained masterful achievement.


pages: 2,323 words: 550,739

1,000 Places to See in the United States and Canada Before You Die, Updated Ed. by Patricia Schultz

Albert Einstein, Alfred Russel Wallace, American Society of Civil Engineers: Report Card, Bretton Woods, Burning Man, California gold rush, car-free, Charles Lindbergh, Columbine, Donald Trump, East Village, El Camino Real, estate planning, Frank Gehry, glass ceiling, Golden Gate Park, Guggenheim Bilbao, Haight Ashbury, haute cuisine, indoor plumbing, interchangeable parts, Mars Rover, Mason jar, Maui Hawaii, Mikhail Gorbachev, Murano, Venice glass, Nelson Mandela, new economy, New Urbanism, Norman Mailer, out of africa, Pepto Bismol, place-making, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Ronald Reagan, Rosa Parks, Saturday Night Live, sexual politics, South of Market, San Francisco, The Chicago School, transcontinental railway, traveling salesman, upwardly mobile, urban decay, urban planning, urban renewal, urban sprawl, wage slave, white picket fence, Works Progress Administration, Yogi Berra, éminence grise

BEST TIMES: last weekend in May for Lobsterfest in Mystic Seaport; mid-Aug for Milford Oyster Festival; early Sept for Norwalk’s Oyster Festival. The Perfect American Small Town and the State’s Oldest Inn ESSEX Connecticut A dignified, Revolutionary War–era spirit lingers in Essex, a mint-condition one-traffic-light village on the Connecticut River, where early colonial and federal houses tell of the town’s shipbuilding heyday. On Main Street, white picket fences frame many landmark buildings, a mix of grand private homes and specialty stores. You can learn about the town’s seafaring heritage at the waterfront Connecticut River Museum, which sits 5 miles north of where the river empties into Long Island Sound. It comprises an 1870s steamboat warehouse filled with ship models and maritime artifacts, including a full-scale replica of America’s first submarine, The Turtle, built during the Revolutionary War.

Back on terra firma, follow the two-lane Old King’s Highway (modern-day Route 6A) from Orleans west to the Cape Cod Canal, which separates the peninsula from the mainland. Over its 34 miles, the road opens onto dramatic water views and passes a plethora of antiques shops to fill your afternoon with browsing. A classic Cape Cod seascape in Chatham. The old sea captain’s town of Chatham is one of the Cape’s most desirable addresses. Shops, art galleries, and eateries line picture-perfect Main Street, a stretch of clapboard buildings, white picket fences, and flowering gardens and window boxes. Built in 1839, the dignified Captain’s House Inn has romantic rooms with four-posters and fireplaces. You can walk to dinner at the Impudent Oyster, where the sophisticated menu (mainly seafood) and white-linen ambience are a welcome break from the ubiquitous clam shacks and sub shops. For the best dessert head to nearby Buffy’s, where the ice cream is homemade daily and the plain old vanilla is heavenly.

Meanwhile, French utopian Étienne Cabet and his followers, the Icarians, established a small commune in Nauvoo, but that too was short-lived; it lasted only from 1849 to 1856. Today, as many as 60 sites in Nauvoo have been richly restored to their mid-1800s appearance, earning the town the nickname “Williamsburg of the Midwest.” Tour the historic district by horse carriage or on foot, passing beautiful brick homes surrounded by white picket fences; follow the scent of baking gingerbread to the Scovil Bakery, with an oven dating from the 1840s, or visit the Webb Brothers Blacksmith Shop. The Mormon Church reacquired the temple site and, in 2002, dedicated a new temple whose exterior is an exact replica of the original. Every year, thousands of Mormons make pilgrimages here to visit the Joseph Smith Historic Center and pay their respects at his grave.


pages: 1,351 words: 404,177

Nixonland: The Rise of a President and the Fracturing of America by Rick Perlstein

affirmative action, Alistair Cooke, American ideology, Bay Area Rapid Transit, Berlin Wall, Bretton Woods, cognitive dissonance, cuban missile crisis, delayed gratification, desegregation, East Village, European colonialism, full employment, Golden Gate Park, Haight Ashbury, immigration reform, In Cold Blood by Truman Capote, index card, indoor plumbing, Joan Didion, Kitchen Debate, liberal capitalism, Mahatma Gandhi, Marshall McLuhan, Monroe Doctrine, moral panic, New Urbanism, Norman Mailer, Own Your Own Home, Paul Samuelson, plutocrats, Plutocrats, price mechanism, Ralph Nader, RAND corporation, rolodex, Ronald Reagan, sexual politics, the medium is the message, traveling salesman, upwardly mobile, urban planning, urban renewal, walking around money, War on Poverty, white picket fence, Whole Earth Catalog

How was it related to bearded picketers against the Vietnam War, the orgies so vile, or singer John Lennon, who had blasphemously called his rock band “bigger than Jesus” and had to apologize that August to the pope? Was this the whirlwind a civilization reaped once the seeds of moral relativism were sown? And, most of all: what next? When might they move out into the bourgeois utopias: the bungalow belts, the white-picket-fenced suburbs of the Midwest, the white stucco of the Southwest, your own backyard? Were there even enough peace officers in existence to respond? The political season approached. What pundits referred to by the shorthand as “the cities” defined the battlefield. Conservatives looked for ways to blame it all on the liberals. A 5–4 Supreme Court decision had been handed down in June requiring police to warn arrestees of their constitutional right against self-incrimination and to an attorney.

It argued for the diplomatic “long view” toward China, the nation that had descended into a sanguinary revolutionary madness, against which Nixon had spoken of in tones of Red-baiting demagoguery for decades: “We simply cannot afford to leave China forever outside the family of nations.” The USSR had softened its hard line, the essay argued; so, with the proper “dynamic detoxification” and “creative counterpressure,” might the Middle Kingdom. The paper was an audition before the Franklins. But Nixon didn’t neglect the Orthogonians. Another article, drafted by Pat Buchanan, came out simultaneously in Reader’s Digest for the masses behind their white picket fences called “What Has Happened to America?” Now that Nixon’s two ’68 opponents, Johnson and Romney, were tangled up in a post-riot battle of legalistic recrimination, the strategic conditions were finally propitious: he introduced himself as a crusader for law and order. “Just three years ago this nation seemed to be completing its greatest decade of racial progress,” the article began. Now the country was “among the most lawless and violent in the history of free peoples.”

That he would be known as a loser for the rest of his life. Something, anything, to redeem the dread: if he lost, he was telling his family, it would be because America had proven herself unworthy of his idealism. He might lose. The previous night, on a two-hour Nixon telethon broadcast across the West Coast, a last-ditch attempt to guarantee his home state, he had made a gaffe: he swore. Richard Nixon had been retailing his white-picket-fence piety to the voters since 1946. The only Nixon America’s television audiences knew was the one who, in his third debate with Kennedy in 1960, had solemnly chided Harry Truman for a recent comment that the Republican Party could “go to hell.” “One thing I have noted as I have traveled around the country are the tremendous number of children who come out to see the presidential candidates” is what square old Dick Nixon had said then.


Discover Kaua'i Travel Guide by Lonely Planet

carbon footprint, G4S, haute couture, land reform, Maui Hawaii, out of africa, polynesian navigation, profit motive, union organizing, white picket fence

BUNK HOUSE AT ROSEWOOD KAUA'I Hotel $ Offline map ( 822-5216; www.rosewoodkauai.com; 872 Kamalu Rd; r with shared bathroom $55-65; ) Hostelers will be forever spoiled by these meticulously tidy bunkrooms with private entrances and kitchenettes. Expect a cleaning fee ($25). For a step up, inquire about the picturesque ‘Victorian cottage’ ($145), and ‘thatched cottage’ ($135), which are also on the storybook-pretty property, complete with white picket fence. HALE AWAPUHI Condo $$$ Offline map ( 651-0040; www.haleawapuhi.com; Papaloa Rd; 2br from $299; ) At a near-decadent 2200 sq ft, this plush beachside sunrise- and moonrise-watching unit is an anomaly among the Eastside's modest trends. With a newly designed kitchen, both pink and black marble floors – separated by an intricate wooden spiral staircase – and a plethora of Balinese furnishings throughout, one can't help but appreciate the attention to detail.


pages: 314 words: 106,575

Black Fire: The True Story of the Original Tom Sawyer--And of the Mysterious Fires That Baptized Gold Rush-Era San Francisco by Robert Graysmith

California gold rush, profit motive, South of Market, San Francisco, white picket fence

As sixty hard-drinking roughhousers, heaving and chanting, rocked to and fro at the handles of the hand-pumper and extinguished two small brush fires, they knew another city-destroying blaze must happen as surely as the sun now rising over the flimsy structures. Charlie Robinson, most famous of all San Francisco torch boys, nearly broke his neck on such a treacherous street. Born in East Monmouth, Maine, he had grown up in a two-story gabled frame house at Number Nine Calhoun Street on Windmill Hill. Perched on a white picket fence across from the house where Hudson, the coffee and tea merchant, ground his spices, Charlie drew fine views of the bay. At age seven, he took painting lessons from the artist Charles C. Nahl. Threats of criminal reprisals forced Charlie’s father, Doc Robinson, a theatrical producer-playwright, to flee San Francisco. He left Charlie and his mother without any means of support, so the boy began running for Big Six.


pages: 460 words: 108,654

Time Travelers Never Die by Jack McDevitt

Albert Einstein, index card, indoor plumbing, Johannes Kepler, life extension, orbital mechanics / astrodynamics, Ralph Waldo Emerson, rolodex, Rosa Parks, Thales of Miletus, walking around money, white picket fence, Winter of Discontent

“Not possible,” she said. Eyes wide, she was looking at the sky, at clusters of trees, at a nearby town, at the dirt road underfoot, at a railroad station. “Can’t be happening.” Dave had been there once before, with Shel, when Thomas Edison was supposed to pass through, but they hadn’t done their research thoroughly, and he didn’t show up. It was a pleasant little town with tree-lined streets and white picket fences. Straw hats were in favor for men, and bright ribbons for ladies. Down at the barbershop, the talk would be mostly about the canal they were going to dig through Panama. Birds sang, and in the distance the clean bang of church bells started. He helped her across a set of railroad tracks, and they stopped in front of a general store. She leaned against him, trying to shut it out. “It takes a little getting used to,” Dave said.


