Long Term Capital Management

159 results back to index


pages: 206 words: 70,924

The Rise of the Quants: Marschak, Sharpe, Black, Scholes and Merton by Colin Read

Amazon: amazon.comamazon.co.ukamazon.deamazon.fr

Albert Einstein, Black-Scholes formula, Bretton Woods, Brownian motion, capital asset pricing model, collateralized debt obligation, correlation coefficient, Credit Default Swap, credit default swaps / collateralized debt obligations, David Ricardo: comparative advantage, discovery of penicillin, discrete time, Emanuel Derman, en.wikipedia.org, Eugene Fama: efficient market hypothesis, financial innovation, fixed income, floating exchange rates, full employment, Henri Poincaré, implied volatility, index fund, Isaac Newton, John von Neumann, Joseph Schumpeter, Long Term Capital Management, Louis Bachelier, margin call, market clearing, martingale, means of production, moral hazard, naked short selling, price stability, principal–agent problem, quantitative trading / quantitative finance, RAND corporation, random walk, risk tolerance, risk/return, Ronald Reagan, shareholder value, Sharpe ratio, short selling, stochastic process, The Chicago School, the scientific method, too big to fail, transaction costs, tulip mania, Works Progress Administration, yield curve

But everybody understood that this company was the most theoretically sophisticated investment house ever created. That was their calling card, and investors clamored to have Long Term Capital Management invest their wealth. These financial theorists understood one thing. Their models typically assume that there are zero transaction costs. We might consider a 180-person firm to be expensive to operate, but the initial funding of the firm represented more than $5 million invested per employee. 168 The Rise of the Quants Long Term Capital Management used the facilities of others, such as Bear Stearns and Merrill Lynch, and the company was registered in the Cayman Islands to reduce regulatory overhead and minimize tax consequences. So that they could avoid the regulation imposed on mutual funds, Long Term Capital Management was organized as a hedge fund, under the Investment Company Act of 1940, which imposes little oversight but allows the admission of only very well-heeled millionaires who understood the risks of a highly leveraged strategy and could afford to lose some money on occasion.

When there was price convergence for these longest-term bonds, and others began to take notice and to imitate Long Term Capital Management’s success, the company had to hunt for other mispricing opportunities and liquidity differentials. These increasingly aggressive trades may no longer have been of the form of price convergence arbitrage trades, and sometimes would not differ from the strategies that were employed by less theoretically motivated trading houses. They began trading traditional options and placed themselves in the position of acting as the insurer of funds operated by other trading houses through their options strategies. Of course, as AIG also discovered much later, every insurance scheme can be profitable so long as there are no claims. If prices rose as Long Term Capital Management predicted, the premiums it collected were simply pure profit. Long Term Capital Management’s strategy was very profitable so long as the market continued on a trajectory that had been maintained ever since the company’s inception.

The Federal Reserve Bank of New York, as the Federal District Bank responsible for the oversight of Wall Street, and its Chairman Allan Greenspan organized a bailout of almost $4 billion to save Long Term Capital Management out of concern that its failure would also bring down the other investment houses with which they subscribed as counterparties. The New York Fed assembled leaders of all the major investment houses in its conference room on September 23, 1998 to construct a plan for the bailout of the highest-flying investment house of the day. The talk resulted in an offer by AIG, Goldman Sachs, and Berkshire Hathaway to buy out the partners of Long Term Capital Management for $250 million and inject an additional $3.75 million into the fund, which they proposed would be absorbed into the Goldman Sachs trading department. The Nobel Prize, Life, and Legacy 171 The group gave John Meriwether and Long Term Capital Management an hour to decide whether they would accept the offer the New York Fed thought they could not refuse.


pages: 467 words: 154,960

Trend Following: How Great Traders Make Millions in Up or Down Markets by Michael W. Covel

Amazon: amazon.comamazon.co.ukamazon.deamazon.fr

Albert Einstein, asset allocation, Atul Gawande, backtesting, Bernie Madoff, Black Swan, buy low sell high, capital asset pricing model, Clayton Christensen, commodity trading advisor, correlation coefficient, Daniel Kahneman / Amos Tversky, delayed gratification, deliberate practice, diversification, diversified portfolio, Elliott wave, Emanuel Derman, Eugene Fama: efficient market hypothesis, fiat currency, fixed income, game design, hindsight bias, housing crisis, index fund, Isaac Newton, John Nash: game theory, linear programming, Long Term Capital Management, mandelbrot fractal, margin call, market bubble, market fundamentalism, market microstructure, mental accounting, Nash equilibrium, new economy, Nick Leeson, Ponzi scheme, prediction markets, random walk, Renaissance Technologies, Richard Feynman, Richard Feynman, risk tolerance, risk-adjusted returns, risk/return, Robert Shiller, Robert Shiller, shareholder value, Sharpe ratio, short selling, South Sea Bubble, Stephen Hawking, systematic trading, the scientific method, Thomas L Friedman, too big to fail, transaction costs, upwardly mobile, value at risk, Vanguard fund, volatility arbitrage, William of Occam

He also noted that Campbell had been long bonds and short a number of global stock index futures contracts ahead of the attack because of established trends.23 Their entries into positions were not triggered by actions on September 11. Their decisions to be in or out of the market were set in motion long before the unexpected event of September 11 happened. Although Enron, the California energy crisis, and September 11 are vivid illustrations of the zero-sum game with trend followers as the winners, the story of Long-Term Capital Management in the summer of 1998 may be the best trend following case study. Event #3: Long-Term Capital Management Collapse Long-Term Capital Management (LTCM) was a hedge fund that went bust in 1998. The story of who lost has been told repeatedly over the years; however, because trading is a zero-sum game, 151 152 Trend Following (Updated Edition): Learn to Make Millions in Up or Down Markets exploring the winners was the real story. LTCM is a classic saga of the zero-sum game played out on a grand scale with trend followers as winners.

., Jr, 62 Kerkorian, Kirk, 111 Killian, Mike, 125 Kingman, Dave, 143, 183-184 Klingler, James, 107 Klopenstein, Ralph, 39 Knapp, Volker, 393 Knoepffler, Alejandro, 273 Koppel, Ted, 117 Kovner, Bruce, 62, 282, 285, 289 Kozloff, Burt, 16 Kroc, Ray, 377 Kurczek, Dion, 393 kurtosis (statistics), 228 Lange, Harry, 111 Lao Tsu, 195 “law of small numbers,” 195 Le Bon, Gustave, 201 leadership traits, 201 “Learning to Love Non-Correlation” (research paper), 112 Lector, Hannibal, 221 Lee Kuan Yew, 205 Lee, Sang, 125 Leeson, Nick, 124-125, 168-172 Lefevre, Edwin, 91 Legg Mason, 285-286 Leggett, Robert, 241 Lehman Brothers, 153 Leonardo da Vinci, 242 leverage, decreasing returns and, 281-282 Levine, Karen, 203 Lewis, Michael, 184, 188 Liechtenstein Global Trust, 156 limitations of day trading, 272 linear versus nonlinear world, 224-229 Litner, John, 86 Little, Grady, 188-189 Little, Jim, 69, 71, 151, 253, 261 Litvinenko, Alexander, 199 Livermore, Jesse, 22, 90-93, 131, 236 Lo, Andrew, 271 Lombardi, Vince, 65, 176 Long Island Business News, 375 Long Term Capital Management (LTCM), xix, 118, 151-164, 272, 280, 293 long volatility, defined, 422 losers averaging, 235, 237-238 winners versus, 123-125 losing investment philosophies, 4-6 losing positions, when to exit, 262-263 losses. See also drawdowns handling, 22-23, 195-196 Long-Term Capital Management (LTCM) collapse, 156 zero-sum trading, 114-120 lottery example (risk and reward), 250-251 Lowenstein, Roger, 259 Lueck, Martin, 29 lumber trading, 134 Lynch, Peter, 110 Madoff, Bernard, 22, 223 The Man Group, 15, 29, 148, 157-158, 287 Managed Account Reports, 376 Mandelbrot, Benoit B., 228 manias, prospect theory, 194-199 Marcus, Michael, 19, 60, 62, 285 Marino, Dan, 261 market defined, 3-4 inefficiency of, 288-290 role of speculation in, 6 market price.

Part II 74 78 85 90 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95 3 Performance Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97 Absolute Returns . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 98 Fear of Volatility and Confusion with Risk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99 Drawdowns . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106 Correlation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 111 Zero Sum Nature of the Markets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 114 George Soros and Zero Sum . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 116 4 Big Events, Crashes, and Panics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 123 Event #1: 2008 Stock Market Bubble and Crash . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 126 Day-by-Day Analysis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 136 Event #2: 2000–2002 Stock Market Bubble . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 138 Event #3: Long-Term Capital Management Collapse . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 151 Event #4: Asian Contagion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 164 Event #5: Barings Bank . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 168 Event #6: Metallgesellschaft . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 172 Final Thoughts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 175 The Always “New” Coming Storm . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 178 5 Baseball: Thinking Outside the Batter’s Box . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 181 The Home Run . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 182 Moneyball and Billy Beane . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 185 John W.


pages: 435 words: 127,403

Panderer to Power by Frederick Sheehan

Amazon: amazon.comamazon.co.ukamazon.deamazon.fr

Asian financial crisis, asset-backed security, bank run, banking crisis, Bretton Woods, British Empire, call centre, central bank independence, collateralized debt obligation, corporate governance, credit crunch, Credit Default Swap, credit default swaps / collateralized debt obligations, crony capitalism, deindustrialization, diversification, financial deregulation, financial innovation, full employment, inflation targeting, interest rate swap, inventory management, Isaac Newton, Long Term Capital Management, margin call, market bubble, McMansion, Menlo Park, mortgage debt, new economy, Northern Rock, oil shock, place-making, Ponzi scheme, price stability, reserve currency, rising living standards, rolodex, Ronald Reagan, Sand Hill Road, savings glut, shareholder value, Silicon Valley, Silicon Valley startup, South Sea Bubble, supply-chain management, supply-chain management software, The Great Moderation, too big to fail, transaction costs, trickle-down economics, VA Linux, Y2K, Yom Kippur War

., p. 35. 38 Ibid. 39 Ibid. 40 FOMC meeting transcript, September 29, 1998, p. 69. The chairman’s mind may have been elsewhere. LongTerm Capital Management had failed and threatened the financial system. 41 Ibid. This page intentionally left blank 15 LongTerm Capital Management: A Lesson Ignored 1998 It is one thing for one bank to have failed to appreciate what was happening to [LongTerm Capital Management], but this list of institutions is just mind boggling.1 —Alan Greenspan, FOMC meeting, September 29, 1998, upon learning that the counterparties that lent to LongTerm Capital Management did not monitor LTCM’s balance sheet In the first three weeks of September 1998, LongTerm Capital Management (LTCM), a Greenwich, Connecticut, hedge fund, lost half a billion dollars a week, and everyone knew it.2 Except, possibly, Alan Greenspan.

General Accounting Office, LongTerm Capital Management: Regulators Need to Focus Greater Attention on Systemic Risk, GAO/GGD-00-3, October 29, 1999, p. 15, quoted in Martin Mayer, The Fed: The Inside Story of How the World’s Most Powerful Financial Institution Drives the Markets (New York: Free Press, 2001), p. 267. 4 Alan Greenspan, “Our Banking History,” speech at the Annual Meeting and Conference of the Conference of State Bank Supervisors, Nashville, Tennessee, May 2, 1998. 5 Citicorp was renamed Citigroup Inc. after it merged with Travelers Group in 1998. Those Daffy Nobels There had been plenty of warnings that not much had changed since the derivative failures in 1994. Ignorance was essential to derivative operations. We need look no further than LongTerm Capital Management and two of its employees, Robert Merton and Myron Scholes.

John Meriwether had anticipated the derivatives boom by forming his Arbitrage Group at Salomon Brothers in 1977.7 Meriwether left Salomon in 1991. In 1993, he formed LongTerm Capital Management (LTCM). He hired his top Salomon colleagues, including Merton and Scholes. By 1997, LTCM employed 25 Ph.D.s, who manufactured highly quantitative arbitrage trades. The fund rose 59 percent in 1995 and 44 percent in 1996, but then the law of diminishing returns kicked in.8 The firm was managing much more money. The Ph.D.s were finding less opportunity to apply their skills. LTCM produced a 17 percent return in 1997. 6 Frank Partnoy, Infectious Greed: How Deceit and Risk Corrupted the Financial Markets (New York: Times Books, 2003), p. 303. 7 Roger Lowenstein, When Genius Failed: The Rise and Fall of LongTerm Capital Management (New York: Random House, 2000), p. 9. 8 Partnoy, Infectious Greed, pp. 254–255.


pages: 257 words: 64,763

The Great American Stickup: How Reagan Republicans and Clinton Democrats Enriched Wall Street While Mugging Main Street by Robert Scheer

Amazon: amazon.comamazon.co.ukamazon.deamazon.fr

banking crisis, Bernie Madoff, Bernie Sanders, collateralized debt obligation, corporate governance, Credit Default Swap, credit default swaps / collateralized debt obligations, facts on the ground, financial deregulation, housing crisis, invisible hand, Long Term Capital Management, mortgage debt, new economy, Ponzi scheme, profit motive, Ralph Nader, Ronald Reagan, too big to fail, trickle-down economics

Bush administration as private, profit-driven pursue subprime, Alt-A, mortgages Gramm, Phil as antiregulatory, free-market ideologue background blames economic collapse on victims responsible for CFMA with ties to Enron as UBS executive weakens CRA standards for poor consumers Gramm, Wendy Lee background as deregulation activist exempts Enron from regulatory restraints as head of CFTC under Reagan, targets regulatory system tries to unseat Bush’s CFTC commissioner Gramm-Latta budget of 1981 Gramm-Leach-Bliley Act Grayson, Alan Great Depression Greenberger, Michael Greenspan, Alan on bailout of Long-Term Capital Management -Clinton agreement defines economic policy declares free markets as self-regulating on growth of OTC derivatives insists derivatives will self-regulate on irrational exuberance of economy opposes Born’s derivatives study, stance profiled, praised, in media in territorial rivalry with Rubin GSEs. See Government sponsored enterprises Hedge funds and AIG Geithner’s reliance on managers Long-Term Capital Management Paulson’s description to G. W. Bush receiving banks’ toxic holdings regulations prevented by Summers Hendrickson, Jill M. Hillebrand, Gail Hirsh, Michael Housing affordability as original purpose of GSEs bubble denied by Raines Fannie Mae, Freddie Mac, fail due to greed, corruption flipped in hot market and Goldman’s toxic derivatives not prime agenda of Fannie Mae, Freddie Mac Howard, J.

Born, who a decade later would begin to be seen as a modern-day Cassandra, recognized the problem immediately, as she would recall in a 2003 interview for Washington Lawyer magazine: “I became concerned about it once I got to the commission and began to learn about the OTC market. The more I learned, the more I realized we didn’t know.” She understood clearly that U.S. and international markets were facing great danger. She referred to Alan Greenspan himself, who said one of the reasons the Federal Reserve Board had supported the bailout of Long-Term Capital Management (a large hedge fund) was that they were “afraid it would have profound worldwide economic repercussions.” A Wall Street Journal article by Michael Schroeder and Greg Ip published December 13, 2001, five years after Born’s appointment, explained the escalating tension: “[Born’s] comments in speeches and in a discussion paper about the need for more oversight and regulation of OTC derivatives triggered an uproar among derivatives dealers—from J.

In dramatic fashion, according to the Wall Street Journal, she was summoned in June 1998 from the hospital bed of her daughter, who had undergone knee surgery, by Representative James Leach, chair of the House Committee on Banking and Financial Services, to an emergency meeting in which “regulatory staff and lawmakers berated Ms. Born for more than two hours in a fruitless effort to persuade her to stop her campaign.” Three months later, the collapse of Long-Term Capital Management led Leach to offer a grudging acknowledgment that Born wasn’t crazy. “You are welcome to claim some vindication,” he said at a congressional hearing. Born was still alive and kicking. Yet she had already aroused the extreme hostility of an army of corporate advocates—especially the formidable DC lobbying machine of Enron, which was “fanatical about preventing any hint of derivatives regulation” according to the Wall Street Journal reporters’ sources.


pages: 584 words: 187,436

More Money Than God: Hedge Funds and the Making of a New Elite by Sebastian Mallaby

Amazon: amazon.comamazon.co.ukamazon.deamazon.fr

Andrei Shleifer, Asian financial crisis, asset-backed security, automated trading system, bank run, barriers to entry, Benoit Mandelbrot, Berlin Wall, Bernie Madoff, Big bang: deregulation of the City of London, Bonfire of the Vanities, Bretton Woods, capital controls, Carmen Reinhart, collapse of Lehman Brothers, collateralized debt obligation, Credit Default Swap, credit default swaps / collateralized debt obligations, crony capitalism, currency manipulation / currency intervention, currency peg, Elliott wave, Eugene Fama: efficient market hypothesis, failed state, Fall of the Berlin Wall, financial deregulation, financial innovation, financial intermediation, fixed income, full employment, German hyperinflation, High speed trading, index fund, Kenneth Rogoff, Long Term Capital Management, margin call, market bubble, market clearing, market fundamentalism, merger arbitrage, moral hazard, natural language processing, Network effects, new economy, Nikolai Kondratiev, pattern recognition, pre–internet, quantitative hedge fund, quantitative trading / quantitative finance, random walk, Renaissance Technologies, Richard Thaler, risk-adjusted returns, risk/return, rolodex, Sharpe ratio, short selling, Silicon Valley, South Sea Bubble, sovereign wealth fund, statistical arbitrage, statistical model, technology bubble, The Great Moderation, The Myth of the Rational Market, too big to fail, transaction costs

Rosenfeld, Harvard Business School presentation. See also Perold, “Long-Term Capital Management.” 20. For example, at the time of the Bank of China party, LTCM’s leverage was about nineteen to one—extraordinarily high relative to most other hedge funds. But, according to the firm’s calculations, LTCM’s value at risk was $720 million, and its $6.7 billion in capital was more than enough to absorb that. See Perold, “Long-Term Capital Management.” 21. Many hedge funds borrowed cheaply by financing positions in the repo market with overnight money. Long-Term was willing to pay more in order to lock the money up for six to twelve months. It also arranged a three-year loan and a standby credit. Rosenfeld presentation; Perold, “Long-Term Capital Management.” 22. Having done its best to lock up capital in these ways, LTCM calculated the residual liquidity risk, gaming out scenarios in which its brokers changed the terms of their lending.

