East Village

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pages: 415 words: 119,277

Naked City: The Death and Life of Authentic Urban Places by Sharon Zukin

1960s counterculture, big-box store, blue-collar work, corporate social responsibility, crack epidemic, creative destruction, David Brooks, East Village, en.wikipedia.org, Frank Gehry, Guggenheim Bilbao, Haight Ashbury, Jane Jacobs, late capitalism, mass immigration, new economy, New Urbanism, Panopticon Jeremy Bentham, rent control, Richard Florida, rolodex, Ronald Reagan, Silicon Valley, South of Market, San Francisco, the built environment, The Death and Life of Great American Cities, Thorstein Veblen, upwardly mobile, urban decay, urban planning, urban renewal, white flight, working poor, Works Progress Administration, young professional

Next door to the herb teas and unsulfured dried fruits, sfogliatelle and cannoli are dispensed just as they have been since 1904. —“East Village Food: Tradition and Change,” New York Times, November 16, 1985 You cannot know the East Village without knowing its local history, and there’s almost too much history for any one neighborhood to have. Unlike Harlem or Williamsburg, the East Village’s story of origin has been shaped less by race and crime than by generations of social protest—against landlords, the rich, the government, and every other form of authority. It started long before Rent, the Broadway musical and film, dramatized the romance of bohemian rebellion on Avenue A to a generation for whom most social protest is, well, history. The East Village was built as cheap housing for immigrants on swampland near the East River docks between Houston and Fourteenth Streets, and between the Bowery and the East River.

Haight-Ashbury in San Francisco and the East Village in New York marked spaces of social diversity and cultural experimentation; they also indicated how the counterculture’s conflict with modernization could create excitement around a city’s old neighborhoods. In a curious and unexpected way, the counterculture’s pursuit of origins—by loosening the authentic self and bonding with the poor and underprivileged—opened a new beginning for urban redevelopment in the 1970s, alongside gentrification and gay and lesbian communities.19 The allure of newly hip neighborhoods spread through the power of alternative media. Years before “edgy” became another word for “hip” and the Internet was invented, independent weekly newspapers like the Village Voice, followed by the East Village Other, SoHo Weekly News, and East Village Eye, put gritty downtown streets on the must-see itinerary for anyone who wanted to be in the know about new cultural trends.

But the gradual reshaping of the dark ghetto’s physical environment—and the winnowing of its population as well—continues to erase Harlem’s contentious history. Yet this is not the only old neighborhood where the urban imaginary is being revised. This happens in the East Village in Lower Manhattan, too, where artists, actors, low-income residents, and students consciously evoke the ghosts of a radical past to battle gentrification. In the East Village the slogan of the day for many years has been “Die, yuppie scum.” 3 Living Local in the East Village I think there are unbelievable things that are going on in Lower Manhattan. The deli is gone, and the BMW is in. —New York Times, May 30, 2007 You’re waiting to meet the Japanese college students at 10 A.M. on the corner of Broadway and Astor Place.


The Rough Guide to New York City by Martin Dunford

Anton Chekhov, Berlin Wall, Bonfire of the Vanities, Buckminster Fuller, buttonwood tree, car-free, Charles Lindbergh, Chuck Templeton: OpenTable:, clean water, colonial exploitation, colonial rule, desegregation, Donald Trump, East Village, Edward Thorp, Exxon Valdez, Frank Gehry, glass ceiling, haute cuisine, illegal immigration, Jane Jacobs, market bubble, Norman Mailer, paper trading, post-work, Saturday Night Live, sustainable-tourism, The Death and Life of Great American Cities, the High Line, transcontinental railway, Triangle Shirtwaist Factory, upwardly mobile, urban decay, urban planning, urban renewal, white flight, Yogi Berra, young professional

Nevertheless, despite the vaudevillian circuses of St Mark’s Place and Cooper Square, and creeping invasion of Starbucks (note THE E AST V I L L AGE The East Village The East Village’s cultural heritage Over the years, the East Village has been home to its share of famous artists, politicos, and literati. In the mid-seventeenth century, Peter Stuyvesant, DirectorGeneral of New Amsterdam, developed the land between what are now 6th and 16th streets, and from Third Avenue to the East River, for his country estate. Fast-forward to the twentieth century: W.H. Auden lived at 77 St Mark’s Place between 1953 and 1972; years earlier the Communist journal Novy Mir operated from the basement, numbering among its contributors Leon Trotsky, who lived for a brief time in New York. In the 1950s, the East Village became one of the main New York haunts of the Beat poets – Kerouac, Burroughs, Ginsberg – who, when not riding trains across the country, would get together at Ginsberg’s house on East 7th Street for declamatory readings.

The fare is hearty and inexpensive; the sandwiches, particularly the pernil (pork) toasted crisp in a sandwich press, are great. East Village Over time, the East Village’s mix of radicals, professionals, and immigrants has produced one of the most potent dining scenes in the city. While variety and quality are high, the prices here are a good bit lower than you’ll find elsewhere in Manhattan.The range of culinary options makes dining in this neighborhood exciting: you can peruse menus on Indian Row; sample dishes at the handful of Ukrainian eateries; or go out on a limb and try something a little more off-beat, like Afghani, Tibetan, or Persian cuisine. Most New Yorkers come to the East Village for its American and Continental dining scene, which, while not as exotic, is far and away the best of all. | East Village Acme 9 Great Jones St, at Lafayette St T 212/420-1934.

Winnie’s 104 Bayard St, between Mulberry and Baxter sts T212/732-2384. Tiny Chinatown bar where the most dedicated New Yorkers go to belt out a few tunes. It’s pretty seedy, but nowhere else in the city will you find such a social hodgepodge united in a common cause: bad singing. | East Village 7B 108 Ave B, at E 7th St T212/4738840. A quintessential East Village hangout, 7B has often been used as the sleazy set in films and commercials. It features deliberately mental bartenders, cheap pitchers of beer, and one of the DRI NKI NG East Village 343 DRI NKI NG | East Village 344 parties larger than four will not be admitted. The cocktails are reputed to be some of the best in the city. Can be hard to find: walk into the Village Yokocho complex, up the stairs to the Gyu-ya restaurant and look for the door on the left. Bar Veloce 175 Second Ave, between E 11th and 12th sts T212/260-3200.


Pocket New York City Travel Guide by Lonely Planet

Airbnb, Chuck Templeton: OpenTable:, East Village, Frank Gehry, G4S, ghettoisation, Saturday Night Live, starchitect, the High Line, urban renewal, walking around money

Sweats, hoodies, underwear and other apparel available in a range of colors. ( 212-226-4880; www.americanapparel.net; 121 Spring St at Greene St; 10am-8pm Mon-Thu, to 9pm Fri & Sat, 11am-8pm Sun; R/W to Prince Street) FREDERIC SOLTAN/CORBIS © East Village & Lower East Side If you’ve been dreaming of those quintessential New York City moments – graffiti on crimson brick, skyscrapers rising overhead, punks and grannies walking side by side, and cute cafes with rickety tables spilling out onto the sidewalks – then the East Village and the Lower East Side is your Holy Grail. Best of New York City Local Eats Katz’s Delicatessen (Click here) ChiKaLicious (Click here) Cafe Orlin (Click here) Drinking Terroir (Click here) McSorley’s Old Ale House (Click here) Abraço (Click here) LGBT Eastern Bloc (Click here) Shopping Trash & Vaudeville (Click here) Museums Lower East Side Tenement Museum (Click here) Getting There Subway Trains don’t reach most East Village locations, but it’s a quick walk from the 6 at Astor Pl or the L at First Ave.

Contents QuickStart Guide New York City Top Sights New York City Local Life New York City Day Planner Need to Know Explore New York Lower Manhattan & the Financial District SoHo & Chinatown East Village & Lower East Side Greenwich Village, Chelsea & the Meatpacking District Union Square, Flatiron District & Gramercy Midtown Upper East Side Upper West Side & Central Park The Best of New York New York City's Best Walks Village Vibe Iconic Architecture Memorable Manhattan Movies New York City's Best... Fine Dining Local Eats Drinking Entertainment LGBT Shopping Architecture Museums Festivals & Events Sports & Activities Nightlife & Clubbing Parks Tours For Free For Kids Survival Guide Arriving in New York City Before You Go Essential Information Getting Around New York City Neighbourhoods Lower Manhattan & the Financial District SoHo & Chinatown East Village & Lower East Side Greenwich Village, Chelsea & the Meatpacking District Union Square, Flatiron District & Gramercy Midtown Upper East Side Upper West Side & Central Park Welcome to New York Empire State Building (Click here) RICHARD I'ANSON/LONELY PLANET IMAGES © No other place does big-city charm quite like Gotham.

The F line will let you off in the thick of the Lower East Side. Bus If you’re traveling from the west side, take the M14 as it will take you further into the East Village. The Sights in a Day Have a wander around the Lower East Side as its youngsters are walk-of-shame-ing home from a raucous night out on town. Stop at the Lower East Side Tenement Museum (Click here) to learn about the area’s immigrant past. Then warp time with a trip into the future at the New Museum of Contemporary Art (Click here) to check out the latest iterations of mind-bending modern art. Pause for a bite at one of the quaint cafes in the East Village, such as Cafe Orlin (Click here), then slurp down a cappuccino at Abraço (Click here). If you’re still feeling peckish, wander down St Marks Place (Click here) with a dessert from ChiKaLicious (Click here), stopping for punk rock wares (and wears) at Trash & Vaudeville (Click here).


pages: 510 words: 138,000

The Future Won't Be Long by Jarett Kobek

Berlin Wall, British Empire, Donald Trump, East Village, Fall of the Berlin Wall, financial independence, Golden Gate Park, means of production, Menlo Park, meta analysis, meta-analysis, New Journalism, Norman Mailer, Ronald Reagan, Saturday Night Live, South of Market, San Francisco, Steve Jobs, thinkpad, Triangle Shirtwaist Factory, urban decay, wage slave, War on Poverty, working poor, young professional

The imagined crime scene, the moment of absolute loneliness, of being helpless and not having a single person to stick up for you, of dying raped in New York in the annus horribilis of 1974, of Helen Sopolsky appearing but once in the Times, of her family leaving the storefront untouched, a memorial hovering over the East Village, rebuking the indifferent city, rebuking a place that let its women die miserable deaths, rebuking the great urban organism that allowed the killer to go free, case unsolved, never apprehended, a tableau openly mocking the idea of justice. I earned straight As. Having opted not to take summer courses, I received word from the bureaucrats that I must evacuate the dormitory at the end of the spring semester. Poor Baby! He’d only just settled into gainful employment at an actual, respectable cinema in the West 20s, and now, as it does, as it will, as it must, life crept upon him, demanding that he abandon his home. I had no intention of leaving the city and suggested that we venture into the world and acquire an East Village apartment. “Adeline,” he said, “I won’t have much money to pay rent.”

A fortnight earlier and he would have been on scene, thick in the mud, for the moment when the world changed, when the city metamorphosed itself with a sacrifice of blood, becoming a dark Satanic mill in service of real estate developers. Fourteen days earlier and he would have been home for the riot at Tompkins Square. * The Lower East Side, its traditional boundaries including the East Village, spent most of the ’70s and early ’80s as a plague pit soaked with spittle and jism, a grotesquerie of drugged-out decadence. Heroin reigned, the substance of choice. By the mid-80s, the crown was in dispute, with crack staging an insurgency. Crime and personal safety became grave issues. Compounding matters, the blocks themselves were shifting. It began with the East Village art explosion, sending out a beacon to the first wave of gentrifiers. Truth be told, these people who were akin to yours truly. Ecstatic epigones and daffy dilettantes. Yet most of that first cohort cultivated a healthy respect for the dirt in which they rocked and rolled.

This is the good stuff, the politics that matter. I’m speaking of the three or four years in which the East Village played host to one of the major combatants in what were once called the Culture Wars. The unhappy late period of David Wojnarowicz. Say what you might about the man, and many have remarked upon his occasional forays into cruelty, but Wojnarowicz woke up one morning and found himself embroiled in a kind of Jahannam that I would not wish upon my worst enemy. What made him remarkable, and what warmed me to him, was the grace that he displayed after being thrust into the inferno. It starts, I suppose, with the death of Wojnarowicz’s lover, Peter Hujar. Another East Village artist struck down by AIDS. In those days, simply everyone who was anyone died of the disease, and America, being America, politicized the illness with its finest traditions of hypocrisy and bigotry.


pages: 289

Hustle and Gig: Struggling and Surviving in the Sharing Economy by Alexandrea J. Ravenelle

"side hustle", active transport: walking or cycling, Affordable Care Act / Obamacare, Airbnb, Amazon Mechanical Turk, barriers to entry, basic income, Broken windows theory, call centre, Capital in the Twenty-First Century by Thomas Piketty, cashless society, Clayton Christensen, clean water, collaborative consumption, collective bargaining, creative destruction, crowdsourcing, disruptive innovation, Downton Abbey, East Village, Erik Brynjolfsson, full employment, future of work, gig economy, Howard Zinn, income inequality, informal economy, job automation, low skilled workers, Lyft, minimum wage unemployment, Mitch Kapor, Network effects, new economy, New Urbanism, obamacare, Panopticon Jeremy Bentham, passive income, peer-to-peer, peer-to-peer model, performance metric, precariat, rent control, ride hailing / ride sharing, Ronald Reagan, sharing economy, Silicon Valley, strikebreaker, TaskRabbit, telemarketer, the payments system, Tim Cook: Apple, transaction costs, Travis Kalanick, Triangle Shirtwaist Factory, Uber and Lyft, Uber for X, uber lyft, ubercab, universal basic income, Upton Sinclair, urban planning, very high income, white flight, working poor, Zipcar

But for Airbnb hosts, the lack of supervision is often described as a “perk” that provides the requisite level of anonymity. Owing to this neighborhood popularity, I attempted to target Airbnb hosts in the East Village, and nineteen of the twenty-three hosts (83 percent) I interviewed had locations in the East Village; five of the hosts with listings in the East Village maintained multiple apartments that also included listings on the Upper West Side, in the West Village, and in Brooklyn. I also interviewed three hosts who lived outside of the East Village and rented their personal homes in Midtown West, Queens, and Brooklyn. One host, in an effort to hide his location, described his apartment as being in the East Village, although it was in Gramercy, a neighborhood on the north border of the East Village. Respondents were overwhelmingly white (83 percent), with one individual identifying as black, two as racially mixed, and one declining to answer.

The majority of my Airbnb interviews were conducted with hosts in the East Village. As with many New York City neighborhoods, the specific borders are open to debate and discussion. I use the New York Times real-estate section’s definition of the neighborhood, which states it is “bounded by 14th Street and East Houston Street, the Bowery/Fourth Avenue and the East River” (see map 1).72 Map 1. The East Village is often described as being bordered by East Fourteenth Street, East Houston Street, Fourth Avenue (also called the Bowery), and the East River. Map data © 2018 Google. The East Village is known as one of the more affordable downtown areas in Manhattan. In her work on gentrification, sociologist Sharon Zukin describes the East Village as “an area where protest is a way of life and history is important.

Lockboxes for Airbnb rentals attached to tree guards in the East Village 4. Lockboxes for Airbnb rentals attached to fence railings in the East Village 5. Screenshot of Airbnb opening page 6. Screenshot of Airbnb income potential in New York City 7. Uber advertisement on the back of a bus in New York City 8. Protest organized by Uber in response to proposed limits on for-hire vehicles 9. Screenshot of Uber’s client-focused webpage 10. “Uber needs partners like you” 11. Jamal’s feet after he cleaned a fish pond in Brooklyn 12. TaskRabbit advertising campaign noting, “We do chores. You live life.” 13. Screenshot of app screens from Pooper media materials 14. Uber drivers attending a counterprotest to raise awareness of their 1099 status MAP 1. The East Village, bordered by East Fourteenth Street, East Houston Street, Fourth Avenue, and the East River TABLES 1.


Frommer's New York City Day by Day by Hilary Davidson

Berlin Wall, buttonwood tree, Chuck Templeton: OpenTable:, Donald Trump, East Village, glass ceiling, Saturday Night Live

TIMES SQUARE y dwa 1 Statue of Liberty & Ellis Island MIDTOWN EAST Eas e F DR Driv 0.25 km MIDTOWN 10 WEST Broadway 1 UPPER EAST SIDE Queensboro Bridge Broa 0 1/4 mi 0.5 km W. 57th St. 11th Ave. 10th Ave. 0 UPPER WEST SIDE 0 Q UEENS UE EN S New York Harbor F er ri a n d e s t o Li b er E lli s I sl a n ty ds W. 72nd St. Special-Interest Tours 44 er E. 14th St. EAST VILLAGE . Houston St LOWER EAST SIDE St. M CHINA- anh att TOWN an Br Broo idg klyn e Bridg e FINANCIAL DISTRICT BROOKLYN 06_579312 ch02.qxd 10/3/05 10:01 AM Page 45 45 t. hS ut So ont S t. t. rom 10,000 years of Native American heritage to the great immigration portal at Ellis Island, from the site of George Washington’s inauguration to the USS Intrepid’s survey of military craft, a trip to New York opens a wide window onto American history. START: Subway 4 or 5 to Bowling Green. . SOUTH STREET SEAPORT AST Queensboro Bridge Q UE EN S N . e F DR Driv Y 1st Ave. E. 14th St. EAST VILLAGE . Houston St LOWER EAST SIDE AN Ma nh oklyn B Museum, in the main building. See & Ellis Island.

. • 111 River St. • Hoboken, NJ 07030-5774 04_579312 moments.qxd 10/3/05 9:53 AM Page viii 04_579312 moments.qxd 10/3/05 9:53 AM 16 Favorite Moments Page 1 04_579312 moments.qxd 10/3/05 9:53 AM Page 2 16 Favorite Moments 86th St Tra nsverse Rd. 1st Ave. 3rd Ave. 5th Ave. 7th Ave. 8th Ave. Riv er Broadway son 7th Ave. St. son Hud Hud VILLAGE ton St. ous W. H SOHO E. 14th St. EAST VILLAGE E. Houston THE LOWER EAST SIDE Delancey y Bower St. E. FINANCIAL 15 1 Nibble your way through Belmont. 2 Spend a few hours at the Met. 3 Walk in Central Park. 4 Stargaze at the Rose Center for Earth and Space. 5 Listen to music at Lincoln Center. 8 Window shop on Fifth Avenue. 9 Sip cocktails at a chic lounge. ay dw Wallabout Bay Br idg e 278 R iv e r Broo k Bridglyn e East Broadway 13 14 278 oa Br nh att an 12 DISTRICT St.

ISL AN D R O O S E VE LT York Ave. 1st Ave. 2nd Ave. 3rd Ave. 1st Ave. 3rd Ave. 2nd Ave. Broadway Lafayette St. East River 1st Ave. . Delancey St LITTLE ITALY g Williamsbur Bridge st Ea CHINATOWN Broadway West Broadway Church St. WORLD TRADE CENTER SITE LOWER EAST SIDE y wa ad Bro St. (Gansevoort Market) 8 Century 21 TRIBECA St. E. Houston e Pik 7 The Meatpacking District St. EAST VILLAGE Allen St. y. of Technology ry Bowe e Hw t Sid 6 The Fashion Institute SOHO Canal W es 5 The Garment District W. Houston St. . St. k St son Varic Hud 4 Bryant Park 2nd Ave. 3rd Ave. ve. ve. 7th A St. son Hud 2 Fifth Avenue 3 Goodman's Café GREENWICH VILLAGE 1st Ave. 5th Ave. 7th Ave. 9th Ave. E. 14th St. 3rd Ave. r the Metropolitan Museum of Art Midtow n Tunnel GRAMERCY UNION SQUARE WASHINGTON SQUARE 1 The Costume Institute at Queens– E. 23rd St. 4th A ive nR 8th Ave. 10th Ave.


pages: 552 words: 163,292

Boom: Mad Money, Mega Dealers, and the Rise of Contemporary Art by Michael Shnayerson

activist fund / activist shareholder / activist investor, banking crisis, Bonfire of the Vanities, corporate raider, diversified portfolio, Donald Trump, East Village, estate planning, Etonian, high net worth, index card, Jane Jacobs, mass immigration, NetJets, Peter Thiel, plutocrats, Plutocrats, rent control, rolodex, Silicon Valley, tulip mania, unbiased observer, upwardly mobile, Works Progress Administration

Hundreds more found SoHo’s doors closed to them: too many artists, too few galleries to take them all in. Almost overnight, impelled by rejection, a mass migration of hopefuls found their way to the East Village, where a half dozen hipster dealers awaited them in raw spaces they chose to call galleries. “It began around 1982, you could feel it,” explained Walter Robinson, the writer and artist whose East Village coverage would read like dispatches from the front. “SoHo was full, all the spaces on the walls were taken, and yet the art world kept booming. Suddenly there wasn’t enough room! So this whole new world of artists and dealers moved over, half a mile in this rundown Polish, Spanish, Lower East Village.”25 First to the party was the Fun Gallery, founded by Barnard College dropout and underground actress Patti Astor. In September 1981, Astor and her partner, Bill Stelling, opened their gallery at 229 East 11th Street.26 Kenny Scharf, whose signature works were the Cosmic Caverns, immersive black-light and Day-Glo paint installations, came up with the name—“Why not call it Fun?”

Yet within a year, eager landlords had jacked up those rents to $1,000, even $1,800.28 “The threat of real estate ran through all of this,” Greenfield-Sanders recalled. “Cheap real estate disappearing.” On a wintry day in 1983, an artist who neither had a regular dealer nor wanted one stood outside the Cooper Union for the Advancement of Science and Art in the East Village, selling snowballs. He wore a long, lumpy overcoat, a mashed fedora, and looked cold as he stood against one of the school’s stone walls, his snowballs neatly lined up in rows on a rug on the sidewalk, priced according to size. His wares were not the only atypical thing about him in the East Village art scene: David Hammons was black. The youngest of ten children born to a single mother in Springfield, Illinois, Hammons was a poor student, steered early on by his teachers to vocational courses. At the age of 20 in 1963, he dutifully attended the Los Angeles Trade-Technical College.

In 1974 Hammons settled in New York City.30 He made body prints, as former ARTnews co-executive editor Andrew Russeth put it, “by pressing a grease-covered body (usually the artist’s own) to paper, then sprinkling the paper with powdered pigment.”31 He had a strong social conscience, and the plight of disaffected black youth became—and remained—the focus of his art. He would become one of the most admired Conceptual artists of his era—and one of the most reclusive. At its peak, the East Village scene drew a new wave of uptown collectors.32 Herb and Lenore Schorr, Elaine Dannheisser, and Don and Mera Rubell all became East Village regulars. Rubell, an Upper East Side gynecologist and brother of Studio 54’s Steve Rubell, cruised the galleries with his wife Mera on a weekly basis. The Rubells had begun collecting art in 1964, allocating funds to pay for it.33 They set themselves a ceiling of no more than $25 or $50 a trip. Still, they found a lot to buy, much of it through the guidance of graffiti artist Keith Haring—and so began one of the most formidable American collections of contemporary art, eventually totaling more than 7,000 artworks by nearly 850 artists, and spawning the Rubell Family Collection museum in Miami.34 S.


pages: 538 words: 164,533

1968: The Year That Rocked the World by Mark Kurlansky

anti-communist, Berlin Wall, colonial rule, cuban missile crisis, desegregation, East Village, Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test, European colonialism, feminist movement, global village, Haight Ashbury, land reform, Marshall McLuhan, Mikhail Gorbachev, MITM: man-in-the-middle, Norman Mailer, post-industrial society, Ronald Reagan, South China Sea

The prestigious schools, the ones that attempted to use their status to skim off the brightest, most promising of the generation, were the worst. New York, albeit many blocks downtown in the East Village, had become the center of a hip counterculture. Abbie Hoffman and Allen Ginsberg and Ed Sanders—who had a group called the Fugs that was named after a word used by Norman Mailer in his novel The Naked and the Dead because he could not use his F-word of choice—were all in the East Village. Hoffman frequently appeared at East Village events with his special honey laced with a distillate of hashish. The East Village, a dilapidated section of the Lower East Side, had only recently acquired its name because the once beat Greenwich Village, now the West Village, had become too expensive. The enormously successful Bob Dylan still lived in the West Village.

The same thing had happened in San Francisco, where Ferlinghetti remained in the North Beach section that the beats had made too fashionable, while the hippies moved out to the poorer, less central Fillmore and Haight-Ashbury sections. The East Village became so famous for its “hippie” lifestyle that tour buses would stop by the busy shops of St. Mark’s Place—or St. Marx Place, as Abbie Hoffman liked to call it—for tourists to view the hippies. In September 1968, East Village denizens rebelled, organizing their own bus tour to a staid section of Queens, where they questioned people mowing lawns and took photos of people taking photos of them. San Francisco and New York were the bipolar epicenters of America’s 1968 hip. This was reflected in rock concert producer Bill Graham’s two halls, the Fillmore West in the Fillmore section of San Francisco and the Fillmore East, which he opened in 1968 on Second Avenue and Sixth Street in the East Village. The new rock concerts began in the neighborhood at what had been the Anderson Yiddish Theater.

Now established as one of the leading “hippies” of New York’s East Village, Hoffman joined a group called the Diggers, founded by a group of actors from San Francisco, the San Francisco Mime Troupe. He explained the difference between a Digger and a hippie in an essay titled “Diggery Is Niggery” for a publication called Win. Diggers, he said, were hippies who had learned to manipulate the media instead of being manipulated by them. “Both are in one sense a huge put-on,” he wrote. The Diggers were named after a seventeenth-century English free land movement that preached the end of money and property and inspired the idea of destroying money and giving everything away for free as revolutionary acts. Hoffman staged a “sweep-in” on Third Street in the East Village, usually one of Manhattan’s dirtiest streets.


pages: 265 words: 83,677

The Lonely City: Adventures in the Art of Being Alone by Olivia Laing

East Village, forensic accounting, global village, late capitalism, Saturday Night Live, Skype, Snapchat

Many marvellous things have emerged from the lonely city: things forged in loneliness, but also things that function to redeem it. 2 WALLS OF GLASS I NEVER WENT SWIMMING IN New York. I came and went, but never stuck a summer, and so all the outdoor pools I coveted remained empty, their water spirited away for the duration of the long off-season. Mostly, I stayed on the eastern edges of the island, downtown, taking cheap sublets in East Village tenements or in co-ops built for garment workers, where day and night you could hear the hum of traffic crossing the Williamsburg Bridge. Walking home from whatever temporary office I’d found that day, I’d sometimes take a detour by Hamilton Fish Park, where there was a library and a twelve-lane pool, painted a pale flaking blue. I was lonely at the time, lonely and adrift, and this spectral blue space, filling at its corners with blown brown leaves, never failed to tug my heart.

As if what he saw was as interesting as he kept insisting he needed it to be: worth the labour, the miserable effort of setting it down. As if loneliness was something worth looking at. More than that, as if looking itself was an antidote, a way to defeat loneliness’s strange, estranging spell. 3 MY HEART OPENS TO YOUR VOICE I DIDN’T STAY IN BROOKLYN long. The friend whose apartment I was staying in came back from L.A. and I moved to the green walk-up in the East Village. The change in habitat marked another phase of loneliness; a period in which speech became an increasingly perilous endeavour. If you are not being touched at all, then speech is the closest contact it is possible to have with another human being. Almost all city-dwellers are daily participants in a complex part-song of voices, sometimes performing the aria but more often the chorus, the call and response, the passing back and forth of verbal small change with near and total strangers.

Sometimes he even has companions, like the one of him standing at night with two laughing homeless men, their arms slung around each other’s shoulders, one of them holding a toy pistol, a trashcan fire burning at their feet. All the same, the mask marks him out as separate: a wanderer or voyeur, unable or unwilling to display his real face. The Rimbaud series was conceived, orchestrated and shot in its entirety by David Wojnarowicz (generally pronounced Wonna-row-vich), a then entirely unknown twenty-four-year-old New Yorker who would in a few years become one of the stars of the East Village art scene, alongside contemporaries like Jean-Michel Basquiat, Keith Haring, Nan Goldin and Kiki Smith. His work, which includes paintings, installations, photography, music, films, books and performances, turns on issues of connection and aloneness, focusing in particular on how an individual can survive within an antagonistic society, a society that might plausibly want them dead rather than tolerate their existence.


How to Survive a Plague: The Inside Story of How Citizens and Science Tamed AIDS by David France

affirmative action, Albert Einstein, Berlin Wall, Donald Trump, East Village, estate planning, facts on the ground, global pandemic, Live Aid, medical residency, placebo effect, Ronald Reagan, sensible shoes, trickle-down economics

With Tracey Tanenbaum at his side, he traveled the city inside chilly limousines, hurtling between expensive dinners and discoteques or the more intimate piano bars, like Marie’s Crisis and the Duplex, where Staley would sometimes take charge of the ivories to accompany off-duty Broadway belters. Later, after dropping Tanenbaum off for the evening, he regularly visited the St. Mark’s Baths, a five-story emporium of dark rooms and unpredictable encounters in the East Village. Sometimes, he’d spend an hour or two across the street beforehand, at a packed gay disco called Boy Bar. That’s where I first saw him. A year younger than I was and a few inches shorter, he and I occupied either side of a wrinkle in gay culture. In my long hair and worn shoes, I was typical East Village stock, as short on finances as I was on boldness; I only ever came to the bar with friends, stood or danced in packs, nursing a single drink all night. I can’t remember a time I struck up a conversation with a stranger who didn’t approach me first.

— THE CRUSHING HEAT wave that summer gave rise to a bizarre plague of mosquitoes, triggering warnings from the public health sector of a possible outbreak of dengue fever, a temporarily incapacitating disease. The social whirl in the Hamptons suffered. Because the East Village had risen from swampland, the problem was even worse there. The talk on the street was whether mosquitoes carried HIV. After all, they transmitted malaria and yellow fever. All the science debunked the possibility, but that did little to quell the irrational fears. Forty cases in a town in Florida were said to have been spread that way—a discredited hypothesis that nonetheless dominated the AIDS news. David Barr and Mickey Wheatley, a fellow staff litigator at Lambda, knew better than to be afraid. On a hot summer night, they chose an outdoor table at the Dojo Restaurant on St. Mark’s Place in the East Village. A twenty-three-year-old HIV-positive associate named Gregg Bordowitz joined them. Bordowitz, a video artist and graduate of the prestigious Whitney Museum Independent Study Program, had been around ACT UP from the beginning, drawn by a desire to chronicle their demonstrations.

Adding to this overall impression, he possessed a voice that naturally reached falsetto ranges, a voice that brought him as much admiration as a singer as it did grief as a high school student in Ohio, where his father derided him as “a sissy” and boys in his gym class had made a sport of holding him down and soaking him with their urine. He found his way to New York after college, settling down in the “gay ghetto,” as the part of Manhattan between Fourteenth Street and Houston Street was known—Greenwich Village, the East Village, and Alphabet City were among the few neighborhoods where it was possible for gay men and lesbians to live without constant fear of being evicted, menaced, or assaulted. Like many others in the ghetto, he found work in the clerical industry. His job as a legal secretary barely taxed his intelligence but left ample time to pursue songwriting and performing, which he considered his true loves.


pages: 288 words: 83,690

How to Kill a City: The Real Story of Gentrification by Peter Moskowitz

affirmative action, Airbnb, Bay Area Rapid Transit, British Empire, clean water, collective bargaining, David Brooks, deindustrialization, Detroit bankruptcy, drive until you qualify, East Village, Edward Glaeser, Golden Gate Park, housing crisis, income inequality, Jane Jacobs, Kickstarter, Kitchen Debate, late capitalism, mortgage tax deduction, Naomi Klein, new economy, New Urbanism, private military company, profit motive, RAND corporation, rent control, Richard Florida, Ronald Reagan, school choice, Silicon Valley, starchitect, The Death and Life of Great American Cities, the High Line, trickle-down economics, urban planning, urban renewal, white flight, working poor, Works Progress Administration, young professional

Next on my walk, I take a left on 9th Street and pass through the detritus of the East Village and the Lower East Side. I never knew the old East Village, so it’s hard for me to mourn its death properly, but I know the new neighborhood, and it’s easy for me to imagine how anything would be better than this—an outdoor mall filled with recently graduated Goldman Sachs boys who can afford nights of $200 binge drinking, new condo buildings that block the skyline, and tourist-oriented shops that locals have no reason to go to. This is the area that was once home to punks, to anarchists, to social movements, to Latino rights organizations, to a street culture of protests and stoop-sitting. I know very few people who can afford to live in the East Village now. The Hispanic population in the East Village recently fell below 50 percent for the first time since 1980.

The city’s own Independent Budget Office found: “The Proposed Arena at Atlantic Yards: An Analysis of City Fiscal Gains and Losses,” Fiscal Brief, New York Independent Budget Office, September 2009. “Brooklyn is 1000 percent”: Norman Oder, “Brooklyn BP Markowitz’s Atlantic Yards Falsehood,” Huffington Post, March 7, 2011. The Hispanic population in the East Village recently fell: Ian Duncan, “Local Hispanic Population Declines,” Local East Village, April 8, 2011. the city’s white population is now rising faster in Manhattan: Sam Roberts, “Census Estimates Show Another Increase in New York City’s Non-Hispanic White Population,” New York Times, June 30, 2014. Tompkins Square Park: Smith, New Urban Frontier, 3–6. there are 120,000 black men who would live in New York City: Justin Wolfers, David Leonhardt, and Kevin Quealy, “1.5 Million Black Men,” New York Times, April 20, 2015.

After Tompkins, I turn right on Avenue B and walk down about ten blocks to Delancey Street and past another city-supported development that is under construction. Essex Crossing will place thousands of glass-fronted condos at the intersection of the Lower East Side and Chinatown. This is, or was, one of the most culturally dense sections of New York. Essex Crossing will be at the entrance to New York’s still vibrant but rapidly gentrifying Chinatown. It’ll sit on top of a forty-year history of music and art that was birthed in the East Village. It’ll further displace the Latino communities here that have managed to hang on. I look at it, turn left, and walk up and over the 7,000 feet of the Williamsburg Bridge, to Brooklyn. Brooklyn, like the West Village, again makes me think of gentrification’s ability to erase collective memory. I cannot imagine what people who aren’t from New York think when they move to Brooklyn. Do they know they’re moving into neighborhoods where just ten years ago you wouldn’t have seen a white person at any time of day?


pages: 416 words: 121,024

How to Murder Your Life: A Memoir by Cat Marnell

Berlin Wall, carbon footprint, East Village, Frank Gehry, impulse control, Joan Didion, Norman Mailer, period drama, pez dispenser, Rosa Parks, urban decay, walkable city, Wall-E, Zipcar

I was also an alcoholic-­in-training who drank warm Veuve Clicquot after work, alone in my boss’s office with the door closed; a conniving uptown doctor shopper who haunted twenty-four-hour pharmacies while my co­workers were at home watching True Blood in bed with their boyfriends; a salami-­and-provolone-puking bulimic who spent a hundred dollars a day on binge foods when things got bad (and they got bad often); a weepy, wobbly hallucination-prone insomniac who jumped six feet in the air à la ­LeBron James and gobbled Valium every time a floorboard squeaked in her apartment; a tweaky self-mutilator who sat in front of The Tonight Show with Jay Leno, digging gory abscesses into her bikini line with Tweezerman Satin Edge Needle Nose Tweezers; a slutty and self-­loathing downtown party girl fellatrix rushing to ruin; and—perhaps most of all—a lonely weirdo who felt like she was underwater all of the time. My brains were so scrambled you could’ve ordered them for brunch at Sarabeth’s; I let art-world guys choke me out during unprotected sex; I only had one friend, a Dash Snow–wannabe named Marco who tried to stick syringes in my neck and once slurped from my nostrils when I got a cocaine nosebleed; my roommate, Nev “­Catfish” Schulman, wanted me out of our East Village two-bedroom; my parents weren’t talking to me ever since I’d stuck my dad with a thirty-thousand-dollar rehab bill. I took baths every morning because I was too weak to stand in the shower; I wrote rent checks in highlighter; I had three prescribing psychiatrists and zero ob-gyns or dentists; I kept such insane hours that I never knew whether to put on day cream or night cream; and I never, ever called my grandma.

The hotel employees had started banging on the door; his parents were after him. He was maxing out their credit cards because he’d run out of cash, and he owed money to dealers. Things were really closing in on him. Once in a while we’d go to the Poetry Garden on the fourteenth floor and hook up next to a heating lamp, but eventually Michael became too paranoid for sex. It happens. My own life wasn’t any better in the East Village. If I was home, I was bingeing—in bed, and late into the night. After I purged, I’d take Ambien—sometimes this was the only way to make myself stop—and pass out surrounded by Cap’n Crunch boxes and pizza crusts and half-empty packages of Double Stuf Oreos. Garbage would be on the bed, on the sofa, and on the floor. One night not one, not two, but three mice—a gang—pushed through the crack of the French doors into my bedroom, then scattered.

You’re up late cracker-jacked on ADHD medication and zing—out of the corner of your eye you see a black flash dart under your refrigerator. Then your entire world turns upside down for three years. At least, that is what happened to me. I’d been at Lucky nearly a year when I decided to ditch the Upper East Side and move downtown. Away from Alex and my bulimia circuit and my Dr. Feelgoods. I wanted to be in the East Village, my favorite Manhattan neighborhood. The second apartment I saw was an alcove studio at 112 First Avenue between Fifth and Sixth Streets. I liked that it was near St. Mark’s Place, the former punk rock mecca, and Tompkins Square Park, which filled up with cute teen runaways in the summer. The creaky, dark, small building was above a strange Polish restaurant and a porny video shop; there was also a McDonald’s and a combination Dunkin’ Donuts/Baskin Robbins on the block.


pages: 135 words: 53,708

Top 10 San Diego by Pamela Barrus, Dk Publishing

California gold rush, centre right, Charles Lindbergh, East Village, El Camino Real, G4S, haute cuisine, illegal immigration, Silicon Valley, the market place, transcontinental railway, urban renewal

Other artists represented are Peter Max, Joanna Zjawinska, Mackenzie Thorpe, and V. Montesinos. d Map P2 • 1205 This fine arts gallery specializes in San Diego artists. Exhibitions feature paintings, drawings, photography, sculptures, and custom furniture from artists such as Mario Uribe, Gail Roberts, Paul Henry, and Johnny Coleman. The glowing, spiritual landscapes of Nancy Kittredge merit special notice. d Map H2 BO U.S. Naval Hospital 5 East Village 12th & Market 8 v Gaslamp Quarter 1 43 San Diego’s Top 10 Left San Diego County Administration Center Right Hotel del Coronado Architectural Highlights San Diego County Administration Center Four architects responsible for San Diego’s look collaborated on this civic landmark. What began as a Spanish-Colonial design evolved into a more “Moderne” 1930s style with intricate Spanish tile work and plaster moldings on the tower. d Map H3 • 1600 Pacific Hwy • Open 8am–5pm Mon–Fri California Building & Tower Bertram Goodhue designed this San Diego landmark for the California-Panama Exposition of 1915–16, using Spanish Plateresque, Baroque, and Rococo details.

From the edge of the Embarcadero, graced with 19th-century sailing ships, to the beautifully restored Victorian and Italianate buildings of the Gaslamp Quarter, a district straight out of the Wild West and home to trattorias, Irish pubs, and a pulsating nightlife, downtown is a great place to have fun in. Apes at San Diego Zoo AY EW L E VARD OU RE Y N FRE LO RIL CAB B STR E E T v12th & Market 16 T H S T R E E T 12 T H AV E 7 East Village 5 Convention Center H A v Gaslamp Quarter RB San Diego OR Ballpark Bay Embarcadero D v District Marina n R 12th & Imperial v I M P E R I A L AV E Park 750 yards 0 Previous pages: Colorful house in Hillcrest meters 750 19 T H S T R E E T MARKET STREET B R O A D WAY 16 T H S T R E E T v C STR E E T AY 1 FRE EW n4 R U S S B O U LE VAR D City College 5th Avenue 9 70 U.S. Naval Hospital GO F STR E E T G STR E E T RK IE v Civic Center v B R O A D WAY v B PA D A STR E E T Downtown Seaport Village Balboa Pa rk 163 5 ASH STREET 8T H AV E N U E Villa Montezuma 8 n C E D A R ST R E E T 10 T H A V E N U E 0 Santa Fe Depot v 3 EL PRADO SAN Little Italy ASH STR E E T 2 GR AP E STR E E T 6T H AV E N U E Martin Luther King Promenade 8 T H AV E N U E 9 J U N I P E R ST 6 County Center/ Little Italy v San Diego Zoo EL PRADO T PE S KET TNER BLVD Museum of Contemporary Art GRA DR Asian Pacific Historic District ST 4T H AV E N U E Little Italy REL RB I ST AV E N U E 8 East Village LAU HA 1ST AV E NU E Horton Plaza Balboa Park & San Diego Zoo L A U R E L STREET 5 S TAT E S T R E E T 4 5 6 7 Embarcadero CIF Gaslamp Quarter AY W EE FR O EG DI RD A LEV BOU N S A ETTNER AY K HW HIG DR IVE R IC O PA 1 2 3 Uptown 6 T H AVE N U E v BALB OA Middletown Sights ARD WY Around Town – Downtown San Diego Left Balboa Park Center Tuna Harbor, Embarcadero Right Fountain at Horton Plaza Park 0 Gaslamp Quarter Embarcadero Buildings in the Gaslamp Quarter filled with maritime life define this lively district (see pp10–11).

Naval Hospital GO F STR E E T G STR E E T RK IE v Civic Center v B R O A D WAY v B PA D A STR E E T Downtown Seaport Village Balboa Pa rk 163 5 ASH STREET 8T H AV E N U E Villa Montezuma 8 n C E D A R ST R E E T 10 T H A V E N U E 0 Santa Fe Depot v 3 EL PRADO SAN Little Italy ASH STR E E T 2 GR AP E STR E E T 6T H AV E N U E Martin Luther King Promenade 8 T H AV E N U E 9 J U N I P E R ST 6 County Center/ Little Italy v San Diego Zoo EL PRADO T PE S KET TNER BLVD Museum of Contemporary Art GRA DR Asian Pacific Historic District ST 4T H AV E N U E Little Italy REL RB I ST AV E N U E 8 East Village LAU HA 1ST AV E NU E Horton Plaza Balboa Park & San Diego Zoo L A U R E L STREET 5 S TAT E S T R E E T 4 5 6 7 Embarcadero CIF Gaslamp Quarter AY W EE FR O EG DI RD A LEV BOU N S A ETTNER AY K HW HIG DR IVE R IC O PA 1 2 3 Uptown 6 T H AVE N U E v BALB OA Middletown Sights ARD WY Around Town – Downtown San Diego Left Balboa Park Center Tuna Harbor, Embarcadero Right Fountain at Horton Plaza Park 0 Gaslamp Quarter Embarcadero Buildings in the Gaslamp Quarter filled with maritime life define this lively district (see pp10–11).


Frommer's San Diego 2011 by Mark Hiss

airport security, California gold rush, car-free, Charles Lindbergh, desegregation, Donald Trump, East Village, El Camino Real, glass ceiling, New Journalism, Norman Mailer, Skype, South of Market, San Francisco, sustainable-tourism, transcontinental railway, urban renewal, white picket fence, Works Progress Administration

Open Tuesday to Saturday 5pm to 2am; happy hour (Tues 5pm–close, Wed–Sat 5–8pm) is a good way to sample the food. 901 Fourth Ave. (at E St.), Gaslamp Quarter. & 619/696-8888. www.confidentialsd. com. Cover: $10–$15. Bus: 3, 120, or 992. Trolley: Civic Center. East Village Tavern & Bowl Whether you bowl passionately or ironically, this raucous spot has you covered. Featuring 12 colorfully lit bowling lanes, as well as a separate bar area with outdoor seating, there’s classic bar food (limited menu served until 1am), a good selection of beer on tap, and billiards. Open daily 11:30am to 2am; kids are allowed in until 9pm. 930 Market St. (btw. Ninth and 10th aves.), East Village. & 619/677-2695. www.bowlevt.com. Bus: 3 or 11. Trolley: Gaslamp Quarter or Park and Market. 230 13_626214-ch10.indd 23013_626214-ch10.indd 230 7/23/10 11:22 PM7/23/10 11:22 PM Ivy Nightclub/Ivy Rooftop These are the hip and very happening clubs located in the ultra-stylish Andaz Hotel (p. 64).

See also Restaurant Index Anza-Borrego, 270 best, 4–5, 96–98 with the best views, 123 burgers, 106 Coronado, 125–127 by cuisine, 98–100 Del Mar, 242–244 downtown, the Gaslamp Quarter and Little Italy, 101–107 Escondido, 257–258 in and around Fiesta de Reyes, 195 fish tacos, 116 Hillcrest & Uptown, 107–111 Julian, 266 La Jolla, 119–125 Little Italy, 101, 104–107 Mission Bay and the Beaches, 114–119 Oceanside, 253 off the beaten path, 127–128 Old Town & Mission Valley, 111–114 price categories, 96 Puerto Nuevo, 286 Rancho Santa Fe, 255–256 Solana Beach, Encinitas & Carlsbad, 249–251 Tijuana, 281–283 Disabilities, travelers with, 40–41 Diversionary Theatre, 225 Dizzy's, 228 Doctors, 288 Dog Beach, 46, 135 Dog Beach Dog Wash, 46 Downtown Information Center, 165 GENERAL INDEX Cabrillo Bridge, 140, 200 Cabrillo National Monument, 146, 164 walking tours, 168 whale-watching, 169 Cabs, 35 airport, 27 Caliente Racetrack (Tijuana), 276 California Ballet, 227 California Center for the Arts (Escondido), 256 California Dreamin', 170 California Overland, 48, 268 California Surf Museum (Oceanside), 252 California Wolf Center (Julian), 262 Callaway Vineyard & Winery, 258 Camping, Anza-Borrego, 270 Carlsbad, 237, 244–251 Carlsbad Fall Village Faire, 22 Carlsbad Marathon & Half Marathon, 18 Carlsbad Mineral Water Spa, 247 Carlsbad Premium Outlets, 221, 245 Carlsbad Ranch, flower fields in bloom at, 19 Carlsbad Spring Village Faire, 20 Carlsbad State Beach, 247 Car rentals, 29–30 Carriage Works, 190 Car travel from the airport, 27 driving rules, 31 driving safety, 40 main arteries and streets, 32–33 parking, 31 to San Diego, 28–29 Casa de Balboa, 204 Casa de Bandini/Cosmopolitan Hotel, 196 Casa del Prado, 204–205 Casa del Rey Moro African Museum, 45 The Casbah, 228 Casinos, 235 Cave Store, 215 Cedros Design District, 215 Celebrate Dance Festival, 227 Cellphones, 50, 288 Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 39 Centro Cultural de la Raza, 141 Centro Cultural Tijuana, 276–277 Chicano Park, murals in, 158–159 Children, families with, 43 best accommodations for, 63 sights and attractions, 160–162 The New Children's Museum, 148 299 16_626214-bindex.indd 29916_626214-bindex.indd 299 7/23/10 11:23 PM7/23/10 11:23 PM GENERAL INDEX Downtown San Diego, 52, 54 accommodations, 64–75 bars, 230–232 restaurants, 101–107 shopping, 207–209 sights and attractions, 158 Drinking laws, 288–289 Driving rules, 31 Driving safety, 40 Dr. Seuss' How the Grinch Stole Christmas!, 22 Drugstores, 290 Dudley's Bakery (Julian), 264 E Eagle and High Peak Mine (Julian), 262 East Village, 54 East Village Tavern & Bowl, 230 Eating and drinking, 12–14 Ecotourism, 46–47 El Campo Santo, 149–150, 198–199 El Cid Campeador, 202–203 ElderTreks, 43 Electricity, 290 Electronic System for Travel Authorization (ESTA), 24 Ellen Browning Scripps Park, 137 El Niño weather pattern, 18 El Prado, 163 The Embarcadero, walking tour, 190–194 Embarcadero Marina Park North, 194 Embassies and consulates, 290 Emergencies, 290 Encinitas, 244–251 Ensenada, 284, 286–287 Entry requirements, 23–25 Escondido, 256–257 Escorted tours, 49 Eveoke Dance Theatre, 227 Exploritas (formerly Elderhostel), 43 F Fallbrook Winery, 165 Fall Flower Tour (Encinitas), 22–23 Families with children, 43 best accommodations for, 63 sights and attractions, 160–162 The New Children's Museum, 148 Farmers Insurance Open, 18–19, 181 Farmers' markets, 218–219 Escondido, 256 Fashion Valley Center, 220 Fax machines, 49 FedEx Office, 51 Ferries and water taxis, 35–36 Ferry Landing Marketplace, 215 Festival of Beer, 22 Fiesta Cinco de Mayo, 20 Fiesta de Reyes, 195–196, 212 Fiesta Island, 135 52-mile San Diego Scenic Drive, 158 Films, 15 Firehouse Museum, 146 First Church of Christ Scientist, 162 Fishing, 172 tournaments, 181 Fish tacos, 116 Flea market, 219 Fleet Week, 22, 164 Flicks, 233 Flightline (San Diego Wild Animal Park), 130 FlowBarrel, 153 Flower Fields at Carlsbad Ranch, 245 FlowRider, 153 Flying Wheels Travel, 41 Folk Arts Rare Records, 220 Food and wine trips, 48–49 Football, 181 college bowl games, 23 Fort Rosecrans National Cemetery, 164 Four Points Communications, 50 Four Seasons Resort Aviara Golf Club, 174 4th & B, 228 Four Winds Trading Company, 216 Free or almost free activities, 5, 158–160 Frey Block Building, 189 F.