pages: 385 words: 111,113

Augmented: Life in the Smart Lane by Brett King

23andMe, 3D printing, additive manufacturing, Affordable Care Act / Obamacare, agricultural Revolution, Airbnb, Albert Einstein, Amazon Web Services, Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic, Apple II, artificial general intelligence, asset allocation, augmented reality, autonomous vehicles, barriers to entry, bitcoin, blockchain, business intelligence, business process, call centre, chief data officer, Chris Urmson, Clayton Christensen, clean water, congestion charging, crowdsourcing, cryptocurrency, deskilling, different worldview, disruptive innovation, distributed generation, distributed ledger, double helix, drone strike, Elon Musk, Erik Brynjolfsson, Fellow of the Royal Society, fiat currency, financial exclusion, Flash crash, Flynn Effect, future of work, gig economy, Google Glasses, Google X / Alphabet X, Hans Lippershey, Hyperloop, income inequality, industrial robot, information asymmetry, Internet of things, invention of movable type, invention of the printing press, invention of the telephone, invention of the wheel, James Dyson, Jeff Bezos, job automation, job-hopping, John Markoff, John von Neumann, Kevin Kelly, Kickstarter, Kodak vs Instagram, Leonard Kleinrock, lifelogging, low earth orbit, low skilled workers, Lyft, M-Pesa, Mark Zuckerberg, Marshall McLuhan, megacity, Metcalfe’s law, Minecraft, mobile money, money market fund, more computing power than Apollo, Network effects, new economy, obamacare, Occupy movement, Oculus Rift, off grid, packet switching, pattern recognition, peer-to-peer, Ray Kurzweil, RFID, ride hailing / ride sharing, Robert Metcalfe, Satoshi Nakamoto, Second Machine Age, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI), self-driving car, sharing economy, Shoshana Zuboff, Silicon Valley, Silicon Valley startup, Skype, smart cities, smart grid, smart transportation, Snapchat, social graph, software as a service, speech recognition, statistical model, stem cell, Stephen Hawking, Steve Jobs, Steve Wozniak, strong AI, TaskRabbit, technological singularity, telemarketer, telepresence, telepresence robot, Tesla Model S, The Future of Employment, Tim Cook: Apple, trade route, Travis Kalanick, Turing complete, Turing test, uber lyft, undersea cable, urban sprawl, V2 rocket, Watson beat the top human players on Jeopardy!, white picket fence, WikiLeaks

In the future, you’ll be able to take a different car to work every day (autonomous, self-driving vehicles) at a much cheaper rate than you could ever do owning a car of your own, live month by month or week by week in a different room and work in a different workspace every day. Because these experiences are personalised, it will still feel like our own personal style is shining through. Generations Y and Z will trade assets for experiences—the American Dream of the white picket fence will likely give way to a dream of a lifestyle. The biggest entrenched economies today will be those most disrupted by the Augmented Age, largely because of their hesitancy to change from reliance on long held investments in existing technologies. It is why China, which is investing heavily in new technologies and infrastructure, will likely eclipse the United States and Eurozone rapidly as the most valuable economy in the world, why unemployment is likely to grow in the United States as the economy resists infrastructure improvement2 and climate change,3 but why the US stock market will thrive.


pages: 353 words: 106,704

Choked: Life and Breath in the Age of Air Pollution by Beth Gardiner

barriers to entry, Boris Johnson, call centre, carbon footprint, clean water, connected car, deindustrialization, Donald Trump, Elon Musk, epigenetics, Exxon Valdez, failed state, Hyperloop, index card, Indoor air pollution, Mahatma Gandhi, megacity, meta analysis, meta-analysis, Ronald Reagan, self-driving car, Silicon Valley, Skype, statistical model, Steve Jobs, white picket fence

The long rows of trees on either side are bare, and the ground that surrounds them is dry and dusty, like everything here. Later this year, these trees will bear almonds; the Central Valley produces 99 percent of America’s supply of the nut3 and 80 percent of the world’s.4 Soon, I pull up to Tom Frantz’s ranch house, set amid his own almond fields. Roses grow out front, near a pink Adirondack chair and a white picket fence; there’s a parched dirt yard beside the driveway. Frantz grew up in this house, and he has a grizzled, weather-beaten face, the face of a man who’s spent much of his life outdoors, a farmer, and also, until his retirement, a high school math teacher. A mane of tousled gray hair springs from his head, and he wears a frayed tan T-shirt and bushy moustache. Frantz is a lifelong gadfly, a relentless litigant and activist, head of a group he cofounded, the quirkily named Association of Irritated Residents, or AIR.


pages: 386 words: 116,233

The Millionaire Fastlane: Crack the Code to Wealth and Live Rich for a Lifetime by Mj Demarco

8-hour work day, Albert Einstein, AltaVista, back-to-the-land, Bernie Madoff, bounce rate, business process, butterfly effect, buy and hold, cloud computing, commoditize, dark matter, delayed gratification, demand response, Donald Trump, fear of failure, financial independence, fixed income, housing crisis, Jeff Bezos, job-hopping, Lao Tzu, Mark Zuckerberg, passive income, passive investing, payday loans, Ponzi scheme, price anchoring, Ronald Reagan, upwardly mobile, wealth creators, white picket fence, World Values Survey, zero day

Unfortunately, some feel that wealth's toll can be paid by entitlements or certain “prerequisites,” such as: A functional family/good childhood “Hard work” versus “smart work” Educational accomplishments and credentials after your name A stellar business plan Venture capital Being a certain sex, color, or age Wishing, dreaming, and thinking positively Knowing the right people in the right places Attending the right schools Being passionate or "doing what you love" or "what you know" Nothing is further from the truth. The Millionaire Fastlane doesn't care about these things. The Fastlane isn't a straight and smooth tree-lined street with white picket fences and children swinging on tires hanging from oak trees. It's a dark, deserted, unpaved road strewn with potholes that forces change and evolution. If the road trip to wealth were easy, wouldn't everyone be wealthy? Expect a price to be paid. Expect risk and sacrifice. Expect bumps in the road. When you hit the first pothole (and yes, it will happen) know that you are forging the process of your unfolding story.


pages: 367 words: 117,340

America, You Sexy Bitch: A Love Letter to Freedom by Meghan McCain, Michael Black

Affordable Care Act / Obamacare, carbon footprint, Columbine, fear of failure, feminist movement, glass ceiling, income inequality, obamacare, Ronald Reagan, Silicon Valley, Tony Hsieh, too big to fail, white picket fence

As far as I could tell, every single person wanted the same things: the opportunity to succeed and to make a productive life for themselves and their children. No more, no less. The funny thing about Meghan’s life and my own is that, judging only by lifestyle, we represent the stereotypes of the opposing political party. She’s the young, free-spirited wild child who lives in big cities. I’m the buttoned-up family guy with the wife, two kids, and house with the (literal, in my case) white picket fence. But people aren’t stereotypes, they’re just people. (Actually Omar the Anarchist was a stereotype, but he’s the exception that proves the rule.) Not long after Meghan calls it (and I would like to note for the record that on our final night, she did call it, the wuss), Stephie’s giving me the “see you later” wave from across the yard. She’d been sticking close to Meghan all night. Whether she was feeling shy or just protective, I don’t know, but it’s amazing to me how close these two have grown.


pages: 497 words: 124,144

Red Moon Rising by Matthew Brzezinski

Albert Einstein, anti-communist, Columbine, cuban missile crisis, Kitchen Debate, RAND corporation, Ronald Reagan, skunkworks, trade route, Vanguard fund, walking around money, white picket fence

With the assignment came a change of address and a new lease on life for von Braun and his team. Compared to Fort Bliss, Huntsville seemed idyllic. The historic hamlet was home to fifteen thousand genteel southerners, and its proud Civil War heritage was etched in the Confederate Monument that crowned the town square. White clapboard church spires dominated the skyline, and the sidewalks were trimmed with white picket fences and immaculately groomed lawns. White was the dominant color in Huntsville, as it was in all of Madison County, Alabama, and throughout the entire Jim Crow South. But the civil rights movement was beginning to take root in 1950, and this worried some of the town’s newest German residents. “We had some concerns here,” Wernher Dahm recalled. “Not so much about segregation . . . as about open strife.”


pages: 402 words: 126,835

The Job: The Future of Work in the Modern Era by Ellen Ruppel Shell

3D printing, affirmative action, Affordable Care Act / Obamacare, Airbnb, airport security, Albert Einstein, Amazon Mechanical Turk, basic income, Baxter: Rethink Robotics, big-box store, blue-collar work, Buckminster Fuller, call centre, Capital in the Twenty-First Century by Thomas Piketty, Clayton Christensen, cloud computing, collective bargaining, computer vision, corporate governance, corporate social responsibility, creative destruction, crowdsourcing, deskilling, disruptive innovation, Donald Trump, Downton Abbey, Elon Musk, Erik Brynjolfsson, factory automation, follow your passion, Frederick Winslow Taylor, future of work, game design, glass ceiling, hiring and firing, immigration reform, income inequality, industrial robot, invisible hand, Jeff Bezos, job automation, job satisfaction, John Markoff, John Maynard Keynes: Economic Possibilities for our Grandchildren, Joseph Schumpeter, Kickstarter, knowledge economy, knowledge worker, Kodak vs Instagram, labor-force participation, low skilled workers, Lyft, manufacturing employment, Marc Andreessen, Mark Zuckerberg, means of production, move fast and break things, move fast and break things, new economy, Norbert Wiener, obamacare, offshore financial centre, Paul Samuelson, precariat, Ralph Waldo Emerson, risk tolerance, Robert Gordon, Robert Shiller, Robert Shiller, Rodney Brooks, Ronald Reagan, Second Machine Age, self-driving car, shareholder value, sharing economy, Silicon Valley, Snapchat, Steve Jobs, The Chicago School, Thomas L Friedman, Thorstein Veblen, Tim Cook: Apple, Uber and Lyft, uber lyft, universal basic income, urban renewal, white picket fence, working poor, Y Combinator, young professional, zero-sum game

In national ratings, real estate agents have by several metrics “the happiest job in America,” or at least among the happiest. Why do real estate agents feel so satisfied with their work? The industry cites several theories, but to get beyond those, I thought it best to put that question to an actual real estate agent. When I called to set our appointment, John Bigelow had just closed one of the biggest deals of his career: a five-bedroom colonial revival tucked behind a white picket fence in a toney neighborhood on the outskirts of Boston. He suggested we meet at the house later that week, and I arrived a few minutes early to encounter him stepping out of a Jaguar, wearing Paul Stewart boots, a Hermès tie, and a fabulous Rolex watch, circa 1977. Noting my quizzical look, he laughed. “I loathe paying retail,” he told me. “I bought the Jag from a client for five hundred dollars.