But by 1988, when Asness arrived in Chicago, Fama was leading the revisionist charge: Along with a younger colleague, Kenneth French, Fama discovered non-random patterns in markets that could be lucrative for traders. After contributing to this literature, Asness headed off to Wall Street and soon opened his hedge fund. In similar fashion, the Nobel laureates Myron Scholes and Robert Merton, whose formula for pricing options grew out of the efficient-markets school, signed up with the hedge fund Long-Term Capital Management. Andrei Shleifer, the Harvard economist who had compared the efficient-market theory to a crashing stock, helped to create an investment company called LSV with two fellow finance professors. His coauthor, Lawrence Summers, made the most of a gap between stints as president of Harvard and economic adviser to President Obama to sign on with D. E. Shaw, a quantitative hedge fund.9 Yet the biggest effect of the new inefficient-market consensus was not that academics flocked to hedge funds.

In 1994, the Federal Reserve announced a tiny one-quarter-of-a-percentage-point rise in short-term interest rates, and the bond market went into a mad spin; leveraged hedge funds had been wrong-footed by the move, and they began dumping positions furiously. Foreshadowing future financial panics, the turmoil spread from the United States to Japan, Europe, and the emerging world; several hedge funds sank, and for a few hours it even looked as though the storied firm of Bankers Trust might be dragged down with them. As if this were not warning enough, the world was treated to another hedge-fund failure four years later, when Long-Term Capital Management and its crew of Nobel laureates went bust; terrified that a chaotic bankruptcy would topple Lehman Brothers and other dominoes besides, panicked regulators rushed in to oversee LTCM’s burial. Meanwhile, hedge funds wreaked havoc with exchange-rate policies in Europe and Asia. After the East Asian crisis, Malaysia’s prime minister, Mahathir Mohamad, lamented that “all these countries have spent 40 years trying to build up their economies and a moron like Soros comes along with a lot of money to speculate and ruins things.”10 And so, by the start of the twenty-first century, there were two competing views of hedge funds.


pages: 701 words: 199,010

The Crisis of Crowding: Quant Copycats, Ugly Models, and the New Crash Normal by Ludwig B. Chincarini

Amazon: amazon.comamazon.co.ukamazon.deamazon.fr

affirmative action, asset-backed security, automated trading system, bank run, banking crisis, Basel III, Bernie Madoff, Black-Scholes formula, buttonwood tree, Carmen Reinhart, central bank independence, collapse of Lehman Brothers, collateralized debt obligation, collective bargaining, corporate governance, correlation coefficient, Credit Default Swap, credit default swaps / collateralized debt obligations, delta neutral, discounted cash flows, diversification, diversified portfolio, family office, financial innovation, financial intermediation, fixed income, Flash crash, full employment, Gini coefficient, high net worth, hindsight bias, housing crisis, implied volatility, income inequality, interest rate derivative, interest rate swap, labour mobility, liquidity trap, London Interbank Offered Rate, Long Term Capital Management, low skilled workers, margin call, market design, market fundamentalism, merger arbitrage, Mexican peso crisis / tequila crisis, moral hazard, mortgage debt, Northern Rock, Occupy movement, oil shock, price stability, quantitative easing, quantitative hedge fund, quantitative trading / quantitative finance, Ralph Waldo Emerson, regulatory arbitrage, Renaissance Technologies, risk tolerance, risk-adjusted returns, Robert Shiller, Robert Shiller, Ronald Reagan, Sharpe ratio, short selling, sovereign wealth fund, speech recognition, statistical arbitrage, statistical model, systematic trading, The Great Moderation, too big to fail, transaction costs, value at risk, yield curve, zero-coupon bond

“FHFA’s First Anniversary and Challenges Ahead.” FHFA Speech, July 30, 2009. Long-Term Capital Management. “Long-Term Capital, Ltd. Private Placement of Ordinary Shares.” Confidential Private Placement Memorandum #225, October 1, 1993. Lowenstein, Roger. When Genius Failed. The Rise and Fall of Long-Term Capital Management. Random House, 2000. Luce, Edward. “Bank of Italy Governor Defends LTCM Position.” Financial Times, October 5, 1998. Lux, Thomas. “Herd Behavior, Bubbles, and Crashes.” The Economic Journal, July 1995. Macauley, Frederick. Some Theoretical Problems Suggested by the Movements of Interest Rates, Bond Yields and Stock Prices in the United States since 1856. NBER, 1938. MacKenzie, Donald. “Long-Term Capital Management and the Sociology of Arbitrage.” Economy and Society, 32:349–380, August 2003.

Chincarini looks at the financial crises of the past 15 years—starting with a comprehensive analysis of the Long-Term Capital Management crisis in 1998 and ending with the Euro-debt crisis of 2012—and argues convincingly that the central risk in these crises was accentuated from within the financial system rather than from external economic forces (it includes the best analysis I have read on the LTCM crisis). This bold new theory has important implications for both industry practices as well as for new regulations. It is essential that we learn the lessons from the past (or else we will repeat the same mistakes). Chincarini’s book should be required reading for anyone who wants to understand and help prevent financial crises.” —Eric Rosenfeld, Co-Founder of Long-Term Capital Management and JWM Partners “Chincarini connects the dots between LTCM, mispriced risk, the 2008 financial crisis, the flash crash, and the Greek debt crisis.

The story begins in 1998 with Long-Term Capital Management’s fascinating collapse and tries to explain the ways in which crowds and leverage demolished one of the most successful hedge funds in history. The failure of LTCM had many lessons for the financial community and for society at large, but no one paid much attention—perhaps because disaster was ultimately averted. Ignored lessons formed a large part of the basis for 2008’s financial disasters, only this time with more leverage, more participants, and a series of policy mishaps. PART I The 1998 LTCM Crisis All human beings are interconnected, one with all other elements in creation. —Henry Read The 2008 financial crisis really began 10 years earlier, with the collapse of the famous hedge fund Long-Term Capital Management (LTCM). LTCM was not an ordinary hedge fund.


pages: 471 words: 124,585

The Ascent of Money: A Financial History of the World by Niall Ferguson

Amazon: amazon.comamazon.co.ukamazon.deamazon.fr

Admiral Zheng, Andrei Shleifer, Asian financial crisis, asset allocation, asset-backed security, Atahualpa, bank run, banking crisis, banks create money, Black Swan, Black-Scholes formula, Bonfire of the Vanities, Bretton Woods, BRICs, British Empire, capital asset pricing model, capital controls, Carmen Reinhart, Cass Sunstein, central bank independence, collateralized debt obligation, colonial exploitation, Corn Laws, corporate governance, credit crunch, Credit Default Swap, credit default swaps / collateralized debt obligations, currency manipulation / currency intervention, currency peg, Daniel Kahneman / Amos Tversky, deglobalization, diversification, diversified portfolio, double entry bookkeeping, Edmond Halley, Edward Glaeser, Edward Lloyd's coffeehouse, financial innovation, financial intermediation, fixed income, floating exchange rates, Fractional reserve banking, Francisco Pizarro, full employment, German hyperinflation, Hernando de Soto, high net worth, hindsight bias, Home mortgage interest deduction, Hyman Minsky, income inequality, interest rate swap, Isaac Newton, iterative process, joint-stock company, joint-stock limited liability company, Joseph Schumpeter, Kenneth Rogoff, knowledge economy, labour mobility, London Interbank Offered Rate, Long Term Capital Management, market bubble, market fundamentalism, means of production, Mikhail Gorbachev, money: store of value / unit of account / medium of exchange, moral hazard, mortgage debt, mortgage tax deduction, Naomi Klein, Nick Leeson, Northern Rock, pension reform, price anchoring, price stability, principal–agent problem, probability theory / Blaise Pascal / Pierre de Fermat, profit motive, quantitative hedge fund, RAND corporation, random walk, rent control, rent-seeking, reserve currency, Richard Thaler, Robert Shiller, Robert Shiller, Ronald Reagan, savings glut, seigniorage, short selling, Silicon Valley, South Sea Bubble, sovereign wealth fund, spice trade, structural adjustment programs, technology bubble, The Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith, The Wisdom of Crowds, Thomas Malthus, Thorstein Veblen, too big to fail, transaction costs, value at risk, Washington Consensus, Yom Kippur War

., p. 159. 78 Nicholas Dunbar, Inventing Money: The Story of Long-Term Capital Management and the Legends Behind It (New York, 2000), p. 92. 79 Dunbar, Inventing Money, pp. 168-73. 80 André F. Perold, ‘Long-Term Capital Management, L.P. (A)’, Harvard Business School Case 9-200-007 (5 November 1999), p. 2. 81 Perold, ‘Long-Term Capital Management, L.P. (A)’, p. 13. 82 Ibid., p. 16. 83 For a history of the efficient markets school of finance theory, see Peter Bernstein, Capital Ideas: The Improbable Origins of Modern Wall Street (New York, 1993). 84 Dunbar, Inventing Money, p. 178. 85 Roger Lowenstein, When Genius Failed: The Rise and Fall of Long-Term Capital Management (New York, 2000), p. 126. 86 Perold, ‘Long-Term Capital Management, L.P. (A)’, pp. 11f., 17. 87 Lowenstein, When Genius Failed, p. 127. 88 André F.

., 17. 87 Lowenstein, When Genius Failed, p. 127. 88 André F. Perold, ‘Long-Term Capital Management, L.P. (B)’, Harvard Business School Case 9-200-08 (27 October 1999), p. 1. 89 Lowenstein, When Genius Failed, pp. 133-8. 90 Ibid., p. 144. 91 I owe this point to André Stern, who was an investor in LTCM. 92 Lowenstein, When Genius Failed, p. 147. 93 André F. Perold, ‘Long-Term Capital Management, L.P. (C)’, Harvard Business School Case 9-200-09 (5 November 1999), pp. 1, 3. 94 Idem, ‘Long-Term Capital Management, L.P. (D)’, Harvard Business School Case 9-200-10 (4 October 2004), p. 1. Perold’s cases are by far the best account. 95 Lowenstein, When Genius Failed, p. 149. 96 ‘All Bets Are Off: How the Salesmanship and Brainpower Failed at Long-Term Capital’, Wall Street Journal, 16 November 1998. 97 See on this point Peter Bernstein, Capital Ideas Evolving (New York, 2007). 98 Donald MacKenzie, ‘Long-Term Capital Management and the Sociology of Arbitrage’, Economy and Society, 32, 3 (August 2003), p. 374. 99 Ibid., passim. 100 Ibid., p. 365. 101 Franklin R.

Perold’s cases are by far the best account. 95 Lowenstein, When Genius Failed, p. 149. 96 ‘All Bets Are Off: How the Salesmanship and Brainpower Failed at Long-Term Capital’, Wall Street Journal, 16 November 1998. 97 See on this point Peter Bernstein, Capital Ideas Evolving (New York, 2007). 98 Donald MacKenzie, ‘Long-Term Capital Management and the Sociology of Arbitrage’, Economy and Society, 32, 3 (August 2003), p. 374. 99 Ibid., passim. 100 Ibid., p. 365. 101 Franklin R. Edwards, ‘Hedge Funds and the Collapse of Long-Term Capital Management’, Journal of Economic Perspectives, 13, 2 (Spring 1999), pp. 192f. See also Stephen J. Brown, William N. Goetzmann and Roger G. Ibbotson, ‘Offshore Hedge Funds: Survival and Performance, 1989-95’, Journal of Business, 72, 1(January 1999), 91-117. 102 Harry Markowitz, ‘New Frontiers of Risk: The 360 Degree Risk Manager for Pensions and Nonprofits’, The Bank of New York Thought Leadership White Paper (October 2005), p. 6. 103 ‘Hedge Podge’, The Economist, 16 February 2008. 104 ‘Rolling In It’, The Economist, 16 November 2006. 105 John Kay, ‘Just Think, the Fees You Could Charge Buffett’, Financial Times, 11 March 2008. 106 Stephanie Baum, ‘Top 100 Hedge Funds have 75% of Industry Assets’, Financial News, 21 May 2008. 107 Dean P.


pages: 289 words: 113,211

A Demon of Our Own Design: Markets, Hedge Funds, and the Perils of Financial Innovation by Richard Bookstaber

Amazon: amazon.comamazon.co.ukamazon.deamazon.fr

affirmative action, Albert Einstein, asset allocation, backtesting, Black Swan, Black-Scholes formula, Bonfire of the Vanities, butterfly effect, commodity trading advisor, computer age, disintermediation, diversification, double entry bookkeeping, Edward Lorenz: Chaos theory, family office, financial innovation, fixed income, frictionless, frictionless market, George Akerlof, implied volatility, index arbitrage, Jeff Bezos, London Interbank Offered Rate, Long Term Capital Management, loose coupling, margin call, market bubble, market design, merger arbitrage, Mexican peso crisis / tequila crisis, moral hazard, new economy, Nick Leeson, oil shock, quantitative trading / quantitative finance, random walk, Renaissance Technologies, risk tolerance, risk/return, Robert Shiller, Robert Shiller, rolodex, Saturday Night Live, shareholder value, short selling, Silicon Valley, statistical arbitrage, The Market for Lemons, time value of money, too big to fail, transaction costs, tulip mania, uranium enrichment, yield curve, zero-coupon bond

HG4530.B66 2007 332.64'524—dc22 2006034368 Printed in the United States of America. 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 ffirs.qxd 3/1/07 3:33 PM Page v In memory of my son, Joseph Israel Bookstaber ffirs.qxd 3/1/07 3:33 PM Page vi ftoc.qxd 3/1/07 3:34 PM Page vii CONTENTS Acknowledgments ix About the Author xi CHAPTER 1 ~ Introduction: The Paradox of Market Risk 1 CHAPTER 2 ~ The Demons of ’87 7 CHAPTER 3 ~ A New Sheriff in Town 33 CHAPTER 4 ~ How Salomon Rolled the Dice and Lost 51 CHAPTER 5 ~ They Bought Salomon, Then They Killed It 77 CHAPTER 6 ~ Long-Term Capital Management Rides the Leverage Cycle to Hell 97 CHAPTER 7 ~ Colossus 125 CHAPTER 8 ~ Complexity, Tight Coupling, and Normal Accidents 143 CHAPTER 9 ~ The Brave New World of Hedge Funds 165 CHAPTER 10 ~ Cockroaches and Hedge Funds 207 CHAPTER 11 ~ Hedge Fund Existential Conclusion: Built to Crash? Notes 261 Index vii 271 255 243 ftoc.qxd 3/1/07 3:34 PM Page viii flast.qxd 3/1/07 3:34 PM Page ix ACKNOWLEDGMENTS N early a decade ago I made a presentation to the Institute for Quantitative Research in Finance on the origins of market crisis.

He is the author of a number of books and articles on finance topics ranging from option theory to risk management, and has xi flast.qxd 3/1/07 3:34 PM Page xii ABOUT THE AUTHOR received various awards for his research, including the Graham and Dodd Scroll from the Financial Analysts Federation and the Roger F. Murray Award from the Institute of Quantitative Research in Finance. He received a Ph.D. in economics from MIT. xii ccc_demon_001-006_ch01.qxd 2/13/07 1:44 PM Page 1 CHAPTER 1 INTRODUCTION: THE PARADOX OF MARKET RISK W hile it is not strictly true that I caused the two great financial crises of the late twentieth century—the 1987 stock market crash and the Long-Term Capital Management (LTCM) hedge fund debacle 11 years later—let’s just say I was in the vicinity. If Wall Street is the economy’s powerhouse, I was definitely one of the guys fiddling with the controls. My actions seemed insignificant at the time, and certainly the consequences were unintended. You don’t deliberately obliterate hundreds of billions of dollars of investor money. And that is at the heart of this book—it is going to happen again.

But in the frenzy of the crisis, the liquidity premium of the on-the-run bond had gotten totally out of hand, and no one cared or took the time to notice that such a subtle relationship had been broken. The Salomon gang bet that once the market cooled the normal physics would reemerge, pick up on this mispricing, and reestablish the relationship, which indeed occurred. Between this and several similar trades they picked up more than $100 million. (Ironically, 11 years later this same team, having left Salomon and riding high at Long-Term Capital Management, would trigger a market crisis that would lead to a far more egregious mispricing between various 30-year bonds. By then I would be sitting at Salomon arguing at a risk management committee meeting for the firm to take on a similar position. But with its trading spirit dulled by the Citigroup merger, Salomon would pass on the opportunity.) The damage to the stock market was accentuated by the fact that many large institutions had increased their stock holdings on the premise that portfolio insurance would protect them from losses.

Trend Commandments: Trading for Exceptional Returns by Michael W. Covel

Amazon: amazon.comamazon.co.ukamazon.deamazon.fr

Albert Einstein, Bernie Madoff, Black Swan, commodity trading advisor, correlation coefficient, delayed gratification, diversified portfolio, en.wikipedia.org, Eugene Fama: efficient market hypothesis, family office, full employment, Lao Tzu, Long Term Capital Management, market bubble, market microstructure, Mikhail Gorbachev, moral hazard, Nick Leeson, oil shock, Ponzi scheme, prediction markets, quantitative trading / quantitative finance, random walk, Sharpe ratio, systematic trading, the scientific method, transaction costs, tulip mania, upwardly mobile, Y2K

When Kernen asked about trend followers purportedly pushing markets further than they should be fundamentally, did that mean he had a way to determine the correct price level of all markets at all times? 3. When Kernen brought up Long Term Capital Management in attempt to compare Harding to its demise, did he not understand that Harding did not believe in efficient markets? Had he ever looked at a monthly up and down track record of Harding or any trend follower? 4. Why ask a trend following trader for “picks”? 5. When Kernen asked Harding if he would come back with the same moniker and title, was he implying that he believed Harding would blow up soon and be back on CNBC under some reformulated firm name—like what the proprietors of Long Term Capital Management did after their blowup? Has he ever asked Warren Buffett that question? I can easily see some painting this interview differently: “Harding set himself up for the LTCM tie-in by framing himself as a computer science shop looking at data and being black box.”