It’s a city of villages, as civic planners like to say, and each neighborhood has its own style. There are the coastal enclaves that could only be found in Southern California, from tony La Jolla by the sea to funky, counterculture Ocean Beach to sleepy Encinitas in North County. Then there’s San Diego’s urban side. Though they may not have been much 25 years ago, today downtown’s Gaslamp Quarter and East Village vibrate with big-city buzz, while hip uptown spots such as Hillcrest and North Park deliver edgier fashion and culture. Thanks to growing cultural and dining scenes, unparalleled outdoor activities, sports franchises, and other entertainment options, urban San Diego can now go toe-to-toe with any American metropolis. SAN DIEGO TODAY San Diego is a place of many identities and perhaps defines itself most strongly in terms of what it isn’t: namely, Los Angeles.


Lonely Planet's Best of USA by Lonely Planet

Affordable Care Act / Obamacare, Airbnb, Bay Area Rapid Transit, Berlin Wall, big-box store, Burning Man, car-free, carbon footprint, Charles Lindbergh, East Village, Fall of the Berlin Wall, Francisco Pizarro, Frank Gehry, Golden Gate Park, haute cuisine, mass immigration, obamacare, ride hailing / ride sharing, Ronald Reagan, Rosa Parks, Silicon Valley, South of Market, San Francisco, the High Line, the payments system, transcontinental railway, upwardly mobile, urban planning, urban renewal, Works Progress Administration

Check the website for the full range of tours that operate throughout the day. Reserve ahead (tours fill up). (Map; %877-975-3786; www.tenement.org; 103 Orchard St, btwn Broome & Delancey Sts; adult/student from $25/20; htours 10:15am-5pm Fri-Wed, to 6:30pm Thu; bB/D to Grand St, J/M/Z to Essex St, F to Delancey St) 1 East Village If you’ve been dreaming of those quintessential New York City moments – graffiti on crimson brick, punks and grannies walking side by side, and cute cafés with rickety tables spilling out onto the sidewalks – then the East Village is your Holy Grail. Stick to the area around Tompkins Square Park, and the lettered avenues (known as Alphabet City) to its east, for interesting little nooks in which to imbibe and ingest – as well as a collection of great little community gardens that provide leafy respites and sometimes even live performances. 1 West Village & Greenwich Village Once a symbol for all things artistic, outlandish and bohemian, this storied and popular neighborhood – the birthplace of the gay-rights movement as well as former home of Beat poets and important artists – feels worlds away from busy Broadway, and in fact feels almost European.

Stroll past the Washington Monument and somber Vietnam Veterans Memorial, before ending at the Lincoln Memorial. Come evening, have dinner and drinks in one of the lively spots off Dupont Circle or Logan Circle. I Washington, DC to New York City L 3½ hrs Amtrak Northeast Regional train to Penn Station 2 New York City After arriving, promenade in lovely Central Park, browse the galleries of the vast Metropolitan Museum of Art, and end the day with ethnic eats and bar-hopping in the East Village. On day two, catch an early-morning subway to Lower Manhattan and walk across the Brooklyn Bridge. Afterward, wander through Chinatown, then go up to SoHo for lunch. In the evening, dine in a cozy, candlelit spot in the West Village, followed by live jazz at the Village Vanguard. I New York City to Boston L 4hrs Amtrak Northeast Regional train to South Station 3 Boston Start the day on Boston Common and set off on the brick-lined Freedom Trail, wandering past historic homes and fabled meeting houses.

Race Point Beach, Provincetown / DENISTANGNEYJR / GETTY IMAGES © Plan Your Trip Ten-Day Itinerary Big Apple to the Big Easy Delve into two of the USA’s most fascinating cities – New York City and Washington, DC – for their world-class museums, iconic buildings, and top-notch food and entertainment options. Then head south for sparkling beaches, Disney magic and Cajun cooking on a ramble through Miami, Orlando and New Orleans. 1 New York City Spend two days exploring the metropolis, visiting memorable people-watching ’hoods such as Chinatown, the West and East Villages, SoHo, Nolita and the Upper West Side. Museum-hop down the Upper East Side. Wander in Central Park, along the High Line and across the Brooklyn Bridge. Prioritize iconic sights, including the Statue of Liberty and MoMA. In the evenings, catch a Broadway show or a concert at legendary Carnegie Hall or the Lincoln Center. I New York City to Washington, DC L 3½ hrs Amtrak Northeast Regional train 2 Washington, DC Take two days to see the nation’s capital.


pages: 395 words: 115,753

The Metropolitan Revolution: The Rise of Post-Urban America by Jon C. Teaford

anti-communist, big-box store, conceptual framework, desegregation, Detroit bankruptcy, East Village, edge city, estate planning, Golden Gate Park, Gunnar Myrdal, Haight Ashbury, housing crisis, illegal immigration, Jane Jacobs, Joan Didion, low skilled workers, manufacturing employment, Nelson Mandela, New Urbanism, plutocrats, Plutocrats, Potemkin village, rent control, Seaside, Florida, Silicon Valley, the built environment, The Death and Life of Great American Cities, upwardly mobile, urban planning, urban renewal, urban sprawl, Victor Gruen, War on Poverty, women in the workforce, young professional

In the words of one planning journal article, this was a means for “protecting industry from Yuppies and other invaders.”36 Perhaps the most publicized and bitterest conflict over gentrification occurred in New York City’s East Village. An aging tenement district, this Lower Manhattan neighborhood experienced a wave of abandonment in the 1970s as landlords no longer found the buildings worth maintaining. In the late 1970s, however, counterculture artists began moving into the remaining low-rent structures, and during the first half of the 1980s the East Village emerged as the hub of New York’s radical art scene. By 1984, there were over seventy commercial galleries in a fourteen-block area. Formerly denounced for defacing the city’s walls and subways, graffiti became an art form in the East Village, as did assemblages made of junk and spare parts rescued from vacant lots. The East Village was the latest manifestation of Manhattan bohemia; one art critic described it as “a neighborhood that encourages one to be the person he is with greater ease than other parts of the city.”

With art came middle-class whites and the developers eager to accommodate them. In 1985 a Citibank executive expressed the prevailing business sentiment regarding the East Village: “This can’t be a slum forever…. I know what young professionals are thinking. This could be another SoHo.”37 These, however, were fighting words. Faced with possible displacement, many of the remaining low-income residents, squatters in the abandoned tenements, and neighborhood radicals in general rallied against the Yuppie invasion. “Die Yuppie Scum” appeared on buildings and sidewalks in the neighborhood. In 1982 protesters marched from the East Village to City Hall Park, where a crowd of more than two thousand demonstrated against the city’s support for gentrification and burned the mayor in effigy.38 Tension persisted throughout the 1980s and peaked in August 1988, when the police attempted to enforce a curfew and evict homeless squatters and other “undesirables” from Tompkins Square Park in the heart of the East Village.

In 1982 protesters marched from the East Village to City Hall Park, where a crowd of more than two thousand demonstrated against the city’s support for gentrification and burned the mayor in effigy.38 Tension persisted throughout the 1980s and peaked in August 1988, when the police attempted to enforce a curfew and evict homeless squatters and other “undesirables” from Tompkins Square Park in the heart of the East Village. They met resistance from what one author has described as “alarmed and outraged punks, post-hippies, [and] housing activists” who carried banners reading “Gentrification Is Class War” and chanted, “It’s our fucking park, you don’t live here!” Forty-four people were injured in the fray, casualties of a cultural clash that was evident, although less boisterous, in many American cities.39 Despite the shouts and complaints, gentrification proceeded, especially in cities with strong downtown office sectors staffed by well-paid young employees eager to avoid the commute to suburbia.


pages: 295 words: 82,786

The Harm in Asking: My Clumsy Encounters With the Human Race by Sara Barron

Burning Man, Columbine, East Village, medical residency

I assumed Park Slope had a higher happiness standard than the East Village. I based this assumption on the fact that Park Slope was, quite simply, a prettier place to be. The East Village had some good blocks; Park Slope had all good blocks. There were more trees, more cute coffee shops. Fewer frat boys at the bars, fewer heroin addicts in the parks. If I lived in Park Slope, I would live near a beautiful corner market. I would go there every morning to buy organic produce, and I would cook it in Jan’s gorgeous, sit-down kitchen every night. In time, I’d start to run. Prospect Park was nearby, and its proximity would inspire me. I’d be on the Park Slope diet of outdoor running and organic produce, and I’d become altogether more fabulous than I’d been on my East Village diet of jerky and rage. I was therefore lucky that Jan liked me as much as I liked Jan’s apartment.

Not Kids. Wayne, as I said, was still supported by his parents. Not a little by his parents. Completely by his parents. The situation surprised and confused me: How had Wayne coerced them? How and why had they agreed? I could only imagine that they had done so begrudgingly, and that if Wayne lived in the East Village, he did so on a grimy street, in one of the shoebox apartments. Please, then, try to imagine the surprise I felt the first time I saw Wayne’s actual apartment. His actually perfect East Village apartment. For it was not a grimy shoebox. No. It was a gorgeous, light-filled unit in the newest building on the street. “Jesus Christ,” was all I could say when I saw it. Wayne shrugged. He pointed to a nearby gym. I could see it through a floor-to-ceiling window. “My dad liked the look of that gym,” he said, “since he likes when I work on my pear shape.”

The only downside was that Wayne was homosexual, and that this, in turn, meant no hope of trading sex for further amenities. It was a shame, really. I would’ve loved the occasional romp if it meant un-begrudged access to Wayne’s high-end foodstuffs. But as Wayne himself would say, “Why shove a lemon up your asshole if you’re drinking lemonade?” Why, indeed? I would opt to keep my asshole lemonfree. Wayne lived in the East Village, which, as a neighborhood, can shift on a dime. Or rather: in a block. From idyllic to disgusting. From brownstones and boutiques to bongs and belly-button rings. The apartments do the same. Some are tiny as a shoebox. They are weirdly arranged with showers in kitchens and toilets in communal hallways. Others, however, are dream-worthy brownstones. They look like how New York looks in the movies.


I Am Not Myself These Days: A Memoir by Josh Kilmer-Purcell

East Village, index card, young professional

His friend starts his bike and gestures to Debbie. Neither one of us hesitate anywhere near as long as we should. I swing a seven-inch heel over the seat and settle down behind Johnny. Debbie, with considerably more effort, maneuvers her three hundred pounds onto the bike behind. With my arms around his leather waist, Johnny takes off toward Third Avenue. The avenue is much busier, especially as we reach St. Mark’s Place. I love the East Village. It should be the manda46 I Am Not Myself These Days tory first home of everyone who moves to New York. We pass groups of runaway teens, half of them kicked out of their homes because they were too much trouble for their families. The other half ran away from their middle-class suburban homes intent on becoming too much trouble for their families. I spot Quentin Crisp in a lavender suit with matching hat and scarf trying to cross Lafayette.

I make money; I just don’t JOSH KILMER-PURCELL make enough to pay my full rent. I have just barely enough cash flow to pay my half of the monthly bill, and even if I never ate or drank (shudder), I still wouldn’t have enough take-home pay to cover my deadbeat roommate’s half. “Is Tempest even looking for work?” Jack asks, moving on to a plate of pierogis. We’re at what’s fast becoming our favorite Polish diner in my East Village neighborhood. I’m so nervous about being evicted I can’t eat. “Unless he’s looking for it facedown in the laps of random cabdrivers, no,” I reply. My roommate has a thing for having sex with most every penised person he comes across. “That’s inexcusable,” he says. “Not having a job or blowing cabbies?” I ask. “Both. Because he’s not getting paid for either.” When I got this job in New York five months ago, I wasn’t confident enough to come to the city without a roommate.

It’s a Saturday afternoon and Jack and I stop by my old apartment to see if Tempest has finally vacated. I gave him a week to get out after I’d moved in with Jack, and so far he’s taken three. But today, other than a broken Absolut bottle in the tub and a leaking lava lamp on the kitchen floor, everything seems to have been cleared out. I’ve been in New York for only six months now, and have moved from an East Village studio to an Upper East Side penthouse. I’d be lying if I didn’t admit I still had a little gnawing feeling about rushing things. Then again, New York doesn’t leave a lot of time for pondering forks in the road. JOSH KILMER-PURCELL People who have paused to gather their wits often find themselves suddenly waking up in a cookie-cutter beige apartment in Hoboken. Or, worse yet, back in whatever backwater they came from.


pages: 1,540 words: 400,759

Fodor's California 2014 by Fodor's

1960s counterculture, active transport: walking or cycling, affirmative action, Asilomar, Bay Area Rapid Transit, big-box store, California gold rush, car-free, centre right, Charles Lindbergh, Chuck Templeton: OpenTable:, Donner party, Downton Abbey, East Village, El Camino Real, Frank Gehry, Golden Gate Park, Haight Ashbury, housing crisis, Kickstarter, Maui Hawaii, Mikhail Gorbachev, Ronald Reagan, Saturday Night Live, Silicon Valley, South of Market, San Francisco, trade route, transcontinental railway, urban renewal, urban sprawl, white picket fence, Works Progress Administration, young professional

TIP Despite efforts to provide accessibility throughout the ship, some areas can only be reached via fairly steep steps; a video tour of these areas is available on the hangar deck. | 910 N. Harbor Dr., Embarcadero | 619/544–9600 | www.midway.org | $18 | Mid-Aug.–June, daily 10–5; July–mid-Aug., daily 9–5; last admission 4 pm. East Village The most ambitious of the Downtown projects is East Village, not far from the Gaslamp Quarter, and encompassing 130 blocks between the railroad tracks up to J Street, and from 6th Avenue east to around 10th Street. Sparking the rebirth of this former warehouse district was the 2004 construction of the San Diego Padres’ baseball stadium, PETCO Park. As the city’s largest Downtown neighborhood, East Village is continually broadening its boundaries with its urban design of redbrick cafés, spacious galleries, rooftop bars, sleek hotels, and warehouse restaurants. Little Italy Unlike many tourist-driven communities, the charming neighborhood of Little Italy is authentic to its roots, from the Italian-speaking residents to the imported delicacies.

. | 93428 | 805/927–2690 | $10 | Tour daily by appointment. Where to Eat Black Cat Bistro. AMERICAN | Jazz wafts through the several small rooms of this intimate East Village bistro where stylish cushions line the banquettes. Start with an order of the fried olives stuffed with Gorgonzola, accompanied by a glass of local or imported wine. Mains on offer might include chipotle linguini (vegetarian or with shrimp) or breast of pheasant stuffed with caramelized apples. | Average main: $24 | 1602 Main St. | 93428 | 805/927–1600 | www.blackcatbistro.com | Reservations essential | Closed Tues. and Wed. No lunch. French Corner Bakery. CAFÉ | Place your order at the counter and then sit outside to watch the passing East Village scene. The rich aroma of coffee and fresh breakfast pastries makes mouths water in the morning; for lunch, try a quiche with flaky crust or a sandwich on house-baked bread. | Average main: $8 | 2214 Main St. | 93428 | 805/927–8227 | Reservations not accepted | No dinner.

. | 93428 | 805/927–8227 | Reservations not accepted | No dinner. FAMILY | Linn’s Restaurant. AMERICAN | Homemade olallieberry pies, soups, potpies, and other farmhouse comfort foods share the menu with fancier dishes such as free-range chicken cordon bleu at this spacious East Village restaurant. Also on-site are a bakery, a café serving more casual fare (take-out available), and a gift shop that sells gourmet foods. | Average main: $18 | 2277 Main St. | 93428 | 805/927–0371 | www.linnsfruitbin.com. Robin’s. ECLECTIC | A multiethnic, vegetarian-friendly dining experience awaits you at this cozy East Village cottage. At dinner, choose from lobster enchiladas, five-spice duck breast, Thai green-curry chicken, and more. Lunchtime’s extensive salad and sandwich menu embraces burgers and tofu alike. TIP Unless it’s raining, ask for a table on the secluded (heated) garden patio. | Average main: $22 | 4095 Burton Dr., at Center St. | 93428 | 805/927–5007 | www.robinsrestaurant.com.


Eastern USA by Lonely Planet

1960s counterculture, active transport: walking or cycling, Affordable Care Act / Obamacare, Albert Einstein, Berlin Wall, bike sharing scheme, Bretton Woods, British Empire, car-free, carbon footprint, centre right, Charles Lindbergh, collective bargaining, cuban missile crisis, desegregation, Donald Trump, East Village, Fall of the Berlin Wall, Frank Gehry, glass ceiling, Guggenheim Bilbao, haute cuisine, Hernando de Soto, illegal immigration, immigration reform, information trail, interchangeable parts, jitney, Kickstarter, license plate recognition, Mason jar, mass immigration, McMansion, megacity, Menlo Park, new economy, New Urbanism, obamacare, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Ronald Reagan, Rosa Parks, Saturday Night Live, Silicon Valley, Skype, the built environment, the High Line, the payments system, transcontinental railway, union organizing, Upton Sinclair, upwardly mobile, urban decay, urban planning, urban renewal, urban sprawl, walkable city, white flight, Works Progress Administration, young professional

Plans call for a reconstruction of a butcher shop and saloon on the ground floor. Visits are available only as part of variously themed scheduled tours, which typically operate every 40 or 50 minutes. EAST VILLAGE Bordered roughly by 14th St, Lafayette St, E Houston St and the East River, the East Village has gentrified in the last decade or so, much to the horror of longtime tenants and punk-kid squatters, who have been around for decades. These days real-estate developers have the upper hand – although the ’hood has not yet shaken its image as an edgy, radical, be-yourself kind of place. Tompkins Square Park PARK This park between Seventh and Tenth Sts and Aves A and B is an unofficial border between the East Village (to the west) and Alphabet City (to the east). It was once an Eastern European immigrant area; you’ll still see old Ukrainians and Poles in the park, but they’ll be alongside punks, students, panhandlers and a slew of dog-walking yuppies.

Souvlaki GR GREEK $ (116 Stanton St, near Essex St; mains $5; 11am-midnight) Owners of a food truck have opened this little restaurant that looks like a soundstage for a film set on a Greek isle. Donut Plant DESSERT $ (379 Grand St, at Norfolk; doughnuts $2.75; 6:30am-6:30pm) Inventively flavored (eg peanut butter and jelly) doughnuts with all-natural ingredients. Another location in the Chelsea Hotel at 222 W 23rd St. EAST VILLAGE Every cuisine and style is represented in the East Village, though even the very best places are certainly more casual than stuffy. St Marks Place and around, from Third to Second Ave, has turned into a little Tokyo with loads of Japanese sushi and grill restaurants. Cookie-cutter Indian restaurants line Sixth St between First and Second Ave. Momofuku Noodle Bar JAPANESE $$ ( ; 171 First Ave, at 11th St; mains $9-16; noon-4pm & 5:30-11pm Sun-Thu, to midnight Fri & Sat) Ramen and steamed buns are the name of the game at this infinitely creative Japanese eatery, part of the growing David Chang empire.

KGB Bar BAR ( 212-505-3360; 85 E 4th St, at 2nd Ave; 7pm-3:30am) The East Village’s own grungy Algonquin roundtable has been drawing literary types to its regular readings since the early 1990s. Even when there’s no artist in residence the heavily worn wood bar is good for kicking back. Mayahuel TEQUILA BAR (304 E 6th St, at Second Ave; 6pm-2am) About as far from your typical spring break tequila bar as you can get – more like the cellar of a monastery. Devotees of the fermented agave can seriously indulge themselves experimenting with dozens of varieties (all cocktails $13). McSorley’s Old Ale House BAR (15 E 7th St, btwn Second & Third Aves; 11am-1am) Around since 1854 – it has the cobwebs and sawdust floors to prove it McSorley’s feels far removed from the East Village veneer of cool: you’re more likely to drink with firefighters, Wall St refugees and a few tourists.


pages: 140 words: 47,093

So Sad Today: Personal Essays by Melissa Broder

East Village, feminist movement, Google Hangouts, McMansion, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI)

I was a suburban Jew, and he was an Italian American from a Catholic family—raised in Queens—but I immediately sensed in him an essential simpatico that made him seem Jewish (in the same ways that I felt Jewish) or more Jewish (in the ways that seemed important) than any Jewish boy I’d been with. He was warmer, funnier, more neurotic and verbose than any of them. He had read more books than all of them combined. He called himself a custodian of words. He was menschy. The first thing I ever said to Ron Jeremy was, Shut up this is my game. I was day-drunk, as I always was then, leading a drinking game at my weekly East Village party. The party was called Drinkers with Writing Problems. Ron Jeremy had come with a friend of a friend to meet girls. He met me. Ron Jeremy says that he took one look at me and knew I was the sexually liberated Jewish girl of his dreams. Twenty minutes after we met, we made out in a photo booth. But before I kissed him, I told him he had to take me on a real date the next day. The following afternoon we went to the Second Avenue Deli.

He asked if I would go to a concert with him when he returned. The joke between us now is that at the time he was putting the “pussy on lockdown.” We emailed every day he was away. When Ron Jeremy got back he brought me a framed photo of a grave he’d found at Père Lachaise Cemetery that had my last name on it. We went out and got drunk, then went back to his apartment, which was in Stuyvesant Town—a sort of middle-class housing project in the East Village. I was scared walking in. Stuyvesant Town had an Auschwitz aesthetic, and all of the redbrick buildings looked the same. I was like, How do I get out of here if I need to? He showed me the escape route on Avenue B and I felt safer. Also, I liked his apartment immediately. It had a retro seventies vibe, everything brown and velvet. It reminded me of my favorite grandmom’s apartment. There has always been a mother-daughter relationship between Ron Jeremy and me.

It was the first of several miracles. The next day I didn’t drink either. Or the next day. Of course, I didn’t quit everything. I continued to take pills: those prescribed to me and those not prescribed. I picked up weed again. I remember sitting by a fireplace in upstate New York, fucked up out of my mind on morphine, thinking, This sobriety is great. Then, one night, I was walking home in the East Village where I lived. I passed by a church. Standing outside was a group of people, mostly gay men, smoking cigarettes. It was eight thirty on a Tuesday night. I kind of knew they weren’t going to church. I asked the men who they were. I don’t know what compelled me to ask. That was the second miracle. The men told me who they were. The third miracle is that I followed them into the church. I have not had a drink or a drug since.


pages: 338 words: 74,302

Only Americans Burn in Hell by Jarett Kobek

AltaVista, coherent worldview, corporate governance, crony capitalism, Donald Trump, East Village, ghettoisation, Google Chrome, haute couture, illegal immigration, indoor plumbing, Jeff Bezos, mandelbrot fractal, MITM: man-in-the-middle, pre–internet, sexual politics, Skype, Snapchat, Steve Jobs, Telecommunications Act of 1996

Fern had been in and out of New York City for almost a decade, starting in the Year of the Unquenched Longing, which roughly corresponded to 1989 AD, 1407 AH, and 5747 AM. It that year, Fern met a young woman named Denise. They dated for a short time, but it was fleeting. Denise had to move to Boston. Before she left New York, Denise introduced Fern to the demimondes of Manhattan’s East Village and the Lower East Side, two overlapping ethnic ghettos that had transformed into cesspools of petty crime and cheap drugs and were gentrifying into cesspools of international money laundering and the expensive drugs required to fuel international money laundering. It was in the East Village, where people were wearing terrible leather jackets and even worse denim jeans, that Fern met a boy named Anthony. Anthony was from Long Island, which was an island next to Manhattan. The western part of Long Island encompassed Queens and Brooklyn, two of New York City’s boroughs.

Unlike the love connection, the crying out of Anthony’s subatomic particulars happened on a level of quantum physics that was inaudible to human ears. Not even people who had passed the Cash Horizon would have heard. But in their case, the inaudibility was irrelevant: the rich are incapable of love or its recognition. Fern was neither human nor past the Cash Horizon. She was from Fairy Land. She heard every word. They talked, they hung around the East Village, they fell into bed, they wandered through the city, and because they’d both consumed endless amounts of media, they were imbued with the photogenic qualities of New York City, and these qualities freighted their wanderings with cultural weight. Everything was ridiculously romantic. On their third date, Anthony and Fern were walking in Washington Square Park. They were in the park because they were headed to Jones Street.

This is what he sang: Every time I fuck them men I give ’em the doggone clap Oh, baby, I give ’em the doggone clap But that’s the kind of pussy that they really like You can fuck my cock Suck my cock Or leave my cock alone Oh, baby, honey, I piss all night long If you suck my pussy, baby I’ll suck your dick I’ll do it to ya, honey, till I make you shit Oh, baby, honey, all night long Long before the Year of the Unspoken Promise, Fern’d concluded that there was nothing new to experience, that all her future years would feature repeats of previous days. She was like a sexy vampire in a novel by Anne Rice. She was bored by eternal life. And then, in a bar in the East Village, surrounded by Ukrainian drunks and terrible black leather jackets, she discovered something new. Meeting Anthony was like being in San Francisco in 1965 AD prior to America’s construction of received drug experiences and dosing with high-grade Owsley lysergic acid diethylamide. Unexplored territory. It was insane love, l’amour fou, sex magick, the post-coital sparkle of two souls in unison wandering through a fluorescent-lit grocery store at 11:30PM, stoned, drunk, lunacy born of a shared experience, tongue in the mouth as guns fire overhead.


pages: 149 words: 48,700

The Rules Do Not Apply by Ariel Levy

Cape to Cairo, East Village, indoor plumbing, Nelson Mandela, out of africa

As a journalist, I’ve spent nearly two decades putting myself in foreign surroundings as frequently as possible. There is nothing I love more than traveling to a place where I know nobody, and where everything will be a surprise, and then writing about it. It’s like having a new lover—even the parts you aren’t crazy about have the crackling fascination of the unfamiliar. The first story I ever published was about another world only an hour from my apartment. I was twenty-two, living in the East Village in a sixth-floor walk-up with a roommate and roaches, working as an assistant at New York magazine. My friend Mayita was an intern in the photo department who knew about a nightclub for obese women in Queens. We talked about it during our lunch break, when we were walking around midtown Manhattan with our plastic containers of limp salad, dreading going back to the office. I was not a key member of the staff.

She didn’t so much want to walk with me or come upstairs with me as she wanted to control me. When the lights were off, that was not a problem. It was as if Jen had access to a user’s manual for my body and brain that nobody else had known existed. I found her objectionable by all normal standards, but the way we connected wasn’t normal: It was uncanny, extreme, unnerving. “I like that dress,” she said once, about a blue terry-cloth beach cover-up I used to wear around the East Village as if it were real clothing. “I bought it for you,” I told her. When I’d tried it on at the store on East Seventh Street, I knew the second I looked in the mirror that I was seeing the version of me that she craved. I wore it constantly. Here, now, sitting in front of me, wearing jeans and a flannel shirt, drinking coffee from a paper cup, was that person—but without breasts, without the defining edge of desperation.

The rabbi referred to “the three of you” throughout the service. I know that Emma feels bad about going into motherhood without me—I felt bad about going into lesbianism without her when I met my first girlfriend. We dislike being out of sync. “Do we look alike?” she used to ask people in college. “On a spectrum of heads,” my father told her once, “you’re not that far apart.” A girl at a bar in the East Village asked us, “Which one of you came up with the personality?” when we were jabbering at her one night soon after we moved to New York City. We loved that. The last time I saw Emma before the wedding was in August, at the beach in Massachusetts, when we were each in our first trimester. Her mother, Margaret, has a carriage house in an eighteenth-century whaling village where the houses have little plaques by the doors stating the years they were built and the occupations of their first inhabitants: mariner; distiller; gentleman.


pages: 373 words: 112,822

The Upstarts: How Uber, Airbnb, and the Killer Companies of the New Silicon Valley Are Changing the World by Brad Stone

Affordable Care Act / Obamacare, Airbnb, Amazon Web Services, Andy Kessler, autonomous vehicles, Ben Horowitz, Boris Johnson, Burning Man, call centre, Chuck Templeton: OpenTable:, collaborative consumption, East Village, fixed income, Google X / Alphabet X, housing crisis, inflight wifi, Jeff Bezos, Justin.tv, Kickstarter, Lyft, Marc Andreessen, Mark Zuckerberg, Menlo Park, Mitch Kapor, Necker cube, obamacare, Paul Graham, peer-to-peer, Peter Thiel, race to the bottom, rent control, ride hailing / ride sharing, Ruby on Rails, Sand Hill Road, self-driving car, semantic web, sharing economy, side project, Silicon Valley, Silicon Valley startup, Skype, South of Market, San Francisco, Startup school, Steve Jobs, TaskRabbit, Tony Hsieh, transportation-network company, Travis Kalanick, Uber and Lyft, Uber for X, uber lyft, ubercab, Y Combinator, Y2K, Zipcar

In 2012, with a steady stream of angry complaints from neighbors about Airbnb and other short-term rental sites pouring into government offices, the city council increased fines to twenty-five thousand dollars for repeat violations of the Multiple Dwelling Law, up from the original penalties of less than three thousand dollars.11 Airbnb was facing a wave of hostility from lawmakers and couldn’t seem to find a way to stand up for itself or its host community. And then Nigel Warren, a thirty-year-old resident of the East Village, came home one afternoon in September 2012 and received an irate phone call from his normally placid landlord, Abe Carrey, an elderly man from Queens. Abe yelled, “Who are you renting my apartment to? What the hell is going on there?” Warren’s stomach dropped. Warren is a hip, soft-spoken web designer—your typical East Village denizen, in other words. He had used Airbnb just three times to rent out his room while traveling over the previous year. His roommate, Julia, had rented out her room once. Their experiences were positive and profitable, earning them a little over a hundred dollars a night, a modest contribution to their three-thousand-dollar-a-month rent for a two-bedroom, one-bath sixth-floor walk-up.

In September, Camp and Kalanick attended the Lobby, an annual off-the-record networking event in Hawaii hosted by the venture capitalist David Hornik, and started quietly pitching the concept to entrepreneurs and investors. Kalanick was getting excited and putting in a few hours a week on it. Around that time, Camp introduced Salazar to Kalanick over e-mail. “Garrett introduced Travis as an adviser to the company,” Salazar says. “He didn’t want to get fully involved, but Garrett was trying to convince him. Garrett knew he could be perfect for it.” A few weeks later, Camp and Kalanick met Salazar in New York’s East Village and tried the app for the first time in authentic conditions. They hired a few random black-car drivers, who likely did not suspect that history was being made, gave them iPhones with the app, fanned out across lower Manhattan, and tried to summon the cars from various locations via smartphone. It was buggy and barely worked. Afterward one driver told Camp as he returned the iPhone, “Well, that was really hard.”

Uber desperately needed help in the largest and most important taxi market in the country. Not only was driver growth still slow but the TLC was being inundated by complaints about Uber from taxi and limo drivers, just as the MTA had been in San Francisco. Officials were now expressing concerns about Uber’s regulatory compliance and threatening the company with a cease-and-desist. Sick of staying in hotels, Geidt checked into an Airbnb in the East Village. She would live there for five months. Right away she found that getting an Uber from her place to the newly opened New York office in Greenpoint, Brooklyn, was a hit-or-miss affair. Cars were scarce and wait times were high. The large livery fleets had all the leverage and demanded outrageous minimum payments to give the Uber app to their drivers. Uber had to rethink everything about its tactics.


pages: 309 words: 92,846

Memoirs of a Jewish Extremist: The Story of a Transformation by Yossi Klein Halevi

1960s counterculture, East Village, ghettoisation, Haight Ashbury, Yom Kippur War

My standard speech spoke of walls of apathy, crimes of silence, perpetrations and perpetuations of oppression. I cherished rhetoric, impersonal passion, the safest way to share emotion with my father. 6. On Sundays I helped my father deliver orders to customers. Our route passed through the East Village, whose streets were transformed into a foreign land: There were macrobiotic restaurants and Indian boutiques, posters announcing rock concerts in balloonlike letters, men in orange robes beating eggplant-shaped drums strapped around their necks. I wanted to leap from the car into the strangeness, into the “east” of the East Village. I had recently decided that I despised the West, that Western civilization had died in Auschwitz. My mother tried to interest me in her collection of classical records, but I refused to listen: The Nazis had played Beethoven in the camps.

Like him, I wanted to know everything the cynic knew, penetrate the most brutal reality, and emerge praising life. I wanted to be what he almost became: a Jew who related to the world not with the grudges of a victim but with the generosity of a survivor. 2. The year of mourning ended. I quit the family business and went back to trying to become a journalist. I began writing a story about the JDL’s collapse, hoping to interest some New York publication. I moved to the East Village, a Lower Manhattan neighborhood populated by punk rockers, junkies, and aspiring artists. My apartment—roaches crawling behind wallpaper, a sheet for a bedroom door—was across the street from Hell’s Angels headquarters. The janitor of my building, an old Jewish woman, carried a pistol. At night Puerto Ricans lit fires in garbage cans and rolled them in the gutter. My roommate, Abe Stern, had been born in Poland after the Holocaust and then moved as a boy with his parents to Los Angeles.

All of Abe’s various wounds—the Polish children who abused him, the anti-Zionists trying to destroy Israel, the successful jerks in college, his mother—merged into one undifferentiated rage. If only Abe could avenge the Jews by humiliating their enemies, he would somehow make everything right. Once, in a restaurant, he found himself sitting beside a group of Polish tourists. He stood and proposed a toast to Poland. The Poles solemnly raised their glasses. “May Russian tanks invade your country and crush it,” he said. The outraged Poles hurriedly left. IN THE EAST VILLAGE, PUNK WAS happening. Abe and I stalked the streets and punk clubs, witnesses to the collapse of the West. Abe insisted that punk culture was inspired by the Final Solution: the leather clothes and Nazi Iron Crosses sold in punk shops, the lines outside clubs presided over by a bouncer wordlessly pointing to those allowed in, like a “selection,” and the tattoo they stamped on your hand when you entered.


USA Travel Guide by Lonely, Planet

1960s counterculture, active transport: walking or cycling, Affordable Care Act / Obamacare, Albert Einstein, Asilomar, Bay Area Rapid Transit, Berlin Wall, Big bang: deregulation of the City of London, big-box store, bike sharing scheme, Bretton Woods, British Empire, Burning Man, California gold rush, call centre, car-free, carbon footprint, centre right, Charles Lindbergh, Chuck Templeton: OpenTable:, cuban missile crisis, desegregation, Donald Trump, Donner party, East Village, edge city, El Camino Real, Fall of the Berlin Wall, feminist movement, Frank Gehry, glass ceiling, global village, Golden Gate Park, Guggenheim Bilbao, Haight Ashbury, haute couture, haute cuisine, Hernando de Soto, Howard Zinn, illegal immigration, immigration reform, information trail, interchangeable parts, intermodal, jitney, Kickstarter, license plate recognition, Mars Rover, Mason jar, mass immigration, Maui Hawaii, McMansion, Menlo Park, Monroe Doctrine, new economy, New Urbanism, obamacare, off grid, Ralph Nader, Ralph Waldo Emerson, RFID, ride hailing / ride sharing, Ronald Reagan, Rosa Parks, Saturday Night Live, Silicon Valley, South of Market, San Francisco, starchitect, stealth mode startup, stem cell, supervolcano, the built environment, The Chicago School, the High Line, the payments system, trade route, transcontinental railway, union organizing, Upton Sinclair, upwardly mobile, urban decay, urban planning, urban renewal, urban sprawl, walkable city, white flight, working poor, Works Progress Administration, young professional, Zipcar

Plans call for a reconstruction of a butcher shop and saloon on the ground floor. Visits are available only as part of variously themed scheduled tours, which typically operate every 40 or 50 minutes. EAST VILLAGE Bordered roughly by 14th St, Lafayette St, E Houston St and the East River, the East Village has gentrified in the last decade or so, much to the horror of longtime tenants and punk-kid squatters, who have been around for decades. These days real-estate developers have the upper hand – although the ’hood has not yet shaken its image as an edgy, radical, be-yourself kind of place. Tompkins Square Park PARK This park between Seventh and Tenth Sts and Aves A and B is an unofficial border between the East Village (to the west) and Alphabet City (to the east). It was once an Eastern European immigrant area; you’ll still see old Ukrainians and Poles in the park, but they’ll be alongside punks, students, panhandlers and a slew of dog-walking yuppies.

Souvlaki GR GREEK $ Offline map Google map ( 116 Stanton St, near Essex St; mains $5; 11am-midnight) Owners of a food truck have opened this little restaurant that looks like a soundstage for a film set on a Greek isle. Donut Plant DESSERT $ Offline map Google map ( 379 Grand St, at Norfolk; doughnuts $2.75; 6:30am-6:30pm) Inventively flavored (eg peanut butter and jelly) doughnuts with all-natural ingredients. Another location in the Chelsea Hotel at 222 W 23rd St. EAST VILLAGE Every cuisine and style is represented in the East Village, though even the very best places are certainly more casual than stuffy. St Marks Place and around, from Third to Second Ave, has turned into a little Tokyo with loads of Japanese sushi and grill restaurants. Cookie-cutter Indian restaurants line Sixth St between First and Second Ave. Momofuku Noodle Bar JAPANESE $$ Offline map Google map ( 171 First Ave, at 11th St; mains $9-16; noon-4pm & 5:30-11pm Sun-Thu, to midnight Fri & Sat) Ramen and steamed buns are the name of the game at this infinitely creative Japanese eatery, part of the growing David Chang empire.

KGB Bar BAR Offline map Google map ( 212-505-3360; 85 E 4th St, at 2nd Ave; 7pm-3:30am) The East Village’s own grungy Algonquin roundtable has been drawing literary types to its regular readings since the early 1990s. Even when there’s no artist in residence the heavily worn wood bar is good for kicking back. Mayahuel TEQUILA BAR Offline map Google map ( 304 E 6th St, at Second Ave; 6pm-2am) About as far from your typical spring break tequila bar as you can get – more like the cellar of a monastery. Devotees of the fermented agave can seriously indulge themselves experimenting with dozens of varieties (all cocktails $13). McSorley’s Old Ale House BAR Offline map Google map ( 15 E 7th St, btwn Second & Third Aves; 11am-1am) Around since 1854 – it has the cobwebs and sawdust floors to prove it McSorley’s feels far removed from the East Village veneer of cool: you’re more likely to drink with firefighters, Wall St refugees and a few tourists.


Coastal California Travel Guide by Lonely Planet

1960s counterculture, Airbnb, airport security, Albert Einstein, anti-communist, Apple II, Asilomar, back-to-the-land, Bay Area Rapid Transit, Burning Man, buy and hold, California gold rush, call centre, car-free, carbon footprint, Donner party, East Village, El Camino Real, Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test, flex fuel, Frank Gehry, glass ceiling, Golden Gate Park, Haight Ashbury, haute couture, haute cuisine, income inequality, intermodal, Joan Didion, Kickstarter, Loma Prieta earthquake, low cost airline, Lyft, Mason jar, New Journalism, ride hailing / ride sharing, Ronald Reagan, Rosa Parks, Saturday Night Live, Silicon Valley, Silicon Valley startup, South of Market, San Francisco, starchitect, stealth mode startup, stem cell, Steve Jobs, Steve Wozniak, Stewart Brand, trade route, transcontinental railway, uber lyft, Upton Sinclair, upwardly mobile, urban sprawl, Wall-E, white picket fence, Whole Earth Catalog, women in the workforce, working poor, Works Progress Administration, young professional, Zipcar

If you don’t feel like a total splurge, look out for happy-hour deals with bargain-priced oysters and fish tacos in the bar (times vary). East Village NeighborhoodPUB FOOD$$ ( MAP GOOGLE MAP ; %619-446-0002; www.neighborhoodsd.com; 777 G St; mains $7-14; hnoon-midnight) Lit with filament bulbs and decorated with exposed beams, pipework overhead and a big mural of Downtown San Diego, this place is often used as a hangout while people are waiting to get entry to the next-door speakeasy Noble Experiment, but it's a great spot in its own right, serving dozens of craft ales and hipster pub eats. BasicPIZZA$$ ( MAP GOOGLE MAP ; %619-531-8869; www.barbasic.com; 410 10th Ave; small/large pizzas from $14/32; h11:30am-2am) East Village hipsters feast on fragrant thin-crust, brick-oven-baked pizzas under Basic’s high ceiling (it’s in a former warehouse).

It's open 20 hours a day, 365 days a year. East Village While out-of-towners frolic happily in the Gaslamp Quarter, San Diego locals and hipsters instead head east to these more insider-y bars. Noble ExperimentBAR ( MAP GOOGLE MAP ; %619-888-4713; http://nobleexperimentsd.com; 777 G St; h7pm-2am Tue-Sun) This place is literally a find. Open a secret door and enter a contemporary speakeasy with miniature gold skulls on the walls, classical paintings on the ceilings and inventive cocktails on the list (from $12). The hard part: getting in. Text for a reservation, and they’ll tell you if your requested time is available and how to find the place. It's also possible to turn up to the bar upstairs (Neighborhood) and put your name on a waiting list. East Village Tavern & BowlSPORTS BAR ( MAP GOOGLE MAP ; %619-677-2695; www.tavernbowl.com; 930 Market St; h11am-12am Sun-Thu, to 2am Sat & Sun) This large sports bar a few blocks from baseball stadium Petco Park ( MAP GOOGLE MAP ; %619-795-5011; www.padres.com; 100 Park Blvd; tours adult/child/senior $15/10/10; h10:30am & 12:30pm Sun-Fri, 3pm Sat; c) has six bowling lanes (thankfully, behind a wall for effective soundproofing).

A Taste of MontereyWINE BAR ( MAP GOOGLE MAP ; www.atasteofmonterey.com; 700 Cannery Row; tasting flights $14-22; h11am-6pm Sun-Thu, to 8pm Fri-Sat) Sample medal-winning Monterey County wines from as far away as the Santa Lucia Highlands while soaking up dreamy sea views, then peruse thoughtful exhibits on barrel-making and cork production. Shared plates, including crab cakes and smoked salmon, provide a tasty reason to linger. Sardine Factory LoungeLOUNGE ( MAP GOOGLE MAP ; %831-373-3775; www.sardinefactory.com; 701 Wave St; h5pm-midnight) The legendary restaurant’s fireplace lounge pours wines by the glass, delivers filling appetizers to your table and has a live piano player most nights. East Village Coffee LoungeCAFE, LOUNGE ( MAP GOOGLE MAP ; %831-373-5601; www.facebook.com/eastvillagemonterey; 498 Washington St; h6am-10pm Mon-Fri, from 7am Sat & Sun; W) Downtown Monterey coffee shop on a busy corner brews with fair-trade, organic beans. At night, it pulls off a big-city lounge vibe with film, open-mike and live-music nights and an all-important booze license. Check the Facebook page for event listings. 3Entertainment For comprehensive entertainment listings, browse the free tabloid Monterey County Weekly (www.montereycountyweekly.com).


Coastal California by Lonely Planet

1960s counterculture, airport security, Albert Einstein, Asilomar, back-to-the-land, Bay Area Rapid Transit, Berlin Wall, buy and hold, California gold rush, call centre, car-free, carbon footprint, centre right, Chuck Templeton: OpenTable:, Donner party, East Village, El Camino Real, Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test, Frank Gehry, global village, Golden Gate Park, Haight Ashbury, haute cuisine, illegal immigration, Joan Didion, Khyber Pass, Kickstarter, Loma Prieta earthquake, low cost airline, Mason jar, McMansion, Ronald Reagan, Silicon Valley, South of Market, San Francisco, stealth mode startup, Steve Wozniak, trade route, transcontinental railway, Upton Sinclair, urban sprawl, white picket fence, women in the workforce, working poor, Works Progress Administration, young professional, Zipcar

Bluebird Inn MOTEL $$ ( 805-927-4634, 800-552-5434; http://bluebirdmotel.com; 1880 Main St; d $70-220; ) With peaceful gardens, this friendly East Village motel offers basic, budget-conscious rooms, some with fireplaces and private creekside patios or balconies. Wi-fi in lobby only. HI Cambria Bridge Street Inn HOSTEL $ ( 805-927-7653; www.bridgestreetinncambria.com; 4314 Bridge St; dm $22-25, r $45-80; check-in 5-9pm; ) Inside a 19th-century parsonage, this tiny hostel sleeps more like a grandmotherly B&B. It has floral charm and a communal kitchen, but the shabby-chic rooms are thin-walled. Book ahead. Eating & Drinking It’s a short walk between several cafes and eateries in the East Village. Indigo Moon CALIFORNIAN $$ (www.indigomooncafe.com; 1980 Main St; lunch mains $6-13, dinner mains $13-29; 10am-4pm & 5-9pm Mon-Sat, 10am-3pm & 5-9pm Sun) Inside this artisan cheese and wine shop, breezy bistro tables complement market-fresh salads, toasty sandwiches and sweet-potato fries.