The Push by Tommy Caldwell

blue-collar work, crowdsourcing, dumpster diving, helicopter parent, white picket fence, zero-sum game

Even when my dad sat quietly working on a jigsaw puzzle, his muttered “All right” at finding a piece that fit seemed raucous. I’d watch Beth heave a sigh, as if she was moving heavy furniture. In fact, she wanted to move my parents out of there. My allegiances were torn, but I said, “Okay, I will tell them.” The thought of asking my parents to leave broke my heart. They’d just arrived. We went for a walk, the news trucks now all gone, strolling past white picket fences and flower boxes. The sound of birds chirping filled the air. The streets were wide and in a perfect grid pattern. I could tell they were trying to make no sound with their feet. I took a few deep breaths and started to speak. “I am so sorry, Mom and Dad.” Tears began pouring down my face. “It’s too hard for you to be here right now. I’ll come home as soon as I can. Don’t worry about me.


pages: 412 words: 128,042

Extreme Economies: Survival, Failure, Future – Lessons From the World’s Limits by Richard Davies

agricultural Revolution, air freight, Anton Chekhov, artificial general intelligence, autonomous vehicles, barriers to entry, big-box store, cashless society, clean water, complexity theory, deindustrialization, eurozone crisis, failed state, financial innovation, illegal immigration, income inequality, informal economy, James Hargreaves, job automation, John Maynard Keynes: Economic Possibilities for our Grandchildren, John Maynard Keynes: technological unemployment, joint-stock company, large denomination, Livingstone, I presume, Malacca Straits, mandatory minimum, manufacturing employment, means of production, megacity, meta analysis, meta-analysis, new economy, off grid, oil shale / tar sands, pension reform, profit motive, randomized controlled trial, school choice, school vouchers, Scramble for Africa, side project, Silicon Valley, Simon Kuznets, Skype, spinning jenny, The Chicago School, the payments system, trade route, Travis Kalanick, uranium enrichment, urban planning, wealth creators, white picket fence, working-age population, Y Combinator, young professional

The iconic river and road make this city, Louisiana’s largest, seem like a place of opportunity and freedom. For those born in New Orleans, life’s road is often much shorter. After a couple of hours driving north on Highway 61 the swamps and cypress trees of low-lying Louisiana disappear as the road begins to undulate through hills. A turning to the right leads to the pretty town of Jackson with its antique shops, neat lawns and white picket fences. Turning left on to Highway 66 the road swoops and rolls past Baptist churches, plastic letters on their signs spelling out messages – JESUS IS RISEN, and GOD’S NOT DEAD – to the passing traffic. Then the highway stops, abruptly, at a dead end. There is a large wire gate and a security tower. This is the entrance to Louisiana State Penitentiary, the ‘Alcatraz of the South’, a place known by prisoners, guards and locals as ‘Angola’.


pages: 666 words: 131,148

Frommer's Seattle 2010 by Karl Samson

airport security, British Empire, Frank Gehry, glass ceiling, global village, haute cuisine, place-making, sustainable-tourism, transcontinental railway, urban sprawl, white picket fence

In less time than it takes to smoke a ham, both sides were calling in reinforcements. Luckily, this pigheadedness was defused, and a more serious confrontation was avoided. The English Camp unit of the historical park is set on picturesque Garrison Bay, and, with its huge old shade trees, wide lawns, and white wooden buildings, it’s the epitome of British civility. There’s even a formal garden surrounded by a white picket fence. You can look inside the reconstructed buildings and imagine the days when this was one of the most far-flung corners of the British Empire. If you’re full of energy, hike the 1.25-mile trail to the top of 650-foot Mount Young for a beautiful panorama of the island. An easier 1-mile hike hugs the shoreline out to the end of Bell Point. The visitor center is open from June through early September daily from 9am to 5pm.


City: A Guidebook for the Urban Age by P. D. Smith

active transport: walking or cycling, Albert Einstein, Andrew Keen, augmented reality, banking crisis, Berlin Wall, British Empire, Broken windows theory, Buckminster Fuller, Burning Man, business cycle, car-free, carbon footprint, clean water, colonial rule, congestion charging, cosmological principle, crack epidemic, double entry bookkeeping, edge city, Edward Lloyd's coffeehouse, en.wikipedia.org, Enrique Peñalosa, Fall of the Berlin Wall, Frank Gehry, garden city movement, global village, haute cuisine, income inequality, Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), invention of gunpowder, Jane Jacobs, John Snow's cholera map, Kevin Kelly, Kibera, Kickstarter, Kowloon Walled City, Masdar, megacity, megastructure, multicultural london english, mutually assured destruction, New Urbanism, Norman Mailer, peak oil, RFID, smart cities, starchitect, telepresence, the built environment, The Death and Life of Great American Cities, the High Line, Thomas Malthus, trade route, urban planning, urban renewal, urban sprawl, Victor Gruen, walkable city, white flight, white picket fence, young professional

By the end of the nineteenth century, the population of downtown was falling steadily at a time when the overall population of cities was rising. People were escaping what one newspaper editor described as ‘the moral and physical miasma of the metropolis’.15 Downtown’s loss was suburbia’s gain. For this was the beginning of America’s enduring love affair with suburbia, the dream of a semi-rural bourgeois utopia. For the middle classes this meant a single-family home surrounded by trees and a white picket fence. Suburbia transformed the metropolis in America: as the nineteenth century drew to a close, there was a clear separation of homes and businesses. Soon every American city had two hearts. A British visitor to Chicago described the radical difference between the two: ‘In the one – height, narrowness, noise, monotony, dirt, sordid squalor, pretentiousness; in the other – light, space, moderation, homelikeness.’16 And there was no doubting where most Americans wanted to live.


pages: 428 words: 138,235

The Billionaire and the Mechanic: How Larry Ellison and a Car Mechanic Teamed Up to Win Sailing's Greatest Race, the Americas Cup, Twice by Julian Guthrie

Apple's 1984 Super Bowl advert, cloud computing, fear of failure, Ford paid five dollars a day, Loma Prieta earthquake, market bubble, Maui Hawaii, new economy, pets.com, Ronald Reagan, side project, Silicon Valley, software as a service, South of Market, San Francisco, Steve Jobs, white picket fence, Yogi Berra

Norbert hailed a cab from the Metropolis Hotel, which had apartments for the team and was where they liked to stay. The driver passed familiar sights in one of Auckland’s oldest suburbs. There at the corner of Scarborough Terrace was St. John the Baptist Catholic Church, opened in 1861 and said to be the oldest parish in Auckland. Next to the small, simple white timber Gothic Revival church was a cemetery plot enclosed by a white picket fence. Norbert walked inside and made the sign of the cross. He had been raised Catholic and the refrains and rituals were a part of him. It was early afternoon and Mass was over. Norbert took his seat in a pew and began to pray. It was his routine when he was in Auckland. “Hey, God,” Norbert began. “It’s Norbert here. I’m back in New Zealand and our team has a chance to win this thing. You may or may not like billionaires, but they are your children too.


pages: 1,106 words: 335,322

Titan: The Life of John D. Rockefeller, Sr. by Ron Chernow

business cycle, California gold rush, collective bargaining, death of newspapers, delayed gratification, double entry bookkeeping, endowment effect, family office, financial independence, Frederick Winslow Taylor, George Santayana, God and Mammon, income inequality, invisible hand, Joseph Schumpeter, Louis Pasteur, Mahatma Gandhi, Menlo Park, New Journalism, oil rush, oil shale / tar sands, passive investing, plutocrats, Plutocrats, price discrimination, profit motive, Ralph Waldo Emerson, refrigerator car, The Chicago School, Thorstein Veblen, transcontinental railway, traveling salesman, union organizing, Upton Sinclair, white picket fence, yellow journalism

In the sole extant reference to the matter, he wrote in 1923, “I had just come from New York State and recall my humiliation in being obliged to remain one term in the old Clinton Street School—I had been for several years in the Owego Academy . . . and supposed I should go at once into the High School instead of the Grammar School.”3 For this proud boy, the demotion must have been one of many small but wounding indignities suffered during these anxious years. When John finally entered high school (later called Central High School) in 1854 at the age of fifteen, it was still a modest, one-story affair, shaded by trees and standing behind a clean white picket fence; it would receive a much fancier new building in 1856. Operating on the progressive theory of free education for boys and girls, the school enjoyed a superb reputation. Since it stressed composition, John had to submit essays on four topics to advance to the next grade: “Education,” “Freedom,” “The Character of St. Patrick,” and “Recollections of the Past.” At a time when America was deeply split over the question of extending slavery to new territories—the Kansas-Nebraska Act was passed in May 1854—these writings exhibit Rockefeller as a young democrat and confirmed abolitionist.