., 228 Jones, Paul Tudor, 15, 143-144 judgment, 30 Kahneman, Daniel, 118 history of trend following, 221-231 Kernen, Joe, 215-218 Hite, Larry, 15 King of the Hill (television program), 147 “home runs,” 81-82 Index Kovner, Bruce, 5, 15 Krakower, Susan, 162 LTCM (Long Term Capital Management), 101-102, 216 Krispy Kreme, 34 luck versus skill in trend following, 189-190 L Lynyrd Skynyrd, 211 “law of small numbers,” 118 M learning from others, 143-144 Lebeau, Charles, 60 Leeson, Nick, 4, 91 Lefèvre, Edwin, 223 Livermore, Jesse, 79, 223, 227-228, 239 long, defined, 12 long only, defined, 12 Long Term Capital Management (LTCM), 101-102, 216 Madoff, Bernard, 81 Magee, John, 226 Man Group, 15 Man Investments, 5 managed futures, defined, 11. See also trend following manipulation of monetary policy, 181-183 Marcus, Michael, 15 Longstreet, Roy, 239 market crashes, trend following during, 97-98 losers and winners market gurus, 147-148 crowd mentality, 117-120 during market crashes, 97-98 Efficient-Markets Hypothesis, 101-102 market predictors, 165-167 contradictions in predictions, 175-178 trend following versus, 194 hatred of trend following, 109-110 market price, importance of, 51-52 unexpected events, 91 market theories zero-sum game, 95 losses avoiding averaging, 79 271 fundamental analysis, 33-35 technical analysis, 35-36 markets drawdowns, 69-70 change in, 45 exit strategies, 75-76 entering, 73 what to trade, 65-67 272 Index McCain, John, 182 media, market predictions by, 177 Merton, Robert, 101 Miller, Merton, 101 origins of trend following, 221-231 Ostgaard, Stig, 221 P Paulson, John, 109 misleading information, spreading, 169-170 Pelley, Scott, 175 monetary policy, government manipulation of, 181-183 performance statistics for trend following, 15-23 money, capitalism and, 113-115 Picasso, Pablo, 88 money management, importance of, 61-62 players, types of, 205 morality of trend following, 109-110 Popoff, Peter, 166 pliability, 30 moving average, defined, 13 portfolio diversity, example of, 65-67 Mulvaney, Paul, 22 position sizing, 61-62 Munger, Charlie, 157 Prechter, Robert, 225 N–O predictions about market, 165-167 Nasdaq market crash (1973-1974), 151 net worth of trend following traders, 15 New Blueprints for Gains in Stocks and Grains (Dunnigan), 230 avoiding, 47-48 contradictions in, 175-178 trend following versus, 194 predictive technical analysis, 35 Nicklaus, Jack, 120 presidents, approval ratings based on economy, 181-182 Nikkei 225 stock index, 151 price action Obama, Barack, 182 optimism in trend following, 201-202 entering markets, 73 importance of, 51-52 profit targets, avoiding, 75-76 Index Profits in the Stock Market (Gartley), 226 Prospect Theory, 118 prudence, 30 Pujols, Albert, 138-139 Q–R quants, defined, 12 quarterly performance reports, 105-106 273 S S&P 500, defined, 13 Sack, Brian, 183 Schabacker, Richard W., 226 Schmidt, Eric, 47 Scholes, Myron, 101 scientific method in trend following, 134-135 Seidler, Howard, 20 Ramsey, Dave, 91 Seinfeld (television program), 161 Rand, Ayn, 113 selecting trading systems, 59-62 reactive technical analysis, 36 self-regulation, 124 “Reminiscences of a Stock Operator” (Lefèvre), 223 self-reliance, 30 repeatable alpha, defined, 12 Seykota, Ed, 15, 62 Rhea, Robert, 225 Shanks, Tom, 21 Ricardo, David, 223 Sharpe ratio, 137 risk assessment, 55-56 sheep mentality, 117-120 risk management, 61-62 short, defined, 12 Robbins, Anthony, 208 Simons, Jim, 135 Robertson, Pat, 166 The Simpsons (television program), 110 robustness of trend following, 85 Rogers, Jim, 23 Roosevelt, Franklin D., 114 Rosenberg, Michael, 201 rules of trend following, 201-202 Serling, Rod, 26 skill versus luck in trend following, 189-190 Smith, Vernon, 26 Social Security, 181 Sokol, David, 158 Soros, George, 189 274 Index speculation qualities of, 30 role of, 29-30 Speilberg, Steven, 208 spreading misleading information, 169-170 statistics in trend following, 137-140 Stone, Oliver, 29 story, fundamental analysis as, 33-35 Studies in Tape Reading (Wyckoff), 226 sunk costs, 118 Sunrise Capital, 5 drawdowns statistics, 70 performance statistics, 22 Technical Traders Guide to Computer Analysis of the Futures Markets (Lebeau), 60 Ten Years in Wall Street (Fowler), 224 three-phase systems, 60 Trader (documentary), 143 traders, investors versus, 29-30 trading gold, 173 trading systems, selecting, 59-62 “Trading With the Trend” (Dunnigan), 229 Transtrend, 5, 15 Trend Commandments (Covel) content of, 6 people written for, 9 trend following Swensen, David, 187 advantages of, 235-236 systematic global macro, defined, 12 compared to black box, 187 systematic trend following.

They flatten, reverse, or crash.4 To do that means you must have a portfolio with enough exposure to diverse global markets to allow you to make the crazy money during the big events. And there will inevitably be more surprise events with headline-generating losers taking the perp walk in the press, with the winners going unknown. That is a prediction worth betting on. This page intentionally left blank “Could you be on a desert island and make money trading?” That is the question to answer.1 Inefficient Markets The hedge fund Long Term Capital Management (LTCM) went bust in 1998, and that event is more relevant today than ever. It laid the foundation for government induced bubble/bailout schemes still employed daily. LTCM promised to use complex mathematical models to make investors wealthy beyond their wildest dreams. It attracted elite Wall Street investors and initially reaped fantastic profits with secret money-making strategies.


pages: 350 words: 103,270

The Devil's Derivatives: The Untold Story of the Slick Traders and Hapless Regulators Who Almost Blew Up Wall Street . . . And Are Ready to Do It Again by Nicholas Dunbar

Amazon: amazon.comamazon.co.ukamazon.deamazon.fr

asset-backed security, bank run, banking crisis, Basel III, Black Swan, Black-Scholes formula, bonus culture, capital asset pricing model, Carmen Reinhart, Cass Sunstein, collateralized debt obligation, Credit Default Swap, credit default swaps / collateralized debt obligations, delayed gratification, diversification, Edmond Halley, facts on the ground, financial innovation, fixed income, George Akerlof, implied volatility, index fund, interest rate derivative, interest rate swap, Isaac Newton, Kenneth Rogoff, Long Term Capital Management, margin call, market bubble, Nick Leeson, Northern Rock, offshore financial centre, price mechanism, regulatory arbitrage, rent-seeking, Richard Thaler, risk tolerance, risk/return, Ronald Reagan, shareholder value, short selling, statistical model, The Chicago School, time value of money, too big to fail, transaction costs, value at risk, Vanguard fund, yield curve

First eBook Edition: July 2011 ISBN: 978-1-4221-7781-5 For T Contents Copyright Foreword Introduction: The Siren Song of the Men Who Love to Win ONE The Bets That Made Banking Sexy Introduction to derivatives. Long-term actuarial approach versus the market approach to credit. Goldman Sachs sees opportunity in default swaps. The market approach vindicated by Enron’s bankruptcy. TWO Going to the Mattresses The advent of VAR and OTC derivatives. The collapse of Long-Term Capital Management (LTCM). A fatal flaw is exposed. The wrong lesson is learned. THREE A Free Lunch . . . with Processed Food A new market for collaterized debt obligations (CDOs). Risky investments, diversification, and the role of the ratings agencies. Barclays finds investors for its CDOs, only to fall out with them. FOUR The Broken Heart Syndrome J.P. Morgan and Deutsche Bank dominate the European CDO market.

He was a lanky Texan whose off-the-rack suits and homespun manner personified the hate-to-lose commercial banker. After we’d talked, I was taken to meet the bank’s chief credit officer, Robert Strong, who talked about his memories of the 1970s recession and how cautious he was about lending. I knew why Chase was selling me this line so hard. A few months earlier, it had lent about $500 million to the massive hedge fund Long-Term Capital Management (LTCM), which was on the brink of bankruptcy and threatened to bring much of Wall Street down with it until a consortium of banks (including Chase) bailed it out. At the time, Chase was mocked for being so careless with its money, and Shapiro was keen to signal that this had been a one-off. That same trip, I went to J.P. Morgan’s headquarters on Wall Street, where it had been based for a century.

And if markets were efficient—in other words, if people like Meriwether did their job—then the prices of futures contracts should be mathematically related to the underlying asset using “no-arbitrage” principles. Bending Reality to Match the Textbook The next leg of my U.S. trip took me to Boston and Connecticut. There I met two more Nobel-winning finance professors—Robert Merton and Myron Scholes—who took Miller’s idea to its logical conclusion at a hedge fund called Long-Term Capital Management (LTCM). Scholes had benefited directly from Miller’s mentorship as a University of Chicago PhD candidate, while Merton had studied under Paul Samuelson at MIT. What made Merton and Scholes famous (with the late Fischer Black) was their contemporaneous discovery of a formula for pricing options on stocks and other securities. Again, the key idea was based on arbitrage, but this time the formula was much more complicated.


pages: 322 words: 77,341

I.O.U.: Why Everyone Owes Everyone and No One Can Pay by John Lanchester

Amazon: amazon.comamazon.co.ukamazon.deamazon.fr

asset-backed security, bank run, banking crisis, Berlin Wall, Bernie Madoff, Big bang: deregulation of the City of London, Black-Scholes formula, Celtic Tiger, collateralized debt obligation, credit crunch, Credit Default Swap, credit default swaps / collateralized debt obligations, Daniel Kahneman / Amos Tversky, diversified portfolio, double entry bookkeeping, Exxon Valdez, Fall of the Berlin Wall, financial deregulation, financial innovation, fixed income, George Akerlof, greed is good, hindsight bias, housing crisis, Hyman Minsky, interest rate swap, invisible hand, Jane Jacobs, John Maynard Keynes: Economic Possibilities for our Grandchildren, laissez-faire capitalism, liquidity trap, Long Term Capital Management, loss aversion, Martin Wolf, mortgage debt, mortgage tax deduction, mutually assured destruction, new economy, Nick Leeson, Northern Rock, Own Your Own Home, Ponzi scheme, quantitative easing, reserve currency, risk-adjusted returns, Robert Shiller, Robert Shiller, Ronald Reagan, shareholder value, South Sea Bubble, statistical model, The Great Moderation, the payments system, too big to fail, tulip mania, value at risk

The gap in price would last only for a couple of seconds, and in that gap Barings would buy low and sell high—a guaranteed, risk-free profit.) The complexity of the mathematics involved in derivatives can’t be exaggerated. This was the reason John Meriwether, a famous bond trader, employed Myron Scholes—he of the Black-Scholes equation—and Robert Merton, the man with whom he shared the 1997 Nobel Prize in Economics, to be directors and cofounders of his new hedge fund, Long-Term Capital Management.* The idea was to use these big brains to create a highly leveraged, arbitraged, no-risk investment portfolio designed to profit no matter what happened, whether the market went up, down, or sideways or popped out for a cheese sandwich. LTCM quadrupled in value in its first four years, then imploded in the chaos that followed Russia’s default on its foreign-debt obligations in 1998. The fund had equity of $4.72 billion, which would have been pretty healthy if it were not for the fact that it was exposed, thanks to the miracles of borrowing, leverage, and derivatives, to $1.25 trillion of risk.

By June 2008, the International Swaps and Derivatives Association, or ISDA—the association of companies dealing in this stuff—was estimating the total size of the market as $54 trillion, close to the total GDP of the planet and many times more valuable than the total number of all the stocks and shares traded in the world. The underlying value of the risks being insured was much lower than the notional value, of course—but the lesson of Long-Term Capital Management was that when such deals blow up, they leave huge holes in the markets because of the sheer number of counterparties holding contracts with notional exposure to the risk. It’s like a game of pass-the-parcel, in which nobody knows who’s actually holding the parcel, much less what’s going to be found inside it when it’s unwrapped. So this tool, the CDS, which had been invented as a way of making lending safer, turned out to magnify and spread risks throughout the global financial system.

A “3-sigma event” is something that is supposed to happen only 0.3 percent of the time, i.e., about once every three thousand times something is measured. Quants use these measures of probability all the time. According to the models in use by the quants, the Black Monday crash of 1987 was a ten-sigma event. Translated into English, that meant that, in the words of Roger Lowenstein’s book When Genius Failed: The Rise and Fall of Long-Term Capital Management: Economists later figured that, on the basis of the market’s historical volatility, had the market been open every day since the creation of the Universe, the odds would still have been against its falling that much in a single day. In fact, had the life of the Universe been repeated one billion times, such a crash would still have been theoretically “unlikely.” The defiance of common sense here is flagrant.


pages: 543 words: 157,991

All the Devils Are Here by Bethany McLean

Amazon: amazon.comamazon.co.ukamazon.deamazon.fr

Asian financial crisis, asset-backed security, bank run, Black-Scholes formula, call centre, collateralized debt obligation, corporate governance, Credit Default Swap, credit default swaps / collateralized debt obligations, diversification, Exxon Valdez, fear of failure, financial innovation, fixed income, high net worth, Home mortgage interest deduction, interest rate swap, laissez-faire capitalism, Long Term Capital Management, margin call, market bubble, market fundamentalism, Maui Hawaii, moral hazard, mortgage debt, Northern Rock, Own Your Own Home, Ponzi scheme, quantitative trading / quantitative finance, race to the bottom, risk/return, Ronald Reagan, Rosa Parks, shareholder value, short selling, South Sea Bubble, statistical model, telemarketer, too big to fail, value at risk

Government agency that conducts investigations at the request of members of Congress. GSEs: Government-sponsored enterprises. Washington-speak for Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac. HOEPA: The Homeownership and Equity Protection Act. A 1994 law giving the Federal Reserve the authority to prohibit abusive lending practices. HUD: Department of Housing and Urban Development. Sets “affordable housing goals” for Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac. LTCM: Long-Term Capital Management. Large hedge fund that collapsed in 1998. MBS: Mortgage-backed securities. NRSROs: Nationally Recognized Statistical Ratings Organizations. The three major credit rating agencies, Moody’s, Standard & Poor’s, and Fitch, were granted this status by the government. OCC: Office of the Comptroller of the Currency. The primary national bank regulator. OFHEO: Office of Federal Housing Enterprise Oversight.

The crisis was averted when the Treasury Department and the Fed, after weeks of around-the-clock effort, maneuvered to have the Exchange Stabilization Fund loan Mexico $20 billion, guaranteed by the United States. That was followed, in short order, by full-blown crises in Russia (which did default), Asia, and Latin America, as well as near crises in Egypt, South Africa, the Ukraine, and elsewhere. Each time, the three men helped contain the crisis while keeping it walled off from the U.S. economy. They did the same in the fall of 1998, when a giant hedge fund, Long-Term Capital Management, collapsed. An LTCM bankruptcy could have been devastating for Wall Street, since the big firms were all on the hook for tens of billions of dollars of LTCM’s losses, both as lenders and as counterparties. “In late-night phone calls, in marathon meetings and over bagels, orange juice, and quiche, these three men . . . are working to stop what has become a plague of economic panic,” Time wrote breathlessly.

To the extent the Committee to Save the World had answers, they were as smug as that cover photo. The developing world, they said, was new to this business of trusting in markets. They didn’t act enough like, well, us, with our supremely efficient market-driven economy. “A Thai banker who breaks the rules by passing $100,000 to his brother-in-law puts the whole system at risk,” is how the author of the article, Joshua Cooper Ramo, characterized their thinking. Even the Long-Term Capital Management disaster didn’t dent their enthusiasm for the way our own markets had evolved. LTCM was a firm that relied entirely on the tools of modern finance, chief among them derivatives, risk models, and debt. Its leverage ratio was a staggering 250 to 1, meaning that it had borrowed $250 for every $1 of equity on its balance sheet. The notional value of its derivatives book was more than $1.25 trillion, and the fact that LTCM traded almost exclusively in derivatives was the central reason it had been able to accumulate so much debt.


pages: 526 words: 158,913

Crash of the Titans: Greed, Hubris, the Fall of Merrill Lynch, and the Near-Collapse of Bank of America by Greg Farrell

Amazon: amazon.comamazon.co.ukamazon.deamazon.fr

Apple's 1984 Super Bowl advert, bank run, banking crisis, bonus culture, call centre, Captain Sullenberger Hudson, collapse of Lehman Brothers, collateralized debt obligation, corporate governance, credit crunch, Credit Default Swap, credit default swaps / collateralized debt obligations, financial innovation, fixed income, glass ceiling, high net worth, Long Term Capital Management, mass affluent, Mexican peso crisis / tequila crisis, Plutocrats, plutocrats, Ronald Reagan, six sigma, sovereign wealth fund, technology bubble, too big to fail, yield curve

Then on August 9, 2007, a French bank, BNP Paribas, announced it would suspend the valuation of three subprime mortgage–based investment funds because liquidity in the market had disappeared. The fact that all trading in the market for these funds had stopped meant there was no longer a market. The BNP announcement caused the normal flow of overnight interbank funding to seize up on the Continent, spurring the European Central Bank to put 95 billion euros into the market as an emergency measure. For the first time in nine years, when Long Term Capital Management imploded in 1998 and threatened to take down several investment banks, including Merrill Lynch, O’Neal felt fear in the pit of his stomach. Back then, he was Merrill’s chief financial officer and the firm’s exposure to Long Term Capital, a hedge fund that bet the wrong way on interest rates, threatened Merrill’s access to overnight funding. O’Neal had to return from vacation in the summer of 1998, and for the next three months he spent every day and night worrying about how and whether Merrill Lynch would be funded.

The room, which had a southwesterly exposure, was bathed in the afternoon sunlight, but Tosi noticed that none of the electric lights were on. There was O’Neal slouched back in his chair, looking disheveled, unshaven, wearing a gray cardigan, his hands at his temples to prop up his slumping head. Tosi had never seen the CEO like this, and it was unnerving. “That fucking Semerci,” O’Neal muttered. “I should have known I could never trust him.” He then started talking about the Long Term Capital Management crisis almost a decade earlier, when he was CFO and Merrill Lynch nearly ran out of money. “Those fixed-income guys got me in 1998, and I swore I’d never let them do it to me again.” When Tosi left the office, he looked at Marian Brooks, O’Neal’s longtime secretary. There were tears in her eyes. A few hours later, after the sun had set, Greg Fleming came to O’Neal’s office, hoping to find the CEO.