Sow’s Ear AMERICAN $$$ ( 805-927-4865; www.thesowsear.com; 2248 Main St; dinner mains $11-30; 5-9pm) For over a decade, the old-school Sow’s Ear has been whipping up haute comfort food inside a cozy house on the East Village’s main drag. Make reservations to dine on traditional lobster pot pie, pork tenderloin with olallieberry chutney and fresh bread baked in terracotta flowerpots. Linn’s Easy as Pie Cafe DELI, BAKERY $ (www.linnsfruitbin.com; 4251 Bridge St; items $4-10; 10am-6pm Oct-Apr, to 7pm May-Sep; ) If you don’t have time to visit Linn’s Fruit Bin, the original farm store out on Santa Rosa Creek Rd (a 20-minute drive east via Main St), you can fork into their famous olallieberry pies and preserves at this take-out counter delivering salads, sandwiches and comfort fare to a sunny East Village patio. Wild Ginger FUSION $$ (www.wildgingercambria.com; 2380 Main St; mains $12-17; 11am-2:30pm Mon-Wed, Fri & Sat & 5-9pm Fri-Wed; ) This bright, cheery chef-owned cafe dishes up garden-fresh, pan-Asian fare, perfectly seasoned and presented, plus housemade sorbets in exotic flavors like pomegranate and pineapple-coconut.

For comprehensive entertainment and nightlife listings, check the free tabloid Monterey County Weekly (www.montereycountyweekly.com). A Taste of Monterey WINE BAR (www.atasteofmonterey.com; 700 Cannery Row; tasting fee $5-20; 11am-6pm) Sample medal-winning Monterey County wines from as far away as the Santa Lucia Highlands while soaking up dreamy sea views, then peruse thoughtful exhibits on barrel-making and cork production. East Village Coffee Lounge CAFE (www.eastvillagecoffeelounge.com; 498 Washington St; 6am-late Mon-Fri, 7am-late Sat & Sun) Sleek coffeehouse on a busy downtown corner brews fair-trade, organic beans. At night, it pulls off a big-city lounge vibe with film, open-mic, live-music and DJ nights and an all-important booze license. Cannery Row Brewing Co BREWPUB (www.canneryrowbrewingcompany.com; 95 Prescott Ave; 11:30am-midnight Sun-Thu, to 2am Fri & Sat) Brews from around the world bring crowds to Cannery Row’s microbrew bar, as does the enticing outdoor deck with roaring firepits.


pages: 195 words: 70,193

Frommer's Portable San Diego by Mark Hiss

car-free, East Village, Golden Gate Park, Irwin Jacobs: Qualcomm, Maui Hawaii, Norman Mailer

Scott is also the mastermind behind the successful eatery Indigo Grill, which does a mash-up of Pacific Coast and Mexican/Southwestern cuisine to Island Prime D O W N T O W N & L I T T L E I T A LY 73 good effect and is worth a visit. Indigo Grill is at 1536 India St., Little Italy (& 619/234-6802). 880 Harbor Island Dr., Embarcadero. & 619/298-6802. www.cohnrestaurants.com. Reservations recommended. Main courses $11–$25 lunch; $22–$39 dinner. AE, DC, DISC, MC, V. Sun–Thurs 11:30am–10pm; Fri–Sat 11:30am–11pm. Free parking. Bus: 923 or 992. MODERATE FRENCH When it opened in 2004, this East Village restaurant created an immediate buzz. Had the owners struck upon some cutting-edge trend? No, it was a simple idea, really; something you’ll find everywhere from Amsterdam to Zanzibar. It’s a bistro. Creative, whimsical touches abound—such as a children’s area, a retail space, and a patio built for two—but this is an otherwise straightforward enterprise, infused with the refined tastes and joie de vivre of its proprietors.

Cafe Chloe is small, it’s loud when at capacity, and its tiny kitchen can get backed up. The fact is, though, while this kind of eatery can be found easily in other cities, it’s still a rarity here. The neighborly conviviality—combined with a short-but-sweet French-inspired menu covering breakfast, lunch, and dinner—makes for a winning dining experience, and one unique enough to create a stir in evermorphing San Diego. Cafe Chloe 721 Ninth Ave. (at G St.), East Village. & 619/232-3242. www.cafechloe.com. Reservations for parties of 5 or more only. Main courses $8–$13 breakfast, $9–$13 lunch, $15–$28 dinner. AE, MC, V. Mon 11am–10pm; Tues–Fri 7am–10pm; Sat 8am–10pm; Sun 9am–9pm. Bus: 3, 5, 11, 210, 901, or 929. The Fish Market SEAFOOD/SUSHI The bustling Fish Market at the end of the G Street Pier on the Embarcadero is a San Diego institution. Chalkboards announce the day’s catches—be it Mississippi catfish, Maine lobster, Canadian salmon, or Mexican yellowtail—which are sold by the pound or available in a number of classic, simple preparations in the casual, always-packed restaurant.

Docent tours are available Tuesday through Thursday from 10am to noon, and the third Tuesday of the month from 1 to 3pm, or by appointment. 1500 El Prado. & 619/239-5548. www.timkenmuseum.org. Free admission. Tues– Sat 10am–4:30pm; Sun 1:30–4:30pm. Closed Sept. Bus: 7 or 7A/B. 4 More Attractions DOWNTOWN & BEYOND In 2004, downtown San Diego completed a huge construction project, the Padres’ PETCO Park (p. 146) which has extended the rebuilt downtown a few blocks farther east. Real estate developers in the “East Village” are stepping up to the plate in hopes of cashing in on a home run. In the meantime, you can wander from the turn-of-the-20th-cento the joyful, modern architecture of the tury Gaslamp Quarter Horton Plaza shopping center (p. 149). The Gaslamp consists of 161⁄2 blocks of restored historic buildings. It gets its name from the old-fashioned street lamps that line the sidewalks. You’ll find dozens of restaurants and our most vigorous nightlife scene here.


pages: 302 words: 74,350

I Hate the Internet: A Novel by Jarett Kobek

Anne Wojcicki, Burning Man, disruptive innovation, East Village, Edward Snowden, Golden Gate Park, Google bus, Google Glasses, Google X / Alphabet X, immigration reform, indoor plumbing, informal economy, Jeff Bezos, liberation theology, Mark Zuckerberg, MITM: man-in-the-middle, Norman Mailer, nuclear winter, packet switching, PageRank, Peter Thiel, quantitative easing, Ray Kurzweil, rent control, Ronald Reagan, Silicon Valley, Steve Jobs, technological singularity, Triangle Shirtwaist Factory, union organizing, V2 rocket, Vernor Vinge, wage slave, Whole Earth Catalog

Abrahamovic Petrovitch as a woman belonging to the social construct of the White race was treated as the more interesting story than that of Jeremy Winterbloss as a man belonging to the social construct of the Black race. Nearly ten years after finishing the last issue of Trill, Adeline was in demand. For her self, as her self. The details of her life became fodder for public discourse. People were fascinated that she had lived through the grimy old East Village. People were interested that her best friend, Baby, was a gay writer of Science Fiction and the author of Annie Zero. People wanted to know how Adeline had kept the secret for so many years. People were fascinated by a woman working in genre comics and doing it so well. People were interested that she lived in San Francisco and wanted her opinions about the tech industry and the dotcom boom of the late 1990s.

She’d attended the Crossroads School for the Arts & Sciences, which was an alternative education relic of the 1970s. It was at Crossroads that Adeline had helped several pregnant girls procure their abortions. She’d seen what lawsuits did to people. Divorce proceedings and custody battles seemed, more than anything, to harm children. So she packed up and moved to San Francisco. Her boyfriend at the time, a former East Village punk rocker turned legal assistant, came with her. He didn’t last. As a single mother drawing over 30 pages of comic art every month, Adeline didn’t have much time for a social life. This was okay. She was in her thirties. She’d whittled away her teens and her twenties with questionable sex, drug use, and novels in translation. There wasn’t much left undone. Suzanne visited regularly. And Jeremy and Minerva came into the city from San Venetia.

Nash Mac had married another woman and fathered two other children. His new wife had blonde hair and no eumelanin in the basale stratum of her epidermis. Her name was Stephanie. She tried very hard to forge a working relationship with Adeline. Despite her efforts, Stephanie couldn’t bridge the gap. She and Adeline were very different. While Stephanie was writing her Master’s thesis on Barbara Kruger at Stanford, Adeline was stepping over dope sick East Village junkies and drawing Felix Trill’s misadventures with amorous cephalopods. And the shared sexual past weighed on Stephanie’s mind. Aware of the distance between them, Stephanie spoke to Adeline in an unusually slow and loud manner, which wasn’t that far from how some people talk to the foreign, the blind and the mentally backwards. This manner of speaking made Adeline assume that Stephanie herself was mentally backwards.


pages: 432 words: 124,635

Happy City: Transforming Our Lives Through Urban Design by Charles Montgomery

2013 Report for America's Infrastructure - American Society of Civil Engineers - 19 March 2013, agricultural Revolution, American Society of Civil Engineers: Report Card, Bernie Madoff, British Empire, Buckminster Fuller, car-free, carbon footprint, centre right, City Beautiful movement, clean water, congestion charging, correlation does not imply causation, East Village, edge city, energy security, Enrique Peñalosa, experimental subject, Frank Gehry, Google Earth, happiness index / gross national happiness, hedonic treadmill, Home mortgage interest deduction, housing crisis, income inequality, income per capita, Induced demand, Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), invisible hand, Jane Jacobs, license plate recognition, McMansion, means of production, megacity, Menlo Park, meta analysis, meta-analysis, mortgage tax deduction, New Urbanism, Panopticon Jeremy Bentham, peak oil, Ponzi scheme, rent control, ride hailing / ride sharing, risk tolerance, science of happiness, Seaside, Florida, Silicon Valley, starchitect, the built environment, The Death and Life of Great American Cities, the High Line, The Spirit Level, The Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith, trade route, transit-oriented development, upwardly mobile, urban planning, urban sprawl, wage slave, white flight, World Values Survey, zero-sum game, Zipcar

The museum commissioned Atelier Bow-Wow, a Japanese architectural firm, to design a temporary shelter in an empty lot in the East Village, then invited a team of collaborators from around the world to use it as a base for our experiments. The museum’s curators hoped that the BMW Guggenheim Lab would be an engine for creating new solutions for city life. They had money to spend and interns to assist. I planned on using their resources to collect data on the effect that city spaces had on people’s emotions and behavior. It was a fantastic opportunity: there are few better places to explore extreme urbanity than Manhattan. The lab’s neighborhood, which straddled the boundary between the East Village and the Lower East Side, is a mashup of tenement-style walk-ups and newer mid-rise condo towers bisected by furious traffic arteries and crowded, cracked sidewalks.

Of course, today’s scorned neighborhoods and designs could be tomorrow’s status symbols if the culture was to send us a different set of messages about their worth. This is already happening. For years, television largely depicted American family and social life as suburban, but in the past two decades the hip protagonists of programs such as Friends and Sex and the City were shown in downtown apartments. Formerly low-status neighborhoods such as Manhattan’s East Village have been invaded by the upwardly mobile, and condominium towers designed by starchitects are sprouting between the tenements. New generations are growing up with a different mental library of stories that shape their domestic tastes. Errors from Above Unfortunately, when choosing how to live or move, most of us are not as free as we think. Our options are strikingly limited, and they are defined by the planners, engineers, politicians, architects, marketers, and land speculators who imprint their own values on the urban landscape.

In his nineteenth-century masterpiece “Crossing Brooklyn Ferry,” Walt Whitman described the sense of communion he experienced in his accidental brushes with thousands of strangers on these streets of Manhattan: … What gods can exceed these that clasp me by the hand, and with voices I love call me promptly and loudly by my nighest name as I approach; … What is more subtle than this which ties me to the woman or man that looks in my face, Which fuses me into you now, and pours my meaning into you? For Whitman, it was as though in all that shared seeing, jostling, and touching, the crowded city was somehow creating a common soul. You can still feel it today if you walk its streets long enough. But anyone living in hyperdensity will tell you that it is not possible to live only amid the crowd. I learned that quickly in my East Village apartment. The place was on the second floor of an old tenement on East Thirteenth Street. The kitchen, living room, bathroom, and bedroom were arranged in a space the size and dimensions of two on-street parking places. The view consisted of a brick wall punctuated by grimy windows fixed with air conditioners and rusting fire escapes. The first time I opened the window, I drew in a lungful of air scented with what might have been mold and rancid cooking oil.


pages: 318 words: 92,257

Floating City: A Rogue Sociologist Lost and Found in New York's Underground Economy by Sudhir Venkatesh

creative destruction, East Village, illegal immigration, side project, Silicon Valley, the scientific method, urban renewal, working poor

But what I really needed, if I wanted to launch another formal study—and I always did—was for Shine to introduce me to these bartenders and bellhops so I could put some meaty details in a grant application and hire research assistants and all the rest of the formal machinery that makes hanging out with drug dealers academically respectable. Once again, I had to be patient. • • • While I was waiting for Shine to come through, Betsy, Michael, and Carter started inviting me to their parties. There were two kinds. The artsy parties happened down in Soho and the East Village, where their artsy friends lived. The family parties were all on the Upper East Side, where their parents lived. At both, people drank and caroused with bohemian abandon late into the night. Sometimes I felt like Jim Fowler on Mutual of Omaha’s Wild Kingdom, gazing at strange creatures from the safety of my ethnographic pith helmet. They had their own idiosyncratic phrases that made no sense unless you knew the people and places they referenced, and they seemed entirely uninterested in bringing outsiders into their peer group except for entertainment—the role I probably filled.

Abbie, 128 Amy, 218–20 Analise, 6–26, 49, 133–35, 158–60, 165, 173–74, 176, 177, 215–35, 242, 253–58, 265, 266–71 Amy and, 218–20 apartment of, 215–16 art gallery and, 230–34, 237–41, 267 attack on, 226–29, 232 Betsy and, 133–34 Brittany and, 11–13, 17–18, 20, 21, 220–22, 226, 234, 237–41, 254–57 drug use and, 10–13, 20 J.B. and, 13–18, 21, 22, 159–61, 215–16, 226–29, 256 Jo Jo and, 221–25, 256 Kate and, 230–34, 237–38, 267 Kimberly and, 219, 221–25 as madam, 17–23, 25, 26, 135, 158–59, 215–29, 232–33, 237, 242–43, 254, 255, 267 Shine and, 7–13, 101, 215, 241, 256, 272 S.V.’s meeting of, 48–49 Angela, 56–60, 62, 71, 72, 78–79, 83–88, 94, 98, 103–4, 110–25, 135–39, 141, 143–46, 154, 158, 162, 163, 172, 173, 175, 182–83, 202, 221, 223, 224, 230, 234, 242, 257–60, 262, 263, 265, 266, 271, 272 apartment of, 112–16, 118–24, 135–37, 162, 165, 231 departure for Dominican Republic, 251, 264 Internet ad of, 111–12 Azad, 75–77, 91 Bearman, Peter, 28, 130, 167–68 black market, 76, 137, 176, 177, 233, 242, 243 wealthy young philanthropists and, 104 blacks, tangle of pathology and, 144 Bodega de la Familia, La, 103–4 Bourdieu, Pierre, 165 BRIC nations, 177 bricolage, 5 Brittany, 11–13, 17–18, 20, 21, 159, 160, 220–222, 226, 234, 237–41, 254–57 brokers, 173–74 Capone, Al, 142 Carla Consuelo, 113–26, 135–38, 143–46, 162–63, 173, 177, 200, 221, 224, 234, 251–54, 257, 260, 262, 265, 266, 271 attacks on, 116–21, 123, 124, 189–90, 196–98, 236, 253, 258–60 as escort, 125–26, 236, 251 Margot Kerry and, 163–66, 189–90, 196–98, 199, 200, 251–53, 258–60 Carlos, 67–68 Carter, Mindy, 7 Castells, Manuel, 176 Cathy, 183–89, 190, 204 Chelsea, 3, 56, 63 Chicago, 8, 85, 271 gangs in, 49, 54, 62, 63, 71, 86, 103, 171 gentrification in, 56 neighborhoods in, 5, 31 New York contrasted with, 8, 24, 31, 32, 33, 42, 56, 62, 201, 269–71 S.V.’s documentary on housing projects in, 10, 166–67, 179, 180 S.V.’s work in, 23–24, 30, 86, 104, 130, 132–33, 144, 166, 178, 250 underground economy in, 5, 40 young philanthropists and, 109 Chicago, University of, 5, 27–29, 31 Cicourel, Aaron, 175, 178 Cincy, 112–16, 118, 121–24 Clark, Michael, 30, 32, 33 class divisions, 145, 176 low income, 175, 176 middle and upper class, 176 moving across, 165, 176–78, 201, 202, 238, 242 new, 177–78 cocaine: crack, 1, 99–100, 143 powdered, 100, 139 Shine’s business in, 1, 9–11, 127, 129–32, 138–43, 207–14, 241, 243, 273 Cohan, 101 Collins, Michael, 42–43, 82, 89, 95–96, 146–47, 197 Columbia University, 27–28, 40, 47 ethical research methods and, 179–80 S.V. at, 130, 166, 185, 269 S.V.’s arrival at, 27, 29–30, 261 Conover, Mortimer, 50–54, 60, 61, 73, 84, 150, 263 stroke suffered by, 51–52 crack cocaine, 1, 99–100, 143 crime, observing, 103 cultural capital, 165, 167, 209–10, 249, 253 cultural repertoire, 213 Darlene, 183, 185, 190–91, 215 Declining Significance of Race, The (Wilson), 29 developing world, 177 dot-com bubble, 98, 236 drugs, drug dealing, 7–8, 52, 76, 129, 138, 177, 242 Analise and, 10–13, 20 cocaine: crack, 1, 99–100, 143 powdered, 100, 139 Shine’s business in, 1, 9–11, 127, 129–32, 138–43, 207–14, 241, 243, 273 Manjun and, 89, 91, 96 Shine and, 1, 4, 9–11, 58 in suburbs, 144 East Village, 132 economy, mainstream, in New York, 39 economy, underground, 40, 86, 92 brokers in, 173–74 in Chicago, 5, 40 connecting to overworld, 178 connectivity in, 172–73 floating communities and, 53–54 legal system and, 171 role of, in lives of middle class and wealthy, 182 social relations in, 52–54 speculation about, 39 trust and confidentiality in, 138 economy, underground, in New York, 1–2, 24, 41–42, 61–62, 86–87, 98, 177, 242 apartment renting and, 84 bank accounts and, 83, 84, 87 black market, 76, 137, 176, 177, 233, 242, 243 wealthy young philanthropists and, 104 day laborers in, 72–73 drugs, see drugs, drug dealing as floating community, 53–54, 58 in Harlem, 36–37, 39–40, 175 health care and, 83, 84 sex work, see sex industry Social Security and, 77 spread into surrounding world, 71 violence in, 89, 196–97 entropy, 242 escort services, 43–44, 84, 121, 182–83, 202, 225, 242 Analise and, 17–23, 25, 26, 135, 158–59, 215–29, 232–33, 237, 242–43, 254, 255, 267 Carla and, 125–26, 236, 251 Fiona and, 245–47 Morgan and, 245–48 quitting in, 240 see also prostitution, prostitutes ethnography, 1, 39 Evalina, 2–3, 9, 11–12, 101, 141, 158, 256 Shine and, 10, 12, 214 Fiona, 245–47 floating communities, 53–54, 58, 137 see also underground economy Foner, Nancy, 94 food stamps, 108 Freakonomics: A Rogue Economist Explores the Hidden Side of Everything (Levitt and Dubner), 39, 98 Friedman, Milton, 209 Gang Leader for a Day (Venkatesh), 1, 29, 40 gangs, 99 in Chicago, 49, 54, 62, 63, 71, 86, 103, 171 gang leaders’ self-image and, 142 Gans, Herbert, 27–28, 167, 203 Geertz, Clifford, 25 generalizability problem, 40 gentrification, 4, 38, 55–56, 177 Giuliani, Rudy, 4, 63, 68, 76, 78, 83 global cities, globalization, 37–39, 61, 93–95, 172, 177, 241, 252, 271, 272 floating and, 137; see also floating communities informational cities and, 176 New York as, 5, 37–40, 93–94, 137, 172, 201, 215, 269–70 sociological study of, 38 Greenpoint, 114 Harlem, 31, 35–37, 59–60, 74, 99, 102, 105, 209–10 underground economy in, 36–37, 39–40, 175 Harvard University, 48, 165 wine tasting, 48–49, 133–34, 224 Harvey, David, 37 Hell’s Kitchen, 4, 5, 55–56, 60, 95, 111, 147, 215 hipsters, 112, 114 homeless, 72–73 immigrants, 93–94, 177, 202 underground railroad for, 97 informational cities, 176 international law, 173 Internet: entrepreneurs, 98 prostitution and, 111–12, 114, 252 Janowitz, Morris, 85 J.B.

(Junebug), 13–18, 21, 22, 159–61, 215–16, 226–29, 235–38, 253–54, 256, 257, 265 film career of, 159, 160, 215, 226, 229–30, 235–37, 255, 256, 268 Shine and, 255 Jimmy, 261–64 johns, 186, 194–95 emotional exchange and, 187–88, 193–95 Jonathan, 192–95 Martin, 186–89, 191–95, 203–6, 250, 257–58 money exchange as protection for, 187–88 Nate, 192–95 Jo Jo, 221–25, 256 Jonathan, 192–95 Joshi, 77–79, 81–82, 88, 91, 162, 263 Juan, 157–58, 165, 207–13, 237–39 Jung, Carl, 236 Karina, 171–72, 173 Kate, 230–34, 237–38, 267 Kerry, Margot, 147, 149–55, 158, 163–74, 175–83, 224, 257, 263–65, 271 background of, 152–53 Carla and, 163–66, 189–90, 196–98, 199, 200, 251–53, 258–60 financial advice given by, 245–48 finishing school of, 199–201 as madam, 154–55, 163–66, 168–73, 176, 181–83, 185, 189–92, 199–201, 215, 230, 232–33, 238, 245–49, 251, 252, 264 sex business quit by, 264, 270 strip clubs and, 180–81 Khan, Shamus, 224 Kimberly, 219, 221–25 Kings County Hospital, 118 Kotlowitz, Alex, 105 Kozol, Jonathan, 105 Kristina, 83–86 La Bodega de la Familia, 103–4 Latino community, 103–4 law, 171 international, 173 Levitt, Steven, 54, 98, 130 Liebow, Elliot, 145 London, 37, 39, 172, 176 Louise, 165 Lower East Side, 63, 98, 103, 104, 110 Madrigal, Father, 113, 115, 118–20, 122–24 Manhattan Nights, 172 see also Kerry, Margot Manjun, 56–63, 65–71, 73, 77, 80–81, 84–86, 88, 91, 94, 111, 138, 143–46, 154, 155, 162, 172–73, 175, 223, 225, 231, 257, 265, 266, 270–72 disappearance of, 88, 91, 95–96, 146 drug trade and, 89, 91, 96 forced prostitution and, 91–92 shop of, 56–59, 61–63, 65, 69–72, 76, 77–80, 82–84, 86–90, 150 thief and, 80, 82, 89, 91 Margot, see Kerry, Margot Marjorie, 204 Martin, 186–89, 191–95, 203–6, 250, 257–58 Marx, Karl, 209 Max, 21 McCombs, Silvia, 105–9 Merton, Robert, 27, 167, 217 Michael (acquaintance of Analise), 160 Michael (acquaintance of Shine), 127, 128, 129 Michael (brother of Shine), 155–57 Midtown, 4, 62, 63, 74, 83–84, 97, 98, 102, 126, 129, 149 Mills, C. Wright, 27–28, 167 Morgan, 245–48 Mortimer, see Conover, Mortimer Moynihan Report, 144 Nate, 192–95 New York, 271–72 Chelsea, 3, 56, 63 Chicago contrasted with, 8, 24, 31, 32, 33, 42, 56, 62, 201, 269–71 contrasts in, 38–39 East Village, 132 gentrification in, 4, 38, 55–56, 177 as global city, 5, 37–40, 93–94, 137, 172, 176, 177, 201, 215, 269–70 Greenpoint, 114 Harlem, 31, 35–37, 59–60, 74, 99, 102, 105, 209–10 underground economy in, 36–37, 39–40, 175 Hell’s Kitchen, 4, 5, 55–56, 60, 95, 111, 147, 215 hipsters in, 112, 114 immigrants in, 93–95, 97, 177, 202 Latino community in, 103–4 Lower East Side, 63, 98, 103, 104, 110 mainstream economy in, 39 Midtown, 4, 62, 63, 74, 83–84, 97, 98, 102, 126, 129, 149 poverty in, 94 sex work in, see sex industry sociology and, 23–25 Soho, 3, 132, 149 suburbanization of, 95 Times Square area, 76 Wall Street, 4, 63, 129, 203 Williamsburg, 114 New York, underground economy in, 1–2, 24, 41–42, 61–62, 86–87, 98, 177, 242 apartment renting and, 84 bank accounts and, 83, 84, 87 black market, 76, 137, 176, 177, 233, 242, 243 wealthy young philanthropists and, 104 day laborers in, 72–73 drugs, see drugs, drug dealing as floating community, 53–54, 58 in Harlem, 36–37, 39–40, 175 health care and, 83, 84 sex work, see sex industry Social Security and, 77 spread into surrounding world, 71 violence in, 89, 196–97 9/11 attacks, 97 Ninth Avenue Family Video, 56–59, 61–63, 65, 69–72, 76, 77–80, 82–84, 86–90, 150 Park, Robert, 29 Patriot Act, 97 philanthropists, young, 104–10, 132 black market and, 104 poor, 23, 94, 201–2, 225 hard work and resilience among, 143–46 stereotypes about, 143–44 welfare and, 106 Silvia and, 106, 108, 109 porn shops, 68–69, 71, 72, 74, 90, 202 of Manjun, 56–59, 61–63, 65, 69–72, 76, 77–80, 82–84, 86–90, 150 of Santosh, 74–75, 88 poverty, see poor prostitution, prostitutes, 1–2, 22, 26, 42–44, 52, 75–76, 110–11, 177 Analise and, 17–23, 25, 26, 135, 158–59, 215–29, 232–33, 237, 242–43, 254, 255, 267 Angela and, 56–60, 62, 71, 72, 78, 83–88, 98, 104, 110–25, 135–39 aspiring artist types and, 184–85 Azad and, 75–76 Brittany and, 11–13, 17–18, 20, 21, 159, 160, 220–222, 226, 234, 237–41 Carla and, see Carla Consuelo Cathy and, 183–89, 190, 204 Cincy and, 112–16, 118, 121–24 clients and, see sex industry clients escort services, see escort services exit strategies and, 232–33, 245–48 female empowerment and, 232 forced, 91–92 high-end, 182–85, 192, 202, 205, 252, 263; see also escort services Internet and, 111–12, 114, 252 Jo Jo and, 221–25, 256 Kimberly and, 219, 221–25 Manjun and, 91–92 Margot Kerry and, 149–55, 163–66, 168–73, 176, 181–83, 185, 189–92, 199–201, 215, 230, 232–33, 238, 245–49, 251, 252, 264 Santosh and, 74 street, 42–43, 71, 73, 78, 84, 98 Vonnie and, 110–25, 135–39, 141 women from business world in, 184–85 Rajesh, 75–76, 91, 98 revanchist policies, 177 Ricky, 198, 258 Santosh, 74–76, 88, 90–93, 97–98, 145–46, 231, 233, 270, 271 Sassen, Saskia, 37, 38 Savage Inequalities (Kozol), 105 September 11 attacks, 97 sex industry, 61, 71–76, 202, 264 aspirations and, 155 escort services, 43–44, 84, 121, 182–83, 202, 225, 242 Analise and, 17–23, 25, 26, 135, 158–59, 215–29, 232–33, 237, 242–43, 254, 255, 267 Carla and, 125–26, 236, 251 Fiona and, 245–47 Morgan and, 245–48 quitting in, 240 ethnic variance in, 181 exit strategies and, 232–33, 245–48 Kristina and, 83–86 multinational nature of, 71–72 networked community and, 84–85 porn shops, 68–69, 71, 72, 74, 90, 202 of Manjun, 56–59, 61–63, 65, 69–72, 76, 77–80, 82–84, 86–90, 150 of Santosh, 74–75, 88 prostitution, prostitutes, 1–2, 22, 26, 42–44, 52, 75–76, 110–11, 177 Analise and, 17–23, 25, 26, 135, 158–59, 215–29, 232–33, 237, 242–43, 254, 255, 267 Angela and, 56–60, 62, 71, 72, 78, 83–88, 98, 104, 110–25, 135–39 aspiring artist types and, 184–85 Azad and, 75–76 Brittany and, 11–13, 17–18, 20, 21, 159, 160, 220–222, 226, 234, 237–41 Carla and, see Carla Consuelo Cathy and, 183–89, 190, 204 Cincy and, 112–16, 118, 121–24 clients and, see sex industry clients escort services, see escort services exit strategies and, 232–33, 245–48 female empowerment and, 232 forced, 91–92 high-end, 182–85, 192, 202, 205, 252, 263; see also escort services Internet and, 111–12, 114, 252 Jo Jo and, 221–25, 256 Kimberly and, 219, 221–25 Manjun and, 91–92 Margot Kerry and, 149–55, 163–66, 168–73, 176, 181–83, 185, 189–92, 199–201, 215, 230, 232–33, 238, 245–49, 251, 252, 264 Santosh and, 74 street, 42–43, 71, 73, 78, 84, 98 Vonnie and, 110–25, 135–39, 141 women from business world in, 184–85 Santosh and, 74–75 social networks and, 73 socioeconomic and ethnic mixing in, 164–66 strip clubs, 6, 44–47, 49–50, 185, 202, 261–62 Margot Kerry and, 180–81 Mortimer and, 50–54 Times Square and, 76 transition to normal life, 245–48 white women in, 158 sex industry clients, 186, 194–95 emotional exchange and, 187–88, 193–95 Jonathan, 192–95 Martin, 186–89, 191–95, 203–6, 250, 257–58 money exchange as protection for, 187–88 Nate, 192–95 Sex Workers’ Project, Urban Justice Center, 2, 43, 47, 71, 73, 83, 175 Shakespeare, William, 233 Shine, 1–6, 12, 16, 23–25, 35–37, 42, 54–59, 62–63, 69–71, 98–103, 126–32, 138–43, 143–46, 155–58, 162, 175–77, 179–80, 196, 207–14, 233, 234, 242–43, 255–58, 264–73 Analise and, 7–13, 101, 215, 241, 256, 272 art galleries and, 2–6, 101, 214–15, 241, 265–66, 273 cocaine business of, 1, 4, 9–11, 58, 127, 129–32, 138–43, 207–14, 241, 243, 273 conflict resolution and, 172 Evalina and, 10, 12, 214 family of, 155–57, 265 father of, 156 geographical boundaries and, 102 at hotel bar, 126–29 J.B. and, 255 Juan and, 157–58, 165, 207–13, 237–39 mother of, 156–57, 210 as pimp, 99 staff of, 138–43, 157–58, 207–8, 231–32, 240 S.V.’s meeting of, 1, 30–35 S.V.’s relationship with, 103 white clients and, 101–3, 141, 174, 209–10, 214 Shoomi, 66–68, 90, 94 Smith, Neil, 177 snowball sampling, 151 Social Security, 77 Society of Fellows, 48 social capital, 165, 167, 209–10, 249, 253 social classes, 145, 176 low income, 175, 176 middle and upper, 176 moving across, 165, 176–78, 201, 202, 238, 242 new, 177–78 sociology, sociologists, 23, 28–29, 37, 73, 87, 143–45, 195, 201, 203, 206, 250, 271 at Columbia, 27–28 ecological viewpoint in, 38, 145 ethical research methods and, 179–80 ethnography, 1, 39 Chicago style and, 23–24 globalization studied by, 38 moving across social classes and, 165, 201 New York style and, 23–25 poor as viewed by, 23, 143–44, 201 small n problem in, 40, 184, 250, 252, 263, 271–72 snowball sampling in, 151 S.V.’s documentary and, 166–67 Soho, 3, 132, 149 squeegee men, 68, 69, 72 State of Grace (film), 55 strip clubs, 6, 44–47, 49–50, 185, 202, 261–62 Margot Kerry and, 180–81 Mortimer and, 50–54 Sula, 80–83, 91 Swidler, Ann, 213 There Are No Children Here (Kotlowitz), 105 third culture, 174 Times Square, 76 Tito, 211, 237 Tori, 185–86 Truly Disadvantaged, The (Wilson), 29 Tuskegee trials, 179 underground economy, 40, 86, 92 brokers in, 173–74 in Chicago, 5, 40 connecting to overworld, 178 connectivity in, 172–73 floating communities and, 53–54 legal system and, 171 role of, in lives of middle class and wealthy, 182 social relations in, 52–54 speculation about, 39 trust and confidentiality in, 138 underground economy in New York, 1–2, 24, 41–42, 61–62, 86–87, 98, 177, 242 apartment renting and, 84 bank accounts and, 83, 84, 87 black market, 76, 137, 176, 177, 233, 242, 243 wealthy young philanthropists and, 104 day laborers in, 72–73 drugs, see drugs, drug dealing as floating community, 53–54, 58 in Harlem, 36–37, 39–40, 175 health care and, 83, 84 sex work, see sex industry Social Security and, 77 spread into surrounding world, 71 violence in, 89, 196–97 University of Chicago, 5, 27–29, 31 Urban Justice Center, 61 Sex Workers’ Project at, 2, 43, 47, 71, 73, 83, 175 Venkatesh, Sudhir (author): arrival at Columbia, 27, 29–30, 261 Bearman and, 28, 130, 167–68 Chicago public housing documentary of, 10, 166–67, 179, 180 Chicago sociology background of, 23–24, 30, 86, 104, 130, 132–33, 144, 166, 178, 250 Clark and, 30, 32, 33 at Columbia, 130, 166, 185, 269 as documentary filmmaker, 179–82, 185, 229–30, 262–63, 268–69 Gang Leader for a Day, 1, 29, 40 panic attacks of, 150–51 research grant of, 185 separation and divorce of, 80–81, 134, 151, 167–69, 188, 189, 191, 194, 217, 250 small n problem in research of, 40, 184, 250, 252, 263, 271–72 at University of Chicago, 5, 27–29, 31 at wine tasting, 48–49, 133–34, 224 Village Voice, 86–87 violence, 89, 196–97 vomiting, 161–62 Vonnie, 110–25, 135–39, 141, 145, 162 Wallace, Terry, 163 Wall Street, 4, 63, 129, 203 Waters, Mary, 95 webs of significance, 25 welfare, 106 Silvia and, 106, 108, 109 White, Harrison, 28 Williams, Carter, 105–10, 132 Williamsburg, 114 Wilson, William Julius, 28–29 wine tasting, 48–49, 133–34, 224 Winters, Betsy, 105–10, 132–34 Winters, Michael, 105–10, 132 women’s shelter, 123 World Trade Center attack, 97


Is Everyone Hanging Out Without Me? (And Other Concerns) by Mindy Kaling

Berlin Wall, Burning Man, Donner party, East Village, illegal immigration, index card, medical residency, pre–internet, rent control, Saturday Night Live, Triangle Shirtwaist Factory

The New Yorker wrote of the show: “Goofy, funny, and improbably believable … Kaling and Withers have created one of the most appealing male-bonding stories since Damon and Pythias. Or Oscar and Felix.” That quote was easy to access because I have it tattooed on my clavicle. This is when our lives started to change. Producers got in touch with us to transfer the show to Off-Broadway. We got a director, we got a budget, and we could finally return our costumes to Brenda’s brothers. The show went up at P.S. 122, a beautiful theater in the East Village that at one point had been a public school. There’s a special level of cool for buildings in Manhattan that have at one point been something else. Someone might say to you, knowingly, “Oh, did you know this theater used to be a zipper factory?” or “You obviously know this discotheque used to be church, right?” or “We are eating in a restaurant that at one point was a typhoid containment center.”

It’s still pretty perfect, but now it has a tiny bump in it, which she good-naturedly pretends she likes. I guess the lesson is that if you’re going to punch someone in the face, your best bet is to punch your best friend. Counterintuitive, I know. Bruce Weber gave us a great review in the Times and also a separate little write-up about the nose incident. The publicity drove sales even more. People were curious about this weird, sixty-minute East Village play starring cross-dressers, during which at any moment physical violence might erupt. Great press from Rolling Stone and Time gave the producers confidence that the show could move to Los Angeles. So while there was a production going on at P.S. 122, we started another one in L.A. EMOTIONAL BLOODSHED Matt & Ben was invited to the U.S. Comedy Arts Festival, in Aspen, which was a big deal, because HBO sponsored the festival and the place was full of powerful Hollywood execs.


pages: 1,351 words: 404,177

Nixonland: The Rise of a President and the Fracturing of America by Rick Perlstein

affirmative action, Alistair Cooke, American ideology, Bay Area Rapid Transit, Berlin Wall, Bretton Woods, cognitive dissonance, cuban missile crisis, delayed gratification, desegregation, East Village, European colonialism, full employment, Golden Gate Park, Haight Ashbury, immigration reform, In Cold Blood by Truman Capote, index card, indoor plumbing, Joan Didion, Kitchen Debate, liberal capitalism, Mahatma Gandhi, Marshall McLuhan, Monroe Doctrine, moral panic, New Urbanism, Norman Mailer, Own Your Own Home, Paul Samuelson, plutocrats, Plutocrats, price mechanism, Ralph Nader, RAND corporation, rolodex, Ronald Reagan, sexual politics, the medium is the message, traveling salesman, upwardly mobile, urban planning, urban renewal, walking around money, War on Poverty, white picket fence, Whole Earth Catalog

She didn’t even note the charismatic outlaw in Haight-Ashbury that summer luring young girls into his orbit the way Clyde lured Bonnie: a songwriter by the name of Charles Manson. The NYPD maintained a twenty-man undercover detail to help terrified parents find runaways. The New York Times’s J. Anthony Lukas won a Pulitzer Prize for his harrowing account of one such teenage girl. “I didn’t even know there was an East Village,” he quoted Irving Fitzpatrick, “the wealthy Greenwich spice importer whose daughter, Linda, was found murdered with a hippie friend in an East Village boiler room on October 8.” The condensed version in the Christmas issue of America’s most widely read magazine was billed as “probably the most nightmarish article the Reader’s Digest has ever published.” “Red and white are Linda’s favorite colors; she thinks they’re gay,” Mrs. Fitzpatrick told the reporter, showing off Linda’s third-floor bedroom, while the reporter alternated images like that with ones from Linda’s other world in italics: “Linda told people she was a witch….

“The outcry of a generation is finally being taken seriously,” ran a letter responding to Time from a Steve Forrer, Gettysburg College, Class of ’69 (Time always included young letter-writers’ ages). “We are thinkers, cool guys, picketers, workers, fighters, but most of all we are the future of America—and that doesn’t scare us.” Pundits spoke of the 26 million new citizens who would come of voting age by the time the 1972 presidential election rolled around, politics’ new X-factor. In “paisley ghettos” such as Haight-Ashbury and New York’s East Village and Old Town in Chicago, teenagers chartered brave new worlds. The manifesto of the first gathering of publishers of the new “underground” press proclaimed as their purpose, “To warn the ‘civilized world’ of its impending collapse,” through “communications among aware communities outside the establishment.” (San Francisco that summer, the underground paper IVO promised, would be “the Rome of a future world founded on love.”)

Episcopalian bishop James Pike noticed “something about the temper and quality of these people, a gentleness, an interest—something good.” Time observed in a long and respectful cover story in the summer of 1967 that their “drug use is primarily Eucharistic in nature” and reported on pilgrimages to “psychadelicatessens” by “shoppers who intend trying nothing stronger than a Bloody Mary” such as Jackie Kennedy, a regular knickknack purchaser in the head shops of the East Village. Though a Time letter-writer expressed another proliferating opinion: “I fail to see much real altruism or idealism in my children or their friends. I see, rather, a perverted, sentimental self-centeredness.” In fact, the more attention paid the psychadelicatessens, the more the squares worked at chartering a youth culture of their own. In January of 1966, the names of 477,000 students from 322 colleges who supported the war were presented by student leaders to the White House.


pages: 173 words: 58,260

Sober Stick Figure: A Memoir by Amber Tozer

East Village, Skype

I thought since performing was the only thing that made me happy (besides being drunk), it must mean that this was what I was supposed to do with my life. I was still afraid of the cool alternative scene, but all I had to do was get real fucking sloshed before I went to a show and everything was fine. One of my goals was to get on a Monday night show called “Eating It.” It was at Luna Lounge, a rock club in the East Village that occasionally hosted comedy events. The show’s producer, Jeff, would always book one or two new comics and it was a BIG DEAL. It was a hot shit show because comics like Sarah Silverman, Janeane Garofalo, Patton Oswalt, Tig Notaro, Todd Barry, Marc Maron, and Bill Burr would perform. I wanted to get on that show so bad, and I was there every Monday night slamming drinks, chain-smoking, and talking to my comedy heroes and trying to get Jeff to like me.

Then I’d have these nights where I would try to find another boyfriend. One who wasn’t so controlling. One time I made out with a 60 year-old guy right at the bar in front of everyone. He was a good kisser. Another time while we were on one of our temporary breakups, I was house-sitting for Jen. She and her boyfriend were out of town, and I had to water her plants. It was great because they lived in the East Village, and there were so many cool bars in that neighborhood. I invited a friend of mine out for drinks. He was a musician and hung around a lot of comics I knew. I had had a crush on him for a while. I brought him back to Jen’s and was like, “I am gonna fuck this guy,” but I couldn’t go through with it because I kept wishing he was Vinnie. We just fooled around, and I blue-balled him on Jen’s couch.


pages: 162 words: 61,105

Eyewitness Top 10 Los Angeles by Catherine Gerber

Berlin Wall, centre right, City Beautiful movement, clean water, East Village, Frank Gehry, haute couture, Mahatma Gandhi, Ronald Reagan, transcontinental railway

A full-scale model of a blue whale greets visitors in the Great Hall. You’ll come face to face with exotic giant spider crabs, playful sea otters, and even get to pet a shark. For a look at what it takes to keep the aquarium afloat, take a Behind-the-Scenes-Tour. d Map E6 • 100 Aquarium Way, Long Beach • 562590-3100 • Open 9am–6pm • Closed Dec 25 • Adm • www.aquariumofpacific.org of Latin & Museum American Art (MOLAA) Part of Long Beach’s emerging East Village Arts District, this lively museum is the only one in the western United States dedicated to showcasing the work of artists who’ve lived or worked in Latin America since 1945. The collection offers great insight into the culture and concerns of artists from Mexico to Tierra del Fuego and every country in between. The premises has expanded from the original layout and includes a sculpture garden.

Loomis Home and Garden 82 The Charles Sumner Greene House 91 Chateau Marmont 8, 104, 106, 146 Chemosphere 41 “Chest of Drawers” 18 Chez Melange 125 Chiat/Day Building 40 chic & hip hotels 147 children’s attractions 50–51 children 50–51, 134, 143 Chinatown 70, 71, 73, 79 New Chinatown 71 Chinese American Museum 21 Chinois on Main 125 Christopher Street West Parade 104 Chung King Road 72 Church, Frederic 24 Cicada 77, 79 E Eames, Charles & Ray 123 East Village Arts District 128 Eastern Columbia Building 77 The Egyptian Theatre 11, 56, 59, 97 “El Alisal” see Charles F. Loomis Home and Garden El Capitan Theatre 11, 56, 97 El Cholo 85 El Matador Beach 44 El Mercado 84 El Pueblo de Los Angeles 7, 20–21, 38, 48, 70, 71, 73 El Pueblo Visitor Center 20 El Tepeyac 85 Elaine’s Hollywood Bed & Breakfast 151 Elan Hotel Modern 147 Electric Tram 14 emergency numbers 142 Empress Pavilion 73, 79 Ennis-Brown House 97 ESPN Zone 33 ESTA (Electronic System for Travel Authorization) 134 European Painting & Sculpture (LACMA) 17 Exposition Park 50, 80, 83 Exposition Park Rose Garden 42, 83 express & courier mail 141 153 Index F Fahey/Klein Gallery 107 Fairbanks Jr, Douglas 96 Fairbanks Sr, Douglas 10, 96, 111 The Fairmont Miramar 144 Family Hotels & Motels 149 Family Room 12 Fantasies Come True 52 Fantasmic!


pages: 385 words: 118,314

Cities Are Good for You: The Genius of the Metropolis by Leo Hollis

Airbnb, banking crisis, Berlin Wall, Boris Johnson, Broken windows theory, Buckminster Fuller, call centre, car-free, carbon footprint, cellular automata, clean water, cloud computing, complexity theory, congestion charging, creative destruction, credit crunch, Credit Default Swap, crowdsourcing, Deng Xiaoping, digital map, East Village, Edward Glaeser, Enrique Peñalosa, Firefox, Frank Gehry, Geoffrey West, Santa Fe Institute, Gini coefficient, Google Earth, Guggenheim Bilbao, haute couture, Hernando de Soto, housing crisis, illegal immigration, income inequality, informal economy, Internet of things, invisible hand, Jane Jacobs, Kickstarter, knowledge economy, knowledge worker, Long Term Capital Management, M-Pesa, Mahatma Gandhi, Mark Zuckerberg, Masdar, mass immigration, megacity, negative equity, new economy, New Urbanism, Occupy movement, openstreetmap, packet switching, Panopticon Jeremy Bentham, place-making, Ray Oldenburg, Richard Florida, sharing economy, Silicon Valley, Skype, smart cities, smart grid, spice trade, Steve Jobs, technoutopianism, the built environment, The Chicago School, The Death and Life of Great American Cities, The Great Good Place, the High Line, The Spirit Level, The Wisdom of Crowds, Thomas Malthus, trade route, traveling salesman, urban planning, urban renewal, urban sprawl, walkable city, white flight, Y2K, Yom Kippur War

This rather undermines the views held by many exasperated campaigners such as Green Alliance activist Julie Hill, who writes ‘we actually need … to have some choices taken away from us’.14 Instead, what is happening in New York shows that we need to see the advantages of making these changes and feel part of the transformation that they bring so that we choose the alternative for ourselves out of preference. I found something like this in an unexpected place. After visiting Staten Island, I returned to Manhattan and headed to the East Village, a once run-down neighbourhood that had gained a reputation for its edgy, artistic atmosphere. It was here that, in the 1940s, Robert Moses knocked down much of the slum housing and replaced it with the projects, vast social-housing tenements that became synonymous with crime and drugs in the 1980s. Amongst the older streets that circled Tompkin Park, lined with barely gentrified brownstone houses, I was fortunate enough to be following a guided tour prepared for me by the Museum of Reclaimed Urban Space, a newly created campaign group hoping to celebrate the squats and local-community gardens of Alphabet City.