At another point, they met an old man in the roadway whom John so sedulously drained of local lore that the latter finally pleaded with weary resignation, “For God’s sake if you will go with me over to that barn yonder, I will start and tell you everything I ever knew.”72 This was the same monotonously inquisitive young man who was known as “the Sponge” in the Oil Regions. For the first six months of their marriage, John and Laura lived with Eliza at 33 Cheshire Street; then they moved into a dignified, two-story brick house at 29 Cheshire Street. Surrounded by a white picket fence, the house had tall, graceful windows but was disfigured by an ugly portico. Even though Rockefeller now operated and partially owned the largest refinery in Cleveland, he and Laura lived frugally without house servants. Rockefeller always cherished the chaste simplicity of this early period and preserved their first set of dishes, which stirred him to wistful reflections in later years. Thus, by the end of the Civil War, John D.


pages: 717 words: 150,288

Cities Under Siege: The New Military Urbanism by Stephen Graham

addicted to oil, airport security, anti-communist, autonomous vehicles, Berlin Wall, call centre, carbon footprint, clean water, congestion charging, creative destruction, credit crunch, DARPA: Urban Challenge, defense in depth, deindustrialization, digital map, edge city, energy security, European colonialism, failed state, Food sovereignty, Gini coefficient, global supply chain, Google Earth, illegal immigration, income inequality, knowledge economy, late capitalism, loose coupling, market fundamentalism, mass incarceration, McMansion, megacity, moral panic, mutually assured destruction, Naomi Klein, New Urbanism, offshore financial centre, one-state solution, pattern recognition, peak oil, planetary scale, private military company, Project for a New American Century, RAND corporation, RFID, Richard Florida, Scramble for Africa, Silicon Valley, smart transportation, surplus humans, The Bell Curve by Richard Herrnstein and Charles Murray, urban decay, urban planning, urban renewal, urban sprawl, Washington Consensus, white flight, white picket fence

Either way, these constellations of urban simulacra do the important geopolitical work of continually reducing the complex social and cultural worlds of global South urbanism to mere targets, mere battlespaces, existing for the sole purpose of being assaulted in urban campaigns against ‘terror’ or for ‘freedom’. For militaries to construct physical simulations of places to be targeted and destroyed is nothing new, of course. Nor is the close relation between play, toys, and war, or the mobilization of Hollywood special effects for a war effort. In the Cold War, for example, atomic and thermonuclear bombs were regularly exploded near simulated suburban homes, complete with white picket fences and nuclear families of mannequins placed around the table having a mock meal. Even earlier, during the Second World War, the Dugway Proving Grounds in Utah was the site for the construction of a village of extremely accurate Berlin tenements as well as a cluster of Japanese houses built of wood and rice paper9. The former were designed by modernist luminary Eric Mendelsohn, freshly exiled from Germany.


pages: 482 words: 149,351

The Finance Curse: How Global Finance Is Making Us All Poorer by Nicholas Shaxson

activist fund / activist shareholder / activist investor, Airbnb, airline deregulation, anti-communist, bank run, banking crisis, Basel III, Bernie Madoff, Big bang: deregulation of the City of London, Blythe Masters, Boris Johnson, Bretton Woods, British Empire, business climate, business cycle, capital controls, carried interest, Cass Sunstein, Celtic Tiger, central bank independence, centre right, Clayton Christensen, cloud computing, corporate governance, corporate raider, creative destruction, Credit Default Swap, cross-subsidies, David Ricardo: comparative advantage, demographic dividend, Deng Xiaoping, desegregation, Donald Trump, Etonian, failed state, falling living standards, family office, financial deregulation, financial innovation, forensic accounting, Francis Fukuyama: the end of history, full employment, gig economy, Gini coefficient, global supply chain, high net worth, income inequality, index fund, invisible hand, Jeff Bezos, Kickstarter, land value tax, late capitalism, light touch regulation, London Whale, Long Term Capital Management, low skilled workers, manufacturing employment, Mark Zuckerberg, Martin Wolf, Mont Pelerin Society, moral hazard, neoliberal agenda, Network effects, new economy, Northern Rock, offshore financial centre, old-boy network, out of africa, Paul Samuelson, plutocrats, Plutocrats, Ponzi scheme, price mechanism, purchasing power parity, pushing on a string, race to the bottom, regulatory arbitrage, rent-seeking, road to serfdom, Robert Bork, Ronald Coase, Ronald Reagan, shareholder value, sharing economy, Silicon Valley, Skype, smart grid, Social Responsibility of Business Is to Increase Its Profits, South Sea Bubble, sovereign wealth fund, special economic zone, Steve Ballmer, Steve Jobs, The Chicago School, Thorstein Veblen, too big to fail, transfer pricing, wealth creators, white picket fence, women in the workforce, zero-sum game

He operates out of an office in a beautiful white-painted former farmhouse with Harrods-green shutters, set among lush clipped lawns, and his job is to persuade businesses to move to the area: first Lenexa, then Johnson County, then Kansas State. He seems to have been effective. Lenexa is a haven of high-end business parks, sprawling low-rise office buildings and industrial centres, nestled among pretty suburban developments chock full of architects, engineers and bioscientists living comfortably behind white picket fences. Employment in Johnson County has been growing by over 4,000 a year through good and bad times, and the unemployment rate, at 3.3 per cent in 2016, has nearly always been lower than the national average.21 When I met him Schreck outlined a number of old-school reasons why so many businesses come to the area. ‘We have had good elected officials who are not afraid to get infrastructure out ahead of growth: streets and roads and sewers and all these kinds of non-sexy things.


Frommer's San Diego 2011 by Mark Hiss

airport security, California gold rush, car-free, Charles Lindbergh, desegregation, Donald Trump, East Village, El Camino Real, glass ceiling, New Journalism, Norman Mailer, Skype, South of Market, San Francisco, sustainable-tourism, transcontinental railway, urban renewal, white picket fence, Works Progress Administration

Main courses $11–$32 lunch, $15–$32 dinner. AE, DISC, MC, V. Sun–Thurs 11:30am–9pm; Fri–Sat 11:30am–10pm (lounge until 1:30am). Free 2-hr. validated parking at Hotel Parisi. Bus: 30. Inexpensive The Cottage BREAKFAST/LIGHT FARE La Jolla’s best—and friendliest— breakfast is served at this turn-of-the-20th-century bungalow. The cottage is light and airy, but most diners opt for tables outside, where a charming white picket fence encloses the trellis-shaded brick patio. Omelets and egg dishes feature Mediterranean, Cal-Latino, and classic American touches. Homemade granola is a favorite, as 124 09_626214-ch06.indd 12409_626214-ch06.indd 124 7/23/10 11:21 PM7/23/10 11:21 PM 7702 Fay Ave. (at Kline St.), La Jolla. & 858/454-8409. www.cottagelajolla.com. Reservations accepted for dinner only. Main courses $8–$13 breakfast, $10–$16 lunch, $12–$23 dinner.


pages: 561 words: 163,916

The History of the Future: Oculus, Facebook, and the Revolution That Swept Virtual Reality by Blake J. Harris

4chan, airport security, Anne Wojcicki, Asian financial crisis, augmented reality, barriers to entry, Bernie Sanders, bitcoin, call centre, computer vision, cryptocurrency, disruptive innovation, Donald Trump, drone strike, Elon Musk, financial independence, game design, Grace Hopper, illegal immigration, invisible hand, Jaron Lanier, Jony Ive, Kickstarter, Marc Andreessen, Mark Zuckerberg, Menlo Park, Minecraft, move fast and break things, move fast and break things, Network effects, Oculus Rift, Peter Thiel, QR code, sensor fusion, side project, Silicon Valley, skunkworks, Skype, slashdot, Snapchat, software patent, stealth mode startup, Steve Jobs, unpaid internship, white picket fence

And he was not alone, joined by Edelmann in matching attire. “I am willing to admit,” Luckey had told her, “that you look slightly better than I do.” Edelmann smiled and as fans snapped photos of her and Luckey—both then, and throughout the trip—she was reminded of something she had said to a friend six months prior: “I think I would have done just fine with an ordinary life: the kids, the mortgage, the white picket fence—I would have been fine with that. But because I’m able to do cool shit, I feel like I have to. For all the people who can’t.” Luckey and Edelmann’s matching outfits were apparently such a hit that it was covered by tech journalists back in the US. Though Luckey appreciated that these reporters found his love of cosplay to be newsworthy, he didn’t much appreciate that just about everyone had still-uncorrected stories about him and Nimble America; and that, of course, those inaccurate stories got linked back to in these new ones.


pages: 559 words: 169,094

The Unwinding: An Inner History of the New America by George Packer

Affordable Care Act / Obamacare, Apple's 1984 Super Bowl advert, bank run, big-box store, citizen journalism, cleantech, collateralized debt obligation, collective bargaining, corporate raider, Credit Default Swap, credit default swaps / collateralized debt obligations, deindustrialization, diversified portfolio, East Village, El Camino Real, Elon Musk, family office, financial independence, financial innovation, fixed income, Flash crash, Henry Ford's grandson gave labor union leader Walter Reuther a tour of the company’s new, automated factory…, housing crisis, income inequality, informal economy, Jane Jacobs, life extension, Long Term Capital Management, low skilled workers, Marc Andreessen, margin call, Mark Zuckerberg, market bubble, market fundamentalism, Maui Hawaii, Menlo Park, Neil Kinnock, new economy, New Journalism, obamacare, Occupy movement, oil shock, paypal mafia, peak oil, Peter Thiel, Ponzi scheme, Richard Florida, Robert Bork, Ronald Reagan, Ronald Reagan: Tear down this wall, shareholder value, side project, Silicon Valley, Silicon Valley startup, single-payer health, smart grid, Steve Jobs, strikebreaker, The Death and Life of Great American Cities, the scientific method, too big to fail, union organizing, urban planning, We are the 99%, We wanted flying cars, instead we got 140 characters, white flight, white picket fence, zero-sum game

“You are a dynamic speaker,” he said, “you need to introduce me every time.” It was like her mother patting her on the back and saying, “It’s going to be all right.” After that she hit the ground running. Miss Hattie said later, “Tammy molded me into the leader that I am.” Across the street from her cut-down-flower garden, in another vacant lot Miss Hattie started the Fairmont Girls and Vicinity Community Garden. She put up a white picket fence, like in the suburbs, and built raised beds out of scavenged wood and chipboard, and compost bins from factory pallets. Georgine’s restaurant loaded thirty pounds of compost in her truck every day, and her doctor gave her horse manure from his farm. Tammy wrote a grant application to the Wean Foundation and Miss Hattie received thirty-seven hundred dollars to get started. She was trying to beautify the neighborhood and teach the kids something nobody could take away from them.


pages: 526 words: 160,601

A Generation of Sociopaths: How the Baby Boomers Betrayed America by Bruce Cannon Gibney