“Okay, you guys have the general idea,” O’Neal said to the board, bringing his subordinates’ presentation to an abrupt end. Chris Hayward, Eric Heaton, Kelly, and Moriarty realized they had been given a cue to leave, and awkwardly departed. O’Neal now made his case to the directors. The problems on Merrill’s balance sheet could get far worse, and there was no way to quantify the potential losses at the moment, he said. He had lived through the Long Term Capital Management crisis in 1998, and once liquidity dries up, Merrill Lynch could get into deep trouble in almost no time. Given this situation, it was only prudent for the firm to look at potential partners, O’Neal explained. That’s why he had reached out to Wachovia. “Stan, this is a great franchise, an iconic brand,” said Cribiore. “It’s as famous as Coca-Cola. We don’t want to be sitting with a bank in Charlotte.”


pages: 349 words: 134,041

Traders, Guns & Money: Knowns and Unknowns in the Dazzling World of Derivatives by Satyajit Das

Amazon: amazon.comamazon.co.ukamazon.deamazon.fr

accounting loophole / creative accounting, Albert Einstein, Asian financial crisis, asset-backed security, Black Swan, Black-Scholes formula, Bretton Woods, BRICs, Brownian motion, business process, buy low sell high, call centre, capital asset pricing model, collateralized debt obligation, complexity theory, corporate governance, Credit Default Swap, credit default swaps / collateralized debt obligations, cuban missile crisis, currency peg, disintermediation, diversification, diversified portfolio, Eugene Fama: efficient market hypothesis, financial innovation, fixed income, Haight Ashbury, high net worth, implied volatility, index arbitrage, index card, index fund, interest rate derivative, interest rate swap, Isaac Newton, job satisfaction, locking in a profit, Long Term Capital Management, mandelbrot fractal, margin call, market bubble, Marshall McLuhan, mass affluent, merger arbitrage, Mexican peso crisis / tequila crisis, moral hazard, mutually assured destruction, new economy, New Journalism, Nick Leeson, offshore financial centre, oil shock, Parkinson's law, placebo effect, Ponzi scheme, purchasing power parity, quantitative trading / quantitative finance, random walk, regulatory arbitrage, risk-adjusted returns, risk/return, shareholder value, short selling, South Sea Bubble, statistical model, technology bubble, the medium is the message, time value of money, too big to fail, transaction costs, value at risk, Vanguard fund, volatility smile, yield curve, Yogi Berra, zero-coupon bond

Chapter 5 The perfect storm – risk mismanagement by the numbers 1 Tanya Styblo Beder ‘The Great Risk Hunt’ (May 1999) The Journal of Portfolio Management, p. 29. 2 Peter Bernstein (1998) Against the Gods: The Remarkable Story of Risk; John Wiley, New York. 3 See ‘The Jorion-Taleb Debate’ (April 1997) Derivatives Strategy, 25. 4 Roger Lowenstein (2002) When Genius Fails: The Rise and Fall of Long-Term Capital Management; Fourth Estate, London, p. 15. 5 For details of Salomon’s Treasury Bond trading scandal, see Nicholas Dunbar (2000) Inventing Money; John Wiley & Sons, Chichester, pp. 110–112; and Roger Lowenstein (2002) When Genius Fails: The Rise and Fall of Long-Term Capital Management; Fourth Estate, London, pp. 19–22; Frank Partnoy (2004) Infectious Greed; Owl Books, New York, pp. 97–109. 6 Quoted by Merton Miller in ‘Trillion Dollar Bet’ (8 February 2000) Nova PBS. 12_NOTES.QXD 17/2/06 4:43 pm Page 323 Notes 323 7 LTCM’s 1997 return is somewhat in dispute.

Chapter 5 The perfect storm – risk mismanagement by the numbers 1 Tanya Styblo Beder ‘The Great Risk Hunt’ (May 1999) The Journal of Portfolio Management, p. 29. 2 Peter Bernstein (1998) Against the Gods: The Remarkable Story of Risk; John Wiley, New York. 3 See ‘The Jorion-Taleb Debate’ (April 1997) Derivatives Strategy, 25. 4 Roger Lowenstein (2002) When Genius Fails: The Rise and Fall of Long-Term Capital Management; Fourth Estate, London, p. 15. 5 For details of Salomon’s Treasury Bond trading scandal, see Nicholas Dunbar (2000) Inventing Money; John Wiley & Sons, Chichester, pp. 110–112; and Roger Lowenstein (2002) When Genius Fails: The Rise and Fall of Long-Term Capital Management; Fourth Estate, London, pp. 19–22; Frank Partnoy (2004) Infectious Greed; Owl Books, New York, pp. 97–109. 6 Quoted by Merton Miller in ‘Trillion Dollar Bet’ (8 February 2000) Nova PBS. 12_NOTES.QXD 17/2/06 4:43 pm Page 323 Notes 323 7 LTCM’s 1997 return is somewhat in dispute. Different sources give different returns for the fund – 17% (see Phillipe Jorion ‘How Long Term Lost Its Capital’ (September 1999) Risk, 31–36, p. 32) or 27% (see Nicholas Dunbar ‘Meriwether’s Meltdown’ (October 1998) Risk 32–36, p. 33). 8 Roger Lowenstein (2002) When Genius Fails: The Rise and Fall of Long-Term Capital Management; Fourth Estate, London, p. 147. 9 Roger Lowenstein (2002) When Genius Fails: The Rise and Fall of Long-Term Capital Management; Fourth Estate, London, pp. 161, 162. Chapter 6 Super models – derivative algorithms 1 The phrase ‘best and brightest’ is attributed to David Halberstam (1993) The Best and the Brightest; Ballantine Books, New York. 2 Emmanuel Derman (2004) My Life as a Quant; John Wiley, New Jersey. 3 Douglas Adams (1979) The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy; Pan Books, p. 75. 4 Fischer Black and Myron Scholes ‘The Pricing of Options and Corporate Liabilities (1973) Journal of Political Economy 81, 399–417. 5 Robert Merton ‘The Theory of Rational Option Pricing’ (1973) Bell Journal of Economics and Management Science 28, 141–183. 6 John Maynard Keynes (1937) The General Theory of Employment, Interest and Money; MacMillan, London, p. 298. 7 Emmanuel Derman (Winter 2000) The Journal of Derivatives, p. 62. 8 See Robert Merton, Nobel Lecture (9 December 1997).

Chapter 7 Games without frontiers – the inverse world of structured products 1 Leo Melamed, Press Briefing (August 2004) quoted in FOW, p. 58. 2 Frank Partnoy (1999) FIASCO; New York, Penguin, p. 163. 3 Testimony before Senate Committee on Local Government Investment (17 January 1995). 4 See ‘Triple Currency Bonds’ IFR (29 March 1986), 615. Chapter 8 Share and share alike – derivative inequity 1 Roger Lowenstein (2002) When Genius Fails: The Rise and Fall of Long-Term Capital Management; Fourth Estate, London, p. 35. 2 The description of the LTCM – UBS option transaction is based on: David Shireff ‘Another Fine Mess at UBS’ (November 1998) Euromoney, 41–43; Nicholas Dunbar ‘Meriwether’s Meltdown’ (October 1998) Risk, 32–36, p. 34; Nicholas Dunbar (2000) Inventing Money; John Wiley & Sons, Chichester, pp. 168–175; Roger Lowenstein (2002) When Genius Fails: The Rise and Fall of Long-Term Capital Management; Fourth Estate, London, pp. 92–94. 12_NOTES.QXD 20/2/06 324 4:11 pm Page 324 Tr a d e r s , G u n s & M o n e y Chapter 9 – Credit where credit is due – fun with CDS and CDO 1 CDO litigation (including the Barclays – HSH and Bank of America – Banca Popolare di Intra litigation) is described in: Nicholas Dunbar ‘Barclays Fights CDO Lawsuits’ (October 2004) Risk, 10, 12; Nicholas Dunbar ‘BoA in Litigation Firing Line’ (March 2005) Risk, 13; Nicholas Dunbar ‘The Curious Incident of the Disputed CDO’ (July 2005) Risk, 22–24; Rachel Woolcott ‘NatWest Rattles Sabre in Law Firm Claim’ (August 2005) Risk, 11.


pages: 385 words: 128,358

Inside the House of Money: Top Hedge Fund Traders on Profiting in a Global Market by Steven Drobny

Amazon: amazon.comamazon.co.ukamazon.deamazon.fr

Albert Einstein, asset allocation, Berlin Wall, Bonfire of the Vanities, Bretton Woods, buy low sell high, capital controls, central bank independence, Chance favours the prepared mind, commodity trading advisor, corporate governance, correlation coefficient, Credit Default Swap, diversification, diversified portfolio, family office, fixed income, glass ceiling, high batting average, implied volatility, index fund, inflation targeting, interest rate derivative, inventory management, Long Term Capital Management, margin call, market bubble, Maui Hawaii, Mexican peso crisis / tequila crisis, moral hazard, new economy, Nick Leeson, oil shale / tar sands, oil shock, out of africa, paper trading, Peter Thiel, price anchoring, purchasing power parity, reserve currency, risk tolerance, risk-adjusted returns, risk/return, rolodex, Sharpe ratio, short selling, Silicon Valley, The Wisdom of Crowds, too big to fail, transaction costs, value at risk, yield curve, zero-coupon bond

As a result, spreads between the benchmark U.S. government bonds and all other risk assets widened dramatically, leading the world to its next financial crisis: Long Term Capital Management. 150 145 Yen per Dollar 140 135 130 125 Yen Carry Trade Goes Bad 120 115 FIGURE 2.12 The Dollar/Yen Carry Trade, 1997–1998 Source: Bloomberg. -9 8 -9 8 De c No v 8 Au g98 Se p98 Oc t-9 8 98 l-9 Ju -9 8 nJu M ay 8 -9 r-9 8 ar Ap b98 Fe M 7 98 nJa 97 -9 v- De c No 97 7 t-9 7 Oc pSe 7 l-9 g9 Au Ju Ju n- 97 110 24 INSIDE THE HOUSE OF MONEY Long Term Capital Management 1998 Although Long Term Capital Management (LTCM) was not a global macro fund, it is worth mentioning for several reasons. For one, the arbitragefocused fund drifted into global macro trades and its subsequent unwind had ramifications for global macro markets.Two, it offers insights into what can go wrong at a hedge fund, as well as shed light on such important issues as liquidity, risk management, and correlations.

Indeed, efforts to take advantage of such misalignments force prices into better alignment and are soon emulated by competitors, further narrowing, or eliminating, any gaps. No matter how skillful the trading scheme, over the long haul, abnormal returns are sustained only through abnormal exposure to risk. Source: Testimony of Chairman Alan Greenspan before the Committee on Banking and Financial Services, U.S. House of Representatives, on PrivateSector Refinancing of the Large Hedge Fund, Long Term Capital Management, October 1, 1998. that they were in LTCM’s portfolio. In other words, their models didn’t provide for the LTCM liquidity premium. LTCM was a reminder of the notion that there is no such thing as a risk-free arbitrage. Because the arbitrage positions they were exploiting were small, the fund had to be leveraged many times to produce meaningful returns.This put them at risk to their lenders’ financing fees as well as general market liquidity.The problem with liquidity is that it is never there when really needed.

Markets are going to go where they’re going to go.Yes, sure, on one or two days when I was liquidating, it pushed it down, but the moment I stopped selling, it went where it was going to go. 80 INSIDE THE HOUSE OF MONEY 250 Yen per Pound 225 200 Siva-Jothy Liquidating Sterling/Yen Position 175 150 No v9 Ja 3 n94 M ar -9 M 4 ay -9 Au 4 g9 Oc 4 t-9 De 4 c9 M 4 ar -9 M 5 ay -9 Ju 5 l-9 Oc 5 t-9 De 5 c9 Fe 5 b9 Ap 6 r-9 Ju 6 l-9 Se 6 p9 No 6 v96 Fe b9 Ap 7 r-9 Ju 7 n9 Se 7 p9 No 7 v97 Ja n9 M 8 ar -9 Ju 8 n9 Au 8 g98 125 FIGURE 5.2 Sterling/Yen, 1993–1998 Source: Bloomberg. Markets are immense but if people know there’s a big position out there that is being liquidated, they’ll go for it. Nick Leeson at Barings Singapore and Long Term Capital Management are the classic cases. The market sniffed their unwinding and traded against them. Did the sterling/yen experience prove useful later on? Yes, definitely. The 1998 LTCM/Russia episode for me was the reverse. The firm didn’t have a great 1998, but the prop group did and I attribute it to the lessons learned in 1994. In 1998, GS had a risk arbitrage group that was set up a few years earlier.


pages: 374 words: 114,600

The Quants by Scott Patterson

Amazon: amazon.comamazon.co.ukamazon.deamazon.fr

Albert Einstein, asset allocation, automated trading system, Benoit Mandelbrot, Bernie Madoff, Bernie Sanders, Black Swan, Black-Scholes formula, Bonfire of the Vanities, Brownian motion, buttonwood tree, buy low sell high, capital asset pricing model, centralized clearinghouse, Claude Shannon: information theory, cloud computing, collapse of Lehman Brothers, collateralized debt obligation, Credit Default Swap, credit default swaps / collateralized debt obligations, diversification, Donald Trump, Doomsday Clock, Emanuel Derman, Eugene Fama: efficient market hypothesis, fixed income, Gordon Gekko, greed is good, Haight Ashbury, index fund, invention of the telegraph, invisible hand, Isaac Newton, job automation, John Nash: game theory, law of one price, Long Term Capital Management, Louis Bachelier, mandelbrot fractal, margin call, merger arbitrage, NetJets, new economy, offshore financial centre, Paul Lévy, Ponzi scheme, quantitative hedge fund, quantitative trading / quantitative finance, race to the bottom, random walk, Renaissance Technologies, risk-adjusted returns, Rod Stewart played at Stephen Schwarzman birthday party, Ronald Reagan, Sergey Aleynikov, short selling, South Sea Bubble, speech recognition, statistical arbitrage, The Chicago School, The Great Moderation, The Predators' Ball, too big to fail, transaction costs, value at risk, volatility smile, yield curve, éminence grise

Fama and French cranked up: The paper was called “The Cross Section of Expected Stock Returns,” published in the June 1992 edition of Journal of Finance. One day in the early 1980s: Nearly all of the details of Boaz Weinstein’s life and career come from interviews with Weinstein and people who knew and worked with him. In 1994, John Meriwether: A number of details of LTCM’s demise were taken from When Genius Failed: The Rise and Fall of Long-Term Capital Management, by Roger Lowenstein (Random House, 2000), and Inventing Money: The Story of Long-Term Capital Management and the Legends Behind It, by Nicholas Dunbar (John Wiley & Sons, 2000). 6 THE WOLF On a spring afternoon in 1985: The Liar’s Poker account is taken from The Poker Face of Wall Street, by Aaron Brown (John Wiley & Sons, 2006), as well as interviews and email exchanges with Brown. The Culver Spy Ring sprang up: “Setauket: Spy Ring Foils the British,” by Tom Morris, Newsday, February 22, 1998.

But they always loomed like a bad memory in the back of their minds, and were from time to time thrust to the forefront during wild periods of volatility such as Black Monday, only to be forgotten again when the markets eventually calmed down, as they always seemed to do. Inevitably, though, the deadly volatility returns. About a decade after Black Monday, the math geniuses behind a massive quant hedge fund known as Long-Term Capital Management came face-to-face with Mandelbrot’s wild markets. In a matter of weeks in the summer of 1998, LTCM lost billions, threatening to destabilize global markets and prompting a massive bailout organized by Fed chairman Alan Greenspan. LTCM’s trades, based on sophisticated computer models and risk management strategies, employed unfathomable amounts of leverage. When the market behaved in ways those models never could have predicted, the layers of leverage caused the fund’s capital to evaporate.

It was a sleepy business, and few traders even knew what they were or how to use the exotic swaps—or had any idea that they represented a new front in the quants’ ascendancy over Wall Street. Indeed, they would prove to be one of the most powerful weapons in their arsenal. The quants were steadily growing, moving ever higher into the upper echelons of the financial universe. What could go wrong? As it turned out, a great deal—a four-letter word: LTCM. In 1994, John Meriwether, a former star bond trader at Salomon Brothers, launched a massive hedge fund known as Long-Term Capital Management. LTCM was manned by an all-star staff of quants from Salomon as well as future Nobel Prize winners Myron Scholes and Robert Merton. On February 24 of that year, the fund started trading with $1 billion in investor capital. LTCM, at bottom, was a thought experiment, a laboratory test conducted by academics trained in mathematics and economics—quants. The very structure of the fund was based on the breakthroughs in modern portfolio theory that started in 1952 with Harry Markowitz and even stretched as far back as Robert Brown in the nineteenth century.


pages: 461 words: 128,421

The Myth of the Rational Market: A History of Risk, Reward, and Delusion on Wall Street by Justin Fox

Amazon: amazon.comamazon.co.ukamazon.deamazon.fr

Albert Einstein, Andrei Shleifer, asset allocation, asset-backed security, bank run, Benoit Mandelbrot, Black-Scholes formula, Bretton Woods, Brownian motion, capital asset pricing model, card file, Cass Sunstein, collateralized debt obligation, complexity theory, corporate governance, Credit Default Swap, credit default swaps / collateralized debt obligations, Daniel Kahneman / Amos Tversky, David Ricardo: comparative advantage, discovery of the americas, diversification, diversified portfolio, Edward Glaeser, endowment effect, Eugene Fama: efficient market hypothesis, experimental economics, financial innovation, Financial Instability Hypothesis, floating exchange rates, George Akerlof, Henri Poincaré, Hyman Minsky, implied volatility, impulse control, index arbitrage, index card, index fund, invisible hand, Isaac Newton, John Nash: game theory, John von Neumann, joint-stock company, Joseph Schumpeter, libertarian paternalism, linear programming, Long Term Capital Management, Louis Bachelier, mandelbrot fractal, market bubble, market design, New Journalism, Nikolai Kondratiev, Paul Lévy, pension reform, performance metric, Ponzi scheme, prediction markets, pushing on a string, quantitative trading / quantitative finance, Ralph Nader, RAND corporation, random walk, Richard Thaler, risk/return, road to serfdom, Robert Shiller, Robert Shiller, rolodex, Ronald Reagan, shareholder value, Sharpe ratio, short selling, side project, Silicon Valley, South Sea Bubble, statistical model, The Chicago School, The Myth of the Rational Market, The Predators' Ball, the scientific method, The Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith, The Wisdom of Crowds, Thomas Kuhn: the structure of scientific revolutions, Thomas L Friedman, Thorstein Veblen, Tobin tax, transaction costs, tulip mania, value at risk, Vanguard fund, volatility smile, Yogi Berra

Shiller, The New Financial Order: Risk in the 21st Century (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2003), 1–2, 5. 20. “Roundtable: The Limits of VAR,” Derivatives Strategy (April 1998): www.derivativesstrategy.com/magazine/archive/1998/0498fea1.asp. 21. The subsequent account of Long-Term Capital Management’s fall is, except where otherwise attributed, taken from the two books: Nicholas Dunbar, Inventing Money: The Story of Long-Term Capital Management and the Legends Behind It (New York: John Wiley & Sons, 2000); Roger Lowenstein, When Genius Failed: The Rise and Fall of Long-Term Capital Management (New York: Random House, 2000). 22. Joe Kolman, “LTCM Speaks,” Derivatives Strategy (April 1999): www.derivativesstrategy.com/magazine/archive/1998/0499fea1.asp. 23. Robert Litzenberger speech, Society of Quantitative Analysts. 24. Richard Bookstaber, A Demon of Their Own Design: Markets, Hedge Funds, and the Perils of Financial Innovation (Hoboken, N.J.: John Wiley & Sons, 2007), 97. 25.