The garden itself was divided up into small rooms, each offering different delights: in one, a woman was tending her vegetables with her grandson; in another two men were sitting on a bench, shooting the breeze in the shade; there was a hut with a table, stove and kettle, obviously where the gardeners came together after a day’s toil. I wandered along pathways made of broken-up bricks and found a quiet corner, to get out of the heat and to enjoy this moment of tranquillity in one of the busiest places in the world. Heaven on earth, a communal garden on Avenue C There are about 640 communal gardens in New York and at least sixty of them can be found in the dense neighbourhood of the East Village. Many of the gardens emerged from community activism, driven by local campaigners who saw the value of transforming abandoned and derelict properties into verdant oases. Often the plots were taken, like the squats, because no one else wanted them and the legal status was only worked out afterwards. In 2002 the district attorney Elliot Spitzer negotiated that the city should acknowledge the gardens and offer some safety of collective ownership.

There also seemed to be people from around the globe, a reminder that this was a world city. From a place like this we can dream of the ideal city without losing perspective or becoming utopian. Thinking of the city at this local level makes change seem possible, a place where the individual can make a difference. It is from here that one can campaign for a local community garden, as can be found in East Village; it is at this scale that we have seen the most successful attempts to revive the neighbourhoods of Detroit; it is making a difference at this local level that drove Colin Beavan to stand for the Green Party of America and start his campaign in Brooklyn. And from this base, great things can emerge, as proven by the work of Betterblock.org: the right message spreading rapidly, networks combining, neighbourhoods becoming cities, the street talking to city hall.


Girl Walks Into a Bar . . .: Comedy Calamities, Dating Disasters, and a Midlife Miracle by Rachel Dratch

Burning Man, Chuck Templeton: OpenTable:, East Village, Haight Ashbury, rolodex, Saturday Night Live, the High Line

Friday passed with no improvement. I woke up Saturday morning and it was the same. And I was meeting this guy tonight. Basically, I could stand and walk OK, but sitting was hard. That’s pretty sexy, right? Anxiety started to creep in, and I began to worry that total back spaz à la SNL would happen during my date. I could just imagine myself sprawled out on the floor of some restaurant in the East Village, waiting for an ambulance. I talked to my friends on the phone. “How about acupuncture?” one of them said. Acupuncture. I’d never tried it before. Ordinarily, I’d be scared of the needles, but at this point I was thinking the needles couldn’t be any worse than the pain in my back. I made a few calls to acupuncturists who were recommended, but none were available on such short notice on a Saturday.

That meant he was in crazy mode—disconnected, hyper, spazzy, feral—some vestigial behavior relating to unknown traumas before he landed in an animal shelter as a rescue. “Isn’t that so like me?” I thought. Once again I had managed to pick a bad boy with a complicated past who seemed really sweet and nice the first time we met and saved all his bad shit for after we were fully involved. Then came the day I found out just how dark this Burleigh was…. I ran into my friend Jenny and we were going to hang somewhere near my apartment in the East Village. I just needed to walk the dog. “I love dogs! I’ll come with you to walk him!” Jenny is a sweet, wide-eyed dancer who had once done a reading of a musical with me. We arrived at my apartment and right away I saw … it’s Cujo time. Burleigh was crazed. He was jumping, he was barking like crazy. The whites of his eyes were gleaming in full effect. He was even nipping a bit. We took him out for a walk and he continued to behave like a madman.


Yes Please by Amy Poehler

airport security, Albert Einstein, blood diamonds, carbon footprint, Donald Trump, East Village, Google Hangouts, Pepto Bismol, Saturday Night Live, Skype, the medium is the message

They were tough to talk to, almost impossible to understand and make eye contact with, but I had a strange affection for their ability to channel their meth-taking into real apartment improvements. The problems began once they started knocking on our door claiming our sink was leaking. Then they would spend the whole day taking the sink apart. Then they would ask for twenty bucks to go find a special sink part and disappear for a week. Then one of them died. So all in all, meth seemed too risky. Heroin was another drug that didn’t catch my tail. I lived in New York’s East Village in 1998, when heroin was making its forty-fifth comeback. The streets were filled with suburban junkies shooting up next to their pit bull puppies. My building was across from Tompkins Square Park, which had been suffering and/or improving due to gentrification, and the apartments were filled with a lot of musicians and models living alone in New York City for the first time. Most of the models took a real liking to me.

Hannah lived above me, and I would picture them fucking and eventually breaking through the floor and crashing through my ceiling, killing us all with one giant official NBA penis. The fear of this encouraged me to move to a new apartment. That and the one freezing morning I had to step over a passed-out model who had nodded off while filling out a W-2 form, only to open the outside door to find a giant pile of human shit. I said good-bye to the East Village and moved over to the West Village, where we don’t have those kinds of problems. In the West Village we just have tweaked-out gay hustlers who hit us over the heads with rocks, thank you very much. I also didn’t try heroin because I was told that everyone threw up the first time they did it, and I was never at a party where I felt like throwing up. When given the option to throw up or not throw up, I usually choose the latter.


pages: 464 words: 127,283

Smart Cities: Big Data, Civic Hackers, and the Quest for a New Utopia by Anthony M. Townsend

1960s counterculture, 4chan, A Pattern Language, Airbnb, Amazon Web Services, anti-communist, Apple II, Bay Area Rapid Transit, Burning Man, business process, call centre, carbon footprint, charter city, chief data officer, clean water, cleantech, cloud computing, computer age, congestion charging, connected car, crack epidemic, crowdsourcing, DARPA: Urban Challenge, data acquisition, Deng Xiaoping, digital map, Donald Davies, East Village, Edward Glaeser, game design, garden city movement, Geoffrey West, Santa Fe Institute, George Gilder, ghettoisation, global supply chain, Grace Hopper, Haight Ashbury, Hedy Lamarr / George Antheil, hive mind, Howard Rheingold, interchangeable parts, Internet Archive, Internet of things, Jacquard loom, Jane Jacobs, jitney, John Snow's cholera map, Joi Ito, Khan Academy, Kibera, Kickstarter, knowledge worker, load shedding, M-Pesa, Mark Zuckerberg, megacity, mobile money, mutually assured destruction, new economy, New Urbanism, Norbert Wiener, Occupy movement, off grid, openstreetmap, packet switching, Panopticon Jeremy Bentham, Parag Khanna, patent troll, Pearl River Delta, place-making, planetary scale, popular electronics, RFC: Request For Comment, RFID, ride hailing / ride sharing, Robert Gordon, self-driving car, sharing economy, Silicon Valley, Skype, smart cities, smart grid, smart meter, social graph, social software, social web, special economic zone, Steve Jobs, Steve Wozniak, Stuxnet, supply-chain management, technoutopianism, Ted Kaczynski, telepresence, The Death and Life of Great American Cities, too big to fail, trade route, Tyler Cowen: Great Stagnation, undersea cable, Upton Sinclair, uranium enrichment, urban decay, urban planning, urban renewal, Vannevar Bush, working poor, working-age population, X Prize, Y2K, zero day, Zipcar

As he told a CNN reporter a few weeks later, what motivated his home renovation was common generosity, “I’ve got more bandwidth than I’m using and I’m willing to share it for free.”26 From that humble start, over the next year we perfected a guerrilla model for setting up free Wi-Fi: donated equipment, volunteer labor, and a host who would cover bandwidth costs and provide a space for our equipment. We hung wireless routers outside our own apartment windows and on the fronts of local businesses like alt.coffee, a café fronting Tompkins Square Park in the East Village. Almost immediately, we found ourselves in a digital land rush. As it turns out, we weren’t the only ones looking to bring Wi-Fi to the street. But we were the only ones hoping to do so for free. All of the big wireless companies like Verizon and T-Mobile, as well as start-ups such as Boingo, wanted to muscle in and turned our public spaces into a commercial battleground. As we worried that Wi-Fi’s wireless commons would be colonized by business, our fears were confirmed when, in December 2002, AT&T, Intel, and IBM teamed up to launch Cometa Networks, a new venture that promised to build a network of 20,000 pay hot spots nationwide.

As a remedy, over the next decade Alexander and his colleagues studied traditional cities around the world, distilling their timeless design elements—“the unchanging receptacle in which the changing parts of the system . . . can work together,” as he had described the corner in Berkeley.2 The results, published in 1977 as A Pattern Language, were a crib sheet for lattice-friendly city building. Standing outside the St. Mark’s Ale House once again in 2011, almost ten years to the day after I first encountered Dodgeball inside, I browsed the East Village’s lattice with my iPhone using Dennis Crowley’s newest app, Foursquare. Alexander’s ideas about trees, lattices, and patterns have lingered on the margins of architecture and urban design since the 1970s. But they had an enormous impact on computer science, where his writings inspired the development of object-oriented programming. Its philosophy of modular, reusable pieces of code that can be brought together in useful semi-lattices—much like the objects on Alexander’s street corner—dominates software design to this day, including the computer language used by iPhone app developers (Objective-C).3 A fifty-year feedback loop closed as I realized that Alexander’s vision of the city as a lattice underpinned the design of the software that now filtered my own view of it.

“What is needed right now is a new type of city,” he continued, perhaps unwittingly echoing the call to arms of the People’s Computer Company some four decades earlier, “a city that is like the Internet in its openness, participation, distributed nature and rapid, organic evolution—a city that is not centrally operated, but that is created, operated and improved upon by all—a DIY City.”18 He outlined his vision of an online community where “people from all over the world think about, talk about, and ultimately build tools for making their cities work better with web technologies.”19 Geraci and I had stayed in touch, and throughout the autumn and early winter of 2008, we would meet for long walks around the East Village, looping out from my apartment at Ninth Street and Third Avenue, on a gallery walk of grassroots smart-city projects. Past the free hot spot a crew of NYCwireless volunteers had installed in early October 2001 to provide relief Internet access after the September 11 terrorist attacks. Past the block where Geraci and fellow ITP student Mohit SantRam had launched the first Neighbornode cluster from SantRam’s apartment.


California by Sara Benson

airport security, Albert Einstein, Apple II, Asilomar, back-to-the-land, Bay Area Rapid Transit, Berlin Wall, Burning Man, buy and hold, California gold rush, call centre, car-free, carbon footprint, Columbine, dark matter, desegregation, Donald Trump, Donner party, East Village, El Camino Real, Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test, Frank Gehry, global village, Golden Gate Park, Haight Ashbury, haute cuisine, Joan Didion, Khyber Pass, Loma Prieta earthquake, low cost airline, McMansion, means of production, Menlo Park, planetary scale, RFID, ride hailing / ride sharing, Ronald Reagan, Silicon Valley, South of Market, San Francisco, stem cell, Steve Jobs, Steve Wozniak, Stewart Brand, the new new thing, trade route, transcontinental railway, Upton Sinclair, urban sprawl, Wall-E, white picket fence, Whole Earth Catalog, working poor, Works Progress Administration, young professional

Eating & Drinking You can easily walk between several restaurants in the East Village. Rustic farm stands line Santa Rosa Creek Rd, a 15-minute drive east of Cambria via Main St. Lily’s Coffeehouse ( 805-927-7259; 2028 Main St; items $1-8; 8:30am-5pm Wed-Mon; wi-fi) A community gathering spot, Francophilic Lily’s has a peaceful front garden patio and brews robust coffees and teas. Drop in on Saturday between 11am and 4pm for made-to-order crepes. Linn’s Easy as Pie Cafe ( 805-924-3050; 4251 Bridge St; mains $4-10; 11am-8pm; ) If you don’t have time to visit Linn’s Fruit Bin, the original farm store out on Santa Rosa Creek Rd, you can still fork into their famous olallieberry pies and preserves at this take-out counter with a sunny patio in the East Village. Indigo Moon ( 805-927-2911; 1940 Main St; mains lunch $6-12, dinner $12-25; 11am-4am daily, dinner Wed-Sun) Inside this artisan cheese and wine shop, breezy bistro tables complement market-fresh salads, toasty sandwiches and crunchy sweet-potato fries.

Fans of the crazy and curious should make a beeline for Nitt-Witt Ridge ( 805-927-2690; 881 Hillcrest Dr; tours adult/child $10/5), a three-story house built entirely out of recycled materials – from abalone shells to beer cans, ceramic tiles to toilet seats. This ‘palace of junk’ is the creation of Arthur Harold Beal (aka Captain Nit Wit, aka Der Tinkerpaw) and was hand-built over a period of 51 years. Call ahead to arrange tours. * * * Cambria has three distinct parts: the tourist-choked East Village, a half-mile from Hwy 1, where antiques shops, art galleries and coffeehouses line Main St; the newer West Village, further west along Main St, where you’ll find the chamber of commerce ( 805-927-3624; www.cambriachamber.org; 767 Main St; 9am-5pm Mon-Fri, noon-4pm Sat & Sun); and motel-lined Moonstone Beach, off Hwy 1. Although the beach’s eponymous milky-white moonstones are long gone, it still attracts romantics with its oceanfront boardwalk and truly picturesque rocky shoreline.

Bridge Street Inn ( 805-927-7653; www.bridgestreetinncambria.com; 4314 Bridge St; dm $22-25, r $50-70; wi-fi) Inside a 19th-century parsonage, this B&B-esque hostel has character, charm and a communal kitchen, but the shabby-chic rooms have thin walls. It’s small, so reserve by calling ahead between 5pm and 9pm daily. Bluebird Inn ( 805-927-4634, 800-552-5434; www.bluebirdmotel.com; 1880 Main St; d $70-220) With peaceful gardens, this friendly East Village motel has basic rooms, some with fireplaces and private balconies overlooking a creek. It’s a reliable budget-conscious choice. Wi-fi in lobby. Blue Dolphin Inn ( 805-927-3300, 800-222-9157; www.cambriainns.com; 6470 Moonstone Beach Dr; d incl breakfast $109-239; wi-fi) This gray, two-story, slat-sided building may not look as upscale as other oceanfront motels, but inside the cozy rooms have fireplaces, pillowtop mattresses and rich-feeling linens.


Bedsit Disco Queen: How I Grew Up and Tried to Be a Pop Star by Tracey Thorn

Berlin Wall, Bob Geldof, East Village, greed is good, Live Aid, means of production, Mikhail Gorbachev, Neil Kinnock, Ronald Reagan, sexual politics, University of East Anglia, young professional

At first, just a medicinal nip before going on worked wonders. Then that wore off a bit, so now a little more is needed. It is only eleven in the morning, and I haven’t eaten yet, but I slug back a couple of large brandies anyway, and hey presto! I feel much warmer and braver. At that moment, Jeff Buckley appears unexpectedly in our cabin. In New York in April 1995, we had done an acoustic gig at a little club/café in the East Village called Sin-é, for the sole reason that Jeff Buckley had, in 1993, released his first EP of live recordings made there. After it was released, and following tip-offs from Geoff Travis, we went to see Jeff play live in London, and at first I had mixed feelings of awe and impatience. He was so good, but he could be so self-involved onstage it was almost impenetrable, and the self-love was off-putting.

Out in New York I wanted to play where he had played, and so we booked a gig at Sin-é, which really was just a café where they pushed the tables back and you set up in a corner of the room. We lugged our own gear down there, turning up with a couple of guitars and a tiny amp, and set up and played to a packed and amazed room, with the pavement outside crowded with those who couldn’t get in, noses pressed against the windows, watching from the street. Our friend Valerie had a small hairdressing salon in the East Village, and Ben wandered down there one day to get a haircut. By magical coincidence Jeff Buckley, who was also friends with Valerie, was in there at the same time getting a trim. Valerie introduced them to each other and they started chatting, and soon discovered that we were all booked to play at that year’s Glastonbury. Jeff suggested we team up and do a song together. Sounds like a great idea, said Ben, and thought no more about it.


pages: 290 words: 87,084

Branded Beauty by Mark Tungate

augmented reality, Berlin Wall, call centre, corporate social responsibility, double helix, East Village, Fall of the Berlin Wall, Frank Gehry, haute couture, invention of the printing press, joint-stock company, liberal capitalism, placebo effect, Ray Kurzweil, Silicon Valley, stem cell

It gave L’Oréal a stronger foothold in Japan, but could also be flipped on its head to sell the idea of avant-garde beauty from Tokyo to sophisticated Western consumers. Its brand positioning focuses on ‘the art of beauty’. Another savvy acquisition was the cult New York skin and hair care brand Kiehl’s. Founded in 1851 by a homeopathic pharmacist named John Kiehl, the company was still run from its original store – which looked as if it had barely changed – in the East Village. This was the only retail outlet it owned; the rest of the distribution was through selected department stores. The brand’s no-nonsense image and utilitarian packaging made it popular with male consumers – an elusive target group for beauty companies. Marketing was resolutely word-of-mouth, relying on generous samples and customer endorsements. When L’Oréal snapped up the brand in 2000, it began opening Kiehl’s outlets all over the world.

Despite the fact that she’s now legal, Leven continues to design and sell jewellery. Her work sits perfectly alongside the exotic tattoo designs papering the studio, which seem to take their cues from the world’s more colourful cultures. She adores India and travels there often. ‘People sometimes assume my jewellery is directly related to body piercing, which is not the case. The body piercing trend was at its height in the mid-90s. We had a piercing shop in the East Village and they were doing a hundred piercings a day. But now it’s calmed down.’ Tattoos, though, are more popular than ever. At the time of my visit there’s a trend for getting text written on the skin. ‘Some people ask for entire poems. It’s a tricky one because skin is of course an entirely different medium to paper. Try tattooing a verse in copperplate on somebody’s ribs, for example.’ As for O’Donnell, he specializes in beautiful, richly coloured Japanese-style tattoos that take up entire blocks of body: imagine golden tigers or giant gem-coloured snakes rippling across a back or a torso.


pages: 270 words: 81,311

In the Devil's Garden: A Sinful History of Forbidden Food by Stewart Lee Allen

anti-communist, British Empire, clean water, East Village, European colonialism, Filipino sailors, Golden Gate Park, haute cuisine, trade route

His manipulation of the Passover feast for political gain, however, was to prove catastrophic; in the ensuing two millenniums, ignorant Christians mourning Christ’s death during Easter routinely massacred Jews because their simultaneous Passover feast—a joyous event commemorating their release from Egyptian bondage—was mistaken as celebration of Christ’s death on the cross. Humble Pie So here I am in some subterranean dive in Manhattan’s East Village. Everywhere you look, there are Japanese hipsters in hornrim glasses sucking on Sapporo beers and munching omelets covered in writhing bonito flakes that look like barf monsters from a bad sci-fi flick. I take a mouthful of my motsu yakitori . Motsu means cow intestines. I love ’em, which is just as well, since each yakitori—a kind of Japanese shish-kebab—is only three inches long, and I am determined to choke down an entire cow intestine.

She then doubled the group’s membership, making it the largest in the world, and used its clout to make females fully enfranchised members of society. In the Green Hour Jeff and I stared doubtfully at the liquid dripping slowly into the glass. “Does that look like it’s turning green to you?” I asked. “Well, no,” Jeffrey drawled, “but maybe if we drank some more, it would.” “Sounds like a plan.” I looked around. It was New Year’s Eve, 1999, and we had ended up at a party thrown by a painter friend in the East Village of Manhattan. A small affair, good fun, but the libations weren’t flowing with quite the fecundity one associates with the festivity in question, and we’d both become parched, particularly Jeff, who, as leader/singer of the renowned Lefty Jones Band, often suffers from inexplicable bouts of thirst. So we’d taken it upon ourselves to rummage through our host’s personal belongings, and there, toward the back of the top shelf in a remote cupboard, we’d stumbled upon a bottle with its cork half-eaten away.


Active Measures by Thomas Rid

1960s counterculture, 4chan, active measures, anti-communist, back-to-the-land, Berlin Wall, Bernie Sanders, bitcoin, call centre, Chelsea Manning, continuation of politics by other means, cryptocurrency, cuban missile crisis, Donald Trump, East Village, Edward Snowden, en.wikipedia.org, facts on the ground, Fall of the Berlin Wall, guest worker program, Internet Archive, Jacob Appelbaum, John Markoff, Julian Assange, kremlinology, Mikhail Gorbachev, Norman Mailer, nuclear winter, peer-to-peer, Ronald Reagan, Silicon Valley, Stewart Brand, technoutopianism, We are Anonymous. We are Legion, Whole Earth Catalog, WikiLeaks, zero day

The paper implied that Whalen and the NYPD had manufactured the fraudulent documents. “This tactical step of Whalen’s is extremely awkward and is thus destined to fail.”14 Eventually, what would later be called metadata gave away the backstory of how the forgeries were made. That story began four months earlier, in a cluttered, narrow printshop in a five-story brick building in Manhattan’s East Village. Max Wagner, a Russian-born immigrant, ran the shop. He had been in the typesetting business for twenty-five years, eighteen of them in New York, where he served the small market for Russian work. Nobody in the city had a better selection of Cyrillic type. That January day in 1930, a man entered Wagner’s printshop. He also was Russian, light-complexioned, forty years old, about five feet tall, and balding.

The man also wanted Wagner to include the dateline “Moscow, ______ 19__” so that the letter writer could fill in the blanks with the day and the year, and to list the Comintern’s street address in Moscow and a local Moscow phone number, 3 20 29. The mysterious man told Wagner he could use whatever type he considered appropriate. The whole interaction took a couple of minutes. The front page of The Forward, May 3, 1930. Max Wagner, an East Village Russian-language printshop owner, saw his own work, a forgery, reproduced in The Forward that day. (The Forward) Wagner got to work. The next day the man came back and looked at the proofs with satisfaction. He did not notice, or did not care, that some of Wagner’s type had been slightly damaged, and that the small print that said “Secretariat of the American Department” on the Comintern letterhead had smeared and was barely legible.16 He gave Wagner a small deposit, took back his own improvised layout sample as well as six of the proofs—two each of three different letterheads—and left the shop, promising to return.

In early June, the House opened the Special Committee to Investigate Communist Activities in the United States, better known as the Fish Committee—named after Congressman Hamilton Fish, Jr., an unflinching anti-Communist. The Fish Committee, which advertised its bias in its very name, inadvertently helped to illuminate the story of the Whalen forgeries. The committee held some of its hearings in New York. One day, when questioning the Evening Graphic’s Spivak, the committee learned of the existence of the printer’s East Village shop. Before lunch, Fish dashed off a handwritten subpoena for the printer. Without any time to prepare, Wagner rushed to the hearing in time to be the first witness of the afternoon session. In garbled, Russian-Yiddish-accented English, he told Congress his story. One congressman asked the printer how he was able to spot his own work. “I can recognize work I do,” responded Wagner with confidence, and pointed to the form of the type.


Bleeding Edge by Pynchon, Thomas

addicted to oil, AltaVista, anti-communist, Anton Chekhov, Bernie Madoff, big-box store, Burning Man, carried interest, Donald Trump, double entry bookkeeping, East Village, Hacker Ethic, index card, invisible hand, jitney, late capitalism, margin call, Network effects, Ponzi scheme, prediction markets, pre–internet, QWERTY keyboard, RAND corporation, rent control, rolodex, Ronald Reagan, Sand Hill Road, Silicon Valley, telemarketer, Y2K

Having managed to score not only seed and angel money but also a series-A round from the venerable Sand Hill Road firm of Voorhees, Krueger, the boys, like American greenhorns of a century ago venturing into the history-haunted Old World, lost no time back east in paying the necessary calls, setting up shop around early ’97 in a couple of rooms sublet from a Website developer who welcomed the cash, down in the then still enchanted country between the Flatiron Building and the East Village. If content was still king, they got nonetheless a crash course in patriarchal subtext, cutthroat jostling among nerd princes, dark dynastic histories. Before long they were showing up in trade journals, on gossip sites, at Courtney Pulitzer’s downtown soirees, finding themselves at four in the morning drinking kalimotxos in bars carpentered into ghost stops on abandoned subway lines, flirting with girls whose fashion thinking included undead signifiers such as custom fangs installed out in the outer boroughs by cut-rate Lithuanian orthodontists.

Something else is up, Reg knew exactly who to bring this ticket to, he read Maxine correctly, knew she could feel something like his own alarm at the perimeters of ordinary greed overstepped, the engines of night and contrived oblivion, out on the tracks, cranking up to speed . . . At which point, just before the transition to REM, the phone rings and it’s Reg himself. “It ain’t a movie anymore, Maxi.” “How early tomorrow you planning to be up, Reg?” Or to put it another way, it’s the middle of the fucking night here. “Not going to sleep tonight.” Meaning Maxine’s not likely to either. So they meet for very early breakfast at a 24-hour Ukrainian joint in the East Village. Reg is over in a corner in back, picking away at his PowerBook. It’s summertime, not too humid or horrible yet, but he’s sweating. “You look like shit, Reg, what happened?” “Technically,” moving his hands away from the keyboard, “I’m supposed to have free run of hashslingrz, right? Except I always knew I didn’t. And, well, yesterday, finally, I walked through the wrong door.” “You’re sure you didn’t find it locked and jimmy it?”

“And Hitler was a good dancer, a wonderful sense of humor, I can’t fuckin believe this, we watch the same movies on the Lifetime channel, these are always the ones who turn out to be the sociopathic rat, shtupping the receptionist, embezzling the children’s lunch money, slowly poisoning the innocent bride with the bug spray in the breakfast food.” “That’s like . . .” innocently, “a cereal killer?” “Just ’cause I once pitched you a commercial about cops? You believed that?” “He’s not a cop. We’re not newlyweds. Remember? Heidi, chill, for goodness sakes.” 21 After a day of wandering around in the vast shopping basin of the SoHo-Chinatown-Tribeca interface, Maxine and Heidi find themselves one evening in the East Village looking for a bar where Driscoll is supposed to be singing with a nerdcore band called Pringle Chip Equation, when sudden gusts of smell, not yet at this distance intense but strangely contoured in their purity, begin as they walk through the humid twilight to accost them. Presently from down the block, screaming in panic, dramatically clutching their noses and occasionally heads, civilians come running.


pages: 284 words: 92,387

The Democracy Project: A History, a Crisis, a Movement by David Graeber

Bretton Woods, British Empire, corporate personhood, David Graeber, deindustrialization, dumpster diving, East Village, feminist movement, financial innovation, George Gilder, John Markoff, Lao Tzu, late fees, Occupy movement, payday loans, planetary scale, plutocrats, Plutocrats, Ralph Nader, reserve currency, Ronald Reagan, seigniorage, too big to fail, trickle-down economics, unpaid internship, We are the 99%, working poor

Marisa is one of those people one is almost guaranteed to underestimate: small, unassuming, with a tendency to fold herself into a ball and all but disappear in public events. But she is one of the most gifted activists I’ve ever met. As I was later to discover, she had an almost uncanny ability to instantly assess a situation and figure out what’s happening, what’s important, and what needs to be done. As the little meeting along the Hudson broke up, Marisa told me about a meeting the next day at EarthMatters in the East Village for a new group she was working with called US Uncut—inspired, she explained, by the British coalition UK Uncut, which had been created to organize mass civil disobedience against the Tory government’s austerity plans in 2010. They were mostly pretty liberal, she hastened to warn me, not many anarchists, but in a way that was what was so charming about the group: the New York chapter was made up of people of all sorts of different backgrounds—“real people, not activist types”—middle-aged housewives, postal workers.

I spent a lot of the next few weeks tracking down old friends from the Direct Action Network who had gone into hiding, retired, burnt out, given up, got jobs, or gone off to live on some organic farm, convincing them this wasn’t another false start, it was real this time, and getting them to join us and share their experience. It took a while, but gradually many did filter back. At that first GA at the Irish Hunger Memorial, we decided all subsequent GAs would be held in Tompkins Square Park in the East Village—that is, not in the relatively desolate environs of Wall Street itself, but in the heart of a real New York community, the kind of place we hoped to see local assemblies eventually emerge. Marisa and I agreed to facilitate the first of them, on August 13, since Marisa had a good deal of experience with consensus process. In fact, she was so good—and everyone else at first so uncertain—she ended up having to help facilitate the next four.


pages: 356 words: 91,157

The New Urban Crisis: How Our Cities Are Increasing Inequality, Deepening Segregation, and Failing the Middle Class?and What We Can Do About It by Richard Florida

affirmative action, Airbnb, basic income, Bernie Sanders, blue-collar work, business climate, Capital in the Twenty-First Century by Thomas Piketty, clean water, Columbine, congestion charging, creative destruction, David Ricardo: comparative advantage, declining real wages, deindustrialization, Donald Trump, East Village, edge city, Edward Glaeser, failed state, Ferguson, Missouri, Gini coefficient, Google bus, high net worth, income inequality, income per capita, industrial cluster, informal economy, Jane Jacobs, jitney, Kitchen Debate, knowledge economy, knowledge worker, land value tax, low skilled workers, Lyft, megacity, Menlo Park, mortgage tax deduction, Nate Silver, New Economic Geography, new economy, New Urbanism, occupational segregation, Paul Graham, plutocrats, Plutocrats, RAND corporation, rent control, rent-seeking, Richard Florida, rising living standards, Ronald Reagan, secular stagnation, self-driving car, Silicon Valley, sovereign wealth fund, superstar cities, the built environment, The Chicago School, The Death and Life of Great American Cities, the High Line, The Rise and Fall of American Growth, The Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith, Thorstein Veblen, trickle-down economics, Uber and Lyft, uber lyft, universal basic income, upwardly mobile, urban decay, urban planning, urban renewal, urban sprawl, white flight, young professional

My early experience of that original urban crisis left a deep imprint on me. When I went off to Rutgers College that fall, I found myself drawn to courses about cities and the urban issues of race, poverty, urban decay, and industrial decline. When I was a sophomore, my urban geography professor, Robert Lake, gave us an assignment to tour Lower Manhattan and chronicle what we saw. I was transfixed by the incredible urban change that was under way in SoHo, the East Village, and surrounding areas, captivated by the energy of the streets and of the artists, musicians, designers, and writers who lived and worked there. Old industrial warehouses and factories were being transformed into studios and living spaces. Punk, new wave, and rap were electrifying the area’s music venues and clubs—the first tender shoots of what would later become a full-blown urban revival.

Nearby, on what was once a wasteland of rubble and sagging piers, a long, green park with a bike path would run along the Hudson River across the entire length of Manhattan. Times Square would still have its lights and flickering billboards, but where seedy theaters and sex shops once stood, he would find an urban version of Disneyland teeming with tourists, some of them relaxing in the rocking chairs placed there for their enjoyment. Where the squatting artists of SoHo and the hippies and punks of the West and East Villages once roamed, he would find upscale restaurants, cafés, and bars filled with well-off investment bankers, techies, tourists, and more than the occasional celebrity. The once functioning meat-processing plants, industrial warehouses, and off-the-beaten-path gay leather bars of the Meatpacking District would be gone; instead, a linear park built atop the neighborhood’s derelict elevated rail line would be crowded with people.


pages: 304 words: 91,566

Bitcoin Billionaires: A True Story of Genius, Betrayal, and Redemption by Ben Mezrich

"side hustle", airport security, Albert Einstein, bank run, Ben Horowitz, bitcoin, blockchain, Burning Man, buttonwood tree, cryptocurrency, East Village, El Camino Real, Elon Musk, family office, fault tolerance, fiat currency, financial innovation, game design, Isaac Newton, Marc Andreessen, Mark Zuckerberg, Menlo Park, Metcalfe’s law, new economy, offshore financial centre, paypal mafia, peer-to-peer, Peter Thiel, Ponzi scheme, QR code, Ronald Reagan, Ross Ulbricht, Sand Hill Road, Satoshi Nakamoto, Schrödinger's Cat, self-driving car, side project, Silicon Valley, Skype, smart contracts, South of Market, San Francisco, Steve Jobs, transaction costs, zero-sum game

It’s not even eleven yet, and we’ve got a couple more stops to make.” He reached back to the elegant table and grabbed a bottle of Dom Perignon, then leaned toward Charlie’s glass, topping it off, doing the same for the Bulgarian beauty between them. “Buckle up, guys. The night’s just getting started.” * * * Three hours later, Charlie was steadying himself against the back wall of a speakeasy in the East Village, focusing on the shot glass full of rum that had somehow found its way into his other hand. Next to him, Cameron—now he was sure it was Cameron, because that had to be Tyler over by the jukebox, talking to a phenomenal-looking blonde whom Charlie was pretty sure was either Tyler’s current girlfriend, ex-girlfriend, or soon to be girlfriend—was telling a story about the Olympic Village in Beijing, something that had to do with a South American rowing team, a Russian boxer, and a bout of food poisoning—but Charlie was having a hell of a time keeping everything clear.

But as Cameron watched him walk away down Lexington Avenue, Charlie’s little form was engaged in what could only be described as a strut. 18 BRIGHT LIGHTS Almost two weeks later, the travesty of the Abercrom meeting fading into a bad memory, Tyler sat in a Starbucks, watching the crowds of tourists and Manhattanites moving along Eighth Street through the window. It was unusual for him to choose such a visible table where he’d be on display, but the place was crowded for 11:00 A.M. on a Tuesday; then again, it was Astor Place, one of the liveliest spots in the city, smack in the middle of the East Village and a stone’s throw away from NYU. Tyler had chosen the table, but not the Starbucks itself. He searched the crowd outside for any sign of their quarry. “There he is,” Cameron said, pointing in the direction of a dapper man moving toward them through the traffic jam of coffee addicts. Tall, hair flecked with silver, chiseled facial structure above a criminally square jaw, wearing what appeared to be a Savile Row suit and an ascot tied around his neck: the guy looked like he’d just stepped out of an F.


pages: 264 words: 90,379

Blink: The Power of Thinking Without Thinking by Malcolm Gladwell

affirmative action, airport security, Albert Einstein, complexity theory, David Brooks, East Village, haute couture, Kevin Kelly, lateral thinking, medical malpractice, medical residency, Menlo Park, Nelson Mandela, new economy, pattern recognition, phenotype, Ronald Reagan, Silicon Valley, Stephen Hawking, theory of mind, young professional

In 1996, Hush Puppies won the prize for best accessory at the Council of Fashion Designers awards dinner at Lincoln Center, and the president of the firm stood up on the stage with Calvin Klein and Donna Karan and accepted an award for an achievement that—as he would be the first to admit—his company had almost nothing to do with. Hush Puppies had suddenly exploded, and it all started with a handful of kids in the East Village and Soho. How did that happen? Those first few kids, whoever they were, weren’t deliberately trying to promote Hush Puppies. They were wearing them precisely because no one else would wear them. Then the fad spread to two fashion designers who used the shoes to peddle something else—haute couture. The shoes were an incidental touch. No one was trying to make Hush Puppies a trend. Yet, somehow, that’s exactly what happened.

Criminologists point to the decline of the crack trade and the aging of the population. Economists, meanwhile, say that the gradual improvement in the city’s economy over the course of the 1990s had the effect of employing those who might otherwise have become criminals. These are the conventional explanations for the rise and fall of social problems, but in the end none is any more satisfying than the statement that kids in the East Village caused the Hush Puppies revival. The changes in the drug trade, the population, and the economy are all long-term trends, happening all over the country. They don’t explain why crime plunged in New York City so much more than in other cities around the country, and they don’t explain why it all happened in such an extraordinarily short time. As for the improvements made by the police, they are important too.


I Love Capitalism!: An American Story by Ken Langone

activist fund / activist shareholder / activist investor, Berlin Wall, Bernie Madoff, Bernie Sanders, business climate, corporate governance, East Village, fixed income, glass ceiling, income inequality, Paul Samuelson, Ronald Reagan, short selling, Silicon Valley, single-payer health, six sigma, VA Linux, Y2K, zero-sum game

You go out with me tomorrow night, and if you don’t have a great time, you’ll never see me or hear from me again.” “I’ve got to ask my mother,” she said. She was sixteen. I was eighteen. She got back on the phone and said, “I can go out, but I have to be home by eleven thirty.” I said, “Eleven thirty? Conrad Janis doesn’t play ‘The Saints’ until midnight.” There was a place down in the East Village then called the Central Plaza, and there was a guy who played the trombone who later became a movie actor; his name was Conrad Janis. It was Dixieland jazz, which was the rage then, and the Central Plaza was a beer hall. You’d get pitchers of beer for a buck and a quarter, and you’d see girls flopping over in their seats, passed out. “I’ve got to be home by eleven thirty,” she said. All right.

We went with a high-school friend of mine and his date; I borrowed my father’s car and went to pick her up. She lived in a nice house, in a nice part of Manhasset: her father, Dick Abbe, worked on Wall Street. They belonged to a country club, the whole deal. I’ll never forget the sight of Elaine when she came to the door; she had a dress on with a crinoline, this thing girls used to wear that made their dresses stick out. She looked beautiful. And we drove down to the East Village and listened to the music and drank beer and had a ball. We laughed like hell. We got there about nine, and we left at ten thirty so Elaine could get home on time. My friend was fine with it. We drove back to Long Island, and I dropped my friend and his date off, then I took Elaine home. I walked her up to her front door and said, “I had a great time.” “So did I,” she said. “I’ll give you a call,” I said, then I turned around to leave.


pages: 290 words: 87,549

The Airbnb Story: How Three Ordinary Guys Disrupted an Industry, Made Billions...and Created Plenty of Controversy by Leigh Gallagher

Airbnb, Amazon Web Services, barriers to entry, Ben Horowitz, Bernie Sanders, cloud computing, crowdsourcing, don't be evil, Donald Trump, East Village, Elon Musk, housing crisis, iterative process, Jeff Bezos, Jony Ive, Justin.tv, Lyft, Marc Andreessen, Mark Zuckerberg, medical residency, Menlo Park, Network effects, Paul Buchheit, Paul Graham, performance metric, Peter Thiel, RFID, Sam Altman, Sand Hill Road, Saturday Night Live, sharing economy, side project, Silicon Valley, Silicon Valley startup, South of Market, San Francisco, Startup school, Steve Jobs, TaskRabbit, the payments system, Tony Hsieh, Travis Kalanick, uber lyft, Y Combinator, yield management

In 2012, police busted prostitutes using an apartment they found on Airbnb in Stockholm as a brothel. In a well-publicized incident in New York in 2014, Ari Teman thought he rented his Chelsea apartment out to a family that was in town for a wedding, but when he stopped in to pick up his bags before heading out of town, he found what he said was a sex party for overweight people in full swing. A few weeks earlier, start-up executive Rachel Bassini rented her penthouse in New York City’s East Village and returned home to find furniture damaged and overturned and everything from used condoms to chewed gum and other detritus—including what seemed to be human feces—on the floors, walls, and furniture. In the spring of 2015, Mark and Star King, married parents of two young children in Calgary, rented their three-bedroom home in the city’s suburban Sage Hill residential neighborhood to a man who said he was in town with a few family members for a wedding.

By 2012, however, the company began to feel the first signs that it might not be so welcome. “We started hearing some rumors that there was going to be a crackdown on our hosts,” recalls Belinda Johnson, the company’s chief business-affairs and legal officer who at the time had recently joined Airbnb as general counsel. In September of that year, according to the New York Times, a thirty-year-old web designer named Nigel Warren used Airbnb to rent out his room in the East Village apartment he shared with a roommate while he went to Colorado for a few days. With the roommate’s OK, Warren listed it for one hundred dollars per night and quickly had a booking from a woman from Russia. When Warren returned from his trip, he learned that the city’s Office of Special Enforcement, a multiagency task force that investigates quality-of-life complaints, had paid a visit to the building and slapped his landlord with three violations and fines totaling $40,000.


pages: 371 words: 93,570

Broad Band: The Untold Story of the Women Who Made the Internet by Claire L. Evans

"side hustle", 4chan, Ada Lovelace, Albert Einstein, British Empire, colonial rule, computer age, crowdsourcing, dark matter, dematerialisation, Doomsday Book, Douglas Engelbart, Douglas Engelbart, Douglas Hofstadter, East Village, Edward Charles Pickering, game design, glass ceiling, Grace Hopper, Gödel, Escher, Bach, Haight Ashbury, Harvard Computers: women astronomers, Honoré de Balzac, Howard Rheingold, HyperCard, hypertext link, index card, information retrieval, Internet Archive, Jacquard loom, John von Neumann, Joseph-Marie Jacquard, knowledge worker, Leonard Kleinrock, Mahatma Gandhi, Mark Zuckerberg, Menlo Park, Mother of all demos, Network effects, old-boy network, On the Economy of Machinery and Manufactures, packet switching, pets.com, rent control, RFC: Request For Comment, rolodex, semantic web, Silicon Valley, Skype, South of Market, San Francisco, Steve Jobs, Steven Levy, Stewart Brand, subscription business, technoutopianism, Ted Nelson, telepresence, Whole Earth Catalog, Whole Earth Review, women in the workforce, Works Progress Administration, Y2K

You pick up some commercial projects on the side, making interactive toys for companies like Kraft, Tommy Hilfiger, and Bounty. But all your real effort goes into your pet project, the thing you think will pull you out of the tech bubble: a sixteen-episode Flash cartoon series. Because you used to throw a great party by the same name, you call it CyberSlacker. CyberSlacker is a semiautobiographical cartoon about an East Village hacker chick. In three-minute episodes, it tells the continuing adventures of a peroxide-blonde misanthrope named Jaime—“but I go by CyberSlacker online”—as she navigates the surreal New York tech scene. In one episode, CyberSlacker tries to get a programming job. First, she calls IBM, where Jaime worked for a year in 1993, but the milquetoast nerd on the other end of the line gives her the creeps.

The big talk, the parties, and the flash that had defined the excitement of the boom suddenly looked like so much excess—and the early true believers, with their fast money and promises of a boundless information future, like charlatans. And then, like a kick in the guts: 9/11. People think 9/11 was one day. “That’s bullshit,” Jaime says. “It was one entire year, every single day, walking outside your apartment in the East Village and there’s like, a family posting signs: ‘Have you seen my mom?’” There were “obituaries every day, people walking around in gas masks.” The reality-altering scale of the attack didn’t just make Jaime’s problems seem irrelevant—it made them seem petty, even cruel. “Smallest violin for the fucking cyberkids who all of a sudden aren’t getting paid money to fucking have sushi parties,” she says.


pages: 334 words: 93,162

This Is Your Country on Drugs: The Secret History of Getting High in America by Ryan Grim

airport security, Alexander Shulgin, anti-communist, back-to-the-land, Burning Man, crack epidemic, double helix, Douglas Engelbart, Douglas Engelbart, East Village, failed state, global supply chain, Haight Ashbury, illegal immigration, John Markoff, Kickstarter, longitudinal study, mandatory minimum, new economy, New Urbanism, PIHKAL and TIHKAL, RAND corporation, Ronald Reagan, Saturday Night Live, Steve Jobs, trade route, transatlantic slave trade, union organizing, Upton Sinclair, upwardly mobile, urban decay, women in the workforce

The strongest link between the two was the Hell’s Angels, a gang of speed-dealing bikers who mingled freely with drug-using hippies. The trade was dominated by the gang so much so that the drug was known as “biker speed” or “biker meth.” As the Angels’ product crossed from the criminal underworld to the hippie counterculture, the New York Times wrote of speed freaks hanging out at Tracy’s doughnut shop in Haight-Ashbury and strung-out “meth monsters” haunting the East Village. Some turned-on kids, much to the alarm of speed-eschewing psychonauts, were doing their parents’ drug. During the Summer of Love, “Speed Kills” buttons were distributed by a Haight-Ashbury free clinic as the counterculture tried to correct itself with a self-devised antimeth campaign. By the fall, the buttons had made an ironic cameo in a lurid Time magazine rape-and-murder story informing readers that “[d]rug-induced violence is nothing new to the neighborhoods where hippies live.”

For the most part, the new crop of speed freaks eschewed inhalers and pills; they injected liquid amphetamines obtained through the black market or cooked up in secret labs. A 1970 feature in the Times described the new image of meth in now-familiar terms: “The speed epidemic blossomed about three years ago in San Francisco’s Haight-Ashbury district and quickly popped up in the nation’s other hippie drug haven, New York’s East Village. Quiet flower children became ravaged scarecrows. The cannibalism of speed was easy to spot: emaciated bodies cocked in twisted postures; caved-in jaws, grinding and grinding; pockmarked skin, torn and scratched and white, and a constant talking, talking, talking.” The story states that, according to the FDA, methamphetamine was the “most popular drug of clandestine chemists.” The Times had the course of the epidemic backward, however: New York’s underground arts scene had embraced meth in the sixties.


The Big Oyster by Mark Kurlansky

clean water, colonial rule, East Village, James Watt: steam engine, joint-stock company, Louis Pasteur, Ralph Waldo Emerson, transcontinental railway, women in the workforce

When the British threatened to attack, not surprisingly from the harbor and not over the wall, few residents were interested in fighting for the Dutch West India Company and most had no objections to British rule as long as they were promised fair treatment. Ninety-three leading citizens, including his son, petitioned Stuyvesant to surrender and avoid suffering. Stuyvesant said that he would rather die, but he nevertheless negotiated terms at his farm on what is today Stuyvesant Street in the East Village. Richard Nicolls became the first governor of New York. T h e B r i t i s h i n h e r i te d a small Dutch town of windmills and canals, though not many of either. They had snidely referred to the Dutch as “Jankees,” a sarcastic joining of the name John and the word cheese. Soon their own colonists would adopt the name. The Dutch accepted 6 2 • T h e B i g O y s te r their conquerors. Many anglicized their names.