1960s counterculture, 2013 Report for America's Infrastructure - American Society of Civil Engineers - 19 March 2013, affirmative action, Affordable Care Act / Obamacare, American Society of Civil Engineers: Report Card, Bernie Madoff, Bernie Sanders, Bretton Woods, business cycle, buy and hold, carbon footprint, Charles Lindbergh, cognitive dissonance, collapse of Lehman Brothers, collateralized debt obligation, corporate personhood, Corrections Corporation of America, currency manipulation / currency intervention, Daniel Kahneman / Amos Tversky, dark matter, Deng Xiaoping, Donald Trump, Downton Abbey, Edward Snowden, Elon Musk, ending welfare as we know it, equal pay for equal work, failed state, financial deregulation, Francis Fukuyama: the end of history, future of work, gender pay gap, gig economy, Haight Ashbury, Home mortgage interest deduction, Hyperloop, illegal immigration, impulse control, income inequality, Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), invisible hand, Jane Jacobs, Kitchen Debate, labor-force participation, Long Term Capital Management, Lyft, Mark Zuckerberg, market bubble, mass immigration, mass incarceration, McMansion, medical bankruptcy, Menlo Park, Mont Pelerin Society, moral hazard, mortgage debt, mortgage tax deduction, neoliberal agenda, Network effects, obamacare, offshore financial centre, oil shock, operation paperclip, plutocrats, Plutocrats, Ponzi scheme, price stability, quantitative easing, Ralph Waldo Emerson, RAND corporation, rent control, ride hailing / ride sharing, risk tolerance, Robert Shiller, Robert Shiller, Ronald Reagan, Rubik’s Cube, school choice, secular stagnation, self-driving car, shareholder value, short selling, side project, Silicon Valley, smart grid, Snapchat, source of truth, stem cell, Steve Jobs, Stewart Brand, survivorship bias, TaskRabbit, The Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith, Tim Cook: Apple, too big to fail, War on Poverty, white picket fence, Whole Earth Catalog, women in the workforce, Y2K, Yom Kippur War, zero-sum game

Compared to today’s operatic contrivances and reality television, Beaver was pure anthropological rigor. The subjects of study, the Cleaver family, were studiously unremarkable: two parents (Ward and June), two kids (the Beav and Wally; presumably the statistically required fractional additional child would have been unsettling to display), plunked down in a suburban house enclosed, inevitably, by a white picket fence. Ward was a World War II veteran who had attended a state college, presumably on the GI Bill, and worked at a trust company; June ran the house. The Cleaver children were both Boomers, notionally born in 1944 and 1950, and raised in ways that would have been instantly familiar to their peers on the other side of the set—and alien to their grandparents. For above all, Ward was a soft touch, a sharp contrast to his own father, an ancien régime monster of discipline and corporal punishment.


Random Family: Love, Drugs, Trouble, and Coming of Age in the Bro by LeBlanc, Adrian Nicole

activist lawyer, Chuck Templeton: OpenTable:, illegal immigration, mandatory minimum, white picket fence, working poor

“Mommy?” Nikki croaked. Mason rose and offered Coco his hand. “There are enough good men in Troy to keep you outta trouble. He’s gotta stay out.” The first thing Coco did when she got back to Corliss Park was drag the lawn chair to the sidewalk and dump it in the garbage. Then she marched straight to Family Dollar. Mercedes wheeled Pearl’s oxygen. Coco bought several packages of decorative white picket-fence pieces, trooped back to Corliss Park, in no mood for nonsense, and shoved them in her lawn. She clamped a bouquet of plastic red and yellow flowers to one of the ankle-high picket-fence posts and waited for Frankie to come home, so she could tell him that he had to go. Frankie didn’t last in the Bronx. He later confided to Coco that he had felt displaced at his mother’s house. His younger brother had claimed his old bedroom.


pages: 1,540 words: 400,759

Fodor's California 2014 by Fodor's

1960s counterculture, active transport: walking or cycling, affirmative action, Asilomar, Bay Area Rapid Transit, big-box store, California gold rush, car-free, centre right, Charles Lindbergh, Chuck Templeton: OpenTable:, Donner party, Downton Abbey, East Village, El Camino Real, Frank Gehry, Golden Gate Park, Haight Ashbury, housing crisis, Kickstarter, Maui Hawaii, Mikhail Gorbachev, Ronald Reagan, Saturday Night Live, Silicon Valley, South of Market, San Francisco, trade route, transcontinental railway, urban renewal, urban sprawl, white picket fence, Works Progress Administration, young professional

., near Missouri Flats exit off U.S. 50 | 95667 | 530/622–9100, 800/854–9100 | www.bestwestern.com | 105 rooms | Breakfast. Seasons Bed & Breakfast. B&B/INN | One of Placerville’s oldest homes has been transformed into a lovely and relaxing oasis. The main house, cottages, and gardens are filled with paintings and sculptures. Privacy is treasured here. A suite with a sitting room and stained-glass windows occupies the main house’s top floor. One cottage has a little white-picket fence around its own mini-garden; another has a two-person shower. Pros: quiet setting; short walk to downtown; attentive hosts; great breakfasts. Cons: B&B environment not for everyone. | Rooms from: $135 | 2934 Bedford Ave. | 95667 | 530/626–4420 | www.theseasons.net | 1 room, 2 suites, 1 cottage | Breakfast. Shenandoah Valley 20 miles south of Placerville. The most concentrated Gold Country wine-touring area lies in the hills of the Shenandoah Valley, east of Plymouth.

., about 2 miles south of Vallecito | 95251 | 209/736–2708 | www.caverntours.com | $14.95 | May–Oct., daily 9–6; Nov.–Apr., weekdays 10–5, weekends 9–5; hrs can vary, call to confirm. Murphys 10 miles northeast of Angels Camp. Murphys is the Gold Country’s most compact, orderly town, with enough shops and restaurants to keep families busy for at least a half-day. A well-preserved town of white-picket fences, Victorian houses, and interesting shops, it exhibits an upscale vibe. Horatio Alger and Ulysses S. Grant came through here, staying at what’s now called the Murphys Historic Hotel & Lodge when they, along with many other 19th-century tourists, came to investigate the giant sequoia groves in nearby Calaveras Big Trees State Park. Getting Here and Around Murphys is 10 miles northeast of Highway 49 on Highway 4.


Sweden by Becky Ohlsen

accounting loophole / creative accounting, car-free, centre right, clean water, financial independence, glass ceiling, haute couture, Kickstarter, low cost airline, low cost carrier, mass immigration, New Urbanism, period drama, place-making, post-work, starchitect, the built environment, white picket fence

Vägsjöfors Herrgård (313 30; info@vagsjoforsherrgard.com; dm Skr200, B&B per person from Skr350) Twenty kilometres north of Torsby, by a stunning lake, is this large manor house. B&B rooms are individually decorated so it’s hard to say what you’ll get, but the decor is genteel, and there are hostel beds too. Lunch is also served (Skr70, noon to 3pm). Hotell Örnen (146 64; hotell-ornen@telia.com; Östmarksvägen 4; s/d Skr740/890, 1-/2-/3-/4-bed apt Skr890/1100/1310/1520) Cosy Örnen is a pretty lemon-coloured place set behind a white picket fence smack-bang in the town centre. Bright white Swedish-style rooms practically vibrate with wholesomeness and folky charm. There are also similar flatlets with private kitchens. Heidruns Bok- & Bildcafé (421 26; www.heidruns.se; Fensbol 39; fika from Skr28; noon-5pm mid-Jun–Aug) In summer there’s live music, poetry and other entertainment at this charming cafe, run by local poet Bengt Berg; Sundays are the big day for entertainment.


pages: 613 words: 181,605

Circle of Greed: The Spectacular Rise and Fall of the Lawyer Who Brought Corporate America to Its Knees by Patrick Dillon, Carl M. Cannon

accounting loophole / creative accounting, affirmative action, Bernie Madoff, buy and hold, collective bargaining, Columbine, computer age, corporate governance, corporate raider, desegregation, energy security, estate planning, Exxon Valdez, fear of failure, fixed income, Gordon Gekko, greed is good, illegal immigration, index fund, John Markoff, mandatory minimum, margin call, Maui Hawaii, money market fund, new economy, oil shale / tar sands, Ponzi scheme, Ralph Nader, rolodex, Ronald Reagan, Sand Hill Road, Silicon Valley, Silicon Valley startup, Steve Jobs, the High Line, the market place, white picket fence, Works Progress Administration, zero-sum game

Despite his misgivings, Lerach called Mel Weiss to relay Cooperman’s conundrum, reminding his mentor that Cooperman had helped them bank a quick $1.75 million. He added, not quite as an afterthought, that like Weiss, Cooperman was an art collector. That addendum shed light on an alternative. Weiss flew to Los Angeles, where Cooperman met him and drove him to his Brentwood home, a relatively unimposing, two-story Cape Cod style, with a large porch, white picket fence, and tidy garden. Inside Cooperman showed off his collection of Monets and Picassos. The notoriously poker-faced Weiss could barely restrain himself as he admired what he saw on Cooperman’s walls, especially Picasso’s Nude Before a Mirror. “Henry Ford once owned this piece,” Cooperman boasted. Weiss, who fancied himself the Henry Ford of the plaintiffs’ bar and owned a sizable collection of his own Picassos, was duly impressed.


pages: 1,048 words: 187,324

Atlas Obscura: An Explorer's Guide to the World's Hidden Wonders by Joshua Foer, Dylan Thuras, Ella Morton

anti-communist, Berlin Wall, British Empire, Buckminster Fuller, centre right, Charles Lindbergh, colonial rule, Colonization of Mars, cosmic microwave background, cuban missile crisis, dark matter, double helix, East Village, Exxon Valdez, Fall of the Berlin Wall, Frank Gehry, germ theory of disease, Golden Gate Park, Google Earth, Haight Ashbury, horn antenna, Ignaz Semmelweis: hand washing, index card, Jacques de Vaucanson, Kowloon Walled City, Louis Pasteur, low cost airline, Mahatma Gandhi, mass immigration, mutually assured destruction, Panopticon Jeremy Bentham, phenotype, Pluto: dwarf planet, Ronald Reagan, Rubik’s Cube, Sapir-Whorf hypothesis, Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence, trade route, transatlantic slave trade, transcontinental railway, Tunguska event, urban sprawl, Vesna Vulović, white picket fence, wikimedia commons, working poor

Tour buses depart daily from the São Luís Bus Terminal. 2.485938 43.128407 In a park without greenery, lagoons and sand dunes sit side by side. Fordlândia SANTARÉM, PARÁ Traveling through thick Brazilian jungle up the Tapajós River, one arrives at a shockingly out-of-place tableau. Amid the monkeys and macaws stand the overgrown ruins of an abandoned American suburb, complete with houses surrounded by white picket fences, fire hydrants, and a golf course. It’s Pleasantville, dropped in the middle of the rain forest. Industrialist Henry Ford created his slice of Americana in the Amazon in the late 1920s. Troubled by the high price of rubber, Ford decided to build his own rubber plantation. He bought over six million acres of Brazilian land and shipped in employees from Michigan to manage the model town. He named his settlement Fordlândia, and the workers—both American and Brazilian—were forced to live according to Ford’s strict, teetotaling rules.