The approach was similar to Ed Thorp’s, but with bonds instead of stocks and a lot more swashbuckling. Rosenfeld lured Merton on board in 1988 as a “special consultant to the Office of Chairman.” Scholes joined up two years later as a consultant to and later cohead of Salomon’s derivatives business. When Meriwether and Rosenfeld launched the most famous (and soon most infamous) hedge fund of the 1990s, Long-Term Capital Management, Merton and Scholes signed on as partners. Merton usually justified his presence in terms of the advice he could give about tradeoffs between risk and return. Scholes was less circumspect. During a road show to pitch the fund in 1993, a young trader at an insurance company scoffed, “No way you can make that kind of money in Treasury markets.” According to the trader, Scholes replied, “You’re the reason.

That put downward pressure on the prices of those other securities, which in turn threatened to start the cycle over again. Just as selling by portfolio insurers trying to protect their clients from price declines had driven down prices yet further in 1987, VaR had the potential to exacerbate a downturn. “Our activities may invalidate our measurements,” Taleb said early in 1998. “All…markets go down together.”20 THE SAGA OF LONG-TERM CAPITAL Management, or LTCM, offers so many cautionary tales that it’s hard to keep track of all of them. Listen to one of the former partners, or read the two fascinating books that chronicle the fund’s downfall, Roger Lowenstein’s When Genius Failed and Nicholas Dunbar’s Inventing Money, and one comes away shaking one’s head at the many hazards of hubris, of wealth, of leverage, of trusting one’s bankers, of trying to make decisions in a partnership.21 The hedge fund’s fall might be evidence that markets are efficient: Its market-beating returns were the result of taking excessive risks.


pages: 471 words: 97,152

Animal Spirits: How Human Psychology Drives the Economy, and Why It Matters for Global Capitalism by George A. Akerlof, Robert J. Shiller

Amazon: amazon.comamazon.co.ukamazon.deamazon.fr

affirmative action, Andrei Shleifer, asset-backed security, bank run, banking crisis, collateralized debt obligation, conceptual framework, credit crunch, Credit Default Swap, credit default swaps / collateralized debt obligations, Daniel Kahneman / Amos Tversky, Deng Xiaoping, Donald Trump, Edward Glaeser, en.wikipedia.org, experimental subject, financial innovation, full employment, George Akerlof, housing crisis, Hyman Minsky, income per capita, inflation targeting, invisible hand, Isaac Newton, Jane Jacobs, Jean Tirole, job satisfaction, Joseph Schumpeter, Long Term Capital Management, loss aversion, market bubble, market clearing, mental accounting, Mikhail Gorbachev, money: store of value / unit of account / medium of exchange, moral hazard, mortgage debt, new economy, New Urbanism, Plutocrats, plutocrats, price stability, profit maximization, purchasing power parity, random walk, Richard Thaler, Robert Shiller, Robert Shiller, Ronald Reagan, South Sea Bubble, The Chicago School, The Death and Life of Great American Cities, The Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith, too big to fail, transaction costs, tulip mania, working-age population, Y2K, Yom Kippur War

This reduces the funds available to the non-bank banks. It also raises the rates that they must pay for the funds they are able to borrow. They may have been fully solvent before the flight to liquidity began, but in a liquidity crisis they may not be able to afford the higher rates required for continued borrowing.12 Bear Stearns and Long Term Capital Management The interactions between the Fed and Bear Stearns in 2008, and between the Fed and Long Term Capital Management in 1998, are illustrative of the Fed’s concern about the shadow banking system and the possibility that failures there would lead to a financial panic. On a Monday morning in March 2008 the public was stunned to discover that over the weekend Bear Stearns, a leading investment bank, had been merged with JPMorgan Chase at the bargain-basement price of $2 per share.

., 197n24 Liebow, Elliot, 161, 196n13 limited liability corporations, 27–29 Limits to Growth, The (study report), 141–42 Lincoln, Abraham, 175 Lindbeck, Assar, 189n17 linked verse, 139 liquidity problems, 80, 81, 82, 83, 85 Littlefield, Henry, 185n14 Liutuan, China, 126–27 Lo, Andrew W., 182n22, 198n9 loanable funds theory, 78–79 Lodge, Henry Cabot, 81 Lohr, Steve, 180n5 London School of Economics, 43 Long Term Capital Management (LTCM), 38, 82, 83–85 López Portillo, José, 53–54 Los Angeles, California, 36, 169, 198n8 Los Angeles Times, 142 Loury, Glenn, 162, 197n18 Love Is a Story (Sternberg), 52 Lowenstein, Roger, 186n16 LTCM. See Long Term Capital Management Ludvigson, Sydney C., 180n12 Lundborg, Per, 183n14 Lusardi, Annamaria, 122, 191n7,8 Luxembourg, 125, 192n17 Macaulay, Frederic, 184n6 McCabe, Kevin A., 189n15 McCloskey, Michael, 151, 195n5 McCloud, James F., 138 McCulloch, Robert, 185n20, 196n10 McDonald, Forrest, 185n22 McDonald, Ian, 188n2 McGrattan, Ellen R., 178n6 McKinley, William, 62 macroeconomics, 174; with and without animal spirits, 4–5; in classical economics, xxiv; confidence and, 13, 14; credit crunch and, 88–89, 90; full employment and, 3; inflation-unemployment trade-off and, 45, 46; Keynesian, xxii; minorities and, 158; money illusion and, 41, 42, 45, 46; new insight into, 171; response required by, 168 Madrian, Brigitte C., 191n6 Maharashtra, India, 34 Malaysia, 126 Mao Zedong, 26, 126 marginal propensity to consume (MPC), 14–15 Mark, Rebecca, 34 mark-to-market accounting, 33–34 marriage, stories in, 52 Marsh, Terry A., 193n6 Martin Luther King Day, 163 Mason, Joseph R., 181n18 Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), 113, 141 Matsusaka, John G., 179n9 Meadows, Dennis L., 194n29 Meadows, Donella H., 194n29 Melino, Angelo, 191n9 mental accounts, 120–21, 192n25 Merrill Lynch, 133 Merton, Robert C., 84, 193n6 Meston, Lord, 71 Mexico, 53–54, 109 Miami, Florida, 36, 169, 198n8 Michigan Consumer Sentiment Index, 16–17, 179n2,9 Milken, Michael, 31–32 Mincer, Jacob, 19 minorities, 6, 157–66, 174, 196–97n1–24; anger in, 161–62; characteristics of those left behind, 161–63; education and, 165–66; importance of trying to assist, 166; real estate market and, 154–55; remedy for economic problems of, 163–66; why they are left behind, 158–60 Minsky, Hyman, xxiv, 177n2,7,8, 186n3 Mishkin, Frederic S., 180n9, 187n9, 191n9, 193n15 MIT.

The typical contract of a hedge fund gives its managers highly questionable incentives.22 A common compensation system for hedge funds gives managers a fixed percentage of the capital under management, typically 2%, and then 20% of the annual profits. On this basis hedge fund owners have a huge incentive to leverage their holdings as much as possible and to make investments that are extremely risky. Curiously it appears that the hedge funds did not, for the most part, invest heavily in sub-prime packages.23 Calomiris claims that, as sophisticated investors, they knew better.24 But the case of Long Term Capital Management (whose failure we shall discuss in considerably more detail in Chapter 7) tells us that hedge funds, leveraged as they are, can fail in unusual times that fall outside the scope of their hedging models. Right now we do not know whether failure of large hedge funds is the next shoe to drop in the current crisis, or whether they really are what they claim to be. They claim to take very little risk; they merely make bets on asset price spreads (or yield spreads) that are too high or too low.


pages: 840 words: 202,245

Age of Greed: The Triumph of Finance and the Decline of America, 1970 to the Present by Jeff Madrick

Amazon: amazon.comamazon.co.ukamazon.deamazon.fr

accounting loophole / creative accounting, Asian financial crisis, bank run, Bretton Woods, capital controls, collapse of Lehman Brothers, collateralized debt obligation, credit crunch, Credit Default Swap, credit default swaps / collateralized debt obligations, desegregation, disintermediation, diversified portfolio, Donald Trump, financial deregulation, fixed income, floating exchange rates, Frederick Winslow Taylor, full employment, George Akerlof, Hyman Minsky, income inequality, index fund, inflation targeting, inventory management, invisible hand, laissez-faire capitalism, locking in a profit, Long Term Capital Management, market bubble, minimum wage unemployment, Mont Pelerin Society, moral hazard, mortgage debt, new economy, North Sea oil, Northern Rock, oil shock, price stability, quantitative easing, Ralph Nader, rent control, road to serfdom, Robert Shiller, Robert Shiller, Ronald Coase, Ronald Reagan, Ronald Reagan: Tear down this wall, shareholder value, short selling, Silicon Valley, Simon Kuznets, technology bubble, Telecommunications Act of 1996, The Chicago School, The Great Moderation, too big to fail, union organizing, V2 rocket, value at risk, Vanguard fund, War on Poverty, Washington Consensus, Y2K, Yom Kippur War

Unlike Volcker, Greenspan, it is fair to say, was also a free market ideologue—that is, he took market efficiency and rationality as givens. He had more influence than any other figure over the direction the nation took over the next two decades, not merely in fighting inflation, but also in government’s role in the economy, effectively diminishing it. He repeated time and again that unfettered markets were best. A few weeks before the fall of the nation’s largest hedge fund, Long-Term Capital Management, in 1998, which collapsed from borrowing extreme amounts, Greenspan argued that such hedge funds were already effectively regulated—by their lenders. Lenders wouldn’t provide dangerous levels of debt to the clients because it was irrational to do so. But LTCM’s lenders were mostly caught unaware because the hedge funds were not required to make their loan positions known. In 1999, when arguing against the proposal of the head of the Commodities Futures Trading Commission to regulate financial derivatives, Greenspan claimed that unrestricted derivatives trading would stabilize finance, not disrupt it.

A large body of American opinion supported this development, and was mostly uncriticized by mainstream economists and the media. The acquiescence to ideology occurred even when markets lurched from financial crisis to crisis under Greenspan’s tenure—a stock market crash in 1987, a thrifts crisis in 1989, the collapse of junk bonds by 1990, a derivatives crisis in 1994, the Mexican peso collapse of 1994, the Asian financial crisis of 1997, the failure of Long-Term Capital Management and the Russian default on debt in 1998, and the severe stock market crash of 2000. Speculative binges enabled by both stimulative monetary policy and regulatory neglect preceded all these collapses. Levels of speculation rose to ever more dangerous heights each time. In the 1980s, the takeover movement built on soaring levels of debt, much of it ultimately bad, rose to unmanageable levels.

The following year Russia defaulted on its interest payments, and Brazil followed. The Greenspan Fed—formally, to repeat, decisions were made by the Open Market Committee, which Greenspan now effectively controlled—had again been ready to raise rates before this new crisis, but Greenspan now cut rates instead. Rubin again strongly urged the world’s central bankers to loosen policies. In October, the highly indebted hedge fund Long-Term Capital Management failed, in part due to the Russian default. Hedge funds, too, were mostly free of regulation or even disclosure requirements about their levels of debt. Only weeks before the LTCM collapse, as noted earlier, Greenspan said that the banks themselves “regulated those who lend money” and would provide the surveillance necessary. The funds also traded actively in unregulated derivatives markets, which enabled them to borrow still more against capital.


pages: 304 words: 80,965

What They Do With Your Money: How the Financial System Fails Us, and How to Fix It by Stephen Davis, Jon Lukomnik, David Pitt-Watson

Amazon: amazon.comamazon.co.ukamazon.deamazon.fr

Admiral Zheng, banking crisis, Basel III, Bernie Madoff, Black Swan, centralized clearinghouse, clean water, corporate governance, correlation does not imply causation, credit crunch, Credit Default Swap, crowdsourcing, David Brooks, Dissolution of the Soviet Union, diversification, diversified portfolio, en.wikipedia.org, financial innovation, financial intermediation, Flash crash, income inequality, index fund, invisible hand, London Whale, Long Term Capital Management, moral hazard, Northern Rock, passive investing, performance metric, Ponzi scheme, principal–agent problem, rent-seeking, Ronald Coase, shareholder value, Silicon Valley, South Sea Bubble, sovereign wealth fund, statistical model, Steve Jobs, the market place, The Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith, transaction costs, Upton Sinclair, value at risk, WikiLeaks

Just as hurricanes do sometimes happen and insurance companies have to pay up, so, too, those otherwise stable relationships sometimes evaporate. When they do, they can take your life savings with them. It was just that sort of low-probability set of events that caused hedge fund Long-Term Capital Management to blow up in 1998, forcing the Federal Reserve to organize a $3.6 billion bailout of the fund, which at its height had controlled derivatives with a notional value of $1.25 trillion.24 Long-Term Capital Management used far more complex mathematical calculations than a manager who just writes put options. But fundamentally, it was exposed to the same risk.25 Weisman calls these strategies “informationless” because you don’t have to know much to create a great performance record—until disaster strikes.

The adjustments to the shape of the curve were many, but the fundamental assumption, that the variability of the outcomes was predictable, was largely unchallenged. 19. International Monetary Fund, “IMF Performance in the Run-up to the Financial and Economic Crisis: IMF Surveillance in 2004–07” (International Monetary Fund, Independent Evaluation Office, January 10, 2011), http://www.ieo-imf.org/ieo/pages/NewsLinks107.aspx. 20. Myron Scholes and Robert Merton were both directors of Long-Term Capital Management. Wikipedia.org/wiki/Long_Term_Capital_Management. 21. John Maynard Keynes, General Theory of Employment Interest and Money (Snowball Publishing, 2012), bk. 5, chap. 21. 22. Friedrich von Hayek, “The Pretense of Knowledge,” Nobel Prize acceptance speech, 1974, http://www.nobelprize.org/nobel_prizes/economic-sciences/laureates/1974/hayek-lecture.html. 23. John Kenneth Galbraith, A History of Economics (Hamish Hamilton, 1987), 125.

The compass that bankers and regulators were using worked well according to its own logic, but it was pointing in the wrong direction, and they steered the ship onto the rocks. History does not record whether the Queen was satisfied with the academics’ response. She might, however, have noted that this economic-statistical model had been found wanting before—in 1998, when the collapse of the hedge fund Long-Term Capital Management nearly took the financial system down with it. Ironically, its directors included the two people who had shared the Nobel Prize in Economics the previous year.20 The Queen might also have noted the glittering lineup of senior economists who, over the last century, have warned against excessive confidence in predictions made using models. John Maynard Keynes, no mathematical slouch, warned eighty years ago that “too large a proportion of recent ‘mathematical’ economics are mere concoctions, as imprecise as the initial assumptions which they rest on, which allow the author to lose sight of the complexities and interdependencies of the real world in a maze of pretentious and unhelpful symbols.”21 Friedrich von Hayek, accepting his Nobel Prize in 1974, argued that “the failure of economists to guide policy more successfully is closely connected to their propensity to imitate as closely as possible the procedures of the … physical sciences.”


pages: 162 words: 50,108

The Little Book of Hedge Funds by Anthony Scaramucci

Amazon: amazon.comamazon.co.ukamazon.deamazon.fr

Andrei Shleifer, asset allocation, Bernie Madoff, business process, carried interest, Credit Default Swap, diversification, diversified portfolio, Donald Trump, Eugene Fama: efficient market hypothesis, fear of failure, fixed income, follow your passion, Gordon Gekko, high net worth, index fund, Long Term Capital Management, mail merge, margin call, merger arbitrage, NetJets, Ponzi scheme, profit motive, quantitative trading / quantitative finance, random walk, Renaissance Technologies, risk-adjusted returns, risk/return, Ronald Reagan, Saturday Night Live, Sharpe ratio, short selling, Silicon Valley, too big to fail, transaction costs, Vanguard fund, Y2K, Yogi Berra

Short-Selling Investor: In an effort to hedge your portfolio, you borrow $100,000 so that you increase your kitty to $200,000. This leverage enables the manager to buy $140,000 worth of good stocks while shorting $60,000 worth of bad stocks, thus giving him more money to play with so he can better diversify his portfolio. As a result, the hedge fund manager incurs less stock-selection risk and less market risk. But, leverage can be a fickle bitch . . . just ask Long-Term Capital Management. As Warren Buffett says, “When you combine ignorance and leverage, you get some pretty interesting results.” Leverage can be tricky as it bears various levels of risk—counter party risk and market risk. I compare this alternative investment tool to a very sharp knife coming out of the steering wheel of your sports car; it can point at your heart as you are traveling downhill on an icy mountain road.

Consequently, a flood of money has poured into these funds, increasing the impact hedge funds have on the market and global economy, and affecting the everyman’s pocketbook. And Now for the Not-Quite-as-Successful By the mid-90s, it appeared that hedge funds had found the Shangri-La of investments. But just as they were about to meet the leprechaun and his pot of gold at the end of the rainbow, it happened—Long-Term Capital Management (LTCM) collapsed in 1998 and was later rescued by the federal government. Founded in 1994 by a proprietary trading legend, John Meriwether from Solomon Brothers; two Nobel Prize-winning economists, Robert C. Merton and Myron Scholes; and a slew of finance wizards, LTCM used an arbitrage strategy that exploited temporary changes in market behavior. By pair trading and betting on price convergence over a range of scenarios (we’ll discuss those strategies in Chapter 7), the LTCM band of brothers leveraged their $4 billion fund until it had a notional exposure of over $1 trillion dollars.