—charles dickens, The Pickwick Papers, “ F 1836 i f t y y e a r s a g o N e w Y o r k w a s l i t t l e m o r e t h a n a village,” wrote Captain Frederick Marryat, the popular British author of maritime adventures, in 1838. “Now it is a fine city with three hundred thousand inhabitants.” By the 1830s, Manhattan was a fast-growing metropolis. In 1835, 250,000 people lived there, mostly between the Battery and Bond Street, which is in today’s East Village. “Trees are few,” observed Edgar Allan Poe in 1844, “but some of the shrubbery is extremely picturesque.” 1 4 4 • T h e B i g O y s te r Pigs still wandered the streets eating garbage that would otherwise have remained on the pavement. “Ugly brutes they are,” wrote Charles Dickens after a visit to New York. The city was expanding rapidly north. The Harlem line provided railroad service to northern Manhattan.


pages: 116 words: 29,544

Winter Gatherings: Casual Food to Enjoy with Family and Friends by Rick Rodgers

East Village

Remove the skin and bones and coarsely chop the meat. Set aside. 5. Add the cream to the soup and heat until piping hot, but do not boil. Season with salt and pepper to taste. In batches, puree the soup in a blender and return to the saucepan. 6. Serve hot, topping each serving with some of the chicken and bacon. “Stuffed Cabbage” Soup Makes 6 to 8 servings When I first moved to New York, I lived in the East Village, which was dotted with Eastern European coffee shops. Each place featured stuffed cabbage as a cheap daily special, and I quickly learned to both love it and make my own. When I don’t have the time for rolling and stuffing the cabbage, I make this soup that has all of the flavors, but is less labor-intensive. * * * MEATBALLS 1 large egg 3 tablespoons dried unflavored bread crumbs 1 teaspoon salt ½ teaspoon freshly ground black pepper 1 pound ground round beef 2 tablespoons vegetable oil SOUP 1 tablespoon vegetable oil 1 large onion, chopped 2 carrots, chopped 2 celery ribs, chopped 2 garlic cloves, finely chopped 4 cups packed coarsely chopped green cabbage (about 1 pound) 4 cups beef stock, preferably homemade, or use low-sodium canned broth One 28-ounce can crushed tomatoes in puree 2 cups water ½ teaspoon dried thyme 2 tablespoons sugar 2 tablespoons cider vinegar 1 bay leaf 1/3 cup long-grain rice Salt and freshly ground black pepper Sour cream, for serving * * * 1.


pages: 327 words: 103,336

Everything Is Obvious: *Once You Know the Answer by Duncan J. Watts

active measures, affirmative action, Albert Einstein, Amazon Mechanical Turk, Black Swan, business cycle, butterfly effect, Carmen Reinhart, Cass Sunstein, clockwork universe, cognitive dissonance, coherent worldview, collapse of Lehman Brothers, complexity theory, correlation does not imply causation, crowdsourcing, death of newspapers, discovery of DNA, East Village, easy for humans, difficult for computers, edge city, en.wikipedia.org, Erik Brynjolfsson, framing effect, Geoffrey West, Santa Fe Institute, George Santayana, happiness index / gross national happiness, high batting average, hindsight bias, illegal immigration, industrial cluster, interest rate swap, invention of the printing press, invention of the telescope, invisible hand, Isaac Newton, Jane Jacobs, Jeff Bezos, Joseph Schumpeter, Kenneth Rogoff, lake wobegon effect, Laplace demon, Long Term Capital Management, loss aversion, medical malpractice, meta analysis, meta-analysis, Milgram experiment, natural language processing, Netflix Prize, Network effects, oil shock, packet switching, pattern recognition, performance metric, phenotype, Pierre-Simon Laplace, planetary scale, prediction markets, pre–internet, RAND corporation, random walk, RFID, school choice, Silicon Valley, social intelligence, statistical model, Steve Ballmer, Steve Jobs, Steve Wozniak, supply-chain management, The Death and Life of Great American Cities, the scientific method, The Wisdom of Crowds, too big to fail, Toyota Production System, ultimatum game, urban planning, Vincenzo Peruggia: Mona Lisa, Watson beat the top human players on Jeopardy!, X Prize

Just as superspreaders drive real epidemics and great men drive history, so too the law of the few claims that social epidemics are “driven by the efforts of a handful of exceptional people.” For example, in discussing the mysterious resurgence of Hush Puppies in the mid-1990s, Gladwell explains that the great mystery is how those shoes went from something worn by a few fashion-forward downtown Manhattan hipsters to being sold in malls across the country. What was the connection between the East Village and Middle America? The Law of the Few says the answer is that one of these exceptional people found out about the trend, and through social connections and energy and enthusiasm and personality spread the word about Hush Puppies just as people like Gaeten Dugas and Nushawn Williams were able to spread HIV.12 Gladwell’s law of the few is catnip to marketers and businessmen and community organizers and just about anyone else in the business of shaping or manipulating people.

The Tipping Point, in fact, is replete with stories about interesting people who seem to have played critical roles in important events: Paul Revere and his famous midnight ride from Boston to Lexington that energized the local militias and triggered the American Revolution. Gaëtan Dugas, the sexually voracious Canadian flight attendant who became known as Patient Zero of the American HIV epidemic. Lois Weisberg, the title character of Gladwell’s earlier New Yorker article, who seems to know everyone, and has a gift for connecting people. And the group of East Village hipsters whose ironic embrace of Hush Puppies shoes preceded a dramatic revival in the brand’s fortunes. These are all great stories, and it’s hard to read them and not agree with Gladwell that when something happens that is as surprising and dramatic as the Minutemen’s unexpectedly fierce defense of Lexington on April 17, 1775, someone special—someone like Paul Revere—must have helped it along.


pages: 304 words: 99,836

Why I Left Goldman Sachs: A Wall Street Story by Greg Smith

always be closing, asset allocation, Black Swan, bonus culture, break the buck, collateralized debt obligation, corporate governance, Credit Default Swap, credit default swaps / collateralized debt obligations, delayed gratification, East Village, fixed income, Flash crash, glass ceiling, Goldman Sachs: Vampire Squid, high net worth, information asymmetry, London Interbank Offered Rate, mega-rich, money market fund, new economy, Nick Leeson, quantitative hedge fund, Renaissance Technologies, short selling, Silicon Valley, Skype, sovereign wealth fund, Stanford marshmallow experiment, statistical model, technology bubble, too big to fail

In the morning, surreally enough, I walked over to the 2nd Ave Deli—my favorite kosher deli in New York during good times, at Second Avenue and Tenth Street—and found it open. I hadn’t eaten dinner the night before, and suddenly I was starving. I ordered a corned beef sandwich. While I waited, an African American man and an elderly Jewish guy argued at the top of their voices about why this had happened to America. Even more surreal was the scene on the streets of the East Village: they were as empty as something out of a postapocalyptic sci-fi movie. New York felt like a ghost town, the wind totally knocked out of it. That same morning, I got a surprising but very welcome call from an HR person in the London office of Goldman Sachs. The guy said, “We know your apartment is a few blocks from the World Trade Center; we’ve got a full system in place to set you up. Number one, we’re going to give you two thousand dollars to buy clothes and anything you need.

I left the office that day knowing that the events of that weekend would be crucial, but that there was nothing I or any of the other hundreds of thousands of people on Wall Street could do but stay glued to the TV and our BlackBerrys. We were awaiting news from the New York Fed, where the heads of the country’s most powerful financial institutions were huddled with Paulson and Geithner trying to solve the hardest brainteaser of their lives. That Saturday night, September 13, Nadine and I were out to dinner with another couple, at a favorite Italian place of mine called Supper, in the East Village. It was a schlep from the Upper West Side, but this was a weekend for good, rustic Italian food. The other couple also worked in finance: he in private equity, she at a hedge fund. The mood wasn’t one of panic; it was one of astonishment. We all couldn’t stop saying how surreal the world we were living in had become. It felt as if we were in a movie. I remember saying that night that if you had told me a few years ago that Bear Stearns and Lehman Brothers could both vaporize within months of each other, I would have called you crazy.


pages: 103 words: 32,131

Program Or Be Programmed: Ten Commands for a Digital Age by Douglas Rushkoff

banking crisis, big-box store, citizen journalism, cloud computing, digital map, East Village, financial innovation, Firefox, hive mind, Howard Rheingold, invention of the printing press, Kevin Kelly, Marshall McLuhan, peer-to-peer, Silicon Valley, statistical model, Stewart Brand, Ted Nelson, WikiLeaks

Instead of engaging with those around her, she’s scrolling through text messages on her phone, from friends at other parties, bars, and clubs throughout New York. She needs to know if the event she’s at is “the event to be at,” or whether something better is happening at that very moment, somewhere else. Sure enough, a blip on display catches her interest, and in what seems like seconds we’re in a cab headed for the East Village. We arrive at a seemingly identical party, but it’s the one that Gina has decided is “the place to be” tonight. Instead of turning the phone off and enjoying herself, however, she turns her phone around, activates the camera, and proceeds to take pictures of herself and her friends—instantly uploading them to her Facebook page for the world to see. She does this for about an hour, until a message comes through one of her networks and she’s off to the next location for the cycle to begin all over again.


Frommer's California 2009 by Matthew Poole, Harry Basch, Mark Hiss, Erika Lenkert

airport security, Asilomar, Bay Area Rapid Transit, California gold rush, call centre, car-free, Charles Lindbergh, clean water, Columbine, Donald Trump, Donner party, East Village, El Camino Real, European colonialism, Frank Gehry, Golden Gate Park, Haight Ashbury, housing crisis, indoor plumbing, Joan Didion, Mason jar, mass immigration, Maui Hawaii, post-work, Saturday Night Live, Silicon Valley, Skype, South of Market, San Francisco, sustainable-tourism, transcontinental railway, urban sprawl, white picket fence, Works Progress Administration, Y Combinator

With little more than 4 blocks’ worth of shops, restaurants, and a handful of B&Bs, Cambria is the per fect place to escape the ev eryday, enjoy the endless expanses of pristine coastal terrain, and meander through little shops selling local ar twork and antiques. Cambria has three distinct parts. Along Main Street is “the Village,” which is divided into two sections: the West Village and the East Village. The West Village is the ne wer, somewhat more touristy end of to wn where you’ll find the visitor information center . The more historic East Village is a bit quieter, more locals oriented, and a tad more sophisticated than the West Village. If you cross Highway 1 to the coastal side at the far w est end of town (or the north end, if you’re considering how the freeway runs), you’ll reach Cambria’s third part, Moonstone Beach. Lined with motels, inns, and a few restaurants on the inland side of the street, ocean-facing Moonstone Beach Drive is my favorite place to stay in Cambria. 428 THE CENTR AL COAST Fun Facts SAN SIMEON: HEARST CASTLE 13 Weekends at “the Ranch” The la vish palac e that William R andolph Hearst alwa ys r eferred t o simply as “the ranch ” t ook r oot in 1919.

Boasting ocean and fairway views, it currently has 129 r ooms, but will expand to 350 b y 2010. W H AT ’S N E W 6 time to be closed, considering this historic structure dates back to 1854, when the original Jolly Boy opened. S et within O ld Town State Historic Park, the Jolly Boy will feature costumed per formers to go along with the meat and seafood menu. Whether you bowl passionately or ironically, East Village Tavern & Bowl (& 619/ 677-2659; www.bowlevt.com) can make room for y ou—especially no w that it ’s already expanding. Featuring a logo of skull and crossbones, this hipster hav en opened in late 2007 with six lanes and is no w doubling that amount. A djacent to the Gaslamp Quarter, the Tavern & Bo wl also has food, good beer on tap, and ubiquitous flatscreen TVs. San Diego’s latest nightspot gem is the Jade Theater (& 619/814-5125; www . jadetheater.com).

H is principal actress, M arion Da vies, also became his c onstant c ompanion and host ess at Hearst Castle. The ranch soon became a pla yground for the Holly wood crowd as w ell as f or dig nitaries such as Winston Chur chill and pla ywright Geor ge Before you set out, pick up the Cambria H istorical Society’s brochure at y our hotel and take a simple, fun self-guided tour of the historical buildings in the East Village. You’ll not only get a history lesson about this picturesque village, but you’ll also discover a few places you may have overlooked otherwise, such as the blacksmith shop at 4121 Burton Dr. or the Santa Rosa Chapel and Cemetery at 2352 Main St. An overnight stay in Cambia also allows visitors to see the coastal region’s “new” attraction: a spring (y es, that ’s the corr ect term—I looked it up) of elephant seals sunning themselves on the beaches y ear-round.


Little Failure: A Memoir by Gary Shteyngart

Albert Einstein, anti-communist, Anton Chekhov, East Village, glass ceiling, Gordon Gekko, greed is good, New Journalism, Ronald Reagan, Yom Kippur War, young professional

I see myself as a prosperous Republican left to his own devices in a backyard that stretches over a hill, swallows up a formerly public lake, and ends in a fierce bramble of barbed wire festooned with a PRIVATE PROPERTY sign. It’s an appropriate way to spend the 1980s. Young immigrant to city: Drop dead. And then I am accepted to the Stuyvesant High School for the maths and the sciences on Fifteenth Street, between First and Second Avenues and between the dangerous districts of East Village, Greenwich Village, Union Square, Times Square, and the Ladies’ Mile. September 1987. Manhattan Island. The car of visiting relatives makes its way down Second Avenue, with me and my knapsack in tow. The relatives, from some second-tier American or Canadian city, glance out apprehensively at the busy, dirty city. “Leave him here,” my mother says. “Igoryochek”—Little Igor—“can you walk across the street by yourself?”

“How can you say that?” John asks. But I say more and more and more about the woman with the jangles of chains atop her cleavage, a woman who has just been pummeled with a cane at her job in a Manhattan S&M dungeon while sick with anemia and a bleeding ulcer, who has been in and out of homeless shelters and mental institutions since being abandoned by her family at age sixteen. “So many people move to the East Village and then go to the opposite extreme of their suburban experience,” I say, venomously, to the camera. “That is so old. To make her character interesting, she has to be engaging and intelligent.” “She’s not a character!” John shouts. Drunk off of Irv’s Japanese plum wine (the strange tipple of choice that summer), and constantly fussing with my cheap new contact lenses, I am in high dudgeon, incensed that John would speak up for this fat suburban dominatrix.


pages: 390 words: 125,082

Years of the City by Frederik Pohl

Albert Einstein, Buckminster Fuller, card file, East Village, Maui Hawaii, medical malpractice, pattern recognition

Some of those old underground fires had probably been smoldering away for a hundred years, damped now and then by the seepage of river water, until they boiled the last of the water away and grew white-hot again. They did no great harm…until they reached open air. And open air was what the City of New York had provided them. For the thousands of expected visitors to the coming Fair the city was building new hotels. Luxury ones in Central Park West. Medium-cost ones in the East Village. And down here, a long subway ride from the Fair itself, the cheapies. The cheapest of the accommodations amounted to nothing more than a three-meter-long file drawer that a man could climb into and close off, each with its own air vent and light and luggage rack and pillow and abiotic mattress. Since there was no money in their budget for such frills as windows, there was no reason to poke these constructions up into expensive domed airspace.

Jimper smiled, excused himself and drifted away, watching the hang-glider as long as he could and praying for the safety of his landing when the figure was out of sight. He had an idea. There was very little that could be done between two consenting persons that he and Doll had not already done, in that little room behind DOOR; but there was one experience they had never shared. It was silly. It was dangerous. It was wholly and completely desired. From his tiny apartment in the East Village to the New Gotham Tower East was only a short ride on a hydrovan, and all the way Jimper was staring at the dome. It was dark, though the time was high noon. When he got to the little room behind DOOR Doll was there before him, already undressed, the hookah going and the smell of hash powerful in the tiny room. “What’s the matter with you, Jimper?” she asked, passing him the mouthpiece. He took a deep drag before replying.


pages: 366 words: 123,151

The Routes of Man: How Roads Are Changing the World and the Way We Live Today by Ted Conover

airport security, Atahualpa, carbon footprint, Deng Xiaoping, East Village, financial independence, Google Earth, mass immigration, megacity, mutually assured destruction, New Urbanism, nuclear winter, off grid, Ronald Reagan, transatlantic slave trade, urban planning, urban renewal

Washington was elected president in 1789 and moved into “the finest private building in town, the four-story McComb House” at 39 Broadway. Lower Broadway and the area west of it was the tony place to live. (To the east was the notorious slum Five Points.) As New York grew, so did Broadway. By 1800, straight, lined with poplars, and paved with cobblestones, it reached Astor Place (in the present-day East Village, a block from my office), where it ended at a fence marking the southern boundary of a farm. An 1811 commission charged with rationalizing the growing city’s streets into a grid recommended straightening Broadway so that it would conform with everything else—but it failed. By 1815, Broadway was two miles long and had veered northwest at 10th Street—so as not to destroy an influential farmer’s cherished tree, according to legend.

We bought hot dogs from a vendor at Columbus Circle and ate them while sitting on the granite steps of the monument to Columbus there; we were honoring a previous rendezvous we’d had one spring break, when we met at noon in Barcelona under the statue of Columbus at the end of the Ramblas. Where Barcelona offers a view of the sea from Columbus, however, New York offered a view of the ugly Coliseum exhibition center, a Robert Moses project that no longer exists. From there, things got better. Broadway runs boulevard-style through the Upper West Side, with a planted center island. The sidewalks are wide. Margot, back when she lived in the East Village, explained to me that the Upper West Side was “suburban,” a concept that it took me a while to grasp. She meant, I think, that it was newer, more oriented to families, and had among its big stores some of the franchise businesses found in malls. We had a lunch of sweet potato pie at Wilson’s soul food restaurant (now defunct), just north of 125th Street on Amsterdam. Then we walked back to Broadway.


Colorado by Lonely Planet

big-box store, California gold rush, carbon footprint, Columbine, East Village, haute couture, haute cuisine, Kickstarter, payday loans, Steve Wozniak, trade route, transcontinental railway, young professional

As a result, while the base area lacks the character and variety of real ski towns such as Breckenridge and Aspen, Keystone has been well planned and it is easy to book reservations and get information. The nicer west village is known as River Run, and though you can access about 100 miles of spectacular bike trails from here, it is a ghost town in late summer. But it is quite picturesque, tucked up against steep pine-draped slopes accessible summer and winter. The east village, Keystone Village, is where you’ll find more winter lifts, two golf courses, a medical clinic and plenty of condos for rent. Activities The big draw is the Keystone Ski Area (www.keystoneresort.com; lift per adult 13-64yr $63-94, senior 65 & over $53-84, child 5-12yr $44-54, Ski & Ride School adult per day from $109, child from $140; 8:30am-4pm Nov 5-Apr 10, to 8pm most days Dec-Mar; ), which climbs from 9280ft to 12,408ft in elevation, and encompasses three mountains or 3148 skiable acres laced with 135 trails, about half of which are expert runs.

Rising from a base elevation of 9712ft to 12,441ft at the summit, Copper Mountain has 2450 acres of skiable terrain accessed by 22 ski lifts and carved with 126 trails almost equally divided among beginners, intermediate, advanced and expert skiers. Which means this is the kind of place families would love. The resort’s ski and ride school can get adults and kids up to speed and feeling comfortable on the mountain, and Nordic fiends will enjoy the 15 miles of groomed trails snaking through the picturesque White River National Forest. There’s also a tubing hill in the East Village. You’d be wise to buy your lift tickets online where you can save up to 20%. During the summer the usual activities are on offer in the village. There’s a climbing wall, miniature golf, and even a go-cart race track (Copper Kart). The American Eagle lift (the only summer lift) leaves you at Solitude Station, where you can have a BBQ lunch and take one of the two nature or hiking trails available The Hallelujah Loop is a short nature trail, or take Andy’s Encore to the alpine overlook then continue cross-country through some loose scree fields to Copper Peak (12,441ft), before hiking back down.

Getting Around Dee Hive Tours & Transportation ( 719-486-2339; www.leadville.com/deetours; tours $10-20; by appointment; ) Welcomes hikers, skiers and cyclists in need of local shuttle transportation. Rides to trailheads or ski areas cost $10 to $20 per person for groups of four to six. Dee Hive also offers 4WD tours on the backroads to old mines and mountain passes. Summit Stage ( 970-668-0999; www.summitstage.com; per ride $5; from Leadville 6-8:45am, to Leadville 3:40-6:35pm; ) Summit Stage’s Lake County Link connects Frisco with Leadville, stopping at East Village in Copper Mountain along the way. At the time of research the bus was leaving from Leadville, heading to Frisco 12 times each morning, and returning 10 times each evening. Transfers to Breckenridge and Vail are available at the Frisco Transfer Station. Fairplay POP 550 / ELEV 8500FT Just 23 miles from Breckenridge on Haighway 9, flanked by the Mosquito Range to the west and the Tarryall Mountains to the east, Fairplay represents the beautiful South Park area’s only ‘urban’ center.


pages: 385 words: 25,673

Word Freak: Heartbreak, Triumph, Genius, and Obsession in the World of Competitive ScrabblePlayers by Stefan Fatsis

deliberate practice, Donner party, East Village, forensic accounting, Golden Gate Park, Gödel, Escher, Bach, index card, Saturday Night Live, zero-sum game

Maybe it had to do with the coming of age of the first wave of baby boomers, college educated, disaffected, uninterested in the social crises of the day. Maybe it was because competitive Scrabble was an outsider’s game, appealing in a way that chess no longer was amid the locust swarms that followed the Fischer-Spassky match in 1972. For whatever reason, a regular Scrabble night sprang up at the Bar Point House of Backgammon in the East Village. There were games at the Olive Tree, a Greenwich Village coffeehouse. And you could play daily at the Chess House on West 72nd and Chess City at 100th and Broadway, which later moved to 75th and Broadway and was renamed the Game Room. Where the Flea House had been the games-playing equivalent of a Wild West saloon — all bluster and braggadocio — the game rooms were goofier and more egalitarian, and the game itself approached more studiously.

“Maybe a Magritte on my leg. I’m doing a Mount Rushmore with my four favorite composers. It’s going to be Handel, Mozart, Beethoven, and Bach.” Richie slaps his knee and laughs. It’s a deep, sinister, Goodfellas guffaw that insists you join in or risk bodily harm. He invites me to come watch him get tattooed. Suddenly he says, “It smells strongly of urine over here, doesn’t it?” I meet Richie on a Friday night at the East Village tattoo parlor of Anil Gupta. Since that day in the park, Richie has had the composers 226 ❑ Word Freak etched into his lower right arm: Mozart in lavender, Bach in orange, Beethoven in green, and Handel in blue. Richie removes his shoes and his right sock and sits in a dental chair. He swallows a couple of Tylenols with codeine and lifts his right pants leg, revealing the work in progress: the funeral mask of King Tutankhamen.


pages: 524 words: 143,596

The Dice Man by Luke Rhinehart

call centre, East Village, fear of failure, impulse control, land reform, Lao Tzu, Socratic dialogue, the medium is the message

Lil came to visit me just once to congratulate me on my future fatherhood and to announce that she had initiated divorce proceedings by taking out the necessary separation papers and that her lawyer would be visiting me shortly. (He did, but I was in the state of catatonia at the time.) She stated that separation and divorce were clearly best for both of us especially since I would undoubtedly be spending much of the rest of my life in mental institutions. Dr. Vener of QSH told me that my former patient Eric Cannon had, after two months of leading a growing herd-of hippies in Brooklyn and in the East Village, been recommitted to the hospital by his father and was asking to see me. He also noted that Arturo Toscanini Jones had also been recommitted - on a technicality unearthed by diligent police and was not asking to see me. In fact, the only good news I was getting from the rest of the world was from my patients in dice therapy. All took my being locked up perfectly in their stride, continued to develop their dicelife on their own and waited patiently and confidently for my return to them.

I might not be more powerful than a locomotive, faster than a speeding bullet, or able to leap tall buildings at a single bound, but in terms of being free at any given moment to do whatever the dice or the spontaneous `I' might dictate, I would be, compared to all known past human beings, a superman. But I was lonely. Superman at least had a regular job and Lois Lane. But being a real superbeing, one capable of marvels and miracles compared to the mechanical and repetitious acrobatics of Superman and Batman, was lonely, I'm sorry, fans, but that's how I felt. I had gone to a dingy hotel in the East Village that made the geriatrics ward at QSH seem like a plush retirement villa. I sweated and sulked and wandered out to play a few dice roles and dice games and sometimes I enjoyed myself thoroughly, but those nights alone in that hotel room were not among the high points of my life. The problem of boredom which the Die had so successfully solved seemed, now that I was approaching the totally free state, to be reappearing.


pages: 769 words: 397,677

Frommer's California 2007 by Harry Basch, Mark Hiss, Erika Lenkert, Matthew Richard Poole

airport security, Asilomar, Bay Area Rapid Transit, car-free, Charles Lindbergh, Chuck Templeton: OpenTable:, clean water, Columbine, Donald Trump, Donner party, East Village, El Camino Real, Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test, Frank Gehry, Golden Gate Park, Guggenheim Bilbao, Haight Ashbury, indoor plumbing, Iridium satellite, Joan Didion, Maui Hawaii, Silicon Valley, South of Market, San Francisco, sustainable-tourism, transcontinental railway, upwardly mobile, urban sprawl, white picket fence, Works Progress Administration

With little more than 4 blocks’ worth of shops, restaurants, and a handful of B&Bs, Cambria is the perfect place to escape the everyday, enjoy the endless expanses of pristine coastal terrain, and meander through little shops selling local artwork and antiques. Cambria has three distinct parts. Along Main Street is “the Village,” which is divided into two sections: the West Village and the East Village. The West Village is the newer, somewhat more touristy end of town where you’ll find the visitor information center. The more historic East Village is a bit quieter, more locals-oriented, and 406 CHAPTER 12 . THE CENTRAL COAST Fun Fact Weekends at “the Ranch” The lavish palace that William Randolph Hearst always referred to simply as “the ranch” took root in 1919. William Randolph (“W.R.” to his friends) had inherited 275,000 acres from his father, mining baron George Hearst, and was well on his way to building a formidable media empire.

If you cross Highway 1 to the coastal side at the far west end of town (or the north end, if you’re considering how the freeway runs), you’ll reach Cambria’s third part, Moonstone Beach. Lined with motels, inns, and a few restaurants on the inland side of the street, ocean-facing Moonstone Beach Drive is my favorite place to stay in Cambria. Before you set out, pick up the Cambria Historical Society’s brochure at your hotel and take a simple, fun self-guided tour of the historical buildings in the East Village. You’ll not only get a history lesson about this picturesque village, but you’ll also discover a few places you may have overlooked otherwise, such as the blacksmith shop at 4121 Burton Dr. or the Santa Rosa Chapel and Cemetery at 2352 Main St. An overnight stay in Cambia also allows visitors to see the coastal region’s “new” attraction: a spring (yes, that’s the correct term—I looked it up) of elephant seals sunning themselves on the beaches year-round.

Entrees might include local mako shark with sweet onion confit and Roquefort blue cheese butter; whole flash-fried striped bass in a citrus-ginger glaze; or top-quality prime beef, chicken, and pork. The Oceanaire Seafood Room 400 J St. (at 4th Ave.), Gaslamp Quarter. & 619/858-2277. www.theoceanaire.com. Reservations recommended. Main courses $15–$50. AE, DISC, MC, V. Sun–Thurs 5–10pm; Fri–Sat 5–11pm. Valet (from 6pm) Sun–Thurs $10, Fri–Sat $15. Bus: 3, 5, or 16. Trolley: Convention Center. M O D E R AT E Cafe Chloe FRENCH This East Village restaurant created an immediate buzz when it opened in 2004. Had the owners struck upon some cutting-edge trend? No, it was a simple idea, really; something you’ll find everywhere from Amsterdam to Zanzibar. It’s a bistro. Creative, whimsical touches abound, for sure—such as the children’s area, a retail space, and a patio built for two—but this is a pretty straightforward enterprise, infused with its proprietors’ refined tastes and joie de vivre.


pages: 286 words: 94,017

Future Shock by Alvin Toffler

Albert Einstein, Brownian motion, Buckminster Fuller, Charles Lindbergh, cognitive dissonance, Colonization of Mars, corporate governance, East Village, global village, Haight Ashbury, information retrieval, invention of agriculture, invention of movable type, invention of writing, longitudinal study, Marshall McLuhan, mass immigration, Menlo Park, New Urbanism, Norman Mailer, post-industrial society, RAND corporation, social intelligence, the market place, Thomas Kuhn: the structure of scientific revolutions, urban renewal, Whole Earth Catalog, zero-sum game

Similarly, "underground newspapers" have sprung up in dozens of American and European cities. There are at least 200 of these in the United States, many of them supported by advertising placed by leading record manufacturers. Appealing chiefly to hippies, campus radicals and the rock audience, they have become a tangible force in the formation of opinion among the young. From London's IT and the East Village Other in New York, to the Kudzu in Jackson, Mississippi, they are heavily illustrated, often color-printed, and jammed with ads for "psychedelicatessens" and dating services. Underground papers are even published in high schools. To observe the growth of these grass-roots publications and to speak of "mass culture" or "standardization" is to blind oneself to the new realities. Significantly, this thrust toward media diversity is based not on affluence alone, but, as we have seen before, on the new technology—the very machines that are supposedly going to homogenize us and crush all vestiges of variety.

It spawned a flock of fledgling subcultural enterprises. TRIBAL TURNOVER Even as this happened, however, the movement began to die. The most passionate LSD advocates of yesterday began to admit that "acid was a bad scene" and various underground newspapers began warning followers against getting too involved with "tripsters." A mock funeral was held in San Francisco to "bury" the hippie subcult, and its favored locations, Haight-Ashbury and the East Village turned into tourist meccas as the original movement writhed and disintegrated, forming new and odder, but smaller and weaker subcults and minitribes. Then, as though to start the process all over again, yet another subcult, the "skinheads," surfaced. Skinheads had their own characteristic outfits—suspenders, boots, short haircuts—and an unsettling predilection for violence. The death of the hippie movement and the rise of the skinheads provide a crucial new insight into the subcultural structure of tomorrow's society.


pages: 519 words: 142,646

Track Changes by Matthew G. Kirschenbaum

active measures, Apple II, Apple's 1984 Super Bowl advert, Bill Gates: Altair 8800, Buckminster Fuller, commoditize, computer age, corporate governance, David Brooks, dematerialisation, Donald Knuth, Douglas Hofstadter, Dynabook, East Village, en.wikipedia.org, feminist movement, forensic accounting, future of work, Google Earth, Gödel, Escher, Bach, Haight Ashbury, HyperCard, Jason Scott: textfiles.com, Joan Didion, John Markoff, John von Neumann, Kickstarter, low earth orbit, mail merge, Marshall McLuhan, Mother of all demos, New Journalism, Norman Mailer, pattern recognition, pink-collar, popular electronics, RAND corporation, rolodex, Ronald Reagan, self-driving car, Shoshana Zuboff, Silicon Valley, social web, Stephen Hawking, Steve Jobs, Steve Wozniak, Steven Levy, Stewart Brand, technoutopianism, Ted Nelson, text mining, thinkpad, Turing complete, Vannevar Bush, Whole Earth Catalog, Y2K, Year of Magical Thinking

Some prescient authors and editors had already realized the potential use of computers for publishing and distribution as well as composition. The avant-garde literary and arts journal Between C&D, which began publication in New York’s East Village in 1983, was printed and distributed on fanfold paper from a dot matrix printer and came packaged in a zip-lock bag. (Authors published by Between C&D include Kathy Acker, Dennis Cooper, Susan Daitch, Gary Indiana, Patrick McGrath, and Lynne Tillman.) Editors Joel Rose and Catherine Texier recalled: “The combination of our high-tech look—the computer printout, the fanfold, the dot-matrix print type—in conjunction with handmade art by East Village (or Downtown) artists on the front and back covers, and the ziplock plastic bag binding, along with, needless to say, the featured ‘new writing’ immediately attracted both readers and writers, from New York City and elsewhere.”50 Such an episode comports with the kinds of arguments scholars such as Harold Love and Peter Stallybrass have long made about the persistence of scribal and manuscript writing into cultures of printing, whereby the cross-transfer between media (in this case print and the digital) results in the proliferation, rather than the attenuation, of prior forms of production.51 But as contemporary commentators like Lanham had understood, with the advent of the Macintosh readers and writers had access to the same digital platform as publishers to create images and cast type as well as to process words—and freely integrate all of these components in their finished work.


pages: 222 words: 60,207

Circus Maximus: The Economic Gamble Behind Hosting the Olympics and the World Cup by Andrew Zimbalist

airline deregulation, business cycle, carbon footprint, East Village, en.wikipedia.org, full employment, Gini coefficient, income inequality, longitudinal study, Nelson Mandela, New Urbanism, principal–agent problem, race to the bottom, selection bias, urban planning, young professional

The first major mixed community development, Chobham Manor, provided about 25 percent affordable housing, 10 percent [age points] below the widely published target, and subsequent developments, to be completed by the early 2020s, are unlikely to achieve even this level. As the social or public gain dimension of the Games’ urban legacy has waned, so the commercial has flourished. 88 The Olympic, now East, Village has become part of a high rise, high density and high price area of development around the transport hub that is Stratford. The vision for the creation of affordable housing has receded. As developers have privileged scheme viability, the proportion of the value captured for investment in social housing and public spaces has diminished particularly on the south side of the former Olympic Park and within the developments on its borders.


pages: 179 words: 59,704

Meet the Frugalwoods: Achieving Financial Independence Through Simple Living by Elizabeth Willard Thames

"side hustle", Airbnb, asset allocation, barriers to entry, basic income, buy and hold, carbon footprint, delayed gratification, dumpster diving, East Village, financial independence, hedonic treadmill, IKEA effect, index fund, indoor plumbing, loss aversion, McMansion, mortgage debt, passive income, payday loans, risk tolerance, Stanford marshmallow experiment, universal basic income, working poor

This is how we found ourselves one Thursday night at a bar in Hell’s Kitchen that served free hot dogs and how, in true Nate fashion, he left with an interview scheduled at a firm in Boston that married his two great loves (other than me): politics and software engineering. He was hired the next week. In early January, we took the $15 Fung Wah bus up to Cambridge, Massachusetts, to find him an apartment. He settled on a subterranean basement unit with the pros of being in a desirable urban neighborhood and a five-minute walk from his new office. We celebrated with dinner at a BYOB Indian restaurant in the East Village that, for unknown reasons, is covered with Christmas lights. It’s also cheap beyond belief, two things I have to believe are correlated. Nate was gone the next week. Cambridge is a lot closer to Brooklyn than Kansas, but it’s still a 217-mile distance in one of the most expensive corridors of the United States. Neither of us owned a car, so we were left with the bus. Let’s iron something out right now: a city bus is fine.


pages: 187 words: 62,861

The Penguin and the Leviathan: How Cooperation Triumphs Over Self-Interest by Yochai Benkler

business process, California gold rush, citizen journalism, Daniel Kahneman / Amos Tversky, East Village, Everything should be made as simple as possible, experimental economics, experimental subject, framing effect, informal economy, invisible hand, jimmy wales, job satisfaction, Joseph Schumpeter, Kenneth Arrow, knowledge economy, laissez-faire capitalism, loss aversion, Murray Gell-Mann, Nicholas Carr, peer-to-peer, prediction markets, Richard Stallman, Scientific racism, Silicon Valley, Steven Pinker, telemarketer, Toyota Production System, twin studies, ultimatum game, Washington Consensus, zero-sum game, Zipcar

Those who demonstrated enthusiasm and the desire for more responsibility were promptly invited to become “neighborhood team leaders” and were put in charge of organizing local campaign activity. They were given no instructions or guidelines other than to think creatively about how to best energize the people in that unique community (after all, things that excite voters in Little Rock, Arkansas, might not be so effective in New York City’s East Village, and vice versa). Neighborhood leaders, in turn, recruited other volunteers for more discrete, specific tasks—such as phone banking or canvassing door-to-door. Each volunteer recruited more volunteers. At the end of the day, more than three million people had volunteered their time, whether by canvassing streets for donations, organizing local events, calling undecideds, or driving voters to the polls.


pages: 184 words: 62,220

Slouching Towards Bethlehem by Joan Didion

Charles Lindbergh, Donner party, East Village, Golden Gate Park, Haight Ashbury, Joan Didion, Khartoum Gordon, Mahatma Gandhi, Marshall McLuhan, Maui Hawaii, profit motive, sealed-bid auction

We are eating a little tempura in Japantown, Chet Helms and I, and he is sharing some of his insights with me. Until a couple of years ago Chet Helms never did much besides hitchhiking, but now he runs the Avalon Ballroom and flies over the Pole to check out the London scene and says things like “Just for the sake of clarity I’d like to categorize the aspects of primitive religion as I see it.” Right now he is talking about Marshall McLuhan and how the printed word is finished, out, over. “The East Village Other is one of the few papers in America whose books are in the black,” he says. “I know that from reading Barron’s!” A new group is supposed to play in the Panhandle today but they are having trouble with the amplifier and I sit in the sun listening to a couple of little girls, maybe seventeen years old. One of them has a lot of makeup and the other wears Levi’s and cowboy boots. The boots do not look like an affectation, they look like she came up off a ranch about two weeks ago.


pages: 231 words: 61,172

Babel-17 by Samuel R. Delany

centre right, East Village, index card

His 1966 novel Babel-17 established his reputation, and over the next decade he became famous for his provocative futuristic explorations of race and sexual identity in the novels Nova (1969), Dhalgren (1975) and Triton (1976). His other works include the Neveryon series of novels (1979-87) and the novel Stars in My Pocket Like Grains of Sand (1984). He has also written frankly about his life as an African-American homosexual, and his non-fiction books include The Motion of Light and Water: Sex and Science Fiction Writing in the East Village, 1957-65 (1988) and Times Square Red, Times Square Blue (Sexual Culture) (1999).


pages: 239 words: 56,531

The Secret War Between Downloading and Uploading: Tales of the Computer as Culture Machine by Peter Lunenfeld

Albert Einstein, Andrew Keen, anti-globalists, Apple II, Berlin Wall, British Empire, Brownian motion, Buckminster Fuller, Burning Man, business cycle, butterfly effect, computer age, creative destruction, crowdsourcing, cuban missile crisis, Dissolution of the Soviet Union, don't be evil, Douglas Engelbart, Douglas Engelbart, Dynabook, East Village, Edward Lorenz: Chaos theory, Fall of the Berlin Wall, Francis Fukuyama: the end of history, Frank Gehry, Grace Hopper, gravity well, Guggenheim Bilbao, Honoré de Balzac, Howard Rheingold, invention of movable type, Isaac Newton, Jacquard loom, Jane Jacobs, Jeff Bezos, John Markoff, John von Neumann, Kickstarter, Mark Zuckerberg, Marshall McLuhan, Mercator projection, Metcalfe’s law, Mother of all demos, mutually assured destruction, Nelson Mandela, Network effects, new economy, Norbert Wiener, PageRank, pattern recognition, peer-to-peer, planetary scale, plutocrats, Plutocrats, post-materialism, Potemkin village, RFID, Richard Feynman, Richard Stallman, Robert Metcalfe, Robert X Cringely, Schrödinger's Cat, Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence, SETI@home, Silicon Valley, Skype, social software, spaced repetition, Steve Ballmer, Steve Jobs, Steve Wozniak, Ted Nelson, the built environment, The Death and Life of Great American Cities, the medium is the message, Thomas L Friedman, Turing machine, Turing test, urban planning, urban renewal, Vannevar Bush, walkable city, Watson beat the top human players on Jeopardy!, William Shockley: the traitorous eight

First performed in Turin, Puccini’s La Bohème has since become what the New York Times claims is the “world’s most popular opera—a rite of passage for generations of those who would be besotted by the tale of bohemians (now a creative class rather than an ethnic group) who make love and art, and who suffer and die.18 After all, La Bohème is both romantic and Romantic. The opera was loosely adapted in 2001 by an Australian film director using U.S. studio money. Luhrmann’s Moulin Rouge tells the same story as the opera and book, and the literally endless variations on these themes from the Lillian Gish 1926 silent melodrama through Jonathan Larson’s 1990s’ musical Rent, which switched the locale to New York’s East Village in the era of AIDS.19 What distinguishes Luhrmann’s film is the way that it deploys this myth from the nineteenth century 61 CHAPTER 3 to analyze, dissect, and recombine the popular culture of the twentieth. The film provides the antithesis of purity, proffering instead a spectacular hodgepodge, a mélange, and a remixer’s delight. Luhrmann’s insight is that the kind of devoted and minute dissection of twentieth-century popular culture by decade and style—1920s’ fashion, 1950s’ music, and 1980s’ hair—was disappearing through the passage of time and under the weight of the ever-growing archive.


pages: 239 words: 70,206

Data-Ism: The Revolution Transforming Decision Making, Consumer Behavior, and Almost Everything Else by Steve Lohr

"Robert Solow", 23andMe, Affordable Care Act / Obamacare, Albert Einstein, big data - Walmart - Pop Tarts, bioinformatics, business cycle, business intelligence, call centre, cloud computing, computer age, conceptual framework, Credit Default Swap, crowdsourcing, Daniel Kahneman / Amos Tversky, Danny Hillis, data is the new oil, David Brooks, East Village, Edward Snowden, Emanuel Derman, Erik Brynjolfsson, everywhere but in the productivity statistics, Frederick Winslow Taylor, Google Glasses, impulse control, income inequality, indoor plumbing, industrial robot, informal economy, Internet of things, invention of writing, Johannes Kepler, John Markoff, John von Neumann, lifelogging, Mark Zuckerberg, market bubble, meta analysis, meta-analysis, money market fund, natural language processing, obamacare, pattern recognition, payday loans, personalized medicine, precision agriculture, pre–internet, Productivity paradox, RAND corporation, rising living standards, Robert Gordon, Second Machine Age, self-driving car, Silicon Valley, Silicon Valley startup, six sigma, skunkworks, speech recognition, statistical model, Steve Jobs, Steven Levy, The Design of Experiments, the scientific method, Thomas Kuhn: the structure of scientific revolutions, unbanked and underbanked, underbanked, Von Neumann architecture, Watson beat the top human players on Jeopardy!

“by Jeff” So the essence was evident early on—his affinity for the quantitative world and his instinct for scientific observation. Today, Hammerbacher is a thirty-two-year-old millionaire many times over. His wife, Halle Tecco, a Harvard MBA, is the founder and chief executive of Rock Health, which provides seed funding and advice for technology start-ups in health care. When they bought an apartment in Manhattan’s East Village in 2013 from the actress Chloë Sevigny, both the New York Post and Britain’s Daily Mail took notice. The Post called the pair “technology entrepreneurs” and the Daily Mail described them as a “tech power couple.” The milestones on Hammerbacher’s life path suggest a sure thing. His is a résumé that speaks of ambition and likely privilege, of someone destined for success in the modern economy of money and technology.


pages: 239 words: 64,812

Geek Sublime: The Beauty of Code, the Code of Beauty by Vikram Chandra

Alan Turing: On Computable Numbers, with an Application to the Entscheidungsproblem, Apple II, barriers to entry, Berlin Wall, British Empire, business process, conceptual framework, create, read, update, delete, crowdsourcing, don't repeat yourself, Donald Knuth, East Village, European colonialism, finite state, Firefox, Flash crash, glass ceiling, Grace Hopper, haute couture, iterative process, Jaron Lanier, John von Neumann, land reform, London Whale, Norman Mailer, Paul Graham, pink-collar, revision control, Silicon Valley, Silicon Valley ideology, Skype, Steve Jobs, Steve Wozniak, supercomputer in your pocket, theory of mind, Therac-25, Turing machine, wikimedia commons, women in the workforce

Even a simple software requirement for a small company that, say, provides secretarial services for the medical insurance industry—“We need an application that makes it easier for our scribes to write up reports from doctors’ examinations of insurance claimants”—will always reveal a swirling hodgepodge of exceptions and special cases. Some of the doctors will have two addresses on file, some will have three, and this one was on Broadway until January 22 and in the East Village afterwards. A report will always begin with a summary of the patient’s claimed condition, unless it’s being written for Company X, which wants a narration of the doctor’s exam up front. There are four main types of boilerplate text for the doctor’s conclusions, but there needs to be a “freeform” option, and room for other templates, but creation of new templates needs to be restricted to certain users.


pages: 246 words: 68,392

Gigged: The End of the Job and the Future of Work by Sarah Kessler

Affordable Care Act / Obamacare, Airbnb, Amazon Mechanical Turk, basic income, bitcoin, blockchain, business cycle, call centre, cognitive dissonance, collective bargaining, crowdsourcing, David Attenborough, Donald Trump, East Village, Elon Musk, financial independence, future of work, game design, gig economy, income inequality, information asymmetry, Jeff Bezos, job automation, law of one price, Lyft, Mark Zuckerberg, market clearing, minimum wage unemployment, new economy, payday loans, post-work, profit maximization, QR code, race to the bottom, ride hailing / ride sharing, Second Machine Age, self-driving car, shareholder value, sharing economy, Silicon Valley, Snapchat, TaskRabbit, Travis Kalanick, Uber and Lyft, Uber for X, uber lyft, union organizing, universal basic income, working-age population, Works Progress Administration, Y Combinator

But actually implementing changes—which would require parties with different political agendas to compromise on specifics, experiments that proved feasibility, and passage through a slow law-making process—was more likely to take decades than years. PART V THE FUTURE OF WORK CHAPTER 12 PIVOT In the spring of 2016, Managed by Q leased a new office in a New York City skyscraper. The company had grown from 150 to 500 employees in the last year, and its previous home in the East Village, in a five-story building with a rickety elevator that featured exposed brick walls, could no longer accommodate enough desks. This new office by comparison looked like a huge corporate office. Or, at least, it would once the company moved in. Eventually Managed by Q would install glass walls to create conference rooms, purchase desks and chairs, and strategically place plants to add a pop of color throughout its new office.


pages: 251 words: 67,801

And Then All Hell Broke Loose: Two Decades in the Middle East by Richard Engel

East Village, friendly fire, invisible hand, Mohammed Bouazizi, Skype, Yom Kippur War

It was a twenty-minute walk to the Old City, and right across from the Mahane Yehuda, the city’s main market for butchers, bakers, and fruit and vegetable sellers. I spent a lot of time browsing in the market—or at least I did before the suicide bombers came. * * * WE LIVED IN AN AREA called Nachlaot, a sort of Bohemian enclave. ITS winding lanes had speakeasies with no signs on the doors and a couple of underground music clubs in basements. It had a New York City East Village feel, a beatnik vibe, and was quite cool. Now large parts of it are ultra-Orthodox. Our friends were almost all journalists. The expat community was nothing like the one in Cairo. Most of the Americans in Jerusalem had made aliyah, a Hebrew word meaning “ascent,” which by Jewish custom means going to Israel. They were Americans who had decided to embrace Zionism and their Jewish heritage, and they were deeply involved in their temple groups.