The Rough Guide to Norway by Phil Lee

banking crisis, bike sharing scheme, car-free, centre right, glass ceiling, Nelson Mandela, North Sea oil, out of africa, place-making, sensible shoes, sustainable-tourism, trade route, walkable city, white picket fence

Once a farm as well as an inn, its agricultural days are recalled by several outbuildings: there are the little turf-roofed storehouses (stabbur), the lodgings for farmhands (karstuggu) and the barn (låve), on top of which is a bell that was rung to summon the hands from the fields. The main building retains many of its original features and also holds an eclectic sample of antiques. The bedrooms, dotted round the compound, are of the same high standard (en suite 450kr extra) – and the old vagabonds’ hut (fantstuggu), built outside the white picket fence that once defined the physical limits of social respectability, contains the cosiest family rooms imaginable. Dinner is served in the restaurant, with mains averaging 260kr, and the complex also includes a café. Located just off the E6 and 500m up the valley from the train station. 1350kr Dovrefjell-Sunndalsfjella Nasjonalpark Running west towards the coast from the railway and the E6, Dovrefjell-Sunndalsfjella Nasjonalpark comprises a great slab of wild wilderness, 1693 square kilometres in extent, its mountains becoming increasingly steep and serrated as they approach the jagged spires backing onto Åndalsnes.


Frommer's Caribbean 2010 by Christina Paulette Colón, Alexis Lipsitz Flippin, Darwin Porter, Danforth Prince, John Marino

European colonialism, haute cuisine, jitney, Murano, Venice glass, offshore financial centre, Saturday Night Live, Skype, sustainable-tourism, white picket fence, young professional

In O ttley’s Plantation I nn, nor th of Basset erre, on the east c oast. & 869/465-7234. Reser vations required. Lunch main courses $13–$27; Sun champagne brunch $36; prix-fixe dinner $66. AE, MC, V. Daily 8–10am, noon–3pm, and 6–8:30pm. Expensive 545 Fisherman’s Wharf S eafood Restaur ant and Bar SEAFOOD/CARIBBEAN At the west end of B asseterre Bay Road, the Fisherman’s Wharf is between the sea and the white picket fence of the O cean Terrace I nn. N ear the busy buffet grill, hardworking chefs pr epare fresh seafood. An emplo yee will take y our drink or der, but you personally place your food order at the grill. It’s a bit like eating at picnic tables, but the fresh-fish selection is excellent, caught locally and grilled to order over St. Kitts charcoal. S picy conch cho wder is a good star ter; grilled lobster is an elegant main course choice, or you may prefer the grilled catch of the day, often snapper.

T U R K S & C A I CO S In a new location, Art Provo, Regent Village, Grace Bay Road (& 649/941-4545), has a large selection of paintings by local artists, pottery, baskets, jewelry, and glass. Bamboo Gallery, Caicos Café P laza, Grace Bay Road ( & 649/946-4748), is one of the island ’s leading art galleries, with a large inv entory of Haitian art. Set in a picturesque Blue Hills cottage with a white picket fence, the Blue Hills Artisan Studio, Blue Hills Beach Road (& 649/941-7639 or 649/232-7639; middlecaicos@ tciway.tc), is an outpost of the M iddle Caicos Co-op. More than 60 Caicos Islands artisans ar e r epresented her e, wher e y ou can pur chase fanner-grass baskets and silv ertoppalm crafts, including beribboned straw hats. T U R K S & C A I CO S 698 landings. Grand Turk may not be the center of action anymore, but it has a genial charm: It’s a laid-back, budget-friendly destination with world-class diving, gorgeous white-sand beaches, and a “What, me worry?”


pages: 389 words: 210,632

Frommer's Oregon by Karl Samson

airport security, Burning Man, carbon footprint, Frank Gehry, glass ceiling, haute cuisine, indoor plumbing, sustainable-tourism, transcontinental railway, upwardly mobile, urban renewal, urban sprawl, white picket fence, Works Progress Administration

Built in 1861, the McCully House is one of the oldest buildings in Oregon being used as an inn, and with its classic, symmetrical lines and simple pre-Victorian styling, it looks as if it could easily be an 18th-century New England inn. If you like being steeped in local history, this is Jacksonville’s best choice. In the McCully Room, you’ll even find the original black-walnut master-bedroom furnishings. Surrounding the inn and enclosed by a white picket fence is a formal rose garden with an amazing variety of roses. This inn also rents out the “C” Street Cottages and has suites in the nearby Reames House. McCully House Inn & Cottages 13_537718-ch10.indd 303 3/17/10 2:07 PM 304 240 E. California St., Jacksonville, OR 97530. & 800/367-1942 or 541/899-1942. Fax 541/899-1560. www. mccullyhouseinn.com. 13 units. $135 double; $150–$295 suite, cottage, and carriage house.


Lonely Planet Norway by Lonely Planet

carbon footprint, cashless society, centre right, energy security, G4S, illegal immigration, Kickstarter, low cost airline, mass immigration, North Sea oil, place-making, trade route, urban renewal, white picket fence

Everything you'd expect in terms of self-catering facilities are provided, as well a small organic juice factory, croquet course, lambs to pet and free bikes to borrow. BestebakkenB&B$$$ ( GOOGLE MAP ; %901 68 449; www.bestebakken.no; Hafslo; s/d/tr 1300/1900/2850kr; p) In the lakeside hamlet of Hafslo, about 7km northwest of Solvorn, this swooningly pretty farmhouse stands in splendid isolation, clad in yellow timber and ringed by a white picket fence. Its 16 rooms are pretty, cosy and chock-full of charm: some have handmade beds, others antique furniture, all squeezed into the house's higgledy-piggledy architecture. A slap-up supper is served nightly. You can also chill in the outside Jacuzzi and organise a spa treatment or massage. oWalaker HotellHOTEL$$$ ( GOOGLE MAP ; %57 68 20 80; www.walaker.com; historic house d 2400-2900kr, annexe d 1900kr; hMay-Sep; iW) This wonderful lemon-yellow hotel is the oldest family-run hotel in Norway.


Rough Guide to San Francisco and the Bay Area by Nick Edwards, Mark Ellwood

1960s counterculture, airport security, back-to-the-land, Bay Area Rapid Transit, British Empire, Burning Man, California gold rush, carbon footprint, City Beautiful movement, El Camino Real, Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test, glass ceiling, Golden Gate Park, Haight Ashbury, haute cuisine, Joan Didion, Kickstarter, Loma Prieta earthquake, Menlo Park, Nelson Mandela, period drama, pez dispenser, Port of Oakland, rent control, Ronald Reagan, Rosa Parks, Sand Hill Road, Silicon Valley, South of Market, San Francisco, Steve Jobs, Steve Wozniak, strikebreaker, transcontinental railway, unpaid internship, upwardly mobile, urban decay, urban planning, urban renewal, white picket fence, Works Progress Administration, young professional

It’s become a wildly popular walking and running destination with striking views all around, and there’s even a stretch of sand reserved for dogs (and their guardians). Behind the lagoon, you’ll find the nearby Crissy Field Center, Mason and Halleck streets (Wed–Sun 9am–5pm; free; t 415/561-7761, w www.parksconservancy.org), which includes a library, bookstore, and café, as well as offering educational programs. Located near the old stables beneath the Highway 101 flyover, the lovably ramshackle Presidio Pet Cemetery is surrounded by a white picket fence amidst a stand of pines. It’s a slight side trip inland from Crissy Field to reach the small burial site, which contains the graves of numerous Army pets. Tilted headstones mark the final resting places of Frisky, Smoochy, Skippy, and Moocher, among hundreds of others; as you’d expect, dogs and cats were the pets of choice for many Army families, but you’re bound to find the odd iguana or hamster grave site if you hunt thoroughly enough.


pages: 941 words: 237,152

USA's Best Trips by Sara Benson

Albert Einstein, California gold rush, car-free, carbon footprint, desegregation, diversified portfolio, Donald Trump, Donner party, East Village, Frank Gehry, glass ceiling, Golden Gate Park, Haight Ashbury, haute couture, haute cuisine, if you build it, they will come, indoor plumbing, Kickstarter, lateral thinking, McMansion, mega-rich, New Urbanism, Ralph Waldo Emerson, rolodex, Ronald Reagan, side project, Silicon Valley, the High Line, transcontinental railway, trickle-down economics, urban renewal, urban sprawl, white flight, white picket fence, Works Progress Administration

Outside, more than 2000 pink marble stars line the sidewalks between La Brea Ave and Vine St – and a bit beyond – as part of Hollywood’s Walk of Fame. Follow the stars east to Skooby’s red-and-white placard reading “gourmet hotdogs.” Why this splash of hotdog pretension? Who knows. The chili-slathered masterpieces at this tiny walk-up don’t need a fancy adjective. Maybe it’s because the fries have aioli sauce. To witness pretension on a grand scale, don’t miss an Ivy drive-by. Tucked behind a white picket fence on uber-trendy N Robertson Blvd, the Ivy still holds court as Queen Bee for see-and-be-seen weekday lunches. Scan the patio for A-listers if camera-toting paparazzi crowd the sidewalk. Neighboring boutiques Kitson, Curve and Lisa Kline sell tiny clothes from hot designers to the young, beautiful and moneyed. For designer-style duds at way cheaper prices, follow Robertson north to grittier Melrose Ave, wandering east to the trendy boutiques, denim shops and thrift stores.


pages: 972 words: 259,764

The Road Not Taken: Edward Lansdale and the American Tragedy in Vietnam by Max Boot

American ideology, anti-communist, Berlin Wall, Charles Lindbergh, colonial rule, cuban missile crisis, David Brooks, desegregation, Dissolution of the Soviet Union, drone strike, European colonialism, facts on the ground, failed state, Fall of the Berlin Wall, Golden Gate Park, jitney, land reform, Mikhail Gorbachev, Potemkin village, RAND corporation, Ronald Reagan, South China Sea, Steve Jobs, War on Poverty, white picket fence, Works Progress Administration

Wilson, who served as Lansdale’s deputy at the Pentagon in the early 1960s, later said, I do not recall Helen Lansdale as being intellectually inclined or curious about what was going on in the world in general, especially in the realm of U.S. foreign policy and national security. . . . She was more of a 19th rather than 20th Century lady, more comfortable with the social customs and cultural mores of that period. And Ed, while deeply steeped in history, was more of a 20th Century figure who was constantly probing the future. She was looking back, he was looking forward. Helen was family-oriented, would have been at her happiest in a small cottage with a white picket fence and raising children. Ed enjoyed a secluded rendezvous, a mountain hideout or a small hidden beach—but only to rest up and gather his strength for the next adventure.10 Pat—more curious, intellectually sophisticated, opinionated, and outgoing—was instinctively in greater sync with Ed’s personality and interests. She had, according to Rufus Phillips, another of Lansdale’s associates, a “very vibrant Filipino personality” and was “a lot of fun to be around.”