Fearful that LTCM’s collapse would signal a more widespread hedge fund fire, the Federal Reserve board intervened and orchestrated a $3.65-billion bailout—with the help of 14 other financial institutions. Each of the major broker dealers (with the exception of Bear Stearns) put up capital, took over the defunct fund, and worked patiently to unravel the trades once the market calmed down. According to the Fed’s William McDonough, “An abrupt and disorderly liquidation would have posed unacceptable risks to the American economy.” Sound familiar? Although Long Term Capital Management took the crown for the most-documented hedge fund failure, the runner-up is more than likely Amaranth Advisors. Founded in 2000, Amaranth Advisors successfully bet on the natural gas market and came up big, showering its clients with sparkling performance. And then came the summer of 2006. Thinking that there might be another Hurricane Katrina-like event that would result in the explosion of natural gas prices, Amaranth bet the farm and put all of its eggs in the natural gas basket.


pages: 430 words: 109,064

13 Bankers: The Wall Street Takeover and the Next Financial Meltdown by Simon Johnson, James Kwak

Amazon: amazon.comamazon.co.ukamazon.deamazon.fr

Andrei Shleifer, Asian financial crisis, asset-backed security, bank run, banking crisis, Bernie Madoff, Bonfire of the Vanities, bonus culture, capital controls, Carmen Reinhart, central bank independence, collapse of Lehman Brothers, collateralized debt obligation, corporate governance, Credit Default Swap, credit default swaps / collateralized debt obligations, crony capitalism, Edward Glaeser, Eugene Fama: efficient market hypothesis, financial deregulation, financial innovation, financial intermediation, financial repression, fixed income, George Akerlof, Gordon Gekko, greed is good, Home mortgage interest deduction, Hyman Minsky, income per capita, interest rate derivative, interest rate swap, Kenneth Rogoff, laissez-faire capitalism, late fees, Long Term Capital Management, market bubble, market fundamentalism, Martin Wolf, moral hazard, mortgage tax deduction, Ponzi scheme, price stability, profit maximization, race to the bottom, regulatory arbitrage, rent-seeking, Robert Shiller, Robert Shiller, Ronald Reagan, Saturday Night Live, sovereign wealth fund, The Myth of the Rational Market, too big to fail, transaction costs, value at risk, yield curve

—Korea Letter of Intent to the IMF, December 3, 19971 In the mid-1990s, financial crises in less developed parts of the world were only too common. Mexico had a major meltdown in 1994–1995 and former communist countries such as Russia, the Czech Republic, and Ukraine struggled with severe financial shocks. Then in 1997–1998, what seemed like the mother of all international financial crises swept from Thailand through Southeast Asia to Korea, Brazil, and Russia. The contagion even spread to the United States via Long-Term Capital Management (LTCM), an enormous and terribly named hedge fund, which came to the brink of collapse. In the United States, economists and policymakers took two main lessons from these crises. The first was that crises could be managed—by pushing other countries to become more like the United States. Through the experiences of 1997–1998, the U.S. Treasury Department and the International Monetary Fund (IMF) developed a game plan for handling financial crises: structural weaknesses such as a failing financial sector had to be dealt with immediately, without waiting for the economy to stabilize.

Our economic system is founded on the notion of fair competition in a market free from government influence. Our society cherishes few things more than the idea that all Americans have an equal opportunity to make money or participate in government. There is no construct more important in American political discourse than the “middle class.” The United States was not untouched by the emerging markets crisis of 1997–1998. In 1998, the most prestigious hedge fund in the world was arguably Long-Term Capital Management, founded only four years before in Greenwich, Connecticut, by a legendary trader, two Nobel Prize–winning economists, and a former vice chair of the Federal Reserve, among others.49 When the crisis broke out, LTCM had about $4 billion in capital (money contributed by investors), which it had leveraged up with over $130 billion in borrowed money.50 It bet that money not on ordinary stocks or bonds, but on complex arbitrage trades (betting that the difference between the prices of two similar assets would vanish) and directional trades (for example, betting that volatility in a given market would decrease).

In 1991, Citibank was facing severe losses on U.S. real estate and loans to Latin America and had to be bailed out by an investment from Saudi prince Al-Waleed bin Talal. In 1994, Orange County lost almost $2 billion on complicated interest rate derivatives sold by Merrill Lynch and other dealers; county treasurer Robert Citron pleaded guilty to securities fraud, although no one on the “sell side” of those transactions was convicted of anything. In 1998, Long-Term Capital Management collapsed in the wake of the Russian financial crisis and had to be rescued by a consortium of banks organized by the Federal Reserve. Scandals are a constant refrain throughout the history of the financial services industry. Particularly severe episodes of wrongdoing often lead to the implementation of new rules that at least close the particular barn door that had been left open in the past; the most important example was the new regulatory scheme created during the Great Depression.


pages: 313 words: 101,403

My Life as a Quant: Reflections on Physics and Finance by Emanuel Derman

Amazon: amazon.comamazon.co.ukamazon.deamazon.fr

Berlin Wall, bioinformatics, Black-Scholes formula, Brownian motion, capital asset pricing model, Claude Shannon: information theory, Emanuel Derman, fixed income, Gödel, Escher, Bach, haute couture, hiring and firing, implied volatility, interest rate derivative, Jeff Bezos, John von Neumann, law of one price, linked data, Long Term Capital Management, moral hazard, Murray Gell-Mann, pre–internet, publish or perish, quantitative trading / quantitative finance, Richard Feynman, Sharpe ratio, statistical arbitrage, statistical model, Stephen Hawking, Steve Jobs, stochastic volatility, technology bubble, transaction costs, value at risk, volatility smile, Y2K, yield curve, zero-coupon bond

The overheated tech-stock market of the late 1990s cast a warm, reflected glow on geeks of all types, as did the droves of hedge funds trying to use mathematical models to squeeze dollars out of subtleties. The guts to lose a lot of money carries its own aura. D.E. Shaw & Co., a NewYork trading house that was rumored to be making substantial profits doing "black box" computerized statistical arbitrage before their billion-dollar losses in 1998, and Long Term Capital Management, the quant-driven Connecticut hedge fund that ultimately needed a multibillion-dollar bailout, have both contributed to this more glamorous view of quantization. And indeed, many of the Long Term Capital protagonists are back in business again at new firms. The capacity to wreak destruction with your models provides the ultimate respectability. THE SACRED AND PROFANE There is an almost religious quality to the pursuit of physics that stems from its transcendent qualities.

But building a riskless money machine, especially on a large scale, is not that easy. There are not that many riskless profits to be harvested in the world. Eventually the struggle to make the same return on larger amounts of capital makes everriskier strategies tempting. In 1998 D. E. Shaw & Co., in partnership with the Bank ofAmerica, reportedly lost close to a billion dollars on the same sorts of strategies that decapitated Long Term Capital Management and took appreciable pounds of flesh out of many other hedge funds and investment banks. Meanwhile, in 1981, I attended the computer science courses offered by the Labs and learned the practical art of programming. I was especially entranced by language design and compiler writing, and spent most of my time creating specific little languages that allowed users to solve specialized problems.

Working away in my undistinguished cubicle-for the first year I had no seat in an office-I did occasionally feel incongruous. One day, as I mindlessly whistled a Beatles song to myself while I programmed my bond option model, I heard the 23-year old kid in the next cube turn around and exclaim astonishedly, "How do you know that?" In fact, though, age didn't matter that much if you had ability, and the turbulence in financial markets since then-the crashes of 1987 and 1989, the collapse of Long Term Capital Management and Russia's default in 1998-has made the appearance of maturity an advantage. Among the new people I met was Roscoe, the amiable, cheerily disillusioned leader of a group of good-humored programmer malcontents who occupied the cubicles on what he called Dissident Row Everyone on Dissident Row ate lunch early and then took a constitutional up to the Brooklyn Bridge and back again. Roscoe's real name was William Dumas and he was rumored to be related to Alexandre Dumas, pere.


pages: 278 words: 82,069

Meltdown: How Greed and Corruption Shattered Our Financial System and How We Can Recover by Katrina Vanden Heuvel, William Greider

Amazon: amazon.comamazon.co.ukamazon.deamazon.fr

Asian financial crisis, banking crisis, Bretton Woods, capital controls, carried interest, central bank independence, centre right, collateralized debt obligation, conceptual framework, corporate governance, credit crunch, Credit Default Swap, credit default swaps / collateralized debt obligations, declining real wages, deindustrialization, Exxon Valdez, falling living standards, financial deregulation, financial innovation, Financial Instability Hypothesis, fixed income, floating exchange rates, full employment, housing crisis, Howard Zinn, Hyman Minsky, income inequality, kremlinology, Long Term Capital Management, margin call, market bubble, market fundamentalism, McMansion, mortgage debt, Naomi Klein, new economy, offshore financial centre, payday loans, pets.com, Plutocrats, plutocrats, Ponzi scheme, price stability, pushing on a string, race to the bottom, Ralph Nader, rent control, Robert Shiller, Robert Shiller, Ronald Reagan, savings glut, sovereign wealth fund, structural adjustment programs, The Great Moderation, too big to fail, trade liberalization, transcontinental railway, trickle-down economics, union organizing, wage slave, Washington Consensus, women in the workforce, working poor, Y2K

Capital gained in value as a result. Labor took it in the neck. Economic ideologies are often elaborate rationales to justify taking care of some folks and neglecting others. Meanwhile, protecting the supply side of the economy, the chairman came to the rescue of the financial system and financial firms again and again, whenever they encountered serious peril or the stock market seriously wilted. The 1998 collapse of Long Term Capital Management was interpreted as threatening the safety of the financial system, so the Fed stepped in (what happened to the therapeutic effects of market discipline?). Likewise, the Fed reacted aggressively to the Russian debt crisis that year and the jitters over the “Y2K crisis” of 2000, and Greenspan provided quick liquidity or interest-rate cuts to calm other financial-market upsets. Greenspan did not formally try to deregulate the banking system, but simply declined to use the Fed’s regulatory powers to enforce regular order or discipline fraudulent behavior.

But the essence of their strategy would have been immediately recognizable to the provincial nail manufacturer in Stendhal’s The Red and the Black, Monsieur de Rênal, whose financial acumen consists of “getting himself paid exactly what he’s owed, while paying what he owes as late as possible.” Rarely has the concept of leverage been more clearly explained. Nobel prizes aside, that’s basically what many of the hedge funds are doing. It’s a strategy that works great right up to the point when it doesn’t, which is what happened to Long-Term Capital Management (LTCM) in September 1998, when the Russian government defaulted and the hedge fund suddenly had to pay what it owed before it got paid. That led to an almost $4 billion bailout orchestrated by the Federal Reserve amid concerns by U.S. financial officials that world credit markets would, as New York Fed president William McDonough quaintly put it at the time, “possibly cease to function for a period of one or more days and maybe longer.”

Foreclosures in Maryland were up more than 400 percent in the third quarter, compared with the first. Minority homeowners, like those in Cummings’s inner-city Baltimore district, are getting hit particularly hard. “I know that so often what happens is that when we’re making decisions in the suites, we forget about the people who actually have to go through this,” Cummings said. But “we’re becoming a bit alarmed.” In past financial implosions, of S&Ls in the eighties or Long Term Capital Management in the nineties, it was easy to name the villains but far trickier to find the victims. Not so here. They’re everywhere, not just in inner-city Baltimore. There are subdivisions in the exurbs that are beginning to resemble ghost towns. So what is to be done? The long-term challenge is to regulate an industry that, left to its own devices, seems to have eaten its young. Last week the Mortgage Reform and Anti Predatory Lending Act of 2007 passed out of Barney Frank’s House Financial Services Committee with the support of nine Republicans.


pages: 460 words: 122,556

The End of Wall Street by Roger Lowenstein

Amazon: amazon.comamazon.co.ukamazon.deamazon.fr

Asian financial crisis, asset-backed security, bank run, banking crisis, Berlin Wall, Bernie Madoff, Black Swan, Brownian motion, Carmen Reinhart, collateralized debt obligation, credit crunch, Credit Default Swap, credit default swaps / collateralized debt obligations, diversified portfolio, eurozone crisis, Fall of the Berlin Wall, fear of failure, financial deregulation, fixed income, high net worth, Hyman Minsky, interest rate derivative, invisible hand, Kenneth Rogoff, London Interbank Offered Rate, Long Term Capital Management, margin call, market bubble, Martin Wolf, moral hazard, mortgage debt, Northern Rock, Ponzi scheme, profit motive, race to the bottom, risk tolerance, Ronald Reagan, savings glut, short selling, sovereign wealth fund, statistical model, the payments system, too big to fail, tulip mania, Y2K

Table of Contents Title Page Copyright Page Dedication Introduction Chapter 1 - TO THE CROSSROADS Chapter 2 - SUBPRIME Chapter 3 - LENDERS Chapter 4 - NIAGARA Chapter 5 - LEHMAN Chapter 6 - DESPERATE SURGE Chapter 7 - ABSENCE OF FEAR Chapter 8 - CITI’S TURN Chapter 9 - RUBICON Chapter 10 - TOTTERING Chapter 11 - FANNIE’S TURN Chapter 12 - SLEEPLESS Chapter 13 - THE FORCES OF EVIL Chapter 14 - AFTERSHOCKS Chapter 15 - THE HEDGE FUND WAR Chapter 16 - THE TARP Chapter 17 - STEEL’S TURN Chapter 18 - RELUCTANT SOCIALIST Chapter 19 - GREAT RECESSION Chapter 20 - THE END OF WALL STREET Acknowledgements NOTES INDEX ABOUT THE AUTHOR ALSO BY ROGER LOWENSTEIN While America Aged: How Pension Debts Ruined General Motors, Stopped the NYC Subways, Bankrupted San Diego, and Loom as the Next Financial Crisis Origins of the Crash: The Great Bubble and Its Undoing When Genius Failed: The Rise and Fall of Long-Term Capital Management Buffett: The Making of an American Capitalist THE PENGUIN PRESS Published by the Penguin Group Penguin Group (USA) Inc., 375 Hudson Street, New York, New York 10014, U.S.A. • Penguin Group (Canada), 90 Eglinton Avenue East, Suite 700, Toronto, Ontario, Canada M4P 2Y3 (a division of Pearson Penguin Canada Inc.) • Penguin Books Ltd, 80 Strand, London WC2R 0RL, England • Penguin Ireland, 25 St.

Lean and sinewy, he resembled the actor Al Pacino, whose character in The Godfather (a movie Fuld watched repeatedly) he vaguely emulated, most famously in the brutal stares with which he responded to subordinates’ entreaties. His darting eyes seemed ever on the alert, as if for predators. Perhaps he had cause, for Lehman suffered a near-death experience almost every market cycle. In 1998, when the hedge fund Long-Term Capital Management imploded, seeming to imperil Wall Street, Fuld valiantly went on the road to keep Lehman’s creditors from withdrawing their lines of credit; his efforts saved the firm. He had the daring of a gambler who believes, deep down, that he will always be able to play the last card—that if down markets or a credit crunch ever swamped his firm, he would find a way to steer it home. Fuld had attended the University of Colorado, and his middling education left him deeply insecure among polished Ivy League investment bankers.

The biggest purveyor of CDO insurance by far was the financial giant American International Group. AIG was based in Manhattan, its Art Deco skyscraper sprouting defiantly from behind the squat fortress of the New York Federal Reserve Bank. However, it sold CDO protection out of its derivatives unit in London, AIG Financial Products, a corporate satellite that employed a squadron of highly trained quants. Not unlike Long-Term Capital Management, the ill-fated hedge fund, Financial Products was an obscure, little-known trading outfit whose tentacles wrapped around the world of high finance. It didn’t offer “insurance” in the traditional sense of writing policies; rather, it entered into derivative contracts known as credit default swaps, under which a counterparty—Goldman, say, or Merrill Lynch—paid an upfront fee for AIG to guarantee the value of a CDO, or some other security.


pages: 566 words: 155,428

After the Music Stopped: The Financial Crisis, the Response, and the Work Ahead by Alan S. Blinder

Amazon: amazon.comamazon.co.ukamazon.deamazon.fr

Affordable Care Act / Obamacare, asset-backed security, bank run, banking crisis, banks create money, Carmen Reinhart, central bank independence, collapse of Lehman Brothers, collateralized debt obligation, conceptual framework, corporate governance, Credit Default Swap, credit default swaps / collateralized debt obligations, Detroit bankruptcy, diversification, double entry bookkeeping, eurozone crisis, facts on the ground, financial innovation, fixed income, friendly fire, full employment, hiring and firing, housing crisis, Hyman Minsky, illegal immigration, inflation targeting, interest rate swap, Isaac Newton, Kenneth Rogoff, liquidity trap, London Interbank Offered Rate, Long Term Capital Management, market bubble, market clearing, market fundamentalism, McMansion, moral hazard, naked short selling, new economy, Nick Leeson, Northern Rock, Occupy movement, offshore financial centre, price mechanism, quantitative easing, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Robert Shiller, Robert Shiller, Ronald Reagan, shareholder value, short selling, South Sea Bubble, statistical model, the payments system, time value of money, too big to fail, working-age population, yield curve, Yogi Berra

Never Again: Legacies of the Crisis Notes Sources Index LIST OF ACRONYMS AND ABBREVIATIONS ABCP: asset-backed commercial paper ABS: asset-backed securities AIG: American International Group AIG FP: AIG Financial Products AMLF: Asset-Backed Commercial Paper Money Market Mutual Fund Liquidity Facility ANPR: Advance Notice of Proposed Rulemaking ARM: adjustable-rate mortgage ARRA: American Reinvestment and Recovery Act (2009) BofA: Bank of America CBO: Congressional Budget Office CDO: collateralized debt obligation CDS: credit default swaps CEA: Council of Economic Advisers CEO: Chief Executive Officer CFMA: Commodity Futures Modernization Act (2000) CFPA: Consumer Financial Protection Agency CFPB: Consumer Financial Protection Bureau CFTC: Commodity Futures Trading Commission CME: Chicago Mercantile Exchange CP: commercial paper CPFF: Commercial Paper Funding Facility CPI: Consumer Price Index CPP: Capital Purchase Program DTI: debt (service)-to-income ratio ECB: European Central Bank EMH: efficient markets hypothesis ESF: Exchange Stabilization Fund FCIC: Financial Crisis Inquiry Commission FDIC: Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation FHA: Federal Housing Administration FHFA: Federal Housing Finance Agency FICO: Fair Isaac Company FOMC: Federal Open Market Committee FSA: Financial Services Authority (UK) FSLIC: Federal Savings and Loan Insurance Corporation FSOC: Financial Stability Oversight Council G7: Group of Seven (nations) GAAP: generally accepted accounting principles GAO: Government Accountability Office GDP: gross domestic product GLB: Gramm-Leach-Bliley Act (1999) GSE: government-sponsored enterprise H4H: Hope for Homeowners HAFA: Home Affordable Foreclosure Alternatives Program HAMP: Home Affordable Modification Program HARP: Home Affordable Refinancing Program HAUP: Home Affordable Unemployment Program HHF: Hardest Hit Fund HOLC: Home Owners’ Loan Corporation HUD: Department of Housing and Urban Development IMF: International Monetary Fund ISDA: International Swaps and Derivatives Association LIBOR: London Interbank Offer Rate LTCM: Long-Term Capital Management LTRO: Longer-Term Refinancing Operations LTV: loan-to-value (ratio) MBS: mortgage-backed securities MOM: my own money NBER: National Bureau of Economic Research NEC: National Economic Council NINJA (loans): no income, no jobs, and no assets NJTC: new jobs tax credit OCC: Office of the Comptroller of the Currency OFHEO: Office of Federal Housing Enterprise Oversight OMB: Office of Management and Budget OMT: Outright Monetary Transactions OPM: other people’s money OTC: over the counter OTS: Office of Thrift Supervision PDCF: Primary Dealer Credit Facility PIIGS: Portugal, Ireland, Italy, Greece, and Spain QE: quantitative easing Repo: repurchase agreement S&L: savings and loan association S&P: Standard and Poor’s SEC: Securities and Exchange Commission Section 13(3): of Federal Reserve Act SIFI: systemically important financial institution SIV: structured investment vehicle SPV: special purpose vehicle TAF: Term Auction Facility TALF: Term Asset-Backed Securities Loan Facility TARP: Troubled Assets Relief Program TBTF: too big to fail TED (spread): spread between LIBOR and Treasuries TIPS: Treasury Inflation-Protected Securities TLGP: Temporary Liquidity Guarantee Program TSLF: Term Securities Lending Facility UMP: unconventional monetary policy WaMu: Washington Mutual PREFACE When the music stops . . . things will be complicated.