Ottolenghi: The Cookbook by Yotam Ottolenghi, Sami Tamimi

East Village, food miles, haute cuisine

Chapter 3 Baking and patisserie Bread and savoury pastries Crusty white Italian loaf Green olive loaf Sour cherry and walnut stick Focaccia (plus three toppings) Jerusalem artichoke and Swiss chard tart Sweet and spicy beef and pork pie Butternut, carrot and goat’s cheese tartlets Brioche ‘Pizza’ with feta, tomato and olive Sweet potato galettes Roasted pepper and cannellini bruschetta Organic salmon and asparagus bruschetta Olive oil crackers Parmesan and poppy biscuits Cheddar and caraway cheese straws Large cakes Apple and olive oil cake with maple icing Orange polenta cake Chocolate fudge cake Caramel and macadamia cheesecake Carrot and walnut cake Small cakes, muffins and cupcakes Teacakes Peach and raspberry Lemon and blueberry Lavender and honey Muffins Plum, marzipan and cinnamon Blueberry crumble Carrot, apple and pecan Cupcakes Hazelnut Chocolate Pear and Amaretto crumble cake Sticky chocolate loaf Bars, biscuits and truffles Pistachio shortbreads Pistachio and ginger biscotti White chocolate and cranberry biscuits Almond and orange Florentines Champagne chocolates Sour cherry amaretti Prune and brandy truffles Raspberry and oat bar Granola bars Brownies Toffee Macadamia and white chocolate Khalid’s chocolate and chestnut bars Meringues and macaroons Macaroons General method Salty peanut and caramel Lime and basil Chocolate Meringues Pistachio and rosewater Cinnamon and hazelnut Tarts Tartlets Pre-baked cases Fresh berries Dark chocolate White chocolate and raspberry Lemon meringue Banana and hazelnut Semolina and raspberry tart Individual plum clafoutis Brioche galette Crusty white Italian loaf We developed the obsession that led to this bread when we tried a heavenly loaf at Prune, our favourite restaurant in New York, down in the East Village. It had the crunchiest dark crust, one that almost cuts the top of your mouth, a soft, waxy centre, full of giant holes, and a giant flavour. It came from the Sullivan Street Bakery. When we got back to London, we rushed to Dan Lepard, our bread mastermind, and he came up with this recipe, which is (almost, we must admit) as good as Sullivan’s. To achieve this creation takes two days and you need a good mixer, as the dough is very wet and sticky and takes a lot of kneading.


pages: 217 words: 69,892

My Year of Rest and Relaxation: A Novel by Ottessa Moshfegh

East Village, illegal immigration, index card, out of africa, Pepto Bismol, rent control, white picket fence

Think of your beauty as an Achilles’ heel. You’re too much on the surface. I don’t say that offensively. But it’s the truth. It’s hard to look past what you look like.” Since adolescence, I’d vacillated between wanting to look like the spoiled WASP that I was and the bum that I felt I was and should have been if I’d had any courage. I’d shopped at Bergdorf’s and Barneys and high-end vintage boutiques in the East Village. The result was an amazing wardrobe, my main professional asset as a new college graduate. I easily landed the job as a gallery girl at Ducat, one of a dozen “fine art” galleries on West Twenty-first Street. I had no big plan to become a curator, no great scheme to work my way up a ladder. I was just trying to pass the time. I thought that if I did normal things—held down a job, for example—I could starve off the part of me that hated everything.


pages: 221 words: 67,514

Me Talk Pretty One Day by David Sedaris

Albert Einstein, complexity theory, East Village, index card, means of production, rent control

My daily budget was a quickly spent twelve dollars, and every extravagance called for a corresponding sacrifice. If I bought a hot dog on the street, I’d have to make up that money by eating eggs for dinner or walking fifty blocks to the library rather than taking the subway. The newspaper was fished out of trash cans, section by section, and I was always on the lookout for a good chicken-back recipe. Across town, over in the East Village, the graffiti was calling for the rich to be eaten, imprisoned, or taxed out of existence. Though it sometimes seemed like a nice idea, I hoped the revolution would not take place during my lifetime. I didn’t want the rich to go away until I could at least briefly join their ranks. The money was tempting. I just didn’t know how to get it. I was nearing the end of a brief seasonal job when I noticed that my favorite town house had been put up for sale.


pages: 234 words: 63,844

Filthy Rich: A Powerful Billionaire, the Sex Scandal That Undid Him, and All the Justice That Money Can Buy: The Shocking True Story of Jeffrey Epstein by James Patterson, John Connolly, Tim Malloy

Bernie Madoff, corporate raider, Donald Trump, East Village, Elon Musk, Isaac Newton, Jeffrey Epstein, Julian Assange, Murray Gell-Mann, Ponzi scheme, Stephen Hawking, WikiLeaks

Worked on his prized stamp collection. Innocent times. CHAPTER 21 Jeffrey Epstein: 1969–1976 It’s the height of the Vietnam War. Students collide with college administrators. Hippies collide with hard hats. Kids with long hair collide with their parents. Jeffrey Epstein does not go in for any of that. At the age of sixteen, he’s taking advanced math classes at Cooper Union, an august institution in the East Village where Abraham Lincoln once spoke. Thanks to a generous endowment, the school is tuition-free, though the application process is famously rigorous. Epstein sails through it. At Harvard or Yale, his accent would give him away. Epstein tawks like the Brooklyn boy he is. But Cooper Union is more open than any Ivy League school. It’s full of boys from Brooklyn, and, aside from his prodigious intellect, Epstein doesn’t stand out.


pages: 1,048 words: 187,324

Atlas Obscura: An Explorer's Guide to the World's Hidden Wonders by Joshua Foer, Dylan Thuras, Ella Morton

anti-communist, Berlin Wall, British Empire, Buckminster Fuller, centre right, Charles Lindbergh, colonial rule, Colonization of Mars, cosmic microwave background, cuban missile crisis, dark matter, double helix, East Village, Exxon Valdez, Fall of the Berlin Wall, Frank Gehry, germ theory of disease, Golden Gate Park, Google Earth, Haight Ashbury, horn antenna, Ignaz Semmelweis: hand washing, index card, Jacques de Vaucanson, Kowloon Walled City, Louis Pasteur, low cost airline, Mahatma Gandhi, mass immigration, mutually assured destruction, Panopticon Jeremy Bentham, phenotype, Pluto: dwarf planet, Ronald Reagan, Rubik’s Cube, Sapir-Whorf hypothesis, Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence, trade route, transatlantic slave trade, transcontinental railway, Tunguska event, urban sprawl, Vesna Vulović, white picket fence, wikimedia commons, working poor

Among the more intriguing items are a collection of chloroform inhalation masks from the 1890s, piles of gallstones removed during surgery, and bloodletting blades once used on patients stricken with the bubonic plague. 1524 North Lake Shore Drive, Chicago. 41.910292 87.62655 Glass eye, gallstones, and outmoded medical instruments are all on display. City Guide: More to Explore in Chicago Galloping Ghost Arcade Brookfield · Hundreds of arcade games await your coin-inserting, button-mashing presence in this suburban den. The Secret Mermaid Burnham Park · In 1986, four sculptors hid a mermaid along the Chicago lakefront. Now she is a permanent fixture. Shit Fountain East Village · This oversize bronze coil of feces is both a tribute to doggie defecation and a reminder to pick it up. Lizzadro Museum of Lapidary Art Elmhurst · Cut and polished stones, some carefully sculpted into mini boats and temples, are on display at this jade-lover’s paradise. U-505 Hyde Park · After sustaining much damage during World War II, the most unlucky U-boat in the German fleet is on display at the Museum of Science and Industry.

City Reliquary Williamsburg · This community museum and store traces the history of New York via items as mundane and fascinating as coffee cups, subway tokens, and souvenir spoons. Manhattan Mmuseumm Chinatown · This tiny museum in a freight elevator specializes in the overlooked, dismissed, and ignored. City Hall Station Civic Center · Stay on the 6 train after its last downtown stop and you’ll encounter an abandoned subway station. Wishbones of McSorley’s Old Ale House East Village · The wishbones hung on this bar’s light fixture are said to have belonged to World War I soldiers who never returned. Museum of American Finance Financial District · Beautiful old banknotes and a jewel-encrusted Monopoly board have been exhibited at this money-minded museum, housed in a former bank building. The New York Academy of Medicine’s Rare Book Room Harlem · See historic volumes on disease and obstetrics, many of which date from the 16th to 18th centuries.


pages: 256 words: 76,433

Overdressed: The Shockingly High Cost of Cheap Fashion by Elizabeth L. Cline

big-box store, business cycle, clean water, East Village, feminist movement, income inequality, informal economy, invention of the sewing machine, Maui Hawaii, McMansion, megacity, race to the bottom, Skype, special economic zone, trade liberalization, Triangle Shirtwaist Factory, upwardly mobile, Veblen good

Versatile clothing like this is becoming a more mainstream idea in fashion, with such retailers as American Apparel selling loose fabric along with styling pamphlets. Starbuck’s line was featured at the 2010 Green Shows, a runway show dedicated to sustainable fashion that is held in Manhattan at the same time as fall Fashion Week. By spring, Starbuck had four of her pieces from the Green shows—the halter top in two colors, the pants, a coat-dress, and a cream wrap dress—in three Manhattan locations of Urban Outfitters. She and I met up at the East Village location so I could test-drive her line, which we found hidden in a rack of tank tops in loud colors and the year’s ubiquitous tiny floral prints. “These styles may not even be wearable in a season,” Starbuck admonished, referring to the chain’s trendy duds. “Because people will look at it and be able to date it very quickly and know exactly when you bought it. It’ll be uncool.” Starbuck made her own line in solids of maroon, black, and cream.


pages: 381 words: 78,467

100 Plus: How the Coming Age of Longevity Will Change Everything, From Careers and Relationships to Family And by Sonia Arrison

23andMe, 8-hour work day, Albert Einstein, Anne Wojcicki, artificial general intelligence, attribution theory, Bill Joy: nanobots, bioinformatics, Clayton Christensen, dark matter, disruptive innovation, East Village, en.wikipedia.org, epigenetics, Frank Gehry, Googley, income per capita, indoor plumbing, Jeff Bezos, Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, Kickstarter, Law of Accelerating Returns, life extension, personalized medicine, Peter Thiel, placebo effect, post scarcity, Ray Kurzweil, rolodex, Silicon Valley, Simon Kuznets, Singularitarianism, smart grid, speech recognition, stem cell, Stephen Hawking, Steve Jobs, Steve Wozniak, Steven Levy, Thomas Malthus, upwardly mobile, World Values Survey, X Prize

This stickiness is part of the larger context, which is also key to spreading a meme. Ideas that are unstoppable can also be called “social epidemics,” and they are “sensitive to the conditions and circumstances of the times and places in which they occur.”52 Gladwell explains this phenomenon in the retail world through the example of Hush Puppy shoes, which, he argues, became popular “because they were being worn by kids in the cutting-edge precincts of the East Village—an environment that helped others to look at the shoes in a new light.”53 So what is the history and who are the ‘cool kids’ driving the longevity meme? Arguably, the event that really brought longevity science to the forefront of the public’s mind was the dual announcement of the first “completion” of a draft of the human genome in 2000 by both Celera Genomics, a private company founded by Dr.


pages: 296 words: 76,284

The End of the Suburbs: Where the American Dream Is Moving by Leigh Gallagher

Airbnb, big-box store, Burning Man, call centre, car-free, Celebration, Florida, clean water, collaborative consumption, Columbine, commoditize, crack epidemic, East Village, edge city, Edward Glaeser, extreme commuting, helicopter parent, Home mortgage interest deduction, housing crisis, Jane Jacobs, Kickstarter, low skilled workers, Mark Zuckerberg, McMansion, Menlo Park, mortgage tax deduction, negative equity, New Urbanism, peak oil, Peter Calthorpe, Ponzi scheme, Richard Florida, Robert Shiller, Robert Shiller, Sand Hill Road, Seaside, Florida, Silicon Valley, Steve Jobs, Stewart Brand, the built environment, The Death and Life of Great American Cities, Tony Hsieh, transit-oriented development, upwardly mobile, urban planning, urban sprawl, Victor Gruen, walkable city, white flight, white picket fence, young professional, Zipcar

A few blocks away, a sixteen-story building is planned for Eighty-ninth and Park, the white-glove epicenter of the Gossip Girl set. A few miles south in the Gramercy neighborhood sits 160 East Twenty-second, a modern, twenty-one-story, full-service doorman building aiming for LEED certification that will offer studio, one-, two-, and three-bedroom luxury condos. There’s One Ten Third, a Mondrian-inspired boutique building that opened in the formerly gritty East Village in 2006, and there are three communities in neighboring Hoboken. The company will soon test its limits even more, with a hotel and condo community being developed on Brooklyn’s waterfront in partnership with Starwood Capital Group and with the purchase in 2013 of two new properties on First Avenue and in Soho. And at the corner of Twenty-eighth and Park Avenue South, what is now a massive hole in the ground will soon give way to a forty-story glass skyscraper designed by the award–winning architect Christian de Portzamparc.


Free as in Freedom by Sam Williams

Asperger Syndrome, cognitive dissonance, commoditize, Debian, Douglas Engelbart, East Village, Guido van Rossum, Hacker Ethic, informal economy, Isaac Newton, John Conway, John Markoff, Larry Wall, Marc Andreessen, Maui Hawaii, Murray Gell-Mann, profit motive, Richard Stallman, Silicon Valley, slashdot, software patent, Steven Levy, Ted Nelson, urban renewal, VA Linux, Y2K

When my laughing convulsions finally subsided, I held up my drink in a toast. "Welcome to the front lines, my friend," I said, clinking pints with my agent. "Might as well enjoy it." If this story really were a play, here's where it would take a momentary, romantic interlude. Disheartened by the tense nature of our meeting, Tracy invited Henning and I to go out for drinks with her and some of her coworkers. We left the bar on Third Ave., headed down to the East Village, and caught up with Tracy and her friends. 164 Once there, I spoke with Tracy, careful to avoid shop talk. Our conversation was pleasant, relaxed. Before parting, we agreed to meet the next night. Once again, the conversation was pleasant, so pleasant that the Stallman e-book became almost a distant memory. When I got back to Oakland, I called around to various journalist friends and acquaintances.


Masters of Deception: The Gang That Ruled Cyberspace by Michelle Slatalla, Joshua Quittner

dumpster diving, East Village, Hacker Ethic, hacker house, job automation, Mitch Kapor, packet switching, Stewart Brand, Whole Earth Review

The kids at Citicorp have found an effective way to communicate their displeasure. The electronic heckling doesn't abate until the Manhattan "meeting" breaks up at about 8: 30 P. M. Eastern Standard Time. The kids wander off in little clumps, headed downtown to grab a cheap supper and to browse around in record stores. They have their monthly routine. First, they go to Around the Clock, a moody, dark East Village restaurant where rap music plays on the juke, a big color TV blares on the wall, and athletic waiters wear knit, olive-drab rave caps. The food is just this side of hippie: wholewheat pita concoctions, three kinds of organic pancakes, "healthy" chicken soup. Mark usually orders two bowls. It settles his stomach. After eating, the boys wander across Third Avenue to Tower Books, where they flip through the endless shelves of hardcovers.


Lonely Planet London by Lonely Planet

Boris Johnson, British Empire, car-free, carbon footprint, centre right, congestion charging, discovery of the americas, East Village, Etonian, financial independence, haute couture, haute cuisine, Isaac Newton, John Snow's cholera map, low cost airline, Mahatma Gandhi, market design, place-making, post-work, Skype, trade route, transatlantic slave trade, urban renewal, Winter of Discontent

F4 22 Leila's ShopG4 23 Les Trois Garçons H5 24 Look Mum No Hands D5 25 Luxe H6 Medcalf (see 28) 26 Modern Pantry B5 27 Morito A4 28 Moro A4 29 Nude Espresso H6 30 Poppies H6 31 Princess of Shoreditch F4 Rosa's (see 30) 32 Sông Quê G2 33 ST ALi C5 34 St John C6 35 St John Bread & Wine H6 36 Viet Grill G3 37 Whitecross St Market D5 Drinking & Nightlife 333 (see 60) 38 93 Feet East H5 39 Aquarium F4 40 Bar Kick G4 41 Book ClubF4 42 Bridge G3 43 Café Kick A4 44 Callooh Callay G4 45 Cargo G4 46 Catch G3 47 Dreambags- jaguarshoesG3 48 East Village F4 49 FabricC6 50 Filthy MacNasty's A3 51 Fox & Anchor C6 52 George & DragonG4 53 Golden Heart H6 54 Happiness Forgets F3 55 Horse & Groom G5 56Jerusalem TavernB5 57 Loungelover H4 58 Macbeth G3 59 Mason & Taylor H4 60 Mother Bar G4 61 Nightjar E4 62 Old Blue Last G4 63 Plastic People F4 64 Prufrock A6 65 Queen of Hoxton F5 66 Red Lion G3 67 Ten Bells H6 68 Three Kings B5 69 Vibe Bar H5 70 Vinoteca C6 71 Worship St Whistling Shop F5 72 XOYO F4 73 Ye Olde Mitre B6 Zetter Townhouse (see 99) Entertainment 74 Comedy Café G4 75 Sadler's Wells B3 Shopping 76 123 Bethnal Green RoadH4 77 Absolute Vintage H6 78 Backyard Market H5 79 Brick Lane Market H5 econe (see 43) 80 Labour & Wait H4 81 Laden Showroom H5 82 Lesley Craze GalleryB5 83 Magma A5 84 Mr Start F4 85 No-one G3 86 Present G4 87 Rough Trade East H5 88 Spitalfields MarketH6 89 Start F4 Start Menswear (see 84) 90 Sunday UpMarket H6 91 Tatty Devine H4 Sleeping 9213 Princelet StH6 93Express by Holiday InnF4 Fox & Anchor (see 51) 94Hoxton HotelF4 95MalmaisonC6 96RookeryC6 97Rosebery HallB4 98Shoreditch RoomsG5 99 Zetter HotelB5 Clerkenwell, Shoreditch & Spitalfields Eating | Drinking & Nightlife | Entertainment | Shopping Sights Clerkenwell Charterhouse Historic Building Offline map Google map (www.thecharterhouse.org; Charterhouse Sq EC1; admission £10; guided tours 2.15pm Wed Apr-Aug; Barbican or Farringdon) You need to book six months in advance to see inside this former Carthusian monastery, where the centrepiece is a Tudor hall with a restored hammerbeam roof.

Old Blue Last Pub Offline map Google map (www.theoldbluelast.com; 38 Great Eastern St EC2; to midnight Mon-Wed, to 12.30am Thu & Sun, to 1.30am Fri & Sat; ; Old St or Shoreditch High St) Frequently crammed with a hip teenage-and-up crowd of Hoxtonites, this beautiful old corner pub’s trendy credentials are courtesy of Vice magazine, the bad-boy rag that owns the place. It hosts some of the best Shoreditch parties and has a rocking jukebox. East Village Club Offline map Google map (www.eastvillageclub.co.uk; 89 Great Eastern St EC2; Old St) Basement club that sees house lovers flocking from all over London, especially for one-off nights featuring some of New York’s finest. Other events range from disco to dancehall and dubstep to drum and bass. Aquarium Club Offline map Google map (www.clubaquarium.co.uk; 256-264 Old St EC1; Old St) The real attraction at this big and brash club is the swimming pool and Jacuzzi (towels provided) and the often very-late opening hours (selected nights until 9am).


pages: 693 words: 204,042

New York 2140 by Kim Stanley Robinson

availability heuristic, back-to-the-land, Black-Scholes formula, Burning Man, central bank independence, creative destruction, credit crunch, crowdsourcing, decarbonisation, East Village, full employment, happiness index / gross national happiness, hive mind, income inequality, invisible hand, Jane Jacobs, liquidity trap, Mason jar, mass immigration, megastructure, microbiome, music of the spheres, New Urbanism, offshore financial centre, plutocrats, Plutocrats, Ponzi scheme, precariat, quantitative easing, rent-seeking, the built environment, too big to fail

Midharbor was a clutter of ice plates headed down to the jam at the Narrows, where they were grinding their way out on the ebb tides, then floating back in on the flood tides, and freezing from time to time in whatever configuration they happened to be in. This had gone on throughout the short days of beastly February, but now March was lambing in. On the appointed day, Charlotte got in one of the cable cars running up thick steel lines from the East Village to the Brooklyn Bridge’s western tower. When that rising car had carried her over the water to the tower, she got out and walked across the old bridge with the rest of the well-bundled New Yorkers crossing the river. The river ice just below them was patterned like a jigsaw puzzle, and only broke open to black water past Governors Island. The wind whistled in the cat’s cradle of wires overhead in its aleatoric aeolia, surely the greatest music ever heard—if not the music of the spheres, then surely by definition the music of the cylinders.

He couldn’t hear himself think; finally that old saying was really true. So he stopped trying to think, but before he gave up, he stepped into a harness Idelba passed out to him, and buckled it tight around his waist. The harness was carabinered and knotted to a rope that was tied to an eye at the front of the wheelhouse, so he was now attached to the tug like a climber to a belay, or a steeplejack to a tower. As they came into the East Village, they saw as they had not before that the storm was simply devastating the city. The Wall Street skyscrapers looked okay, and perhaps they even provided some windbreak to the lower neighborhoods immediately north of them, but between the veering winds and the storm surge, the smaller and older buildings north and east of downtown were being overwhelmed. It was as they had heard over the radio, and seen when the cloud was up: buildings were falling down.


pages: 281 words: 83,505

Palaces for the People: How Social Infrastructure Can Help Fight Inequality, Polarization, and the Decline of Civic Life by Eric Klinenberg

2013 Report for America's Infrastructure - American Society of Civil Engineers - 19 March 2013, American Society of Civil Engineers: Report Card, assortative mating, basic income, big-box store, Broken windows theory, carbon footprint, Cass Sunstein, clean water, deindustrialization, desegregation, Donald Trump, East Village, Filter Bubble, ghettoisation, helicopter parent, income inequality, informal economy, invisible hand, Jane Jacobs, John Snow's cholera map, late fees, Mark Zuckerberg, mass incarceration, Menlo Park, New Urbanism, Peter Thiel, Ray Oldenburg, Richard Florida, Ronald Reagan, Rosa Parks, shareholder value, Silicon Valley, smart grid, the built environment, The Death and Life of Great American Cities, The Great Good Place, the High Line, universal basic income, urban planning, young professional

The compact but crowded area below Forty-Second Street includes some of New York City’s most impoverished and most affluent neighborhoods, headquarters for several of the world’s largest corporations, thousands of public housing units, and scores of community organizations that serve those in need. It hosts global financial institutions near the Battery, large hospitals near the East River, prestigious art galleries in Chelsea and the West Village, and thousands of small businesses throughout. It also has dozens of subway stops and an electrical substation in the East Village that supplies power to most of downtown. All of this flooded during Sandy, when fourteen-foot storm surges topped the river’s edges in southern Manhattan, inundating the Lower East and Lower West Sides. There was damage everywhere, but the East Side, where there are thick concentrations of poor people in aging public housing projects, and a cluster of large medical institutions, proved especially vulnerable.


pages: 239 words: 84,235

A Long Way Gone: Memoirs of a Boy Soldier by Ishmael Beah

East Village

Bah was dancing with another group of boys. Dr. Tamba sat in the audience smiling for the first time since we had arrived in New York City. After the dance, Laura pulled me aside and told me that she was moved by what I had said. That night we went out to an Indian restaurant, and I was happy that someone in this part of the world serves rice. We ate a lot, chatted, exchanged addresses, and then went to Laura’s house in the East Village. I couldn’t understand why she called the area a village, because it didn’t look like any village I knew. Our chaperons didn’t come with us; they went back to the hotel. I didn’t know that Laura’s house was going to be my future home. There were traditionally woven cloths from all over the world hanging on the walls; statues of animals sat on large bookshelves that contained storybooks; clay vases with beautiful and exotic birds on them stood on tables; and there were bamboo instruments and other strange ones.


Paper Knowledge: Toward a Media History of Documents by Lisa Gitelman

Andrew Keen, computer age, corporate governance, deskilling, Douglas Engelbart, Douglas Engelbart, East Village, en.wikipedia.org, information retrieval, Internet Archive, invention of movable type, Jaron Lanier, knowledge economy, Marshall McLuhan, Mikhail Gorbachev, national security letter, On the Economy of Machinery and Manufactures, optical character recognition, profit motive, QR code, RAND corporation, RFC: Request For Comment, Shoshana Zuboff, Silicon Valley, Steve Jobs, The Structural Transformation of the Public Sphere, Turing test, WikiLeaks, Works Progress Administration

Rather than consider documents in a single social subsystem (loosely called “scholarly communication,” and its institutions that are discussed in chapter 2), chapter 3 considers documents that transgress the borders between different systems, documents that leak beyond the structures of the scriptural economy designed to maintain secrecy, for instance, or to protect intellectual property at the expense of the public domain. In the place of mimeographed or microfilmed documents, chapter 3 considers the photocopy. It begins by dragging photocopies back into the past. Henry Jenkins and others have celebrated self-­published fanzines as an early gesture toward today’s online sociability. Like so much Web content, tattered old zines—whether by science fiction fans, East Village poets, or coffeehouse radicals and riot grrls—are evidence of the power and persistence of “grassroots creativity.”57 Yet there is a lot still to learn about the ways that old textual duplication technology stands as an antecedent of today’s new participatory media. Chapter 3 seeks to fill in some of the missing details by offering an account not of fans or zines but rather of the xerographic medium so many of them have deployed since the 1960s.


pages: 287 words: 82,576

The Complacent Class: The Self-Defeating Quest for the American Dream by Tyler Cowen

affirmative action, Affordable Care Act / Obamacare, Airbnb, Alvin Roth, assortative mating, Bernie Sanders, Black Swan, business climate, business cycle, circulation of elites, clean water, David Graeber, declining real wages, deindustrialization, desegregation, Donald Trump, drone strike, East Village, Elon Musk, Ferguson, Missouri, Francis Fukuyama: the end of history, gig economy, Google Glasses, Hyman Minsky, Hyperloop, income inequality, intangible asset, Internet of things, inventory management, knowledge worker, labor-force participation, low skilled workers, Marc Andreessen, Mark Zuckerberg, medical residency, meta analysis, meta-analysis, obamacare, offshore financial centre, Paul Samuelson, Peter Thiel, purchasing power parity, Richard Florida, security theater, sharing economy, Silicon Valley, Silicon Valley ideology, Skype, South China Sea, Steven Pinker, Stuxnet, The Great Moderation, The Rise and Fall of American Growth, total factor productivity, Tyler Cowen: Great Stagnation, upwardly mobile, Vilfredo Pareto, working-age population, World Values Survey

For a low-skilled worker, the higher wages in those cities do not always make up for the much higher rental costs. And the reason is that those cities are so, so expensive, at least in the parts where most productive workers are willing to live.32 Compare today to the 1950s. At that time, a typical apartment in New York City rented for about $60 a month, or, adjusting for inflation, about $530 a month. Today you can’t find a broom closet in the East Village for that amount. Even in the South Bronx there is gentrification, and some new apartments are going up for a projected $3,750 a month for a small-one bedroom abode. Many parking spaces in fact cost more than the going rate for a 1950s NYC apartment.33 Or to put that 1950s rent in perspective, the U.S. median wage at that time was about $5,000 a year, so a typical New Yorker spent as little as 10 percent of salary on rent, or perhaps even less to the extent that New Yorkers were earning more than other typical Americans.


pages: 269 words: 83,307

Young Money: Inside the Hidden World of Wall Street's Post-Crash Recruits by Kevin Roose

activist fund / activist shareholder / activist investor, Basel III, cognitive dissonance, collateralized debt obligation, Credit Default Swap, credit default swaps / collateralized debt obligations, discounted cash flows, Donald Trump, East Village, eurozone crisis, fixed income, forward guidance, glass ceiling, Goldman Sachs: Vampire Squid, hedonic treadmill, jitney, knowledge worker, new economy, Occupy movement, plutocrats, Plutocrats, Robert Shiller, Robert Shiller, selection bias, shareholder value, side project, Silicon Valley, Skype, Steve Jobs, The Predators' Ball, too big to fail, urban planning, We are the 99%, young professional

Wall Street also imbues its new analysts with a sense of where they are supposed to live, eat, and spend time outside of work. These rules are less hard and fast, but generally, neighborhoods like Murray Hill and Hell’s Kitchen are considered the terrain of the first-year analyst, and bars like Joshua Tree (nicknamed “J-Tree” by a generation’s worth of analysts) and the Patriot Saloon are considered first-year watering holes. A second-year analyst might live in the East Village or Chelsea, and hang out at slightly better bars like Brass Monkey and Penny Farthing. Not until he or she reached the associate level, and began making $200,000 or more a year, was a Wall Street worker expected to shack up in a chic neighborhood like the West Village or SoHo, and age out of dive bars altogether in favor of finer establishments. At the same time the analyst is being educated in the ways of Wall Street, he or she is also being slowly separated from the outside world.


pages: 324 words: 80,217

The Decadent Society: How We Became the Victims of Our Own Success by Ross Douthat

Affordable Care Act / Obamacare, AI winter, Bernie Sanders, bitcoin, Burning Man, Capital in the Twenty-First Century by Thomas Piketty, centre right, charter city, crack epidemic, crowdsourcing, David Graeber, Deng Xiaoping, Donald Trump, East Village, Elon Musk, Flynn Effect, Francis Fukuyama: the end of history, Francisco Pizarro, ghettoisation, gig economy, Haight Ashbury, helicopter parent, hive mind, Hyperloop, immigration reform, informal economy, Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), Islamic Golden Age, Jeff Bezos, Joan Didion, Kevin Kelly, Kickstarter, knowledge worker, life extension, mass immigration, mass incarceration, means of production, megacity, move fast and break things, move fast and break things, multiplanetary species, New Journalism, Nicholas Carr, Norman Mailer, obamacare, Oculus Rift, open borders, out of africa, Panopticon Jeremy Bentham, Peter Thiel, plutocrats, Plutocrats, pre–internet, QAnon, quantitative easing, rent-seeking, Robert Bork, Robert Gordon, Ronald Reagan, secular stagnation, self-driving car, Silicon Valley, Silicon Valley ideology, Snapchat, social web, Steve Jobs, Steven Pinker, technoutopianism, the built environment, The Rise and Fall of American Growth, Tyler Cowen: Great Stagnation, wage slave, women in the workforce, Y2K

But in the real world, it’s possible that Western society is really leaning back in an easy chair, hooked up to a drip of something soothing, playing and replaying an ideological greatest-hits tape from its wild and crazy youth, all riled up in its own imagination and yet, in reality, comfortably numb. 6 A Kindly Despotism In the summer of 2018, a body was discovered in a car parked in the East Village in New York. The dead man, identified as Geoffrey Corbis, had been inside the automobile for a week before anybody noticed. After some investigation, it turned out that his real name was Geoffrey Weglarz and that his life story traced a particularly depressing variation on the larger baby boomer arc. Born one of seven children in Florida in the 1950s, he was a space-age obsessive as a kid—he and a childhood pal “would spend hours rehashing the details of each expedition,” the New York Times reported in an obituary-cum-analysis of his death.


pages: 316 words: 91,969

Gray Lady Down: What the Decline and Fall of the New York Times Means for America by William McGowan

affirmative action, Affordable Care Act / Obamacare, corporate governance, David Brooks, different worldview, East Village, friendly fire, haute couture, illegal immigration, immigration reform, liberation theology, medical residency, New Journalism, obamacare, payday loans, postnationalism / post nation state, pre–internet, uranium enrichment, yellow journalism, young professional

Malkin quoted one Wichita resident in a letter to the local paper: “If this had been two white males accused of killing four black individuals, the media would be on a feeding frenzy and every satellite news organization would be in Wichita doing live reports.” Malkin concluded: “If you read The New York Times or The Washington Post or watched the evening news this week, the Wichita Massacre never happened.” In October 2004, in New York’s East Village, a black man from Brooklyn shot three people and terrorized patrons in a bar, threatening to burn the place with kerosene and a lighter. At one point he held fifteen people hostage. At trial, prosecutors charged that the man was “on a mission of hate” to kill white people, and explained that the police had found tapes of anti-white rap music interspersed with the man’s own anti-white rants. “Get ready to pull your guns out on these crackers, son.


pages: 313 words: 92,907

Green Metropolis: Why Living Smaller, Living Closer, and Driving Less Are Thekeys to Sustainability by David Owen

A Pattern Language, active transport: walking or cycling, big-box store, Buckminster Fuller, car-free, carbon footprint, clean water, congestion charging, delayed gratification, distributed generation, drive until you qualify, East Village, food miles, garden city movement, hydrogen economy, invisible hand, Jane Jacobs, linear programming, McMansion, Murano, Venice glass, Negawatt, New Urbanism, off grid, oil shale / tar sands, peak oil, placebo effect, Stewart Brand, The Death and Life of Great American Cities, Thomas L Friedman, unemployed young men, urban planning, urban sprawl, walkable city, zero-sum game

New York is one of the most thoroughly altered landscapes imaginable, an almost wholly artificial environment, in which the terrain’s primeval contours have long since been obliterated and most of the parts that resemble nature (the trees on side streets, the rocks in Central Park) are essentially decorations. Quite obviously, this wasn’t always the case. When Europeans first began to settle Manhattan, in the early seventeenth century, a broad salt marsh lay where the East Village does today, the area now occupied by Harlem was flanked by sylvan bluffs, and Murray Hill and Lenox Hill were hills. Streams ran everywhere, and beavers built dams near what is now Times Square. One early European visitor described Manhattan as “a land excellent and agreeable, full of noble forest trees and grape vines,” and another called it a “terrestrial Canaan, where the Land floweth with milk and honey.”9 But then, across a relatively brief span of decades, Manhattan’s European occupiers leveled the forests, flattened the hills, filled the valleys, buried the streams, and superimposed an unyielding, two-dimensional grid of avenues and streets, leaving virtually no hint of what had been before.


pages: 304 words: 87,702

The 100 Best Vacations to Enrich Your Life by Pam Grout

Albert Einstein, Buckminster Fuller, clean water, complexity theory, David Brooks, East Village, Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test, global village, Golden Gate Park, if you build it, they will come, Maui Hawaii, Mikhail Gorbachev, Nelson Mandela, Ralph Nader, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Ronald Reagan, supervolcano, transcontinental railway, urban sprawl, Yogi Berra

“You stay in one place, pretend you live there, and do the things the locals do,” Kenny says. “It deepens the whole experience. The idea is to do things as well as possible, not as fast as possible.” Among the many possibilities in the United States, you can stay in a house on Lake Ruben, Georgia, or at a ski lodge in the Colorado Rockies. In Mexico, spend a week in an apartment in Mexico City’s La Condesa, an area described by the New York Times as much like the East Village. On a recent trip to England, Kenny and Cohen rented a cottage in Wiltshire. Wherever you go, you can stay true to the slow travel credo by staying within 30 minutes of home, get to know the locals at nearby bars, restaurants, and cafés, and walk to interesting sights, perhaps a local garden, museum, or market. Sure, you’ll see only one small corner of the world, but you’ll see it in depth—as visiting residents rather than fly-by-night tourists


pages: 309 words: 96,434

Ground Control: Fear and Happiness in the Twenty First Century City by Anna Minton

Albert Einstein, Berlin Wall, Big bang: deregulation of the City of London, Boris Johnson, Broken windows theory, call centre, crack epidemic, credit crunch, deindustrialization, East Village, energy security, Francis Fukuyama: the end of history, ghettoisation, hiring and firing, housing crisis, illegal immigration, invisible hand, Jane Jacobs, Jaron Lanier, Kickstarter, moral panic, new economy, New Urbanism, race to the bottom, rent control, Richard Florida, Right to Buy, Silicon Valley, Steven Pinker, the built environment, The Death and Life of Great American Cities, The Spirit Level, trickle-down economics, University of East Anglia, urban decay, urban renewal, white flight, white picket fence, World Values Survey, young professional

What has happened under New Labour is that, to find a way around planning restrictions, shopping centres have moved wholesale into the centre of cities. Westfield London is one example, but what is increasingly common is the creation of open-air property complexes which also own and control the streets, squares and open spaces of the city. Like Docklands, which was able to assemble a huge area of land because of the powers of the UDCs, these new places are able to take over large parts of our cities using similar powers. East Village, Madison Square, Liverpool Liverpool One, the huge new private shopping complex in the centre of Liverpool which covers thirty-four streets in the heart of the city, is the biggest so far. Today, every town and city is home to these new places, large and small, built on brownfield sites and owned and run by property companies. A brownfield site is the technical term for land, normally in cities, which has previously been used by industry, unlike the virgin land of a ‘greenfield’ site.


The Making of a World City: London 1991 to 2021 by Greg Clark

Basel III, Berlin Wall, Big bang: deregulation of the City of London, Boris Johnson, British Empire, business climate, business cycle, capital controls, carbon footprint, congestion charging, corporate governance, cross-subsidies, deindustrialization, Dissolution of the Soviet Union, East Village, Fall of the Berlin Wall, financial innovation, financial intermediation, global value chain, haute cuisine, housing crisis, industrial cluster, intangible asset, Kickstarter, knowledge economy, knowledge worker, labour market flexibility, low skilled workers, manufacturing employment, Masdar, mass immigration, megacity, New Urbanism, offshore financial centre, Pearl River Delta, place-making, rent control, Robert Gordon, Silicon Valley, smart cities, sovereign wealth fund, trickle-down economics, urban planning, urban renewal, working poor

Today, what were once pioneering developments on the fringes of Zone 1 are almost the norm, with King’s Cross, Paddington, and Earl’s Court now very viable propositions 94 The evolution of London, 1991 to 2015 Table 7.2: Prominent foreign investors in London’s commercial real estate market since the global financial crisis Sovereign Wealth Funds State Oil Fund (Sofaz) China Investment Corporation State Administration of Foreign Exchange Korea Investment Corporation Kuwait Investment Authority Azerbaijan China China 78 St James’s Street Canary Wharf, Winchester House Drapers Gardens, 12 Throgmarton Avenue Korea Kuwait 1 Bartholomew Square Willis Building, 5 Canada Square, 60 Threadneedle Street, 1 Bunhill Row Regent Street portfolio Norges Bank Investment Management Qatari Investment Authority (Qatari Diar, Qatar Holdings) Norway Government of Singapore Investment Corporation Singapore Pension Funds Canada Pension Plan Investment Board National Pension Service Employees Provident Fund (EPF) Swedish Cityhold (First and Second National Pension Funds) Qatar Canada Korea Malaysia Sweden Other Funds/Firms Brookfield Properties Oxford Properties Europe Gingko Tree Deka Samsung Asset Management Mitsubishi Estates Permodalan Nasional Berhad SEB Asset Management Olayan Group Blackstone Real Estate Canada Canada China Germany Japan Japan Malaysia Norway Saudi Arabia USA Carlyle EREP Hines JP Morgan Asset Management USA USA USA Wealthy Individuals (and their syndicates) Moise Yacoub Safra Brazil Undisclosed Russia Nathan Kirsh South Africa The Shard, Harrods, Canary Wharf, One Hyde Park, Grosvenor Square, East Village (Olympic Park), Shell Centre, Chelsea Barracks, One Cabot Square, Park House Bluewater Victoria Circle, 55 Bishopsgate, Westfield Stratford City 88 Wood Street, 40 Grosvenor Place Battersea Power Station, Whitefriars, One Sheldon Square, 40 Portman Square The Peak (5 Wilton Road), 1 Kingdom Street, 40 Holborn Viaduct 99 Bishopsgate, 125 Old Broad St. 71 High Holborn, 122 Leadenhall Street Ropemaker Place Palestra (SE1), 90 York Way 10 Gresham Street 1 Victoria Street, 6–8 Bishopsgate 1 Exchange Square, 90 High Holborn 1 Threadneedle Street Brompton Road estate Devonshire Square, Chiswick Park, Broadgate, 1–11 John Adam Street 60 Victoria Embankment, Sampson House Broadgate West Bishops Square Plantation Place Grand Buildings (1 Trafalgar Square) Tower 42 Source: Jones Lang LaSalle (2012); GVA (2012).


pages: 320 words: 90,526

Squeezed: Why Our Families Can't Afford America by Alissa Quart

Affordable Care Act / Obamacare, Airbnb, Automated Insights, autonomous vehicles, barriers to entry, basic income, Bernie Sanders, business intelligence, Donald Trump, Downton Abbey, East Village, Elon Musk, full employment, future of work, gig economy, glass ceiling, haute couture, income inequality, Jaron Lanier, job automation, late capitalism, Lyft, minimum wage unemployment, moral panic, new economy, nuclear winter, obamacare, Ponzi scheme, post-work, precariat, price mechanism, rent control, ride hailing / ride sharing, school choice, sharing economy, Silicon Valley, Skype, Snapchat, surplus humans, TaskRabbit, Travis Kalanick, Uber and Lyft, Uber for X, uber lyft, union organizing, universal basic income, upwardly mobile, wages for housework, women in the workforce, working poor

But today the people most likely to help working-class immigrants like Blanca who aspire to the middle class are less likely to be able to get into the United States and, if they do, more likely to be unable to stay. Being an immigrant hasn’t always kept newcomer parents in America down or stalled. My immigrant grandparents had a small shoe store in the Bronx, and as a child, I played on the floor of the store with polish, a shoehorn, and a footwear stretcher. As a teenager, my paternal grandmother worked on New York City’s Lower East Side putting feathers on hats. In the early 2000s in the East Village, the primary music was a steady buzz of receipts being printed out in thousands of franchises and boutiques. But in my mind, figures of those early-twentieth-century workrooms hung around the neighborhood like ghosts. I thought of how my mother got through college by working at a department store, and then how I got to be a special flower in progressive school thanks to her determination that my life would be full of poetry recitals and those colorful math counting blocks they called Cuisenaire rods.


pages: 357 words: 88,412

Hijacking the Runway: How Celebrities Are Stealing the Spotlight From Fashion Designers by Teri Agins

Donald Trump, East Village, haute couture, new economy, Saturday Night Live, Silicon Valley, Skype, Steve Jobs, women in the workforce

Mizrahi waxed on about how his collections were full of “fabulous clothes, the only kind that will sell,” but in truth his clothes weren’t selling at all—a business that at its peak was estimated never to be more than $10 million a year. Ultimately, he was like the pop singer whose fans didn’t buy his music. But Mizrahi’s going-out-of-business drama turned out to be only a hiatus of sorts. Fashion designers are famous for second and third reincarnations, and Mizrahi would have his too. But first, he was on to his next curtain call. I caught him at a gig in the East Village at Joe’s Pub when he was playing the piano, swaying while he crooned the Fred Astaire vintage number “I Left My Hat in Haiti.” By 2000, he was appearing off-Broadway, starring in his one-man confessional, Les Mizrahi, a charming performance where he sketched on a big easel—and constructed a dress in muslin onstage, while prattling wistfully about his fashion career. His Hollywood the-show-must-go-on attitude was nothing but savvy.


pages: 287 words: 86,870

The Glass Hotel by Emily St. John Mandel

Bernie Madoff, big-box store, discrete time, East Village, high net worth, McMansion, Panamax, Pepto Bismol, Ponzi scheme, sovereign wealth fund, white picket fence, Y2K

Simone had been in New York City for six months by now, and she thought that she was starting to understand how a person could become very tired here. She’d seen them on the subway, the tired people, the people who’d worked too long and too hard, caught up in the machine, eyes closed on the evening trains. Simone had always thought of them as citizens of a separate city, but the gap between their city and hers was beginning to close. “How many people knew about it?” Simone asked eventually. They were passing through the East Village. “I assume everyone in the asset management unit. Everyone who worked on the seventeenth floor.” Claire didn’t open her eyes. Simone was beginning to wonder if Claire was sedated. “All of them? Oskar, Enrico, Harvey…?” “It turns out that’s literally all they were doing on that floor, running a fraudulent scheme.” “Did anyone else know? Up on Eighteen?” “I don’t know.


pages: 340 words: 91,745

Duped: Double Lives, False Identities, and the Con Man I Almost Married by Abby Ellin

Bernie Madoff, bitcoin, Burning Man, business intelligence, Charles Lindbergh, cognitive dissonance, Donald Trump, double helix, dumpster diving, East Village, feminist movement, forensic accounting, fudge factor, hiring and firing, Internet Archive, longitudinal study, Lyft, mandatory minimum, meta analysis, meta-analysis, pink-collar, Ponzi scheme, Robert Hanssen: Double agent, Ronald Reagan, Silicon Valley, Skype, Snapchat, telemarketer, theory of mind, Thomas Kuhn: the structure of scientific revolutions

—and sold them for drug money, which was also where the Con Ed cash had gone. He was not from Scotland but Vermont. He knew no one at MTV, which explains why I never got a call back on the résumé I sent over. The accent was a hoax. James was mortified. As the youngest of five kids, he always despaired of being the only person in a room who didn’t have the same information as everyone else. He spent the next few months scouring East Village record shops and trying to buy back our lost music. He also tracked down Ewan, who was living on the streets. James barked at me whenever I brought up Ewan’s name. “Can’t you just drop it?” he’d say. “I feel like a total asshole.” “But you didn’t know! He lied to you!” “I don’t care.” We never discussed it again. Twenty years later, it’s still too upsetting. IT’S EASY TO understand why the duped don’t like to talk about their experiences.


pages: 364 words: 102,528

An Economist Gets Lunch: New Rules for Everyday Foodies by Tyler Cowen

agricultural Revolution, big-box store, business climate, carbon footprint, cognitive bias, creative destruction, cross-subsidies, East Village, en.wikipedia.org, food miles, guest worker program, haute cuisine, illegal immigration, informal economy, iterative process, mass immigration, oil shale / tar sands, out of africa, pattern recognition, Peter Singer: altruism, price discrimination, refrigerator car, The Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith, Tyler Cowen: Great Stagnation, Upton Sinclair, winner-take-all economy, women in the workforce

Most of the important new, cheap ethnic restaurants serving everything from Colombian food to classic Italian are burgeoning in Queens, Brooklyn, and the Bronx. Chinatown in Flushing, Queens, is deliciously hectic. It is also possible to find good, cheap ethnic food on the far West Side of midtown Manhattan; this remains an underpriced location, as are the deeper and more distant parts of the East Village. It is difficult to find such food in the major, midtown parts of Park Avenue and overall, in New York City, the expensive areas are encroaching on the quirky. The collapse of the real estate bubble slowed down this trend but did not halt it. Manhattan avenues tend to be higher-rent than locations on the streets. Given the long, thin shape of the island, the north-south avenues carry more vehicular and foot traffic.


pages: 550 words: 89,316

The Sum of Small Things: A Theory of the Aspirational Class by Elizabeth Currid-Halkett

assortative mating, back-to-the-land, barriers to entry, Bernie Sanders, BRICs, Capital in the Twenty-First Century by Thomas Piketty, clean water, cognitive dissonance, David Brooks, deindustrialization, Deng Xiaoping, discrete time, disruptive innovation, Downton Abbey, East Village, Edward Glaeser, en.wikipedia.org, Etonian, Geoffrey West, Santa Fe Institute, income inequality, iterative process, knowledge economy, longitudinal study, Mason jar, means of production, NetJets, new economy, New Urbanism, plutocrats, Plutocrats, post scarcity, post-industrial society, profit maximization, Richard Florida, selection bias, Silicon Valley, The Design of Experiments, the High Line, The inhabitant of London could order by telephone, sipping his morning tea in bed, the various products of the whole earth, the market place, Thorstein Veblen, Tony Hsieh, Tyler Cowen: Great Stagnation, upwardly mobile, Veblen good, women in the workforce

BBC News. Retrieved from http://www.bbc.com/news/business-22956470. Zukin, S. (1989). Loft living: Culture and capital in urban change (2nd ed.). New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers University Press. ———. (1993). Landscapes of power: From Detroit to Disney World. Berkeley: University of California Press. Zukin, S., & Kosta, E. (2004). Bourdieu off-Broadway: Managing distinction on a shopping block in the East Village. City & Community 3(2): 101–114. doi:10.1111/j.1535-6841.2004.00071.x. Zukin, S., & Maguire, J. S. (2004). Consumers and consumption. Annual Review of Sociology 30(1): 173–197. doi:10.1146/annurev.soc.30.012703.110553. INTERVIEWS CONDUCTED Eugene Ahn, Forage Restaurant, September 16, 2013 Kate Berridge, author, February 26, 2014 Elizabeth Bowen, Altadena Farmers Market, October 15, 2013 Kevin Carney, Mohawk Botique, September 16, 2013 Nancy Chin, professor, Department of Public Health and Sciences, University of Rochester Medical Center, May 29, 2014 Paula Daniels, Los Angeles Food Policy Council, February 24, 2016 Juan Gerscovich, Industry of All Nations, October 9, 2013 Andrew Wallace Hadrill, professor of Roman Studies, University of Cambridge, March 17, 2014 Corky Harvey, The Pump Station, November 30, 2012 Marian MacDorman, senior statistician, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; editor-in-chief, Birth: Issues in Perinatal Care, May 28, 2014 Laura and Jason O’Dell, Bucks and Does, October 23, 2013 Geoff Watts, Intelligentsia, October 30, 2013 Essie Weingarten, founder, Essie Cosmetics Ltd, December 1, 2012 Jen Williams and Derec Williams, founders, Pop Physique, July 9, 2015 Mark Zambito, Intelligentsia, October 2, 2013 INDEX Note: Page numbers followed by “f” or “t” indicate figures or tables, respectively.