Lonely Planet Chile & Easter Island (Travel Guide) by Lonely Planet, Carolyn McCarthy, Kevin Raub

California gold rush, call centre, carbon footprint, centre right, Colonization of Mars, East Village, haute cuisine, Kickstarter, land reform, low cost airline, mass immigration, New Urbanism, off grid, place-making, QR code, Skype, sustainable-tourism, trade route, upwardly mobile, urban sprawl, white picket fence

Sleeping & Eating There are numerous roadside eateries on the road to the Resbaladero. All offer decent food; pick the ambience you like best. Hostal Cafe Suizo HOSTEL $ ( 741-551; Ibáñez 210; s/d CH$16,000/20,000; ) Just 100m west of the Resbaladero, this is a sweet little guesthouse run by an elderly Danish-Swiss couple, with a handful of sprucely kept rooms around a leafy little patio behind a white-picket-fenced facade. Breakfasts are served, from CH$1800. Alfajores Rah SWEETS $ (Balmaceda; alfajores CH$100) Visit the counter of this ramshackle little shop opposite the church for the best alfajores (crackers sandwiching sweetened condensed milk, and rolled in shredded coconut) and local honey. El Gato Rapido CHILEAN $ (Esmeralda 255; mains CH$2500-7500) Simple eatery close to the main plaza, with good-value set lunches (although they tend to sell out early) as well as sandwiches and meaty mains.


pages: 1,028 words: 267,392

Wanderers: A Novel by Chuck Wendig

Black Swan, centre right, citizen journalism, clean water, Columbine, coronavirus, currency manipulation / currency intervention, game design, global pandemic, hiring and firing, hive mind, Internet of things, job automation, Kickstarter, Lyft, Maui Hawaii, oil shale / tar sands, private military company, RFID, side project, Silicon Valley, Skype, supervolcano, uber lyft, white picket fence

His wife, standing off to the side of the room—she was watching him, and for a moment their gazes met and held. He smiled at her, happy as a pig in the proverbial, well, you know. She did not return the smile. Then her eyes flicked away to someone near him— A hand clasped his, pulling him nearly off his feet. Ozark Stover. “Preacher,” Stover said, his big bearded grin like a white picket fence half hidden behind a parting thicket. “That was what I hoped to hear. It’s good to hear someone speaking truth about the—what was it? Devil’s Pilgrims. Indeed, indeed.” “Mister Stover, thank you for coming. And for bringing all your people. You sure I didn’t go too far?” he asked. “I usually don’t bring that kind of…zeal to my sermons, to be honest with you.” “You did good. That thing about the astronomer who discovered the comet?


Hawaii by Jeff Campbell

airport security, big-box store, California gold rush, carbon footprint, centre right, Charles Lindbergh, commoditize, creative destruction, Drosophila, G4S, haute couture, land reform, lateral thinking, low-wage service sector, Maui Hawaii, polynesian navigation, risk/return, sustainable-tourism, upwardly mobile, urban sprawl, wage slave, white picket fence

BUDGET Bunk House at Rosewood Kaua′i (822-5216; www.rosewoodkauai.com; 872 Kamalu Rd; r with shared bathroom $50-60; ) Hostelers will be forever spoiled by these meticulously tidy bunk rooms with private entrances and kitchenettes. Expect a cleaning fee ($25). For a step up, inquire about the picturesque ‘Victorian cottage’ ($145), and ‘thatched cottage’ ($135), which are also on the storybook-pretty property, complete with white picket fence. Lani Keha (822-1605; www.lanikeha.com; 848 Kamalu Rd; s/d from $65/75; ) Solo travelers and sociable types will appreciate the low-key, communal atmosphere in this longtime guesthouse. Nothing fancy, the three rooms feature lauhala-mat flooring, king beds and well-worn but clean furnishings. Gather round the kitchen and living room. Garden Room (822-5216, 822-3817; 6430 Ahele Dr; r $75; ) Find serenity in an immaculate studio overlooking a gorgeous pond with waterlilies and koi (Japanese carp).


Central Europe Travel Guide by Lonely Planet

Albert Einstein, anti-communist, Berlin Wall, call centre, car-free, carbon footprint, centre right, Defenestration of Prague, Fall of the Berlin Wall, Frank Gehry, Guggenheim Bilbao, illegal immigration, Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, Kickstarter, low cost airline, low cost carrier, Mikhail Gorbachev, Nelson Mandela, offshore financial centre, Peter Eisenman, place-making, ride hailing / ride sharing, Ronald Reagan, Ronald Reagan: Tear down this wall, Rubik’s Cube, Skype, trade route, urban renewal, white picket fence, young professional

The most famous of the latter are the beautiful Füchtingshof (Glockengiesserstrasse 25; 9am-noon & 3-6pm) and the Glandorps Gang (Glockengiesserstrasse 41-51) , which you can peer into. If you head south along An der Obertrave southwest of the Altstadt, you’ll pass one of Lübeck’s loveliest corners, the Malerwinkel (Painters’ Quarter), where you can take a break on garden benches among blooming flowers, gazing out at the houses and white picket fences across the water. A few steps further, fans of The Tin Drum shouldn’t miss the Günter Grass-Haus ( 122 4192; www.guenter-grass-haus.de; Glockengiesserstrasse 21; adult/concession €5/2.50, ‘Kombi’ card with Buddenbrookhaus €7/4; 10am-5pm Apr-Dec, 11am-5pm Jan-Mar) , which includes a fine collection of manuscripts and sculptures. Fellow Nobel Prize–winning author Thomas Mann (Death in Venice) was born in Lübeck and he’s commemorated in the award-winning Buddenbrookhaus ( 122 4190; www.buddenbrookhaus.de; Mengstrasse 4; adult/concession €5/2.50; ‘Kombi’ card with Günter Grass-Haus €7/4; 11am-6pm Apr-Dec, 11am-5pm Jan-Mar) .


pages: 1,169 words: 342,959

New York by Edward Rutherfurd

Bonfire of the Vanities, British Empire, Charles Lindbergh, illegal immigration, margin call, millennium bug, out of africa, place-making, plutocrats, Plutocrats, rent control, short selling, Silicon Valley, South Sea Bubble, the market place, urban renewal, white picket fence, Y2K, young professional

She’d only walked a short way along the sand, however, when reaching into her bag, she realized that she’d left her pencils up in the room, so she had to go back. Arriving at the inn, she didn’t see Gretchen and Theodore, so she supposed Gretchen might have gone up to their room. But the room was empty, so she collected her pencils and went out again. She was just setting off along the path when she saw them. They were a little way off, standing together at the end of the inn’s white picket fence, under the shade of a small tree. They didn’t see her, because they were too deep in their conversation, nor could she hear what they were saying, but you could see at once that they were having a quarrel. Gretchen’s normally placid face was screwed up in fury. Mary had never seen her looking like that before. Theodore was looking irritated and impatient. The only thing to do was hurry away and pretend she had not seen.


pages: 675 words: 344,555

Frommer's Hawaii 2009 by Jeanette Foster

airport security, California gold rush, Charles Lindbergh, glass ceiling, gravity well, haute couture, haute cuisine, indoor plumbing, Maui Hawaii, place-making, polynesian navigation, South China Sea, sustainable-tourism, urban renewal, urban sprawl, white picket fence, Yogi Berra

Waipio Wayside Bed & Breakfast Inn P.O. Box 840, Honokaa, HI 96727. & 800/833-8849 or 808/775-0275. www.waipiowayside.com. 5 units. $99–$190 double. Rates include full organic tropical continental breakfast w/coffee, fruit (sunrise papayas, mangoes, tangerines), granola, yogurts, and muffins. Extra person $25. MC, V. Located on Hwy. 240, 2 miles from the Honokaa post office; look on the right for a long white picket fence and sign on the ocean side of the road; the 2nd driveway is the parking lot. Amenities: Concierge; TV/VCR/DVD in living room. In room: Dataport. HILO Just outside Hilo is a terrific bed-and-breakfast called Lihi Kai, 30 Kahoa St., Hilo, HI 96720 (& 808/935-7865), a beautifully designed house with mahogany floors, perched on the edge of a cliff with a wide-angle view of Hilo Bay. Double rooms start at $65 (with a 3-night minimum; otherwise, it’s $70 a night).


pages: 769 words: 397,677

Frommer's California 2007 by Harry Basch, Mark Hiss, Erika Lenkert, Matthew Richard Poole

airport security, Asilomar, Bay Area Rapid Transit, car-free, Charles Lindbergh, Chuck Templeton: OpenTable:, clean water, Columbine, Donald Trump, Donner party, East Village, El Camino Real, Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test, Frank Gehry, Golden Gate Park, Guggenheim Bilbao, Haight Ashbury, indoor plumbing, Iridium satellite, Joan Didion, Maui Hawaii, Silicon Valley, South of Market, San Francisco, sustainable-tourism, transcontinental railway, upwardly mobile, urban sprawl, white picket fence, Works Progress Administration

Main courses $10–$26; Sat–Sun brunch $8–$12. AE, DC, DISC, MC, V. Mon–Thurs 11:30am–10pm; Fri 11:30am–11pm; Sat 11am–11pm; Sun 11am–10pm. Street parking usually available. Bus: 34. INEXPENSIVE The Cottage BREAKFAST/CALIFORNIA La Jolla’s best, friendliest breakfast is served at this turn-of-the-20th-century bungalow on a sunny village corner. The cottage is light and airy, but most diners opt for tables outside, where a white picket fence encloses the trellis-shaded brick patio. Omelets and egg dishes feature Mediterranean, Asian, or classic American touches; house-made granola is a favorite as well (also packaged and sold to go). The Cottage bakes its own muffins, rolls, and coffee cakes. Breakfast dishes are served all day, but toward lunch the kitchen begins turning out freshly made soups, light meals, and sandwiches. Summer dinners are a delight, particularly when you’re seated before dark on a balmy seaside night.