Another involved a sale of derivatives by Bankers Trust to Proctor & Gamble, which led to a lawsuit by the latter and to the release of some crude and damning audiotapes. A third was the escapades of a single rogue trader, Nick Leeson, whose wild gambles in Singapore literally broke Barings, Britain’s oldest investment bank—and wound up as a movie. An inauspicious start, you might say. But that was nothing compared with what happened in the summer and fall of 1998, when losses at the now-infamous hedge fund Long-Term Capital Management (LTCM) helped set off a worldwide financial crisis—one that seemed monumental until it was dwarfed by the stunning events of 2007–2009. An overconfident LTCM got itself on the wrong side of a huge volume and variety of derivative bets, each of which entailed substantial amounts of synthetic leverage. On top of that, LTCM’s balance sheet was itself highly leveraged. The firm was on the fast track to oblivion, probably causing lots of collateral damage in its wake, when the Federal Reserve intervened by orchestrating a private-sector bailout by Wall Street firms.

The firm was also very profitable, especially for its top executives. The top five took home over $1.4 billion in cash and stock sales over the years 2000–2008. Bear was also contrarian in another sense. Ten years earlier, during the height of the 1998 financial crisis, it had earned the enmity of the other Wall Street banks when it alone refused to accept its pro rata share of the emergency buyout of what was left of the faltering hedge fund Long-Term Capital Management (LTCM). Bear’s refusal left a bitter aftertaste that Wall Streeters remembered in March 2008. One way in which Bear Stearns set its own course during the bubble was by becoming a huge player in the mortgage business, especially in the subprime mortgage business. Mortgage securitization became the largest component of Bear’s fixed-income division, which was in turn the company’s most profitable line of business, generating almost half the firm’s revenues.

Investment: A History by Norton Reamer, Jesse Downing

Amazon: amazon.comamazon.co.ukamazon.deamazon.fr

Albert Einstein, algorithmic trading, asset allocation, backtesting, banking crisis, Berlin Wall, Bernie Madoff, Brownian motion, buttonwood tree, California gold rush, capital asset pricing model, Carmen Reinhart, carried interest, colonial rule, credit crunch, Credit Default Swap, Daniel Kahneman / Amos Tversky, debt deflation, discounted cash flows, diversified portfolio, equity premium, estate planning, Eugene Fama: efficient market hypothesis, Fall of the Berlin Wall, family office, Fellow of the Royal Society, financial innovation, fixed income, Gordon Gekko, Henri Poincaré, high net worth, index fund, interest rate swap, invention of the telegraph, James Hargreaves, James Watt: steam engine, joint-stock company, Kenneth Rogoff, labor-force participation, land tenure, London Interbank Offered Rate, Long Term Capital Management, loss aversion, Louis Bachelier, margin call, means of production, Menlo Park, merger arbitrage, moral hazard, mortgage debt, Network effects, new economy, Nick Leeson, Own Your Own Home, pension reform, Ponzi scheme, price mechanism, principal–agent problem, profit maximization, quantitative easing, RAND corporation, random walk, Renaissance Technologies, Richard Thaler, risk tolerance, risk-adjusted returns, risk/return, Robert Shiller, Robert Shiller, Sand Hill Road, Sharpe ratio, short selling, Silicon Valley, South Sea Bubble, sovereign wealth fund, spinning jenny, statistical arbitrage, technology bubble, The Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith, time value of money, too big to fail, transaction costs, underbanked, Vanguard fund, working poor, yield curve

When it comes to failures, by contrast, leverage often takes the blame. This is precisely how most people understood the spectacular investment failure of Long-Term Capital Management, a large hedge fund management firm, in 1998. The firm, it was later discovered, had been magnifying its portfolio with leverage ratios as high as 100 to 1—that is, $100 of debt-equivalent employed for every dollar of equity committed. 6 Investment: A History Even though the firm was invested primarily in high-quality government bonds, its use of this extraordinary leverage created so much risk that even minor fluctuations in the value of its portfolio could cause extreme pressure on its available net worth. Had it not been for a government-organized bailout, Long-Term Capital Management would almost certainly have collapsed.5 On the other hand, there have been great investment successes over extended periods of time achieved by well-regarded investors (Warren Buffett again comes to mind) through the use of more moderate levels of financial leverage coupled with good asset selection and stable financing sources.

During the years leading up to the Great Recession of 2007–2009, there were widespread attitudes in various administrations and Congresses that led to relaxation of some of the more restrictive prohibitions that were the legacy of the Great Depression and subsequent financial crises such as the savings and loan crisis of the late 1980s, various international crises of the 1990s, and the collapse of Long-Term Capital Management in 1998. One notable example was the repeal of Glass-Steagall in the late 1990s. The Glass-Steagall Act passed by Congress in the 1930s prevented commercial banks from owning investment banks in a post-Depression attempt to prevent deposit-taking institutions from engaging in high-risk financial transactions.33 Throughout the period, competitive regulatory agencies were allowed to develop, gaps in regulatory coverage occurred and were not corrected, clarity in regulatory responsibilities was not established, and lapses in regulatory enforcement occurred.

Of course, this is precisely when the market is offering bargains—and some of the best value investors have come to realize this—but much of the market is too shaken to take advantage of the possibilities. The problem here is not so much one of theory but one of data; the truth is that there have not been an enormous number of these tail scenarios in major markets. In the last 25 years or so, we have seen the crash of 1987, the collapse of Long-Term Capital Management in 1998, the popping of the technology bubble in the late 1990s and into early 2000, and the Great Recession from 2007 to 2009. To build robust theories, or even effective working models, we require a broader set of data from which we can draw, synthesize, and eventually generalize. Of course, one does not want to overemphasize how problematic it is that there have been so few tail events in major markets—one certainly does not want to tempt fate and invite more.


pages: 381 words: 101,559

Currency Wars: The Making of the Next Gobal Crisis by James Rickards

Amazon: amazon.comamazon.co.ukamazon.deamazon.fr

Asian financial crisis, bank run, Benoit Mandelbrot, Berlin Wall, Big bang: deregulation of the City of London, Black Swan, borderless world, Bretton Woods, BRICs, British Empire, business climate, capital controls, Carmen Reinhart, Cass Sunstein, collateralized debt obligation, complexity theory, corporate governance, Credit Default Swap, credit default swaps / collateralized debt obligations, currency manipulation / currency intervention, currency peg, Daniel Kahneman / Amos Tversky, Deng Xiaoping, diversification, diversified portfolio, Fall of the Berlin Wall, family office, financial innovation, floating exchange rates, full employment, game design, German hyperinflation, Gini coefficient, global rebalancing, global reserve currency, high net worth, income inequality, interest rate derivative, Kenneth Rogoff, labour mobility, laissez-faire capitalism, liquidity trap, Long Term Capital Management, mandelbrot fractal, margin call, market bubble, Mexican peso crisis / tequila crisis, money: store of value / unit of account / medium of exchange, Network effects, New Journalism, Nixon shock, offshore financial centre, oil shock, open economy, paradox of thrift, price mechanism, price stability, private sector deleveraging, quantitative easing, race to the bottom, RAND corporation, rent-seeking, reserve currency, Ronald Reagan, sovereign wealth fund, special drawing rights, special economic zone, The Myth of the Rational Market, The Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith, The Wisdom of Crowds, Thomas Kuhn: the structure of scientific revolutions, time value of money, too big to fail, value at risk, War on Poverty, Washington Consensus

They set an agenda, assign tasks, utilize staff and reassemble after a suitable interval, which could be a day or month, depending on the urgency of the situation. Progress is reported and new goals are set, all without the normal accoutrements of established bureaucracies or rigid governance. This process was something Geithner learned in the depths of the Asian financial crisis in 1997. He saw it again when it was deployed successfully in the bailout of Long-Term Capital Management in 1998. In that crisis, the heads of the “fourteen families,” the major banks at the time, came together with no template, except possibly the Panic of 1907, and in seventy-two hours put together a $3.6 billion all-cash bailout to save capital markets from collapse. In 2008, Geithner, then president of the New York Fed, revived the use of convening power as the U.S. government employed ad hoc remedies to resolve the failures of Bear Stearns, Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac from March to July of that year.

With few exceptions, the leading macroeconomists, policy makers and risk managers failed to foresee the collapse and were powerless to stop it except with the blunt object of unlimited free money. To explain why, it is illuminating to take 1947, the year of publication of Paul Samuelson’s Foundations of Economic Analysis, as an arbitrary dividing line between the age of economics as social science and the new age of economics as natural science. That dividing line reveals similarities in market behavior before and after. The collapse of Long-Term Capital Management in 1998 bears comparison to the collapse of the Knickerbocker Trust and the Panic of 1907 in its contagion dynamics and private resolution by bank counterparts with the most to lose. The stock market crash of October 19, 1987, when the Dow Jones Industrial Average dropped 22.61 percent in a single day, is reminiscent of the two-day drop of 23.05 percent on October 28–29, 1929. Unemployment in 2011 is comparable to the levels of the Great Depression, when consistent methodologies for the treatment of discouraged workers are used for both periods.

The debate between the efficient markets theorists and the social scientists would be just another arcane academic struggle but for one critical fact. The theory of efficient markets and its corollaries of random price movements and a bell curve distribution of risk had escaped from the lab and infected the entire trading apparatus of Wall Street and the modern banking system. The application of these flawed theories to actual capital markets activity contributed to the 1987 stock market crash, the 1998 implosion of Long-Term Capital Management and the greatest catastrophe of all—the Panic of 2008. One contagious virus that spread the financial economics disease was known as value at risk, or VaR. Value at risk is the method Wall Street used to manage risk in the decade leading up to the Panic of 2008 and it is still in widespread use today. It is a way to measure risk in an overall portfolio—certain risky positions are offset against other positions to reduce risk, and VaR claims to measure that offset.


pages: 351 words: 102,379

Too big to fail: the inside story of how Wall Street and Washington fought to save the financial system from crisis--and themselves by Andrew Ross Sorkin

Amazon: amazon.comamazon.co.ukamazon.deamazon.fr

affirmative action, Asian financial crisis, Berlin Wall, collateralized debt obligation, credit crunch, Credit Default Swap, credit default swaps / collateralized debt obligations, Fall of the Berlin Wall, fear of failure, fixed income, Goldman Sachs: Vampire Squid, housing crisis, indoor plumbing, invisible hand, London Interbank Offered Rate, Long Term Capital Management, margin call, market bubble, Mikhail Gorbachev, moral hazard, NetJets, Northern Rock, oil shock, paper trading, risk tolerance, rolodex, Ronald Reagan, savings glut, shareholder value, short selling, sovereign wealth fund, supply-chain management, too big to fail, value at risk, éminence grise

He liked to tell the story about how he once sat at a blackjack table and watched a “whale” of a gambler in Vegas lose $4.5 million, doubling every lost bet in hopes his luck would change. Fuld took notes on a cocktail napkin, recording the lesson he learned: “I don’t care who you are. You don’t have enough capital.” You can never have enough. It was a lesson he had learned again in 1998 after the hedge fund Long-Term Capital Management blew up. In the immediate aftermath, Lehman was thought to be vulnerable because of its exposure to the mammoth fund. But it survived, barely, because the firm had a cushion of extra cash—and also because Fuld had aggressively fought back. That was another takeaway from the Long Term Capital fiasco: You had to kill rumors. Let them live, and they became self-fulfilling prophecies. As he fumed to the Washington Post at the time, “Each and every one of these rumors was proved to be incorrect.

But Corzine did not have a strong enough hold on the firm when, in 1996, he first made the case to its partners for why Goldman should go public. Resistance to the idea of an IPO was strong, as the bankers worried it would upend the firm’s partnership and culture. But with a big assist from Paulson, who became co-chief executive in June 1998, Corzine ultimately won the day: Goldman’s initial public offering was announced for September of that year. But that summer the Russian ruble crisis erupted and Long-Term Capital Management was teetering on the brink of collapse. Goldman suffered hundreds of millions of dollars in trading losses and had to contribute $300 million as part of a Wall Street bailout of Long-Term Capital that was orchestrated by the Federal Reserve Bank of New York. A rattled Goldman withdrew its offering at the last minute. What was known only to a small circle of Paulson’s closest friends was that he was actually considering quitting the firm, tired of Corzine, New York, and all the internal politics.

Peterson had been leading the search for a replacement for William McDonough, who was retiring after a decade at the helm of the New York Fed. McDonough, a prepossessing former banker with First National Bank of Chicago, had become best known for summoning the chief executives of fourteen investment and commercial banks in September 1998 to arrange a $3.65 billion private-sector bailout of the imploding hedge fund Long-Term Capital Management. Peterson had been having trouble with the search; none of his top choices was interested. Making his way down the candidates list, he came upon the unfamiliar name of Timothy Geithner and arranged to see him. At the interview, however, he was put off by Geithner’s soft-spokenness, which can border on mumbling, as well as by his slight, youthful appearance. Larry Summers, who had recommended Geithner, tried to assuage Peterson’s concerns.


pages: 478 words: 126,416

Other People's Money: Masters of the Universe or Servants of the People? by John Kay

Amazon: amazon.comamazon.co.ukamazon.deamazon.fr

Affordable Care Act / Obamacare, asset-backed security, bank run, banking crisis, Basel III, Bernie Madoff, Big bang: deregulation of the City of London, bitcoin, Black Swan, Bonfire of the Vanities, bonus culture, Bretton Woods, call centre, capital asset pricing model, Capital in the Twenty-First Century by Thomas Piketty, cognitive dissonance, corporate governance, Credit Default Swap, cross-subsidies, dematerialisation, diversification, diversified portfolio, Edward Lloyd's coffeehouse, Elon Musk, Eugene Fama: efficient market hypothesis, eurozone crisis, financial innovation, financial intermediation, fixed income, Flash crash, forward guidance, Fractional reserve banking, full employment, George Akerlof, German hyperinflation, Goldman Sachs: Vampire Squid, Growth in a Time of Debt, income inequality, index fund, inflation targeting, interest rate derivative, interest rate swap, invention of the wheel, Irish property bubble, Isaac Newton, London Whale, Long Term Capital Management, loose coupling, low cost carrier, M-Pesa, market design, millennium bug, mittelstand, moral hazard, mortgage debt, new economy, Nick Leeson, Northern Rock, obamacare, Occupy movement, offshore financial centre, oil shock, passive investing, peer-to-peer lending, performance metric, Peter Thiel, Piper Alpha, Ponzi scheme, price mechanism, purchasing power parity, quantitative easing, quantitative trading / quantitative finance, railway mania, Ralph Waldo Emerson, random walk, regulatory arbitrage, Renaissance Technologies, rent control, Richard Feynman, risk tolerance, road to serfdom, Robert Shiller, Robert Shiller, Ronald Reagan, Schrödinger's Cat, shareholder value, Silicon Valley, Simon Kuznets, South Sea Bubble, sovereign wealth fund, Spread Networks laid a new fibre optics cable between New York and Chicago, Steve Jobs, Steve Wozniak, The Great Moderation, The Market for Lemons, the market place, The Myth of the Rational Market, the payments system, The Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith, The Wisdom of Crowds, Tobin tax, too big to fail, transaction costs, tulip mania, Upton Sinclair, Vanguard fund, Washington Consensus, We are the 99%, Yom Kippur War

They include the Markowitz model of portfolio allocation (to which Greenspan referred) and the Black–Scholes model (the derivative pricing model to which he alluded). The key components of academic financial theory, however, are the ‘efficient market hypothesis’ (EMH), for which Eugene Fama won the Nobel Prize in 2013, and the Capital Asset Pricing Model (CAPM), for which William Sharpe won the Nobel Prize in 1990. Sharpe shared that prize with Markowitz, and Myron Scholes received a Nobel Prize in 1997, just before the famous blow-up of Long-Term Capital Management, in which Scholes was a partner; Black had died in 1995. All of these financial economists have affiliations to the University of Chicago. EMH asserts that all available information about securities is ‘in the price’. Interest rates are expected to rise, Procter and Gamble owns many powerful brands, the Chinese economy is growing rapidly: these factors are fully reflected in the current level of long-term interest rates, the Procter & Gamble stock price and the exchange rate between the dollar and the renminbi.