Fresh Off the Boat by Eddie Huang

affirmative action, back-to-the-land, Columbine, cuban missile crisis, East Village, Howard Zinn, Lao Tzu, rent control, Telecommunications Act of 1996, walkable city

It’s just not so fun when your teeth are rotting and your breath is stanking ’cause you fell asleep eating a pound of gummies watching Martin Yan’s China. Martin Yan’s China is the best way to brush up on your Chingrish. Phrases like, “This is the fashion” or “Rook how beaurifo my kung pao panda rook on dees rotus reef” are great for get togethers during the moon festival! Anyway, reader questions … “Where is the restaurant going to be?” Either NYC or Boston. Looking in both places right now, specifically East Village south of 13th, north of Houston, in NYC, and Brighton/Brookline in Boston. “Is this a Chinese restaurant?” Well, I am a Chinaman, there will be a few Chinaman items, but no, it is not a “Chinese restaurant.” But like they say, “You can take a Chinaman out the paddies, but he will still put MSG in all your food.” I didn’t know where the blog or the restaurant was headed, but I was having fun and honestly that’s all that mattered.


pages: 299 words: 97,378

Home Sweet Anywhere: How We Sold Our House, Created a New Life, and Saw the World by Lynne Martin

connected car, Downton Abbey, East Village, haute cuisine, McMansion, pink-collar, Skype

Every morning, we indulged in subtle jockeying about who would be first in. The last one out would dance with the squeegee. Soon we were strolling up the tree-lined street toward the Blue Mosque. Small shops opened in the bright morning light, scarf-covered mothers herded their children to school, and outdoor cafés filled with Turkish men drinking tea, smoking, and chatting. The low brick buildings reminded us of the East Village in New York, but with a colorful twist. Jewel-toned textiles were everywhere. Rugs, coats, jackets, sunshades, and furniture were bathed in vibrant shades of red, ochre, blue, and green. We sniffed the rich aromas of coffee, baking pastry, and meats searing over charcoal. Some of the savory whiffs came from the apartments, but more from the small restaurants and cafés. Boys with brass trays full of steaming pots, richly decorated tea glasses, and plates heaped with pastries darted through the streets, delivering breakfast to the shopkeepers.


pages: 831 words: 98,409

SUPERHUBS: How the Financial Elite and Their Networks Rule Our World by Sandra Navidi

activist fund / activist shareholder / activist investor, assortative mating, bank run, barriers to entry, Bernie Sanders, Black Swan, Blythe Masters, Bretton Woods, butterfly effect, Capital in the Twenty-First Century by Thomas Piketty, Carmen Reinhart, central bank independence, cognitive bias, collapse of Lehman Brothers, collateralized debt obligation, commoditize, conceptual framework, corporate governance, Credit Default Swap, credit default swaps / collateralized debt obligations, crony capitalism, diversification, East Village, Elon Musk, eurozone crisis, family office, financial repression, Gini coefficient, glass ceiling, Goldman Sachs: Vampire Squid, Google bus, Gordon Gekko, haute cuisine, high net worth, hindsight bias, income inequality, index fund, intangible asset, Jaron Lanier, John Meriwether, Kenneth Arrow, Kenneth Rogoff, knowledge economy, London Whale, Long Term Capital Management, longitudinal study, Mark Zuckerberg, mass immigration, McMansion, mittelstand, money market fund, Myron Scholes, NetJets, Network effects, offshore financial centre, old-boy network, Parag Khanna, Paul Samuelson, peer-to-peer, performance metric, Peter Thiel, plutocrats, Plutocrats, Ponzi scheme, quantitative easing, Renaissance Technologies, rent-seeking, reserve currency, risk tolerance, Robert Gordon, Robert Shiller, Robert Shiller, rolodex, Satyajit Das, shareholder value, Silicon Valley, social intelligence, sovereign wealth fund, Stephen Hawking, Steve Jobs, The Future of Employment, The Predators' Ball, The Rise and Fall of American Growth, too big to fail, women in the workforce, young professional

We will examine how the system should be recalibrated in order to create a more inclusive society with a fairer economy that benefits all. CHAPTER 12 Super-Crash: “Executive Contagion” THE CRASH OF A TITAN: JOHN MERIWETHER Few people can take credit for generating billions of dollars in losses and single-handedly bringing01he0.inancial system to the brink of collapse. John Meriwether of Long Term Capital Management (LTCM) is one of them. At a wine tasting at Chef Daniel Boulud’s DBGB in the East Village, hosted by my friend Jim, a financier and avid wine collector, I met the now infamous Meriwether. I arrived later than most of the other guests, who had gathered in the center of the private wood-paneled room featuring an elegant table set with a myriad of different wine glasses, shiny silverware, and sharply folded napkins. In a tribute to Château Mouton Rothschild, the theme of the tasting was “Mouton Madness.”


pages: 323 words: 95,939

Present Shock: When Everything Happens Now by Douglas Rushkoff

algorithmic trading, Andrew Keen, bank run, Benoit Mandelbrot, big-box store, Black Swan, British Empire, Buckminster Fuller, business cycle, cashless society, citizen journalism, clockwork universe, cognitive dissonance, Credit Default Swap, crowdsourcing, Danny Hillis, disintermediation, Donald Trump, double helix, East Village, Elliott wave, European colonialism, Extropian, facts on the ground, Flash crash, game design, global pandemic, global supply chain, global village, Howard Rheingold, hypertext link, Inbox Zero, invention of agriculture, invention of hypertext, invisible hand, iterative process, John Nash: game theory, Kevin Kelly, laissez-faire capitalism, lateral thinking, Law of Accelerating Returns, loss aversion, mandelbrot fractal, Marshall McLuhan, Merlin Mann, Milgram experiment, mutually assured destruction, negative equity, Network effects, New Urbanism, Nicholas Carr, Norbert Wiener, Occupy movement, passive investing, pattern recognition, peak oil, price mechanism, prisoner's dilemma, Ralph Nelson Elliott, RAND corporation, Ray Kurzweil, recommendation engine, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI), Silicon Valley, Skype, social graph, South Sea Bubble, Steve Jobs, Steve Wozniak, Steven Pinker, Stewart Brand, supply-chain management, the medium is the message, The Wisdom of Crowds, theory of mind, Turing test, upwardly mobile, Whole Earth Catalog, WikiLeaks, Y2K, zero-sum game

She’s at a bar on Manhattan’s Upper East Side, but she seems oblivious to the boys and the music. Instead of engaging with those around her, she’s scrolling through text messages on her phone, from friends at other parties across town. She needs to know if the event she’s at is the event to be at, or whether something better is happening at that very moment, somewhere else. Sure enough, a blip on the tiny screen catches her interest, and in seconds her posse is in a cab headed for the East Village. She arrives at a seemingly identical party and decides it’s “the place to be,” yet instead of enjoying it, she turns her phone around, activates the camera, and proceeds to take pictures of herself and her friends for the next hour—instantly uploading them for the world to see her in the moment. He sees the signs all around him: the latest “natural” disaster on the evening news; the fluctuations in the prices at the gas pump; talk of a single world currency.


pages: 296 words: 94,948

Le Freak: An Upside Down Story of Family, Disco, and Destiny by Nile Rodgers

Bob Geldof, delayed gratification, East Village, haute couture, Live Aid, nuclear winter, Rosa Parks, Saturday Night Live, Stephen Hawking, the High Line, urban renewal

I’d been enjoying the last days of spring with a fair-weather (or weekend) hippie named April. She lived at home and we’d just met that night, Tuesday, June 2, at the hippie musical Hair. After the show we went to hang out at the Bethesda Fountain in Central Park, when two guys approached us and said they were on leave from the military. “Can you help us score some grass?” they asked. We took them to a few of our East Village haunts and partied until the wee hours. Then they invited us down to a pad in Little Italy. While there, they somehow slipped STP (a very powerful hallucinogen, called DOM nowadays) into one of my drinks. I started tripping my brains out and didn’t know why. I was quickly losing control. Given I was an old hand at tripping, I initially thought this was one of those fabled flashbacks I’d heard about.


The Pirate's Dilemma by Matt Mason

"side hustle", Albert Einstein, augmented reality, barriers to entry, citizen journalism, creative destruction, don't be evil, Donald Trump, Douglas Engelbart, East Village, Firefox, future of work, glass ceiling, global village, Hacker Ethic, haute couture, Howard Rheingold, Internet of things, invisible hand, Isaac Newton, jimmy wales, job satisfaction, John Markoff, Joseph Schumpeter, Kickstarter, Lao Tzu, Marshall McLuhan, means of production, Naomi Klein, new economy, New Urbanism, patent troll, peer-to-peer, prisoner's dilemma, RAND corporation, RFID, Richard Florida, Richard Stallman, SETI@home, Silicon Valley, South China Sea, Stephen Hawking, Steve Jobs, Steve Wozniak, Steven Levy, Stewart Brand, Tim Cook: Apple, urban sprawl, Whole Earth Catalog

By age sixteen he’d given up trying to fit in with his dysfunctional family. He ditched school and moved into his own place. He realized he needed options instead of rules, which is why two years later he packed his things and headed for New York City. He started out shining shoes, renting a place, and reveling in his newfound independence. Mancuso seemed to fit in here. He began hanging out in Tompkins Square Park in the East Village by the bandstand, where a group called the Grateful Dead were just getting started, as was a guy named Jimi Hendrix. The sixties were kicking in; everybody was dropping out. He begins experimenting with acid and soon 138 | THE PIRATE’S DILEMMA met a young Timothy Leary, the legendary high priest of psychedelia, in a macrobiotic food restaurant. “The man was one of the coolest human beings ever.


pages: 349 words: 102,827

The Infinite Machine: How an Army of Crypto-Hackers Is Building the Next Internet With Ethereum by Camila Russo

4chan, Airbnb, algorithmic trading, altcoin, always be closing, Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic, Asian financial crisis, bitcoin, blockchain, Burning Man, crowdsourcing, cryptocurrency, distributed ledger, diversification, Donald Trump, East Village, Ethereum, ethereum blockchain, Flash crash, Google Glasses, Google Hangouts, hacker house, Internet of things, Mark Zuckerberg, Maui Hawaii, mobile money, new economy, peer-to-peer, Peter Thiel, pets.com, Ponzi scheme, prediction markets, QR code, reserve currency, RFC: Request For Comment, Richard Stallman, Robert Shiller, Robert Shiller, Sand Hill Road, Satoshi Nakamoto, semantic web, sharing economy, side project, Silicon Valley, Skype, slashdot, smart contracts, South of Market, San Francisco, the payments system, too big to fail, tulip mania, Turing complete, Uber for X

The Ethereum documents and Vitalik’s blog posts said that they give no guarantees of ether’s future value but the chart they showed in the terms-and-conditions document, with a downward sloping line to represent the ether supply growth rate, surely gave prospective buyers reason to be hopeful. Bitcoin continued to trickle in, and on the seventh day of the crowdsale, Tuesday, July 29, Ken decided to make the plunge. He had moved back to New York from San Francisco just four days earlier. He and his wife were staying at the Ludlow Hotel in the East Village while the moving trucks were on their way from the West Coast with their belongings, and their children were staying at their grandparents’ in Florida to avoid the majority of the move. He was working at one of his venture fund’s investor’s offices until he got his own place. It had been a fairly typical day. He had been in meetings with investors and portfolio companies since the early morning and had come back to his borrowed desk in the evening to return calls and get to his outstanding emails.


pages: 941 words: 237,152

USA's Best Trips by Sara Benson

Albert Einstein, California gold rush, car-free, carbon footprint, desegregation, diversified portfolio, Donald Trump, Donner party, East Village, Frank Gehry, glass ceiling, Golden Gate Park, Haight Ashbury, haute couture, haute cuisine, if you build it, they will come, indoor plumbing, Kickstarter, lateral thinking, McMansion, mega-rich, New Urbanism, Ralph Waldo Emerson, rolodex, Ronald Reagan, side project, Silicon Valley, the High Line, transcontinental railway, trickle-down economics, urban renewal, urban sprawl, white flight, white picket fence, Works Progress Administration

The main byway of Nolita, leafy, residential Elizabeth St, is a polyglot of languages and cultures, and has one ancient Italian butcher shop Robert De Niro fans will recognize right away. You’ll get a taste of the diversity if you stop for lunch at Café Colonial, a French-Brazilian fusion joint with a big, tropical mural on the outside wall and the classic Parisian tin ceiling inside. Across Houston St and heading east, you are walking the border between the funky Lower East Side on your right and the iconic East Village on your left. When you come across Ave C, head north, into what used to be called Alphabet City. Comprising Aves A, B, C and D, these four streets entered pop culture lore as the backdrop to the Broadway smash, Rent, the story of young creative types struggling to make art (and the rent) in pre-gentrification New York. This was formerly a drug ghetto full of tenement squats but there are new signs of life along these prettied-up avenues, like the bluesy bar Louis 649, on the 1st floor of a restored townhouse, with hardwood floors, a resident pit bull and a louche, speakeasy feel.

When working on music at 3am, Moby often heads to the oldest part of Chinatown (Mott St, south of Canal St) and literally loses himself in his city. “Most of the city is built on a grid system, so this is one of the only places you can do that. All the signs are in Cantonese or Mandarin and the streets are narrow and winding…I’ll listen to my headphones, walk around and just get totally lost.” Unpredictability is the secret weapon of the Slipper Room, a delectably gaudy East Village cabaret. “You never know what you’re going to get there, it might be some terrible band or a bizarre, fantastic burlesque show,” says Moby, who is routinely dragged on stage to perform. “Get a couple of drinks in me and I’m shameless.” Simona Rabinovitch * * * At 96th St you can hop back on the subway and skip down to Little Korea, conveniently next to Macy’s department store, in case you had a hankering to ride its old, wooden escalators.


pages: 519 words: 104,396

Priceless: The Myth of Fair Value (And How to Take Advantage of It) by William Poundstone

availability heuristic, Cass Sunstein, collective bargaining, Daniel Kahneman / Amos Tversky, delayed gratification, Donald Trump, East Village, en.wikipedia.org, endowment effect, equal pay for equal work, experimental economics, experimental subject, feminist movement, game design, German hyperinflation, Henri Poincaré, high net worth, index card, invisible hand, John von Neumann, Kenneth Arrow, laissez-faire capitalism, Landlord’s Game, loss aversion, market bubble, mental accounting, meta analysis, meta-analysis, Nash equilibrium, new economy, Paul Samuelson, payday loans, Philip Mirowski, Potemkin village, price anchoring, price discrimination, psychological pricing, Ralph Waldo Emerson, RAND corporation, random walk, RFID, Richard Thaler, risk tolerance, Robert Shiller, Robert Shiller, rolodex, social intelligence, starchitect, Steve Jobs, The Chicago School, The Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith, ultimatum game, working poor

The word “behavioral” emphasizes that this is an empirical science, studying how flesh-and-blood people act rather than prescribing how they ought to act. Behavioral decision theory is still a small field, much like an extended family. In interviewing some of its most distinguished figures, my talk of “Professor Kahneman” instantly branded me an outsider. To everyone in the field, it’s “Danny” and “Amos,” and this is no false familiarity. Almost everyone knew them. Seated, with his feet up, in the study of his East Village penthouse, “Danny” was almost apologetic when I mentioned his United Nations experiment, part of the body of work that merited his Nobel Prize. “At the time,” he said, “it was not considered a big sin.” The “sin” was using deception in a psychological experiment, something now frowned upon. He and Tversky used one piece of aparatus, a carnival-style wheel of fortune marked with numbers up to 100.


pages: 452 words: 110,488

The Cheating Culture: Why More Americans Are Doing Wrong to Get Ahead by David Callahan

1960s counterculture, affirmative action, business cycle, corporate governance, corporate raider, creative destruction, David Brooks, deindustrialization, East Village, fixed income, forensic accounting, full employment, game design, greed is good, high batting average, housing crisis, illegal immigration, income inequality, job satisfaction, mandatory minimum, market fundamentalism, McMansion, microcredit, moral hazard, new economy, New Urbanism, offshore financial centre, oil shock, old-boy network, plutocrats, Plutocrats, postindustrial economy, profit maximization, profit motive, RAND corporation, Ray Oldenburg, Robert Bork, rolodex, Ronald Reagan, shareholder value, Shoshana Zuboff, Silicon Valley, Steve Jobs, The Bell Curve by Richard Herrnstein and Charles Murray, The Chicago School, Thorstein Veblen, War on Poverty, winner-take-all economy, World Values Survey, young professional, zero-sum game

Its building on the Hudson is a place of exalted dreams and of pent-up aspirations often traceable just a few decades back to peasant cultures abroad. But Stuyvesant is also a place of profound desperation and extreme pressures. Two decades ago, Stuyvesant's students were mainly Jewish or Eastern European. Back then, the school was located on East 15th Street, and it was filled with kids from neighborhoods in the East Village and Upper West Side. These days, New York's Jews and Greeks and Hungarians and Romanians have largely graduated to secure spots in the middle or upper middle class; most send their children to private schools. Stuyvesant today is filled with a new generation of strivers who are clawing their way up from the lower rungs of the economic ladder—Indian kids from Queens, Chinese kids from Chinatown, Koreans from all boroughs, and others: West Indians, Pakistanis, Vietnamese, Bengalis.


pages: 375 words: 106,536

Lost at Sea by Jon Ronson

Affordable Care Act / Obamacare, Columbine, computer age, credit crunch, Douglas Hofstadter, Downton Abbey, East Village, Etonian, false memory syndrome, Gödel, Escher, Bach, income inequality, Internet Archive, Jeff Bezos, Kickstarter, late fees, Louis Pasteur, obamacare, Peter Thiel, Saturday Night Live, Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence, Skype, telemarketer

Back at the Kubrick house he carefully laid the panorama out—like a homemade Google street view years before Google had conceived of such a thing—down a long corridor. Kubrick emerged from his room, looked at it, and said: “Well. It sure beats going there.” So was it all worth it? Was the hooker doorway eventually picked for Eyes Wide Shut the quintessential hooker doorway? Back at home I watch Eyes Wide Shut again on DVD. The hooker doorway looks exactly like any doorway you would find in Lower Manhattan—maybe on Canal Street or in the East Village. It is a red door, up some brownstone steps, with the number 265 painted on the glass at the top. Tom Cruise is pulled through the door by the hooker. The scene is over in a few seconds. It was eventually shot on a set at Pinewood. I remember the Napoleon archive, the years it took Kubrick and some assistants to compile it, and I suggest to Jan Harlan, Kubrick’s executive producer and brother-in-law (and Manuel’s father), that had there not been all those years of attention to detail during the early planning of the movie, perhaps Napoleon would have actually been made.


Western USA by Lonely Planet

airport security, Albert Einstein, Apple II, Asilomar, back-to-the-land, Bay Area Rapid Transit, Burning Man, California gold rush, call centre, car-free, carbon footprint, Charles Lindbergh, Chuck Templeton: OpenTable:, Donner party, East Village, edge city, Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test, Frank Gehry, global village, Golden Gate Park, Haight Ashbury, haute couture, haute cuisine, illegal immigration, intermodal, Joan Didion, Kickstarter, Loma Prieta earthquake, Mahatma Gandhi, Mars Rover, Maui Hawaii, off grid, Silicon Valley, Silicon Valley startup, South of Market, San Francisco, starchitect, stealth mode startup, stem cell, Steve Jobs, Steve Wozniak, supervolcano, trade route, transcontinental railway, Upton Sinclair, urban planning, women in the workforce, Works Progress Administration, young professional, Zipcar

World Famous SEAFOOD $$$ ( 858-272-3100; www.worldfamous.signonsandiego.com; 711 Pacific Beach Dr, Pacific Beach; mains breakfast & lunch $9-16, dinner $15-25; 7am-11pm) Watch the surf while enjoying ‘California coastal cuisine,’ an ever-changing menu of inventive dishes from the sea (think banana rum mahi and bacon-and-spinach-wrapped scallops), plus steaks, salads, lunchtime sandwiches and burgers. Drinking Wine Steals WINE BAR ( 619-295-1188; www.winestealssd.com; 1243 University Ave, Hillcrest) Laid-back wine tastings (go for a flight or choose a bottle off the rack in the back), live music, gourmet pizzas and cheese platters bring in a nightly crowd to this low-lit wine bar. Look for two newer branches in San Diego, Wine Steals East Village (793/5 J St, Downtown) and Lounge-Point Loma (2970 Truxtun Rd, Point Loma). Tipsy Crow BAR, LOUNGE (www.thetipsycrow.com; 770 5th Ave, Downtown) There are three distinct levels at this historic Gaslamp building that’s been turned into an atmospheric watering hole: the main floor with its long mahogany bar, the lounge-like ‘Nest’ (thought to be the site of a former brothel), and the brick-walled ‘Underground’ with a dancefloor and live music acts.

First Awakenings DINER $$ (www.firstawakenings.net; American Tin Cannery, 125 Oceanview Blvd, Pacific Grove; mains $5-12; 7am-2pm Mon-Fri, to 2:30pm Sat & Sun; ) Sweet and savory creative breakfasts and lunches, plus bottomless pitchers of coffee, make this hideaway cafe in an outlet mall near the aquarium worth seeking out. Montrio Bistro CALIFORNIAN $$$ ( 831-648-8880; www.montrio.com; 414 Calle Principal; mains $14-29; 5-10pm Sun-Thu, to 11pm Fri & Sat; ) Inside a 1910 firehouse, this classy restaurant’s tables are covered in butcher paper with crayons for kids. Seasonal New American cooking and Monterey County wines satisfy. East Village Coffee Lounge CAFE $ (www.eastvillagecoffeelounge.com; 498 Washington St; snacks & drinks $3-6; 6am-late Mon-Fri, from 7am Sat & Sun) Sleek coffeehouse with a liquor license and live-music, DJ and open-mic nights. Crêpes of Brittany SNACKS $ (www.vivalecrepemonterey.com; 6 Old Fisherman’s Wharf; snacks $4-9; 8:30am-7pm Sun-Thu, to 8pm Sun) Authentic savory and sweet crepes swirled by a French expat; expect long lines and shorter hours in winter.


pages: 392 words: 112,954

I Can't Breathe by Matt Taibbi

"side hustle", activist lawyer, affirmative action, Broken windows theory, desegregation, Donald Trump, East Village, Ferguson, Missouri, Frank Gehry, mass incarceration, plutocrats, Plutocrats, Ronald Reagan, Snapchat, War on Poverty

In 2000, America’s leading fast-food philosopher, Malcolm Gladwell, helped establish his place in the intelligentsia on the back of a half-baked analysis of Broken Windows in a book called The Tipping Point. Gladwell sold Middle America on the idea that making little changes in an environment can bring about big results, and you can fight crime the same way you start a fashion trend. So just as you can sell lots of Hush Puppies shoes by getting a bunch of kids in a chic neighborhood like the East Village to wear them, so too can you stop felonies and murders by busting graffiti artists. Or something. It sounded convincing enough to the millions of people who read the book. The only people who had a problem with Broken Windows seemed to be the ones living in the target neighborhoods. People in black and Hispanic neighborhoods of New York and other cities began showing up in lawyers’ offices with horror stories of being knocked down, strip-searched on the street, and busted repeatedly for nonsense charges like obstructing government administration, loitering, or obstructing pedestrian traffic.


pages: 399 words: 114,787

Dark Towers: Deutsche Bank, Donald Trump, and an Epic Trail of Destruction by David Enrich

Affordable Care Act / Obamacare, anti-globalists, Asian financial crisis, banking crisis, Berlin Wall, buy low sell high, collateralized debt obligation, commoditize, corporate governance, Credit Default Swap, credit default swaps / collateralized debt obligations, Donald Trump, East Village, estate planning, Fall of the Berlin Wall, financial innovation, forensic accounting, high net worth, housing crisis, interest rate derivative, interest rate swap, Jeffrey Epstein, London Interbank Offered Rate, Lyft, Mikhail Gorbachev, NetJets, obamacare, offshore financial centre, post-materialism, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Renaissance Technologies, risk tolerance, Robert Mercer, rolodex, sovereign wealth fund, too big to fail, transcontinental railway, yield curve

At least two board members nodded off. Afterward, the men rode the elevator downstairs together, and Mitchell congratulated Breit on his presentation. “What do you mean, Edson?” Breit asked. “They literally fell asleep.” Edson guffawed. “That’s what we want!” As years passed, Bill and Edson became inseparable, even outside the office. They frequented the century-old Russian and Turkish Baths in the East Village. Sometimes Bill’s oldest child, Val, was allowed to tag along, watching as the men melted in the 190-degree sauna and had contests about who could stay in the longest. (A bright yellow sign warned against remaining more than thirty minutes at a time, but such rules were meant to be broken.) They’d sit in there, clad in the green shorts that the baths provided to people who didn’t want to be naked, the hot air singeing their lungs, gossiping about work and their families.


pages: 397 words: 114,841

High Steel: The Daring Men Who Built the World's Greatest Skyline by Jim Rasenberger

collective bargaining, Donald Trump, East Village, illegal immigration, MITM: man-in-the-middle, strikebreaker, Tacoma Narrows Bridge, union organizing, urban planning, young professional

They were both walking bosses on the Time Warner Center, sharing the building between them. Keith commanded the first phase of erection, the raising gangs, the rigs, the bolter-ups, and the steel deliveries. Marvin took care of the follow-up, the detail crews, the welders. They didn’t see as much of each other as they used to. They no longer commuted to and from work together, as they had for years, because Keith had recently started seeing a woman who lived in the East Village. Most afternoons, though, they met up for lunch, usually at a Greek deli on 58th Street where everyone knew them. “How are my friends today?” the counterman bellowed as they straddled a couple of stools one afternoon. “Happy as a bowl of fuckin’ sunshine,” mumbled Keith. “Lemme have a cup of coffee. What are you having, Marv?” Marvin ordered a grilled cheese. At 43, Marvin was a year older than Keith but looked a couple years younger, his features softer, less weathered.


pages: 363 words: 123,076

The Gang That Wouldn't Write Straight: Wolfe, Thompson, Didion, Capote, and the New Journalism Revolution by Marc Weingarten

1960s counterculture, Bonfire of the Vanities, British Empire, citizen journalism, cognitive dissonance, Donner party, East Village, Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test, Haight Ashbury, In Cold Blood by Truman Capote, Joan Didion, Kickstarter, Menlo Park, New Journalism, non-fiction novel, Norman Mailer, post-work, pre–internet, rent control, rolodex, Ronald Reagan, Stewart Brand, upwardly mobile, working poor, yellow journalism

A year after its rebirth, New York hadn’t lost a beat. Wolfe, Breslin, and the rest were contributing the same high level of journalism to the magazine, but there were growing pains that needed to be addressed. The magazine’s lively mix of politics, culture, and lifestyle coverage was strong, but not distinguished enough to stand apart from the other two weekly newspapers in town, the Village Voice and the East Village Other. Felker knew he needed a sharper focus, a stronger point of view. The Voice and the Other were addressing readers who lived below Fourteenth Street; New York would have to be for Felker’s crowd, those who lived tightly circumscribed lives on the upper half of Manhattan island—the privileged class who worried about building a nest egg to pay for private school tuition and struggled to pay their maintenance fees on co-op apartments, as well as the class-conscious strivers who longed to be tuned in to the vertiginous uptown whirl.


pages: 414 words: 123,666

Merchants' War by Stross, Charles

British Empire, dumpster diving, East Village, indoor plumbing, offshore financial centre, packet switching, peak oil, stem cell

As soon as she was on the foot plate, he twitched the reins. I'm going to have to pay him, Miriam thought, furiously racking her brains for ideas as the cab rattled across the stone pavements. What with? She fumbled in her greatcoat's pockets. One of them disgorged a foul-smelling cheesecloth bag full of loose tobacco. The other contained nothing but a loose button. Oh, great. They were turning past Highgate now, down in what corresponded to the East Village in her world. Not an upmarket neighborhood in New London, but there were worse places to be-like inside a thief-taker's lockup for trying to cheat a cabbie of his fare. What was the woman's name, Bishop? Margaret Bishop? I'm going to have to ask her to pay for me. Miriam tensed up. Or I could world-walk hack to the other side, wait a couple of hours, and -but her headache was already telling her no.


pages: 457 words: 126,996

Hacker, Hoaxer, Whistleblower, Spy: The Story of Anonymous by Gabriella Coleman

1960s counterculture, 4chan, Amazon Web Services, Bay Area Rapid Transit, bitcoin, Chelsea Manning, citizen journalism, cloud computing, collective bargaining, corporate governance, creative destruction, crowdsourcing, David Graeber, Debian, do-ocracy, East Village, Edward Snowden, feminist movement, George Santayana, hive mind, impulse control, Jacob Appelbaum, jimmy wales, Julian Assange, low cost airline, mandatory minimum, Mohammed Bouazizi, Network effects, Occupy movement, pirate software, Richard Stallman, SETI@home, side project, Silicon Valley, Skype, Steven Levy, WikiLeaks, zero day

Meeting Sabu Thanks to a detailed FAQ published by the New York City Department of Information Technology & Telecommunications, we know roughly how many sidewalk payphones dot the five boroughs: “As of January 2, 2014 there are 9,903 active public pay telephones on or over the City’s sidewalks.”13 I, personally, never even noticed them, until Sabu asked me to use one. He did not want to arrange a meeting online. It felt safer and prudent to use a payphone; key loggers are always a possibility with computers. Our first rendezvous was scheduled for soon after Bolonga’s doxing, on October 3 at the Chipotle on St. Mark’s Place in the East Village. Although we had never met, he assured me that “you will recognize me.” The one picture purporting to be Sabu that was floating around the web was of a wiryyet, muscular Latino man. I arrived early. The minutes moved slowly, until suddenly, I was aware of a tall but much larger and more commanding figure sauntering towards me. Carrying his large body with aplomb, he seemed to be in his element.


pages: 468 words: 123,823

A People's History of Poverty in America by Stephen Pimpare

"Robert Solow", affirmative action, British Empire, car-free, clean water, cognitive dissonance, Columbine, Daniel Kahneman / Amos Tversky, deindustrialization, delayed gratification, dumpster diving, East Village, Frederick Winslow Taylor, George Gilder, hedonic treadmill, hiring and firing, Howard Zinn, illegal immigration, impulse control, income inequality, index card, Jane Jacobs, low skilled workers, Mahatma Gandhi, mass incarceration, meta analysis, meta-analysis, moral panic, Naomi Klein, New Urbanism, payday loans, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Ronald Reagan, The Bell Curve by Richard Herrnstein and Charles Murray, The Death and Life of Great American Cities, The Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith, Thomas Malthus, union organizing, urban renewal, War on Poverty, white flight, working poor, Works Progress Administration

But a lot of the sangfroid is derived from an indifference to the kind of pain that comes with an utter depletion of financial resources. I think repetition must inure the human animal to certain kinds of agony.41 Walls again, recounting an exchange years later with her now-homeless mother:“You want to help me change my life?” Mom asked. “I’m fine. You’re the one who needs help. Your values are all confused.” “Mom, I saw you picking through trash in the East Village a few days ago.” “Well, people in this country are too wasteful. It’s my way of recycling.” She took a bite of her Seafood Delight. “Why didn’t you say hello?” “I was too ashamed, Mom. I hid.” Mom pointed her chopsticks ate me. “You see?” she said. “Right there. That’s exactly what I’m saying. You’re way too easily embarrassed. Your father and I are who we are. Accept it.”42 There are now entire poor-relief industries based upon the notion of food reclamation—not-for-profits which “rescue” (that’s their language) food that would otherwise be thrown out from restaurants, grocery stores, and private and corporate parties, and then distribute it to soup kitchens, homeless shelters, old-age homes, and community centers.


Stock Market Wizards: Interviews With America's Top Stock Traders by Jack D. Schwager

Asian financial crisis, banking crisis, barriers to entry, beat the dealer, Black-Scholes formula, commodity trading advisor, computer vision, East Village, Edward Thorp, financial independence, fixed income, implied volatility, index fund, Jeff Bezos, John Meriwether, John von Neumann, locking in a profit, Long Term Capital Management, margin call, money market fund, Myron Scholes, paper trading, passive investing, pattern recognition, random walk, risk tolerance, risk-adjusted returns, short selling, Silicon Valley, statistical arbitrage, the scientific method, transaction costs, Y2K

That has nothing to do with either economics or literature. How did that evolve? It was a passion. I was probably influenced by my mother, who does large-format photography—in the style of Ansel Adams. What kind of photography did you do? Primarily photography of architecture and some portraiture work, but from the vantage point of looking at people as architecture rather than as personalities. In the early 1980s, I had a show in the East Village, which went quite well. However, then the gallery owner had requests from clients who wanted me to photograph certain subjects according to their specifications—for example, to match their sofa, or something equally as ridiculous. UA-UDIWWHM I decided if my reason for working was to make money, I might as well go into business. I had a friend who worked at an investment bank. He said, "You speak five languages; they need people like you."


Building and Dwelling: Ethics for the City by Richard Sennett

Buckminster Fuller, car-free, clean water, cognitive dissonance, complexity theory, creative destruction, dematerialisation, Deng Xiaoping, double helix, Downton Abbey, East Village, en.wikipedia.org, Frank Gehry, ghettoisation, housing crisis, illegal immigration, informal economy, interchangeable parts, Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), Jane Jacobs, Joseph Schumpeter, Kickstarter, Mark Zuckerberg, Masdar, mass immigration, means of production, megacity, new economy, Nicholas Carr, Norbert Wiener, open borders, place-making, plutocrats, Plutocrats, Richard Florida, Shoshana Zuboff, Silicon Valley, Silicon Valley startup, smart cities, Smart Cities: Big Data, Civic Hackers, and the Quest for a New Utopia, the built environment, The Chicago School, The Death and Life of Great American Cities, the High Line, The Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith, urban planning, urban renewal, Victor Gruen

Le Bon, Gustave Le Corbusier (Charles-Édouard Jeanneret) Modular Man Plan Voisin The Radiant City and rupture When the Cathedrals Were White Le Nôtre, André Le-Pré-Saint-Gervais, France Lebanon, civil war Ledoux, Claude-Nicolas Leibniz, Gottfried Wilhelm L’Enfant, Pierre Charles Leonardo da Vinci Letchworth Garden City Lévi-Strauss, Claude Levinas, Emmanuel libraries Lincoln, Abraham liquid modernity Liu Thai Ker Living Breakwaters berm local knowledge see street-smarts Locke, John London, approach to Berkeley Square Bloomsbury Bourne Estate Canary Wharf Clerkenwell commuter transport courtesy rituals in Docklands gentrification in green space Grenfell Tower fire Hatton Garden Heron Quay Herzen in immigration to Indians in Jews in Leather Lane legal experience map-making of Mayfair Metropolitan Police Act (1864) Millennium Dome Nelson’s Column at night paving Piccadilly pollution index population Ranelagh Gardens Saffron Hill sewers South Bank Spitalfields street cries terraces Trafalgar Square unemployment in Vauxhall Gardens waterways West India Docks Woburn Walk working class Lucretius On the Nature of Things Lussault, Michel Lynch, Kevin The Image of the City Lyons ForCity project McMillan Commission making and makers Mann, Horace Mann, Thomas, Buddenbrooks Mao Zedong markets, street see also Delhi: Nehru Place Márquez, Gabriel Garcia Marx, Karl The Communist Manifesto (with Friedrich Engels) Grundrisse der Kritik der politischen Ökonomie Masdar, Abu Dhabi mask of civility master-plan for cities master–slave relationship Mauss, Marcel May, Theresa (Prime Minister) Mazzanti, Giancarlo Meachem, John Medellín, Santo Domingo funicular libraries Parque Biblioteca España refugees in warning sounds in window boxes membranes Merholz, Peter metropolis, flight from Mexicans, as immigrants Mexico Mexico City population density transport Mies van der Rohe, Ludwig migrants, migration see also immigration Milton, John, Il Penseroso Missionaries and Cannibals (video game) MIT (Massachusetts Institute of Technology) Electronic Systems Laboratory Media Lab Mitchell, Melanie Mitchell, William City of Bits mitigation and adaptation mobility mobs model-making Monier, Joseph monocultures Montaigne, Michel de Moscow Gorki Street Moses, Robert motor traffic Mumford, Lewis ‘Mother Jacobs’ Home Remedies’ Technics and Civilization Munich Murger, Henri, La Bohème music, and type-forms Musil, Robert, The Man without Qualities Muslims Nash, John Nazism Negroponte, Nicholas Neighbour (as concept) neighbour assemblies neighbourhood Nelson, Horatio Lord Netherlands water management networks, closed and open New York, additive grid Battery Park City benches in Brookfield Place Central Park Chanin Building climate change projects commuter railroads Dirty Dick’s Foc’sle Bar docks Dryline berm East River East Village Eighth Avenue electric power station Fifth Avenue financial trading 14th Street Googleplex Greenwich Village Harlem High Line immigrants passing through John F. Kennedy International Airport life in Living Breakwaters local community loft spaces Lower East Side Manhattan La Marqueta New York Times tower 96th Street North End Avenue pollution index population Port Authority Queens Rector Place risk of flooding Seagram Building Sixth Avenue Spanish Harlem Staten Island, Tottenville stoops Sunnyside Times Square Tocqueville in traffic travel in Tribeca Union Square Upper East Side Upper West Side walking in Wall Street Washington Square water-edge projects waterways West Side Highway West Village White Horse Tavern, Greenwich Village Woolworth Building Zoo Newton, Isaac Nicolson, Marjorie Hope Nietzsche, Friedrich Nimwegen, Christof van Nolli, Giovanni Battista, map of Rome Obama, Barack octopus city Okakura, Kakuzo The Book of Tea Oles, Thomas Olmsted, Frederick Law Olsen, Donald open and closed systems open-systems thinking open forms incomplete multiple porous punctuated synchronous orientation verbal Ortega y Gasset, José orthogonal form Osborn, Frederic the Other, as alien or fraternal Buber and definitions of exclusion of fleeing Googleplex and isolation from and Neighbour shunning stereotypes of Oudolf, Piet Ovink, Henk Paccoud, Antoine Palestine Liberation Organization Palestinians Palladio, Andrea Paris, Bachelard in Balzac’s Bibliothèque Nationale Boulevard St-Germain Café de la Paix Champs-Élysées and Charter of Athens Commune courtyards department stores Eiffel Tower Haussmann’s boulevards Herzen in Hotel de Ville Hôtel Salé Jane Jacobs and Louvre La Madeleine church Marais quarter modernity of Montmartre at night Palais-Royal Périphèrique Place Louis XV (Place de la Concorde) Plan Voisin Proust’s public health in quays 7th arrondissement Stendhal’s traffic working class see also Le Corbusier, Plan Voisin Park, Robert E.


Northern California Travel Guide by Lonely Planet

Airbnb, Apple II, Asilomar, back-to-the-land, Bay Area Rapid Transit, big-box store, Burning Man, buy and hold, California gold rush, call centre, car-free, carbon footprint, clean water, dark matter, Donald Trump, Donner party, East Village, El Camino Real, Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test, Frank Gehry, friendly fire, glass ceiling, Golden Gate Park, Google bus, Haight Ashbury, haute couture, haute cuisine, housing crisis, Joan Didion, Kickstarter, Loma Prieta earthquake, Lyft, Mahatma Gandhi, Mark Zuckerberg, Mason jar, McMansion, means of production, Port of Oakland, ride hailing / ride sharing, Ronald Reagan, Silicon Valley, Silicon Valley startup, South of Market, San Francisco, stealth mode startup, stem cell, Steve Jobs, Steve Wozniak, Stewart Brand, the built environment, trade route, transcontinental railway, uber lyft, Upton Sinclair, urban sprawl, white picket fence, Whole Earth Catalog, women in the workforce, working poor, Works Progress Administration, young professional

A Taste of MontereyWINE BAR ( MAP GOOGLE MAP ; www.atasteofmonterey.com; 700 Cannery Row; tasting flights $14-22; h11am-6pm Sun-Thu, to 8pm Fri-Sat) Sample medal-winning Monterey County wines from as far away as the Santa Lucia Highlands while soaking up dreamy sea views, then peruse thoughtful exhibits on barrel-making and cork production. Shared plates, including crab cakes and smoked salmon, provide a tasty reason to linger. Sardine Factory LoungeLOUNGE ( MAP GOOGLE MAP ; %831-373-3775; www.sardinefactory.com; 701 Wave St; h5pm-midnight) The legendary restaurant’s fireplace lounge pours wines by the glass, delivers filling appetizers to your table and has a live piano player most nights. East Village Coffee LoungeCAFE, LOUNGE ( MAP GOOGLE MAP ; %831-373-5601; www.facebook.com/eastvillagemonterey; 498 Washington St; h6am-10pm Mon-Fri, from 7am Sat & Sun; W) Downtown Monterey coffee shop on a busy corner brews with fair-trade, organic beans. At night, it pulls off a big-city lounge vibe with film, open-mike and live-music nights and an all-important booze license. Check the Facebook page for event listings. 3Entertainment For comprehensive entertainment listings, browse the free tabloid Monterey County Weekly (www.montereycountyweekly.com).

Fogcatcher InnHOTEL$$$ ( GOOGLE MAP ; %805-927-1400; www.fogcatcherinn.com; 6400 Moonstone Beach Dr; r from $204; Ws#) Moonstone Beach Dr hotels are nearly identical, but this one stands out with its pool and hot tub. Faux English Tudor–style cottages harboring quietly luxurious modern rooms, some with fireplaces and ocean views. Pet fee $75. 5Eating & Drinking It’s a short walk between cutesy cafes and interesting restaurants in Cambria's East Village. Linn's Easy as Pie CafeAMERICAN$ ( GOOGLE MAP ; %805-927-0371; www.linnsfruitbin.com; 4251 Bridge St; dishes $6-12; h10am-7pm Mon-Thu, to 8m Fri-Sat; c) If you don’t have time to visit Linn’s original farm stand on Santa Rosa Creek Rd (a 20-minute drive east via Main St), you can fork into its famous olallieberry pie at this take-out counter that delivers soups, salads, sandwiches and comfort fare such as chicken pot pie to a sunny deck.


pages: 400 words: 129,841

Capitalism: the unknown ideal by Ayn Rand

Albert Einstein, anti-communist, Berlin Wall, British Empire, business cycle, East Village, Ford paid five dollars a day, full employment, Isaac Newton, laissez-faire capitalism, means of production, minimum wage unemployment, profit motive, the market place, trade route, transcontinental railway, urban renewal, War on Poverty, yellow journalism

We do not spend endless hours debating the nature of Soviet Russia or whether Yugoslavia is a degenerate workers’ state.” [And]: “With sit-ins we saw for the first time the chance for direct participation in meaningful social revolution.” In their off-picket-line hours, [states the same article] the P.L. [Progressive Labor] youngsters hang out at the experimental theaters and coffee shops of Manhattan’s East Village. Their taste in reading runs more to Sartre than to Marx. With an interesting touch of unanimity, a survey in Newsweek (March 22, 1965) quotes a young man on the other side of the continent: “ ‘These students don’t read Marx,’ said one Berkeley Free Student Movement leader. ‘They read Camus.’ ” “If they are rebels,” the survey continues, “they are rebels without an ideology, and without long-range revolutionary programs.


pages: 455 words: 133,719

Overwhelmed: Work, Love, and Play When No One Has the Time by Brigid Schulte

8-hour work day, affirmative action, Bertrand Russell: In Praise of Idleness, blue-collar work, Burning Man, business cycle, call centre, cognitive dissonance, David Brooks, deliberate practice, desegregation, DevOps, East Village, Edward Glaeser, epigenetics, fear of failure, feminist movement, financial independence, game design, gender pay gap, glass ceiling, helicopter parent, hiring and firing, income inequality, job satisfaction, John Maynard Keynes: Economic Possibilities for our Grandchildren, knowledge economy, knowledge worker, labor-force participation, meta analysis, meta-analysis, new economy, profit maximization, Results Only Work Environment, Richard Feynman, Ronald Reagan, Saturday Night Live, sensible shoes, sexual politics, Silicon Valley, Skype, Steve Jobs, Thorstein Veblen, women in the workforce, working poor, Zipcar, éminence grise

And since most mothers put themselves last and reach for the to-do list first, their example teaches their daughters to do the same.2 Leisure researchers have also found that the more one plays in childhood, the more likely one is to play in adulthood, that trying a range of activities and experiences early on, when the stakes for failing or proving oneself are so much lower, makes it easier to return to them later, in adulthood.3 Nadia wanted to show her daughters that by infusing her own life and work as a painter and designer with play, they could do the same with theirs. She wanted to teach them not to lose themselves, like she did. Nadia also wanted to teach her girls that it’s in playing together that a family becomes truly close. The family has its own kind of to-do list: a jar they pull from, full of fun things they’d like to do. On the agenda one recent weekend: Find the best hot chocolate in Manhattan, visit the Doughnut Plant in the East Village and try a new flavor; go on a scavenger hunt; ride bikes; play a Scrabble-like game called Bananagram; see a movie (which was actually a dare to see how many movies they could sneak into in one day); plan the next family vacation: Name the country you most would want to visit, explain that country’s history, and create a budget and figure out what the family could do on it. “Our mom is always the one to say, ‘Let’s try something new.’


pages: 496 words: 137,645

Theft by Finding: Diaries (1977-2002) by David Sedaris

clean water, East Village, index card, Joan Didion, place-making, Ronald Reagan

I walked around today and saw a man get chased and kicked in the ass for taking an apple from a fruit stand. Tonight it’s cool and the air is dry. The city smells like burned coffee. October 19, 1990 New York Lily has been painting and doing light carpentry work in the town house of an antiques dealer. He has a little dog named Crumpet that acts pitiful and lame when it wants food and attention. She told me about him at a falafel restaurant in the East Village, and then I told her about my downstairs neighbors, who have been complaining about the sound of my footsteps. “Because of them I now go barefoot when I’m at home,” I told her. “And I tiptoe.” A woman sitting near us finished her meal and said to me on her way out, “Listen, you pay rent too. There’s no need for you to tiptoe around your own apartment.” October 21, 1990 New York Every day I get the paper from the same trash can on Abingdon Square and look through the want ads.


pages: 504 words: 129,087

The Ones We've Been Waiting For: How a New Generation of Leaders Will Transform America by Charlotte Alter

"side hustle", 4chan, affirmative action, Affordable Care Act / Obamacare, basic income, Berlin Wall, Bernie Sanders, carbon footprint, clean water, collective bargaining, Columbine, corporate personhood, correlation does not imply causation, Credit Default Swap, crowdsourcing, David Brooks, Donald Trump, double helix, East Village, ending welfare as we know it, Fall of the Berlin Wall, feminist movement, Ferguson, Missouri, financial deregulation, Francis Fukuyama: the end of history, gig economy, glass ceiling, Google Hangouts, housing crisis, illegal immigration, immigration reform, income inequality, Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), job-hopping, Kevin Kelly, knowledge economy, Lyft, mandatory minimum, Marc Andreessen, Mark Zuckerberg, mass incarceration, McMansion, medical bankruptcy, move fast and break things, move fast and break things, Nate Silver, obamacare, Occupy movement, passive income, pre–internet, race to the bottom, RAND corporation, Ronald Reagan, sexual politics, Silicon Valley, single-payer health, Snapchat, TaskRabbit, too big to fail, Uber and Lyft, uber lyft, universal basic income, unpaid internship, We are the 99%, white picket fence, working poor, Works Progress Administration

By 9:30 p.m. on October 29, 9-1-1 was receiving ten thousand calls per hour. By 10:00 p.m., Ground Zero was submerged, the subways had flooded, and the Hudson River was pouring into the Hugh L. Carey Tunnel between Brooklyn and Manhattan. New York University’s medical center lost power, and doctors and nurses evacuated vulnerable patients by flashlight. Cars floated out of underground parking garages. By midnight the East Village had flooded, a ConEd facility had exploded, and almost all of Lower Manhattan had lost power. In Westchester County, an eleven-year-old boy and his friend were both killed when a tree collapsed into the living room. On Staten Island, Glenda Moore’s house lost power, and her husband (a sanitation worker, who had been called into duty to help with the storm) told her to find a safer place to stay.


pages: 428 words: 134,832

Straphanger by Taras Grescoe

active transport: walking or cycling, Affordable Care Act / Obamacare, airport security, Albert Einstein, big-box store, bike sharing scheme, Boris Johnson, British Empire, call centre, car-free, carbon footprint, City Beautiful movement, congestion charging, correlation does not imply causation, David Brooks, deindustrialization, East Village, edge city, Enrique Peñalosa, extreme commuting, financial deregulation, Frank Gehry, glass ceiling, Golden Gate Park, housing crisis, hydraulic fracturing, indoor plumbing, intermodal, invisible hand, Jane Jacobs, jitney, Joan Didion, Kickstarter, Kitchen Debate, laissez-faire capitalism, Marshall McLuhan, mass immigration, McMansion, megacity, mortgage tax deduction, Network effects, New Urbanism, obamacare, oil shale / tar sands, oil shock, Own Your Own Home, peak oil, pension reform, Peter Calthorpe, Ponzi scheme, Ronald Reagan, Rosa Parks, sensible shoes, Silicon Valley, Skype, the built environment, The Death and Life of Great American Cities, the High Line, transit-oriented development, union organizing, urban planning, urban renewal, urban sprawl, walkable city, white flight, working poor, young professional, Zipcar

The potential for a livable downtown was always there: compared to eastern cities, Los Angeles developed late, and its central business district was never home to noisy, polluting factories. At least 200,000 people work downtown every weekday, and 40,000 now live there, a number that has doubled in a decade. (Nonetheless, its population is still smaller than the tiny slice of Manhattan that is the East Village). Many historic buildings, converted into swank condos during the boom years, are now filled with half-vacant rental properties. Though a supermarket opened in 2007, there are still no public schools, making it a hard sell for parents. Spring Street has a decent stretch of hip bars, but few lights seem to be on in residential buildings in the evening, and it is difficult to find a café open on a Saturday.