Germany Travel Guide by Lonely Planet

Airbnb, Albert Einstein, bank run, Berlin Wall, bike sharing scheme, British Empire, call centre, car-free, carbon footprint, centre right, double helix, eurozone crisis, Fall of the Berlin Wall, Frank Gehry, glass ceiling, haute couture, haute cuisine, Honoré de Balzac, Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, Johannes Kepler, Kickstarter, low cost airline, low cost carrier, Mikhail Gorbachev, New Urbanism, oil shale / tar sands, Peace of Westphalia, Peter Eisenman, post-work, ride hailing / ride sharing, Ronald Reagan, Ronald Reagan: Tear down this wall, sensible shoes, Skype, starchitect, trade route, upwardly mobile, urban planning, urban renewal, V2 rocket, white picket fence

Lübeck Sights 1 Buddenbrookhaus D2 2 Dom D5 3 Füchtingshof E1 Glandorps Gang (see 4) 4 Günter Grass-Haus E1 5 Heiligen-Geist-Hospital E1 Holstentor (see 8) 6 Katharinenkirche E1 7 Marienkirche D2 8 Museum Holstentor C3 9 Petrikirche C3 10 Rathaus D2 11 Salzspeicher C3 12 St Annen Museum E4 13 Theater Figuren Museum C3 14 Willy Brandy House E1 Activities, Courses & Tours 15 Quandt-Linie C3 Sleeping 16 Baltic Hotel A3 17 Hotel an der Marienkirche D2 18 Hotel Jensen Hotel C3 19 Hotel Lindenhof A3 20 Hotel zur Alten Stadtmauer E4 21Klassik Altstadt HotelD1 22 Park Hotel am Lindenplatz A3 23 Rucksackhotel F1 Eating 24 Amaro F1 25 Brauberger C2 Café Niederegger (see 38) 26 Grenadine E3 Kartoffel Keller (see 5) 27 Krützfeld E3 28 Miera E3 29SchiffergesellschaftD1 30 Vai D3 Drinking 31 Café Remise E3 32 Im Alten Zolln E4 33 Jazz-Café D4 34 Theaterquelle D1 Entertainment 35 CafeBar E3 36 Figurentheater C3 37 Musikhochschule Lübeck C3 Shopping 38NiedereggerD3 Sights You can easily spend a day wandering amidst Lübeck’s steeple-punctuated sights. For respite, head south along An der Obertrave southwest of the Altstadt; you’ll pass one of Lübeck’s loveliest corners, the Malerwinkel (Painters’ Quarter), where you can take a break on garden benches among blooming flowers, gazing out at the houses and white-picket fences across the water. In the Middle Ages, Lübeck was home to numerous craftspeople and artisans. Their presence caused demand for housing to outgrow the available space, so tiny single-storey homes were built in courtyards behind existing rows of houses. These were then made accessible via little walkways from the street. Almost 90 suchGänge (walkways) and Höfe (courtyards) still exist, among them charitable housing estates built for the poor, the Stiftsgängeand Stiftshöfe.


Caribbean Islands by Lonely Planet

Bartolomé de las Casas, big-box store, British Empire, buttonwood tree, call centre, car-free, carbon footprint, clean water, colonial rule, cuban missile crisis, discovery of the americas, Donald Trump, glass ceiling, haute cuisine, income inequality, intermodal, jitney, Kickstarter, microcredit, offshore financial centre, place-making, Ronald Reagan, Rubik’s Cube, Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence, sustainable-tourism, urban planning, urban sprawl, white picket fence

There are several good surfing breaks on the south Atlantic shore, especially in winter. Try Rush Reef or the reef off Garbanzo Beach for some of the Bahamas’ best surfing. Rent boards for BS$30 per day at Sundried T’s ( 242-366-0616) , located beside the Government Dock. Sleeping & Eating Hope Town Harbour Lodge BOUTIQUE HOTEL $$ ( 242-366-0095; www.hopeownlodge.com; Queen’s Hwy; r & cottages BS$99-325; ) With her white-picket fence and frosting-blue balconies, this hilltop charm-cake will have you at hello, and palm-framed harbor views will keep you from saying goodbye. Rooms in the main house are smallish; bluff-top cottages more spacious. Everyone’s invited to chill by the tiled freshwater pool (nonguests just need to buy some food at the outdoor grill ) or dine at the adjacent white-tablecloth restaurant . Abaco Inn HOTEL $$ ( 242-366-0133; www.abacoinn.net; Queen’s Hwy; r BS$160; ) Talk about location!


Germany by Andrea Schulte-Peevers

Albert Einstein, bank run, Berlin Wall, call centre, car-free, carbon footprint, centre right, computer age, credit crunch, Donald Trump, Fall of the Berlin Wall, Frank Gehry, glass ceiling, Google Earth, haute couture, haute cuisine, Honoré de Balzac, Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, Johannes Kepler, Kickstarter, low cost airline, low cost carrier, Mikhail Gorbachev, New Urbanism, Peace of Westphalia, Peter Eisenman, place-making, post-work, ride hailing / ride sharing, sensible shoes, Skype, trade route, urban planning, urban renewal, V2 rocket, white picket fence

The most famous of the latter are the beautiful Füchtingshof (Glockengiesserstrasse 25; 9am-noon & 3-6pm) and the Glandorps Gang (Glockengiesserstrasse 41-51), which you can peer into. If you head south along An der Obertrave southwest of the Altstadt, you’ll pass one of Lübeck’s loveliest corners, the Malerwinkel (Painters’ Quarter), where you can take a break on garden benches among blooming flowers, gazing out at the houses and white picket fences across the water. LITERARY MUSEUMS There must be something in the water in Lübeck, or maybe it’s all that marzipan. The city has connections to two Nobel Prize–winning authors (as well as Nobel Peace Prize–winning former chancellor Willy Brandt). The winner of the 1929 Nobel Prize for Literature, Thomas Mann, was born in Lü-beck in 1875 and his family’s former home is now the Buddenbrookhaus ( 122 4190; www.buddenbrookhaus.de; Mengstrasse 4; adult/concession/child under 18yr €5/2.50/2; 11am-6pm Apr-Dec, 11am-5pm Jan-Mar).


Frommer's California 2009 by Matthew Poole, Harry Basch, Mark Hiss, Erika Lenkert

airport security, Asilomar, Bay Area Rapid Transit, California gold rush, call centre, car-free, Charles Lindbergh, clean water, Columbine, Donald Trump, Donner party, East Village, El Camino Real, European colonialism, Frank Gehry, Golden Gate Park, Haight Ashbury, housing crisis, indoor plumbing, Joan Didion, Mason jar, mass immigration, Maui Hawaii, post-work, Saturday Night Live, Silicon Valley, Skype, South of Market, San Francisco, sustainable-tourism, transcontinental railway, urban sprawl, white picket fence, Works Progress Administration, Y Combinator

Main courses $11–$27; Sat–Sun brunch $9–$18. AE, DC, DISC, MC, V. Mon–Thurs 11:30am–10pm; Fri 11:30am–11pm; Sat 11am–11pm; Sun 11am–10pm. Street parking usually available. Bus: 30. 17 The Cottage BREAKFAST/LIGHT FARE La Jolla’s best breakfast is served at this turn-of-the-20th-century bungalow on a sunny village corner . The cottage is light and airy, but most diners opt for tables outside, where a charming white picket fence encloses the trellis-shaded brick patio. Omelets and egg dishes feature Mediterranean, Cal-Latino, and classic American touches. Homemade granola is a favorite as well (it’s even packaged and sold to go). The Cottage also bakes its own muffins, rolls, and coffee cakes. Breakfast dishes are ser ved all day , but to ward lunchtime the kitchen begins turning out fr eshly made, healthful soups, light meals, and sandwiches.


Southeast Asia on a Shoestring Travel Guide by Lonely Planet

active transport: walking or cycling, airport security, Alfred Russel Wallace, anti-communist, British Empire, call centre, car-free, carbon footprint, clean water, clockwatching, colonial rule, Google Earth, haute cuisine, indoor plumbing, Kickstarter, large denomination, low cost airline, low cost carrier, Mason jar, megacity, period drama, Skype, South China Sea, spice trade, superstar cities, sustainable-tourism, trade route, urban sprawl, white picket fence, women in the workforce

The graves belong to the chiefs of Sangalla, descendants of the mythical divine being Tamborolangiq, who is believed to have introduced the caste system, death rituals and agricultural techniques into Torajan society. Take a kijang from Makale to Sangalla, get off about 1km after the turn-off to Suaya, and walk a short distance (less than a kilometre) through the rice fields to Tampangallo. Tentena 0458 / POP 12,000 This lakeside town of white picket fences and churches is a good place to break your bus journey north from Rantepao. Surrounded by clove-covered hills, it’s a peaceful and very easy-to-manage town. The price is right, service is good and the rooms are clean at Hotel Victori ( 21392; Jl Diponegoro 18; r from 140,000Rp; ). Only the higher-end rooms have air-con. This is a good spot to meet guides. Good meals are served. Buses make the run to Poso (20,000Rp, two to three hours) throughout the day.