The Unicorn's Secret by Steven Levy

Albert Einstein, Buckminster Fuller, card file, East Village, financial independence, Golden Gate Park, Haight Ashbury, index card, John Markoff, Marshall McLuhan, Ralph Nader, rolodex, Saturday Night Live, Steven Levy, Stewart Brand, Thomas Kuhn: the structure of scientific revolutions, upwardly mobile, Whole Earth Catalog

As in the time he confessed to Ira that he knew little about Marxism. “A week or so later, Ira came back with about five or six carefully selected volumes, which I read,” says the bishop. “Kind of a quick course.” Ira was also Powelton’s chief diplomatic officer. He was able to boast kinship with the superstars of the movement. He often visited New York City, hanging out at activist Jerry Rubin’s East Village apartment with the founding fathers of Yippiedom. It was a movement Ira liked; as Rubin wrote in his 1970 tome, Do It, “Yippies are leaders without followers. Yippies do whatever we want whenever we want to do it.” This was displayed in famous acts like dropping money onto the floor of the New York Stock Exchange and watching the straights go crazy. Though some of the more militant protesters thought Ira’s devotion to the cause was not sufficiently single-minded, Rubin liked the Unicorn.


pages: 393 words: 127,312

Gotta Get Theroux This: My Life and Strange Times in Television by Louis Theroux

Burning Man, Columbine, East Village, In Cold Blood by Truman Capote, index card, Potemkin village, Silicon Valley, the market place

The same director made another film about the pornographer Al Goldstein, called Screwed, which had a scene on an adult film set that was both funny and imbued with a surprising dignity and pathos – an actor reeled off a list of theatrical credentials in mainstream productions before the film cut to a ludicrous bit of dialogue (‘Would a blow job go well with that?’ ‘A blow job would go great with this’) as a precursor to an energetic sex scene. In those days, in New York, those so inclined could investigate the world of niche film-making at a legendary video store in the East Village called Kim’s. Kim’s is gone now, rendered obsolete by the Internet and streaming, but in an era before YouTube and WorldStar and Twitter it was like the nether regions of Web 2.0 in physical form. Racks of underground films organized by director, esoteric documentaries on bizarre subjects. Chicken Hawk, an access-based documentary about NAMBLA, a group that advocated in favour of paedophilia; Blast ’Em, about obsessive fans and paparazzi who stood in gaggles outside stars’ homes in New York; Dream Deceivers, about a pair of teenagers in rural America who attempted suicide under the influence of a Judas Priest record.


pages: 440 words: 132,685

The Wizard of Menlo Park: How Thomas Alva Edison Invented the Modern World by Randall E. Stross

Albert Einstein, centralized clearinghouse, Charles Lindbergh, death of newspapers, distributed generation, East Village, Ford paid five dollars a day, I think there is a world market for maybe five computers, interchangeable parts, Isaac Newton, Livingstone, I presume, Marshall McLuhan, Menlo Park, plutocrats, Plutocrats, Saturday Night Live, side project, Silicon Valley, Steve Jobs, Steven Levy, urban renewal

Faulty Edison Electric lines beneath the street knocked horses down in an incident a few years later. Here, too, “people who saw the affair thought it was very funny.” See “Horses Thrown Down,” NYT, 2 June 1889. The problem of street-level electrical shocks is not merely a curiosity of that early era. On 16 January 2004, a young woman, Jodie Lane, was electrocuted while walking her dogs in the East Village. The dogs stepped on a metal plate that was electrified by stray current; they survived, but Lane did not. Regrettably, Major Eaton’s inclination to deny, deny, deny lives on in his latter-day successors in New York City. Consolidated Edison was less than forthcoming about the origins of the accident, and reporters uncovered 539 complaints of electrical jolts delivered by the streets of New York in the five years preceding Lane’s death, only a small portion of which had been reported to the city authorities.


pages: 515 words: 143,055

The Attention Merchants: The Epic Scramble to Get Inside Our Heads by Tim Wu

1960s counterculture, Affordable Care Act / Obamacare, AltaVista, Andrew Keen, anti-communist, Apple II, Apple's 1984 Super Bowl advert, barriers to entry, Bob Geldof, borderless world, Brownian motion, Burning Man, Cass Sunstein, citizen journalism, colonial rule, East Village, future of journalism, George Gilder, Golden Gate Park, Googley, Gordon Gekko, housing crisis, informal economy, Internet Archive, Jaron Lanier, Jeff Bezos, jimmy wales, Live Aid, Mark Zuckerberg, Marshall McLuhan, McMansion, Nate Silver, Network effects, Nicholas Carr, placebo effect, post scarcity, race to the bottom, road to serfdom, Saturday Night Live, science of happiness, self-driving car, side project, Silicon Valley, slashdot, Snapchat, Steve Jobs, Steve Wozniak, Steven Levy, Ted Nelson, telemarketer, the built environment, The Chicago School, the scientific method, The Structural Transformation of the Public Sphere, Tim Cook: Apple, Torches of Freedom, Upton Sinclair, upwardly mobile, white flight, zero-sum game

Since its 1956 debut on CBS, it had been sponsored by the same soap company, Procter & Gamble, for which it had been created by Irna Phillips herself, the inventor of the genre.7 When MTV called, Bunim teamed up with another producer, Jonathan Murray, and began to work up a teen soap opera tentatively entitled St. Mark’s Place. It was planned as a serial drama about young people living in the East Village, hoping to make it as performers or artists or whatever—a kind of forerunner to the musical Rent. But when Bunim and Murray presented their budget, MTV’s executives balked. As Murray recalled, they said, “We get our music videos for free, and now we’re going to spend $300,000 for half an hour of television?”8 Apparently Freston and MTV had not completely thought through the idea of new formats; virtually any of them would require actually spending money on content.


The Rough Guide to Ireland by Clements, Paul

Berlin Wall, bike sharing scheme, British Empire, Celtic Tiger, Columbine, digital map, East Village, haute couture, Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), Kickstarter, Murano, Venice glass, plutocrats, Plutocrats, Ronald Reagan, sustainable-tourism, the market place, trade route, urban planning, urban renewal, urban sprawl

Stuffs plenty of seafood in its sandwiches – including its famous open crab sandwich – main courses and chowder. Daily 9am–5pm. Beach Guest House 051 383316, dunmorebeachguesthouse.com. Excellently kept rooms, some with sea-facing balconies, at this very smart, modern house on the seafront in the east village, with fine views from its conservatory. Breakfast delights include smoked salmon and scrambled egg, and French toast. Good rates for singles. March–Oct. €80 Strand Inn 051 383174, thestrandinn.com. Life in the east village is focused around this popular eighteenth-century inn, where most bedrooms have balconies overlooking the sea, enjoying views out towards the Hook Head lighthouse; they have a fresh, modern style, with white bedding and splashes of colour, perhaps from pastel cushions or a sympathetic modern painting.


pages: 499 words: 152,156

Age of Ambition: Chasing Fortune, Truth, and Faith in the New China by Evan Osnos

conceptual framework, crony capitalism, currency manipulation / currency intervention, David Brooks, Deng Xiaoping, East Village, financial independence, Gini coefficient, income inequality, indoor plumbing, information asymmetry, land reform, Lao Tzu, low skilled workers, market fundamentalism, Mohammed Bouazizi, plutocrats, Plutocrats, rolodex, scientific worldview, Silicon Valley, South China Sea, sovereign wealth fund, special economic zone, Steve Jobs, transcontinental railway, Washington Consensus, Xiaogang Anhui farmers, young professional

His girlfriend at the time was moving to the United States to go to school, and in February 1981 he joined her. * * * In New York, Ai studied English and found a cheap basement apartment near East Seventh Street and Second Avenue. He spent his weekends haunting the galleries, roaming the city, as his brother put it, like “a mud-fish burrowing wherever there is muck.” He was intoxicated by the raw energy of the East Village, which to him felt “like a volcano with smoke always billowing out of the top.” Joan Lebold Cohen, a historian of Chinese art who got to know many Chinese artists in New York at the time, recalls visiting Ai’s building. “The whole place reeked of urine,” she said. “His apartment was a single room, no furniture, just a bed on the floor, and a television. And he was riveted to the television.” She went on, “It was, I think, the Iran-Contra hearings.


pages: 547 words: 148,732

How to Change Your Mind: What the New Science of Psychedelics Teaches Us About Consciousness, Dying, Addiction, Depression, and Transcendence by Michael Pollan

1960s counterculture, Albert Einstein, Anton Chekhov, Burning Man, cognitive dissonance, conceptual framework, crowdsourcing, dark matter, Douglas Engelbart, East Village, experimental subject, Exxon Valdez, Golden Gate Park, Google Earth, Haight Ashbury, Howard Rheingold, Internet Archive, John Markoff, Kevin Kelly, Marshall McLuhan, Mason jar, Menlo Park, meta analysis, meta-analysis, moral panic, Mother of all demos, placebo effect, Ralph Waldo Emerson, randomized controlled trial, Ronald Reagan, scientific mainstream, scientific worldview, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI), sensible shoes, Silicon Valley, Skype, Steve Jobs, Stewart Brand, the scientific method, theory of mind, Thomas Bayes, Whole Earth Catalog

It’s difficult to imagine such a counter history.) It didn’t help that Leary liked to say things like “LSD is more frightening than the bomb” or “The kids who take LSD aren’t going to fight your wars. They’re not going to join your corporations.” These were no empty words: beginning in the mid-1960s, tens of thousands of American children actually did drop out, washing up on the streets of Haight-Ashbury and the East Village.* And young men were refusing to go to Vietnam. The will to fight and the authority of Authority had been undermined. These strange new drugs, which seemed to change the people who took them, surely had something to do with it. Timothy Leary had said so. But this upheaval would almost certainly have happened without Timothy Leary. He was by no means the only route by which psychedelics were seeping into American culture; he was just the most notorious.


We Are the Nerds: The Birth and Tumultuous Life of Reddit, the Internet's Culture Laboratory by Christine Lagorio-Chafkin

4chan, Airbnb, Amazon Web Services, Bernie Sanders, big-box store, bitcoin, blockchain, Brewster Kahle, Burning Man, crowdsourcing, cryptocurrency, David Heinemeier Hansson, Donald Trump, East Village, game design, Golden Gate Park, hiring and firing, Internet Archive, Jacob Appelbaum, Jeff Bezos, jimmy wales, Joi Ito, Justin.tv, Kickstarter, Lean Startup, Lyft, Marc Andreessen, Mark Zuckerberg, medical residency, minimum viable product, natural language processing, Paul Buchheit, Paul Graham, paypal mafia, Peter Thiel, plutocrats, Plutocrats, QR code, recommendation engine, RFID, rolodex, Ruby on Rails, Sam Altman, Sand Hill Road, Saturday Night Live, self-driving car, semantic web, side project, Silicon Valley, Silicon Valley ideology, Silicon Valley startup, slashdot, Snapchat, social web, South of Market, San Francisco, Startup school, Stephen Hawking, Steve Jobs, Steve Wozniak, technoutopianism, uber lyft, web application, WikiLeaks, Y Combinator

In August 2007, the crew flew back to Boston for Slowe and Sakillaris’s actual big Greek wedding celebration, in which Huffman and Ohanian were groomsmen. It was everything Sakillaris—now Kristen Slowe—dreamed of: Greek Orthodox ceremony and a big party. For the nerds, they played the Star Wars theme before their first dance. For the one-year anniversary of the acquisition, in late October, Reddit hosted not one but several open-bar boozefests around the country. New York City’s was in a dive bar tucked beyond Avenue B in the East Village. Steve Newhouse attended, as did his younger cousin, S. I. Newhouse. Gawker wrote up the scene, noting the presence of the media-empire family, despite their general allergy to tabloid-style coverage. The media-gossip site dubbed the rest of the crowd “Silicon Alley’s scruffiest.” Ohanian, despite traveling many weeks—jetting back to Virginia to see his mother as her cancer and treatments intensified, or out to San Francisco for work—had grown comfortable with his new corporate life, commuting from Park Slope to Times Square, working some eight hours out of his beige office, and heading home or out to dinner with friends.


pages: 2,323 words: 550,739

1,000 Places to See in the United States and Canada Before You Die, Updated Ed. by Patricia Schultz

Albert Einstein, Alfred Russel Wallace, American Society of Civil Engineers: Report Card, Bretton Woods, Burning Man, California gold rush, car-free, Charles Lindbergh, Columbine, Donald Trump, East Village, El Camino Real, estate planning, Frank Gehry, glass ceiling, Golden Gate Park, Guggenheim Bilbao, Haight Ashbury, haute cuisine, indoor plumbing, interchangeable parts, Mars Rover, Mason jar, Maui Hawaii, Mikhail Gorbachev, Murano, Venice glass, Nelson Mandela, new economy, New Urbanism, Norman Mailer, out of africa, Pepto Bismol, place-making, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Ronald Reagan, Rosa Parks, Saturday Night Live, sexual politics, South of Market, San Francisco, The Chicago School, transcontinental railway, traveling salesman, upwardly mobile, urban decay, urban planning, urban renewal, urban sprawl, wage slave, white picket fence, Works Progress Administration, Yogi Berra, éminence grise

A hub of life in the Village, Washington Square Park always buzzes with activity. South of the Village, the onetime manufacturing district (and later arts haven) known as SoHo is now a high-end retail district dominated by beautiful 19th-century castiron architecture, as exemplified by the Haughwout Store building at the corner of Broadway and Broome. East of Broadway from Houston to 14th, what’s now known as the East Village was originally part of the Lower East Side (see p. 179) until renamed by realtors in the 1960s. It extends all the way to the East River, offering a slowly subsiding grungier vibe left over from the 1970s–’80s punk scene, as well as a smattering of Polish and Ukrainian restaurants surviving from distant immigrant days. WHERE: The Village is bounded by Broadway on the east, the Hudson River on the west, Houston St. to the south, and 14th St. to the north.

Tour 5 allows visitors to stroll the grounds during the evening and illustrates what an overnight stay was like for the ever-changing roster of high-profile guests (Hearst was known for his strict rules of behavior—guest David Niven was often chastised for drinking in his room). Hearst Castle covers the hillside above the tiny coastal town of San Simeon, but most visitors will prefer spending time in the relaxed, exceedingly charming artists community of Cambria, located 6 miles south. Though the center of town is only a few blocks long, diversity can be found by meandering the historic and country-elegant East Village and the newer, more touristy West Village. Drop by the Sow’s Ear restaurant for gourmet comfort food in a tiny cottage that is both warm and romantic. If you’re staying the night, revel in the small-town country-coastal vibe at the J. Patrick House, a charming two-story log cabin B&B complete with wood-burning fireplaces, fluffy duvet covers, and bedtime milk and cookies. WHERE: 223 miles south of San Francisco.

., 983–84 Eagle’s Eye Restaurant, B.C., 1036–37 Eagle Watch Weekend, Ill., 503 East Amana, Iowa, 514–15 Eastern Canada, 973–1022 Eastern Shore, Md., 128–29 EASTERN SHORE, Va., 242 Eastern Star, N.S., 992 EASTERN TOWNSHIPS, Que., 1012–13, 1019 Easter Parade, N.Y., 182 EAST HADDAM, Conn., 5 East Hampton, N.Y., 160, 161 Easton, Md., 128–29 Easton, Pa., 208 East Orange, N.J., 136 East Quogue, N.Y., 160 East Village, N.Y., 176 Eaton’s Ranch, Wyo., 673 Eatonton, Ga., 330 Echo Lake State Park, N.H., 79 Ecola State Park, Oreg., 869 Edelweis Room, Alta., 1026 Edgartown, Mass., 61 Edgewater Resort, Idaho, 602 Edmonton, Alta., 1031–32 EDMONTON INTERNATIONAL FRINGE THEATRE FESTIVAL, Alta., 1031–32 Edmund Pettus Bridge, Ala., 297 Edray, W.Va., 282 Edsel and Eleanor Ford House, Mich., 529 Edwardian Inn, Ark., 394 Edwin Cheney House, Ill., 497 Eeyore’s Bithday Party, Tex., 758 EFFIGY MOUNDS, Iowa, 517–18 Egg Harbor, Wis., 575 Egg Mountain, Mont., 618 Ehukai Beach Park, Hawaii, 969 1811 House, Vt., 101 1842 Inn, Ga., 346 1884 Paxton House Inn, Ga., 353 1896 House Country Inn, Mass., 68 18TH & VINE, Mo., 452–53, 455 Einstein’s, Ga., 336 Eisenhower Center, Kans., 609 El Capitan, Calif., 862 El Don Motel, N.Mex., 746 Eldridge Street Synagogue, N.Y., 180 Eleanor Roosevelt Historic Site, N.Y., 158 Elemis Spa, Conn., 10 Eleutherian College, Ind., 508 Eleutherian Mills, Del., 115 Elevation Hotel, Colo., 710 Elfreth’s Alley, Pa., 219 Elfreth’s Alley Museum, Pa., 219 Elizabeth Pointe Lodge, Fla., 302 Elizabeth’s on 37th, Ga., 348 Elkhart, Ind., 513 Elkhorn Ranch, N.Dak., 642 Elkhorn Resort Hotel, Man., 1066 Elkins, W.Va., 280 Elkins Ranch, Tex., 761 Elk Island, Wyo., 668 Elk Mountain Resort, Colo., 707 Elko, Nev., 726 Ellie Caulkins Opera House, Colo., 711 Elliott’s Oyster House, Wash., 901 ELLIS ISLAND, N.Y., 173, 192–93 Elliston Place Soda Shop, Tenn., 476 El Mercado, Tex., 784 El Mirador, Tex., 785 El Monte Sagrado Resort, N.Mex., 754–55 Elms Estate, R.I., 83 El Museo del Barrio, N.Y., 185 ELORA, Ont., 995–96 Elora Festival, Ont., 995 Elora Gorge Park, Ont., 995 Elora Mill Country Inn, Ont., 995 El Paisano Hotel, Tex., 778 El Rancho Hotel, N.Mex., 740 El Roblar Hotel, Calif., 836 El Tovar Lodge, Ariz., 685 Elvis Honeymoon House, Calif., 838 Elvis Presley Birthplace & Museum, Miss., 443, 467 Elvis Presley Park, Miss., 443 Ely, Minn., 548–49 Elysian Fields Inn, La., 431 Embarcadero, Calif., 847 Emerald Isle, N.C., 366 Emerald Lake, B.C., 1064 Emerald Lake, Colo., 720 Emerald Lake Lodge, B.C., 1064 Emerald Pools Trail, Utah, 802 Emerson Inn by the Sea, Mass., 49 Emerson Resort and Spa, N.Y., 144 Emily Carr Institute, B.C., 1048 Emma Nevada House, Calif., 809 EMPIRE STATE BUILDING, N.Y., 174–75 Empress Room, B.C., 1060 Empty Glass, W.Va., 276 ENCHANTMENT RESORT, Ariz., 696, 697–98 Enfield Shaker Museum, N.H., 70 English Grille, Ky., 414 Enid A.


pages: 606 words: 157,120

To Save Everything, Click Here: The Folly of Technological Solutionism by Evgeny Morozov

3D printing, algorithmic trading, Amazon Mechanical Turk, Andrew Keen, augmented reality, Automated Insights, Berlin Wall, big data - Walmart - Pop Tarts, Buckminster Fuller, call centre, carbon footprint, Cass Sunstein, choice architecture, citizen journalism, cloud computing, cognitive bias, creative destruction, crowdsourcing, data acquisition, Dava Sobel, disintermediation, East Village, en.wikipedia.org, Fall of the Berlin Wall, Filter Bubble, Firefox, Francis Fukuyama: the end of history, frictionless, future of journalism, game design, Gary Taubes, Google Glasses, illegal immigration, income inequality, invention of the printing press, Jane Jacobs, Jean Tirole, Jeff Bezos, jimmy wales, Julian Assange, Kevin Kelly, Kickstarter, license plate recognition, lifelogging, lone genius, Louis Pasteur, Mark Zuckerberg, market fundamentalism, Marshall McLuhan, moral panic, Narrative Science, Nelson Mandela, Nicholas Carr, packet switching, PageRank, Parag Khanna, Paul Graham, peer-to-peer, Peter Singer: altruism, Peter Thiel, pets.com, placebo effect, pre–internet, Ray Kurzweil, recommendation engine, Richard Thaler, Ronald Coase, Rosa Parks, self-driving car, Silicon Valley, Silicon Valley ideology, Silicon Valley startup, Skype, Slavoj Žižek, smart meter, social graph, social web, stakhanovite, Steve Jobs, Steven Levy, Stuxnet, technoutopianism, the built environment, The Chicago School, The Death and Life of Great American Cities, the medium is the message, The Nature of the Firm, the scientific method, The Wisdom of Crowds, Thomas Kuhn: the structure of scientific revolutions, Thomas L Friedman, transaction costs, urban decay, urban planning, urban sprawl, Vannevar Bush, WikiLeaks

Such deference to autonomous systems—and make no mistake, where there is autonomous search, there will be autonomous advertising—can transform many other areas of life. Bianca Bosker, a technology journalist, hints at this digital and highly automated future when she complains that she no longer finds places to eat; rather, they find her. Or, in the parlance of Silicon Valley, “search” is displaced by “discovery.” She writes,My web searches for new neighborhood joints—“best brunch Flatiron NYC,” “cafe East Village”—have given way to Foursquare insta-alerts that pop up on my phone to tell me there’s a nice place nearby. Thanks to the app’s “List” feature, which allows me to subscribe to lists of must-try destinations compiled by friends and city guides, Foursquare lets me know whenever I’m close to a restaurant that has scored an endorsement. Hunting and gathering online for ideas about where to get my next meal—or outfit, or book, or playlist, for that matter—has given way to sitting back and being served up snack-sized morsels of information.


pages: 553 words: 168,111

The Asylum: The Renegades Who Hijacked the World's Oil Market by Leah McGrath Goodman

anti-communist, Asian financial crisis, automated trading system, banking crisis, barriers to entry, Bernie Madoff, computerized trading, corporate governance, corporate raider, credit crunch, Credit Default Swap, East Village, energy security, Etonian, family office, Flash crash, global reserve currency, greed is good, High speed trading, light touch regulation, market fundamentalism, peak oil, Peter Thiel, pre–internet, price mechanism, profit motive, regulatory arbitrage, reserve currency, rolodex, Ronald Reagan, side project, Silicon Valley, upwardly mobile, zero-sum game

He quit and took a series of odd jobs that included producing rock videos in the 1980s for Dolly Parton and Glenn Campbell, before going back to work for his father and then quitting again. “I gave accounting a good shot,” he says, “but I hated every day.” He cast about for a few more years before finding his calling—or the precursor to his calling—trading cattle futures at Nymex back when neither he nor pretty much anyone else had ever heard of the place. Randy Warsager, the soft-spoken Nazi hunter who happened to be Schaeffer’s roommate when he moved to New York’s East Village in the 1970s, persuaded him to try trading. Schaeffer began losing money almost immediately. But at least he was no longer bored. He took out a trading account in 1976 at Merrill Lynch, where Warsager also kept an account. Schaeffer was not a natural risk-taker, so he bought one cattle contract and sat on it for ages. John Tafaro, who was their account executive at Merrill before joining Schaeffer and Warsager later in the pits, would tease Schaeffer mercilessly about his skittishness.


pages: 559 words: 169,094

The Unwinding: An Inner History of the New America by George Packer

Affordable Care Act / Obamacare, Apple's 1984 Super Bowl advert, bank run, big-box store, citizen journalism, cleantech, collateralized debt obligation, collective bargaining, corporate raider, Credit Default Swap, credit default swaps / collateralized debt obligations, deindustrialization, diversified portfolio, East Village, El Camino Real, Elon Musk, family office, financial independence, financial innovation, fixed income, Flash crash, Henry Ford's grandson gave labor union leader Walter Reuther a tour of the company’s new, automated factory…, housing crisis, income inequality, informal economy, Jane Jacobs, life extension, Long Term Capital Management, low skilled workers, Marc Andreessen, margin call, Mark Zuckerberg, market bubble, market fundamentalism, Maui Hawaii, Menlo Park, Neil Kinnock, new economy, New Journalism, obamacare, Occupy movement, oil shock, paypal mafia, peak oil, Peter Thiel, Ponzi scheme, Richard Florida, Robert Bork, Ronald Reagan, Ronald Reagan: Tear down this wall, shareholder value, side project, Silicon Valley, Silicon Valley startup, single-payer health, smart grid, Steve Jobs, strikebreaker, The Death and Life of Great American Cities, the scientific method, too big to fail, union organizing, urban planning, We are the 99%, We wanted flying cars, instead we got 140 characters, white flight, white picket fence, zero-sum game

Kevin traded credit derivatives and corporate bonds—things like airline debt. When you were on a prop desk and getting it right, there was nothing better on Wall Street, and for two years he got it right. He earned close to a million dollars a year, most of it his bonus—multiples of his previous pay—and he would have made more if he had cared more. He paid off the mortgage on his apartment in the East Village, lived off his salary, and saved the bonus. He didn’t own a car or a boat. He became a connoisseur of New York’s best restaurants and picked up the tab for his starving-artist friends. He didn’t need more. It wasn’t just American mortgages that blew up the world—it was global credit. Kevin was part of that, and during the middle years of the decade he watched the credit bubble inflate. He wasn’t doing anything wrong—he had a great deal going on the prop desk and didn’t want to screw it up.


pages: 647 words: 201,252

The Mad Man: Or, the Mysteries of Manhattan by Samuel R. Delany

affirmative action, Berlin Wall, East Village, index card, Pepto Bismol, place-making, publish or perish, sexual politics

The Variety is, incidentally, the second-oldest functioning theater building in New York City. Sitting in the front row, down in what no doubt was once the loge, off to the side sat a tall guy in his late twenties/early thirties. I’d already seen him wandering about the theater two or three times downstairs. He wore a black leather jacket, black jeans, and a black plastic cap. But it wasn’t your standard motorcycle drag that signals SM interests; rather, he seemed some East Village local who was simply into the “punk” look you see all up and down the streets of the neighborhood outside. He was playing with himself. I slipped in beside him—I’d been sure he was wearing black pants when I’d seen him before. But now he was in white ones—then, no, I realized seconds later: his pants were black, but he’d pushed them all down around his ankles, so that his pale legs were what I saw!


pages: 706 words: 202,591

Facebook: The Inside Story by Steven Levy

active measures, Airbnb, Airbus A320, Amazon Mechanical Turk, Apple's 1984 Super Bowl advert, augmented reality, Ben Horowitz, blockchain, Burning Man, business intelligence, cloud computing, computer vision, crowdsourcing, cryptocurrency, don't be evil, Donald Trump, East Village, Edward Snowden, El Camino Real, Elon Musk, Firefox, Frank Gehry, glass ceiling, indoor plumbing, Jeff Bezos, John Markoff, Jony Ive, Kevin Kelly, Kickstarter, Lyft, Mahatma Gandhi, Marc Andreessen, Mark Zuckerberg, Menlo Park, Metcalfe’s law, MITM: man-in-the-middle, move fast and break things, move fast and break things, natural language processing, Network effects, Oculus Rift, PageRank, Paul Buchheit, paypal mafia, Peter Thiel, pets.com, post-work, Ray Kurzweil, recommendation engine, Robert Mercer, Robert Metcalfe, rolodex, Sam Altman, Sand Hill Road, self-driving car, sexual politics, Shoshana Zuboff, side project, Silicon Valley, Silicon Valley startup, slashdot, Snapchat, social graph, social software, South of Market, San Francisco, Startup school, Steve Ballmer, Steve Jobs, Steven Levy, Steven Pinker, Tim Cook: Apple, web application, WikiLeaks, women in the workforce, Y Combinator, Y2K

Under the leadership of Fidji Simo, Facebook was spending billions of dollars on a service called Facebook Watch, even producing its own programs. Zuckerberg finally let the project go forward, but Instagram was directed to agree that the IGTV videos would be posted to Facebook by default before it could launch the product. The launch, which was to take place in Menlo Park with a live connection to journalists and influencers gathered in Facebook’s East Village New York City office, was a disaster. Instagram had contracted with a top-end events organizer, which produced an elaborate set with a revolving stage. It didn’t work, and the presentation bombed. By the time a newly improvised presentation was ready, many of the journalists were gone. And then Systrom left for his paternity leave. * * * • • • BY MAY 2018, when Zuckerberg reorganized his executive team, it was universally understood that the alpha dog among them was Chris Cox, who until then was the head of products.


Lonely Planet London City Guide by Tom Masters, Steve Fallon, Vesna Maric

Boris Johnson, British Empire, centre right, Clapham omnibus, congestion charging, dark matter, discovery of the americas, double helix, East Village, financial independence, first-past-the-post, ghettoisation, haute cuisine, Isaac Newton, John Snow's cholera map, Mahatma Gandhi, market design, Nelson Mandela, place-making, South of Market, San Francisco, Stephen Hawking, transatlantic slave trade, urban planning, urban renewal, Winter of Discontent, young professional

Downstairs you get a big house-party vibe with DJs who mix up pretty much anything from ‘90s Euro disco to chart hits to electro and techno. It’s free, open late and great fun. DOGSTAR Map 7733 7515; 389 Coldharbour Lane SW9; 9pm-3am Fri & Sat; Brixton You’ll have to push your way through the huge downstairs bar (Click here) of this converted pub to get to the house-music club upstairs, but that’s what all the Brixton clubbers do. EAST VILLAGE Map 7739 5173; www.eastvillageclub.com; 89 Great Eastern St EC2; 5pm-1am Mon & Tue, 5pm-3.30am Wed-Sun; Old St The old Medicine Bar’s popularity flagged so much that it was only a matter of time before someone snapped up the fine location and did something worthwhile with it. Well, finally the space has been transformed into a club that has seen house lovers flocking from all over London.


pages: 760 words: 218,087

The Pentagon: A History by Steve Vogel

Berlin Wall, Charles Lindbergh, City Beautiful movement, cuban missile crisis, East Village, Fall of the Berlin Wall, New Journalism, Norman Mailer, Ronald Reagan, Works Progress Administration

A healthy dose of comic absurdity was thrown in. Abbie Hoffman, cofounder of the radical Youth International Party (Yippies) and a showman in the tradition of P. T. Barnum, announced plans to use the psychic energy of thousands of protesters to levitate the Pentagon three hundred feet in the air, where it would turn orange and vibrate until all evil spirits spilled out. Several hundred hippies in New York City’s East Village practiced on a table-size cardboard model, chanting ecstatically as wires raised the model Pentagon—illuminated by psychedelic lights—into the air. Hoffman and cohort Marty Carey also made a reconnaissance of the Pentagon to calculate how many “witches” would be needed to encircle the building. “Marty brought some incense and Tibetian bells, we improvised an Apache war dance and proceeded to measure at arm’s length the distance from one corner to the next,” Hoffman later wrote.


Frommer's London 2009 by Darwin Porter, Danforth Prince

airport security, British Empire, double helix, East Village, Edmond Halley, glass ceiling, haute cuisine, Isaac Newton, Maui Hawaii, Murano, Venice glass, New Urbanism, place-making, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Ronald Reagan, Sloane Ranger, Stephen Hawking, sustainable-tourism, urban renewal, young professional

Fax 020/7286-1057. www.theetongroup.com. 43 units. £150–£190 ($300–$380) double. AE, DC, MC, V. Tube: Warwick Ave. Amenities: Room service; massage; laundry service; same-day dry cleaning, nonsmoking rooms. In room: A/C, TV, minibar, coffeemaker, hair dryer, iron, safe, trouser press, Wi-Fi. SHEPHERD’S BUSH EXPENSIVE K-West Hotel & Spa Finds This cutting-edge hotel is where South Beach (Miami, that is) meets New York’s East Village. A hotel as modern as tomorrow has been fashioned out of the former home of the BBC administration center. In spite of its off-center Shepherd’s Bush location, it attracts cool guests, especially media mavens and touring musicians. The latter can be seen rocking all night long in the chic K Lounge and recovering the next day with an Asian head massage in the spa. Swanky suites and elegant bedrooms in an avant-garde neutral style await this cosmopolitan crowd of guests.


pages: 678 words: 216,204

The Wealth of Networks: How Social Production Transforms Markets and Freedom by Yochai Benkler

affirmative action, barriers to entry, bioinformatics, Brownian motion, call centre, Cass Sunstein, centre right, clean water, commoditize, dark matter, desegregation, East Village, fear of failure, Firefox, game design, George Gilder, hiring and firing, Howard Rheingold, informal economy, information asymmetry, invention of radio, Isaac Newton, iterative process, Jean Tirole, jimmy wales, John Markoff, Kenneth Arrow, longitudinal study, market bubble, market clearing, Marshall McLuhan, Mitch Kapor, New Journalism, optical character recognition, pattern recognition, peer-to-peer, pre–internet, price discrimination, profit maximization, profit motive, random walk, recommendation engine, regulatory arbitrage, rent-seeking, RFID, Richard Stallman, Ronald Coase, Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence, SETI@home, shareholder value, Silicon Valley, Skype, slashdot, social software, software patent, spectrum auction, technoutopianism, The Fortune at the Bottom of the Pyramid, The Nature of the Firm, transaction costs, Vilfredo Pareto

Lessig called this the principle of bovinity: a small number of rules, consistently applied, suffice to control a herd of large animals. There is no need to assure that all people in all contexts continue to behave as couch potatoes for the true scope of the networked information economy to be constrained. It is enough that the core enabling technologies and the core cultural practices are confined to small groups-- some teenagers, some countercultural activists. There have been places like the East Village or the Left Bank throughout the period of the industrial information economy. For the gains in autonomy, democracy, justice, and a critical culture that are described in part II to materialize, the practices of nonmarket information production, individually free creation, and cooperative peer production must become more than fringe practices. They must become a part of life for substantial portions of the networked population.


pages: 788 words: 223,004

Merchants of Truth: The Business of News and the Fight for Facts by Jill Abramson

23andMe, 4chan, Affordable Care Act / Obamacare, Alexander Shulgin, Apple's 1984 Super Bowl advert, barriers to entry, Bernie Madoff, Bernie Sanders, Charles Lindbergh, Chelsea Manning, citizen journalism, cloud computing, commoditize, corporate governance, creative destruction, crowdsourcing, death of newspapers, digital twin, diversified portfolio, Donald Trump, East Village, Edward Snowden, Ferguson, Missouri, Filter Bubble, future of journalism, glass ceiling, Google Glasses, haute couture, hive mind, income inequality, information asymmetry, invisible hand, Jeff Bezos, Joseph Schumpeter, Khyber Pass, late capitalism, Marc Andreessen, Mark Zuckerberg, move fast and break things, move fast and break things, Nate Silver, new economy, obamacare, Occupy movement, performance metric, Peter Thiel, phenotype, pre–internet, race to the bottom, recommendation engine, Robert Mercer, Ronald Reagan, Saturday Night Live, self-driving car, sentiment analysis, Silicon Valley, Silicon Valley ideology, Silicon Valley startup, skunkworks, Snapchat, social intelligence, social web, Steve Jobs, Steven Levy, technoutopianism, telemarketer, the scientific method, The Wisdom of Crowds, Tim Cook: Apple, too big to fail, WikiLeaks

We are all waiting for it, are we not?” The audience erupted in applause. Some employees walked out. The problem was a broader management issue: the very wealthy Vice founders had lost touch with the young masses in Brooklyn. Once worshipped, they had both become remote figures. They swooped in for shoots for the HBO show, but neither wanted to be in the field for more than a few days. Alvi had married and was redoing his East Village apartment; Smith had recently had a third daughter. They were no longer the guys who in 1994 had joined forces with McInnes and began making their first millions with naked pictures and gross-out antics. That’s what they built their brand on. Now, despite the gloss of HBO and Emmys, they were facing the ramifications of how they treated women. The scandals kept coming, one involving Andrew Creighton, who had joined the company back in 2002 and helped Smith run the business end of things from London.


Lonely Planet Chile & Easter Island (Travel Guide) by Lonely Planet, Carolyn McCarthy, Kevin Raub

California gold rush, call centre, carbon footprint, centre right, Colonization of Mars, East Village, haute cuisine, Kickstarter, land reform, low cost airline, mass immigration, New Urbanism, off grid, place-making, QR code, Skype, sustainable-tourism, trade route, upwardly mobile, urban sprawl, white picket fence

Drinking Patrimonial BAR Offline map (Balmaceda 291; cocktails CH$2000-4000) This intimate spot is the bohemian bar of choice, warmed by a wood-burning stove and home to just a few tables. It’s on the 2nd floor overlooking the plaza and is a good spot to try Chiloé’s own craftbrew, Vertus (porter and golden ale) or excellent make-your-own micheladas (Mexican beer cocktails). Kaweshkar Lounge LOUNGE Offline map (www.kaweshkarlounge.cl; Blanco Encalada 31; cocktails CH$2000-5000) The retro, haphazard design of this diver bar recalls Berlin or New York’s East Village. The cocktails are well mixed, but when we came through, its chalkboard read, ‘We’re not in Lonely Planet but we are great!’, despite the fact it has been listed in the guide since 2009. Ristretto Café CAFE, BAR $ Offline map (Blanco 264; snacks CH$400-1000; closed Sun; ) It’s a shame the best cafe in Chiloé allows smoking, but in the land of Nescafé, you just have to suck it up. There is an extensive coffee, tea and tapas menu and over 50 international beers that insure it turns into a bar by night.


Frommer's Israel by Robert Ullian

airport security, British Empire, car-free, Chuck Templeton: OpenTable:, East Village, haute cuisine, Khartoum Gordon, mass immigration, Maui Hawaii, place-making, Silicon Valley, Skype, sustainable-tourism, trade route, urban planning, urban sprawl, Yom Kippur War

There are wonderful sorbets and pies on the dessert list, and a carefully composed bar and wine list. Business lunch specials are offered from noon to 5pm. 3 Ben Shitah St. & 02/632-5001. Reservations useful. Main courses NIS 70–NIS 110 ($18–$28/£9–£14); lunch specials vary daily. AE, DC, MC, V. Daily noon–5pm and 7pm–midnight. Inexpensive Value SOUP This little “souperia” looks like an outpost in Berkeley, Cambridge, or New York’s East Village—a mix of assorted old tables, chairs and sofas, candlelight, mellow background music, and garage and attic-sale decor. Marak means “soup” in Hebrew, and the menu consists of very good vegetarian soups (a different selection every night), served with bread and pesto. Among the standards are sweet potato; lentil with wine; spicy Yemenite tomato, onion, and cheese; and tomato with anise. Great shakshuka, a spicy egg-and-tomato dish, rounds out the hot menu.


pages: 1,009 words: 329,520

The Last Tycoons: The Secret History of Lazard Frères & Co. by William D. Cohan

activist fund / activist shareholder / activist investor, bank run, carried interest, cognitive dissonance, commoditize, computer age, corporate governance, corporate raider, creative destruction, credit crunch, diversification, Donald Trump, East Village, fear of failure, fixed income, G4S, hiring and firing, interest rate swap, intermodal, Joseph Schumpeter, late fees, Long Term Capital Management, Marc Andreessen, market bubble, offshore financial centre, Ponzi scheme, Ralph Nader, Ralph Waldo Emerson, rolodex, Ronald Reagan, shareholder value, The Nature of the Firm, the new new thing, Yogi Berra

But that progress quickly came to a complete halt in the aftermath of the hiring of a beautiful young woman, an undergraduate at the highly regarded Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania. Her name was Kate Bohner. She was athletic, tall, and striking, with long blond hair and long, muscular legs. When Bohner was in her junior year at Penn, she happened to be at a dinner party in New York on Valentine's Day 1987. She was seated next to Kim Taipale, an up-and-coming vice president at Lazard living in the East Village. They got to talking, and Taipale asked Bohner what she was thinking about doing for the summer between her junior and her senior years. Bohner said something about working at Goldman Sachs, and Taipale urged her to come to Lazard instead. Michel had just decided to shake things up at Lazard Brothers by installing a team of Lazard New York bankers there with the hope of having some of the American M&A techniques rub off on the British (who, of course, were disdainful of the whole exercise).


Frommer's Mexico 2008 by David Baird, Juan Cristiano, Lynne Bairstow, Emily Hughey Quinn

airport security, AltaVista, Bartolomé de las Casas, centre right, colonial rule, East Village, glass ceiling, haute cuisine, indoor plumbing, low cost airline, low cost carrier, Maui Hawaii, out of africa, Pepto Bismol, place-making, Skype, sustainable-tourism, the market place, urban planning

In recent years, the Centro Histórico downtown has earned a reputation for having a number of hip and edgy bars and clubs concentrated within walking distance. The posh Polanco neighborhood is known for its perennially hot nightclub scene, and in recent years many of the trendiest nightspots have opened in the Condesa and Roma neighborhoods (reputedly the SoHo of Mexico City, though the nightlife scene is more akin to New York’s East Village). Some of the city’s most exclusive nightclubs lie in the Lomas area. In the south of the city, San Angel remains highly popular, although it’s a bit of a drive if you’re not already staying in that area. Most bars don’t even begin to get going until around 10 or 11pm and usually stay open until at least 3am; nightclubs get started Tips Crime at Night Make sure to leave valuables—especially watches and jewelry—at your hotel, and bring only the cash you will need.


pages: 803 words: 415,953

Frommer's Mexico 2009 by David Baird, Lynne Bairstow, Joy Hepp, Juan Christiano

airport security, AltaVista, Bartolomé de las Casas, centre right, colonial rule, East Village, glass ceiling, haute cuisine, indoor plumbing, low cost airline, low cost carrier, out of africa, Pepto Bismol, place-making, Skype, sustainable-tourism, the market place, urban planning, young professional

In recent years, the Centro Histórico downtown has earned a reputation for having a number of hip and edgy bars and clubs concentrated within walking distance. The posh Polanco neighborhood is known for its perennially hot dining and bar scene, and in recent years many of the trendiest nightspots have opened in the Condesa and Roma neighborhoods (reputedly the SoHo of Mexico City, though the nightlife scene is more akin to New York’s East Village). Some of the city’s most exclusive nightclubs lie in the Lomas area. In the south of the city, San Angel remains highly popular, although it’s a bit of a drive if you’re not already staying in that area. Most bars don’t even begin to get going until around 10 or 11pm and usually stay open until at least 3am; nightclubs get started after midnight and continue into the wee hours. Many clubs operate only Thursday through Saturday.


The power broker : Robert Moses and the fall of New York by Caro, Robert A

Albert Einstein, American Society of Civil Engineers: Report Card, bank run, British Empire, card file, centre right, East Village, friendly fire, ghettoisation, hiring and firing, housing crisis, Internet Archive, invisible hand, Isaac Newton, land reform, Ralph Waldo Emerson, rent control, Right to Buy, The Death and Life of Great American Cities, urban decay, urban planning, urban renewal, working poor, Works Progress Administration, young professional

Then, tentatively at first, then more and more boldly, readers were given a chance to read about Title I in the morning as well: the Trib was in. But the pooling continued. In fact, there soon sprang up a circle at whose heart were Haddad and Gleason but which included also Woody Klein of the Telly, the Journal-American's Marty Steadman, Peter Braestrup of the Herald Tribune —and a reporter from the underground, thirty-one-year-old Mary Perot Nichols; born a Philadelphia Main Line Wasp, she had moved to the East Village, begun crusading against Moses' proposed road through Washington Square Park, and had seen at a glance truths about Moses' whole method of operation that no one, seemingly, had understood before; her only journalistic connection was The Village Voice, but her observations in it were in many ways the most penetrating printed up to that time. These reporters would meet almost daily with Hortense Gabel, the one city official willing to openly help them.