The central bank might provide funds itself as ‘lender of last resort’ and/or help orchestrate a rescue operation by other financial institutions. But as the sector became more aggressive and competitive such co-operation diminished. Perhaps the last great co-ordinated rescue operation – which involved much official twisting of private-sector arms – was the support package for the racy and absurdly named hedge fund Long-Term Capital Management in 1998. (The foul-mouthed Jimmy Cayne, of Bear Stearns, who refused to participate, would receive his comeuppance a decade later when the Federal Reserve took pleasure in forcing a fire-sale of his failing business to J.P. Morgan.) But the concerns about banks that paralysed the USA in 1933, or which brought the global financial system close to collapse in 2008, were not like that.

And as investor interest in them grew, their prices became increasingly correlated with those of mainstream assets. From the 1990s private equity – which invested in a diversified collection of new businesses – and hedge funds – which adopted unconventional investment strategies – were favoured as diversifying ‘alternative assets’. The original hedge funds were run by legendary names such as George Soros and Julian Robertson: Long-Term Capital Management was the most famous of all. But after the new economy bubble burst in 2000, pension funds and large investors poured money into these so-called alternative investments. But as demand for ‘alternative assets’ increased, the resulting increased supply of ‘alternative assets’ came more and more to resemble repackaging of existing assets. Hedge funds built portfolios of derivatives, or packages of securitised loans, which tracked general economic developments, while private equity invested in larger, established businesses little different from those listed on public markets.


pages: 504 words: 139,137

Efficiently Inefficient: How Smart Money Invests and Market Prices Are Determined by Lasse Heje Pedersen

Amazon: amazon.comamazon.co.ukamazon.deamazon.fr

algorithmic trading, Andrei Shleifer, asset allocation, backtesting, bank run, banking crisis, barriers to entry, Black-Scholes formula, Brownian motion, buy low sell high, capital asset pricing model, commodity trading advisor, conceptual framework, corporate governance, credit crunch, Credit Default Swap, currency peg, David Ricardo: comparative advantage, declining real wages, discounted cash flows, diversification, diversified portfolio, Emanuel Derman, equity premium, Eugene Fama: efficient market hypothesis, fixed income, Flash crash, floating exchange rates, frictionless, frictionless market, Gordon Gekko, implied volatility, index arbitrage, index fund, interest rate swap, late capitalism, law of one price, Long Term Capital Management, margin call, market clearing, market design, market friction, merger arbitrage, mortgage debt, New Journalism, paper trading, passive investing, price discovery process, price stability, purchasing power parity, quantitative easing, quantitative trading / quantitative finance, random walk, Renaissance Technologies, Richard Thaler, risk-adjusted returns, risk/return, Robert Shiller, Robert Shiller, shareholder value, Sharpe ratio, short selling, sovereign wealth fund, statistical arbitrage, statistical model, systematic trading, technology bubble, time value of money, total factor productivity, transaction costs, value at risk, Vanguard fund, yield curve, zero-coupon bond

Hedge fund indices have large correlations to equity markets, and the correlation has been growing over time. Also, hedge funds often have negative skewness and excess kurtosis, meaning that they sometimes have extreme returns, especially on the downside. Indeed, hedge funds, especially the small ones, have a high attrition rate, and the industry has been marked by some large blowups, including the failures of Long-Term Capital Management (LTCM), Bear Stearns’ credit funds, and Amaranth. Rather than looking at the performance of actual hedge funds, we can circumvent some of the issues discussed above by cutting to the chase and studying the actual trading strategies that hedge funds pursue as we do in this book. As we will see, the core strategies have worked more often than not over long time periods and worked for economic reasons of efficiently inefficient markets. 1.3.

The expected shortfall is the expected loss, given that you are losing more than the VaR: Another measure of risk is the stress loss. This measure is computed by performing various stress tests, that is, simulated portfolio returns during various scenarios, and then considering the worst-case loss in these scenarios. Such stress scenarios can include significant past events, such as the 1998 price shocks around the Long-Term Capital Management (LTCM) bailout, September 11, and the failure of Lehman Brothers, as well as imagined future events, such as the failure of a sovereign state (e.g., Greece), a large interest rate move, a large shock to equity prices, a spike in volatility, or a sharp increase in margin requirements. While estimates of volatility and, to some extent, VaR measure the risk during relatively “normal” markets over a fixed time horizon, stress tests tell you about risk during extreme events.

GS: Well, because I had developed this boom/bust theory. Call it a theory of bubbles. I’ve written books about it. I published a book in ’98 when I said I thought that markets were about to collapse, The Crisis of Global Capitalism. The prediction turned out to be false; the markets didn’t collapse. LHP: Well, it took a few more years. GS: The authorities managed to contain the problem in 1998. You had Long-Term Capital Management, and it was a pretty serious situation, which was saved by Bill McDonough, the head of the Federal Reserve in New York. He put the players in one room and said, “You’ve got to do something!” And then they saved the day. So, we survived ’98. But by allowing what I call this super bubble to develop, it grew larger and finally exploded in 2008. In 2006, I published a book, The Age of Fallibility, where I had a very short section that previewed what was coming.


pages: 364 words: 101,286

The Misbehavior of Markets by Benoit Mandelbrot

Amazon: amazon.comamazon.co.ukamazon.deamazon.fr

Albert Einstein, asset allocation, Augustin-Louis Cauchy, Benoit Mandelbrot, Big bang: deregulation of the City of London, Black-Scholes formula, British Empire, Brownian motion, buy low sell high, capital asset pricing model, carbon-based life, discounted cash flows, diversification, double helix, Edward Lorenz: Chaos theory, Elliott wave, equity premium, Eugene Fama: efficient market hypothesis, Fellow of the Royal Society, full employment, Georg Cantor, Henri Poincaré, implied volatility, index fund, informal economy, invisible hand, John von Neumann, Long Term Capital Management, Louis Bachelier, mandelbrot fractal, market bubble, market microstructure, new economy, paper trading, passive investing, Paul Lévy, Plutocrats, plutocrats, price mechanism, quantitative trading / quantitative finance, Ralph Nelson Elliott, RAND corporation, random walk, risk tolerance, Robert Shiller, Robert Shiller, short selling, statistical arbitrage, statistical model, Steve Ballmer, stochastic volatility, transfer pricing, value at risk, volatility smile

Kurtosis bell curve with calculation of La Revue Britannique (Delacroix) Lagrange legacy of Lakebed sediments Langbein, Walter Laplace, Marquis Pierre-Simon de Bachelier and legacy of Least-squares method Gauss and Legendre and mathematics of Legendre, Adrien-Marie chance explored by Gauss v. least-squares method of Leibniz, Gottfried von Lenin Leontief, Wassily Lévy, Paul Bachelier and exceptional chance law from probability theory from Ligeti, Gyorgy Lintner, John Lo, Andrew W. Long-Term Capital Management LP (LTCM) Lorenz, Edward LTCM. See Long-Term Capital Management LP Lynch, Peter Machiavelli, Niccolo Madan, Dilip B. Magellan Fund Magnetism stochastic view of Mandelbrot, Benoit cotton mystery solved by eureka moment of Hurst heard of by IBM work of main work of persistence of Mandelbrot fractals Marcus, Alan J. Market behavior Bachelier on deceptiveness of efficiency in five rules of inherent uncertainty in investment bubbles in mathematical study of misleading in momentum effect in multifractal modeling of Oanda’s study of parable of personality in pictorial essay of research needed for risk in roughness in Russian crisis and tax deductions influencing time relativity in timing in trouble streaks in turbulence of value concept influencing Market cube diagram Market-to-book effect Markowitz, Harry influence of modern finance influenced by MPT from Nobel prize for portfolio theory of price changes understood by risk understood by Marshak, Jacob Marshall, Alfred Martingale condition Mathematics Bachelier on calculating fractal dimension with calculus in chaology computational nightmare of economists using expectation Gaussian geometry in Hilbert on invariance in Kolmogorov in least squares method in market studied with mean variance calculation with modeling with Nile river with nineteenth century Onsager in power law in price deviation in scaling in seismology in simplifying life through time in topology in wild randomness and Mehra, Rajnish Memory Efficient Market Hypothesis and financial market with long stock price movements with Meriwether, John Merrill Lynch CAPM used by Merton, Robert C.

Nobel prize for price changes understood by Santa Fe Institute Scaling patterns Bouchaud’s model with cotton prices with multifractal modeling of Nile river flooding with physics with probability curve with proportions controlled by railroad stock with theory of time-scale with turbulence with Scholes, Myron background of influence of Long-Term Capital Management with modern finance influenced by Nobel prize for options valued by stress test encouragement of Schoutens, Wim SEC. See Securities and Exchange Commission Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) price continuity viewed by research need and turbulent trading viewed by Security Analysis (Graham and Dodd) Seismology Shakespeare, William Sharman, F.A. Sharpe, William F. asset valuation of CAPM discovered by economists’ view of expected return beta of influence of Long-Term Capital Management viewed by Markowitz and modern finance influenced by Nobel prize for risk understood by Sierpinski, Waclaw Sierpinski gasket fractals Skinner, B.F.

Anywhere the bell-curve assumption enters the financial calculations, an error can come out. History is replete with ironies. And it is one of the greatest that the truly wild nature of markets was re-discovered, at their cost, by two of the most ardent formulators of orthodox economics, Scholes and Merton. In 1993, the two Nobel laureates joined some heavyweight Wall Street bond traders in the creation of a new hedge fund, Long-Term Capital Management LP. The partners collectively contributed $100 million and raised a war-chest that eventually topped $7 billion. Their strategy was straightforward. They would scour the world for occasions when, by their orthodox valuation formulae, the prices of individual options appeared to be wrong. They would bet heavily—with a “leverage” or debt ratio as great as 50-to-1—on the market’s eventually correcting the mistake.


pages: 369 words: 94,588

The Enigma of Capital: And the Crises of Capitalism by David Harvey

Amazon: amazon.comamazon.co.ukamazon.deamazon.fr

accounting loophole / creative accounting, anti-communist, Asian financial crisis, bank run, banking crisis, Bernie Madoff, Big bang: deregulation of the City of London, Bretton Woods, British Empire, business climate, call centre, capital controls, credit crunch, Credit Default Swap, David Ricardo: comparative advantage, deindustrialization, Deng Xiaoping, deskilling, equal pay for equal work, European colonialism, failed state, financial innovation, Frank Gehry, full employment, global reserve currency, Google Earth, Guggenheim Bilbao, illegal immigration, indoor plumbing, interest rate swap, invention of the steam engine, Jane Jacobs, joint-stock company, Joseph Schumpeter, Just-in-time delivery, land reform, liquidity trap, Long Term Capital Management, market bubble, means of production, megacity, microcredit, moral hazard, mortgage debt, new economy, New Urbanism, Northern Rock, oil shale / tar sands, peak oil, place-making, Ponzi scheme, precariat, reserve currency, Ronald Reagan, sharing economy, Silicon Valley, special drawing rights, special economic zone, statistical arbitrage, structural adjustment programs, the built environment, the market place, The Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith, Thomas L Friedman, Thomas Malthus, Thorstein Veblen, too big to fail, trickle-down economics, urban renewal, urban sprawl, white flight, women in the workforce

The financial crisis that rocked east and south-east Asia in 1997–8 was huge and spin-offs into Russia (which defaulted on its debt in 1998) and then Argentina in 2001 (precipitating a total collapse that led to political instability, factory occupations and take-overs, spontaneous highway blockades and the formation of neighbourhood collectives) were local catastrophes. In ,the United States the fall in 2001 of star companies like WorldCom and Enron, which were basically trading in financial instruments called derivatives, imitated the huge bankruptcy of the hedge fund Long Term Capital Management (whose management included two Nobel Prize winners in economics) in 1998. There were plenty of signs early on that all was not well in what became known as the ‘shadow banking system’ of over-the-counter financial trading and hence unregulated markets that had sprung up as if by magic after 1990. There have been hundreds of financial crises around the world since 1973, compared to very few between 1945 and 1973; and several of these have been property- or urban-development-led.

This was the way to avoid the regulator and free the market. The traders were by the mid-1990s often highly trained mathematicians and physicists (many arriving with doctorates in those fields straight from MIT) who delighted in the complex modelling of financial markets along lines pioneered back in 1972 when Fischer Black, Myron Scholes and Robert Merton (who later became infamous for their role in the Long-term Capital Management crash and bail-out in 1998) wrote out a mathematical formula for which they earned a Nobel Prize in Economics on how to value an option. The trading identified and exploited inefficiencies in markets and spread risks but, given its entirely new patterns, this permitted manipulations galore that were extremely difficult to regulate or even to spot because they were buried in the intricate ‘black box’ mathematics of computerised over-the-counter trading programs.

So much for Marx’s hope that the new technologies and organisational forms would render matters more readily understandable and transparent! Profits earned by many individual traders soared and bonuses went stratospheric. But so too did losses. By 2002, the writing should have clearly been on the wall. A young Singapore-based trader named Nicholas Leeson brought down the venerable bank of Baring, and companies like Enron, WorldCom, Global Crossing and Adelphia would bite the dust, as would Long-term Capital Management and the government of Orange County, California, all of them as a result of trading in these new unregulated markets (derivatives and options) and hiding their trades in all manner of shady accounting devices and mathematically sophisticated valuation systems. Technological and financial innovations of this sort have played a role in putting us all at risk under a rule of experts that has nothing to do with guarding the public interest but everything to do with using the monopoly power given by that expertise to earn huge bonuses for gung-ho traders who aspire to be billionaires in ten years’ time and thereby secure instant membership in the capitalist ruling class.


pages: 311 words: 99,699

Fool's Gold: How the Bold Dream of a Small Tribe at J.P. Morgan Was Corrupted by Wall Street Greed and Unleashed a Catastrophe by Gillian Tett

Amazon: amazon.comamazon.co.ukamazon.deamazon.fr

accounting loophole / creative accounting, asset-backed security, bank run, banking crisis, Black-Scholes formula, Bretton Woods, business climate, collateralized debt obligation, credit crunch, Credit Default Swap, credit default swaps / collateralized debt obligations, diversification, easy for humans, difficult for computers, financial innovation, fixed income, housing crisis, interest rate derivative, interest rate swap, locking in a profit, Long Term Capital Management, McMansion, mortgage debt, North Sea oil, Northern Rock, Renaissance Technologies, risk tolerance, Robert Shiller, Robert Shiller, short selling, sovereign wealth fund, statistical model, The Great Moderation, too big to fail, value at risk, yield curve

Aggressive and high-risk hedge funds exploded onto the scene, some growing so large that they were competing in earnest with the new banking behemoths. The financial world was becoming “flat,” morphing into one seething, interlinked arena for increasingly free and fierce competition. Those playing in this twenty-first-century domain of unfettered cyberfinance knew these changes carried risks. The fate of hedge fund maverick Long-Term Capital Management was a deeply troubling cautionary tale. LTCM, which had been created in 1994, epitomized the new era of finance. It was run by a group of academics and traders who ardently believed in libertarian economics and who were dedicated to the cause of using computing power and mathematical skills to hunt for trading opportunities all over the world. Robert Merton, a Nobel laureate and one of the partners in LTCM, was a friend of Peter Hancock, and he—like the J.P.

To Geithner, it was a classic case of a “collective action problem.” In late 2004, he acted, encouraging Corrigan to head a study of a group of leading Wall Street financiers to examine the state of the complex financial world. By then Corrigan was working as a managing director at Goldman Sachs and had already conducted one such exercise, back in 1999, which set out the lessons to be learned after the Long-Term Capital Management hedge fund collapsed. This second study would have a much wider agenda, analyzing the state of complex finance more generally. When the three-hundred-page report was finally released in the summer of 2005, it duly demanded that banks overhaul their back office procedures for credit derivatives. “Dear Hank,” Corrigan wrote in a letter to Henry Paulson, then CEO at Goldman Sachs, that accompanied the report.

The drama was also spurring wide debate about what had gone wrong. Only a few days after Bear Stearns collapsed, Timothy Geithner had urged Jerry Corrigan, his predecessor at the New York Fed, to organize a “voluntary” Wall Street report on how complex finance could be made less risky. Corrigan was only too happy to oblige. Corrigan had already overseen two earlier studies, one on the lessons from the implosion of Long-Term Capital Management, and the second, in 2005, just as the credit bubble was getting under way, on the state of complex finance. Corrigan was convinced that his third report, though, would be the most important. “We need to ask some important rhetorical questions—like, Why did everyone miss the boat?” Corrigan observed. “I am still mystified by that—that is the big issue. Yes, we knew that risk was mispriced, but we did not see what was coming!


pages: 345 words: 87,745

The Power of Passive Investing: More Wealth With Less Work by Richard A. Ferri

Amazon: amazon.comamazon.co.ukamazon.deamazon.fr

asset allocation, backtesting, Bernie Madoff, capital asset pricing model, cognitive dissonance, correlation coefficient, Daniel Kahneman / Amos Tversky, diversification, diversified portfolio, endowment effect, estate planning, Eugene Fama: efficient market hypothesis, fixed income, implied volatility, index fund, Long Term Capital Management, passive investing, Ponzi scheme, prediction markets, random walk, Richard Thaler, risk tolerance, risk-adjusted returns, risk/return, Sharpe ratio, too big to fail, transaction costs, Vanguard fund, yield curve

They decided to reduce their positions in subprime mortgages because they thought a lot of dumb money was buying. The firm is still in business today because they won that bet. However, this strategy doesn’t always work. There have been many occasions when betting against dumb money hasn’t worked out. Long Term Capital Management thought they were betting against dumb money by purchasing Russian bonds as others were dumping them in 1998. Russia ultimately defaulted on its foreign debt obligations. This led to insolvency for Long Term Capital Management and put the country on the verge of a financial market meltdown. In order to avoid the crisis, the president of the New York Federal Reserve had to orchestrate a bailout by several leading Wall Street firms. How the Dumb Money Gets Divided Tactical asset allocation is a zero-sum game.

The #1 fund in 2008 finished dead last in 2009. Buying recent past performance is a tough-love way to seek alpha. Investors’ love affair with last year’s top funds often turns into a messy divorce just a few years later. Former Federal Reserve chairman Alan Greenspan addressed manager persistence during testimony to Congress in 1998 in his Fed Speak way. Greenspan made this comment over the demise of Long-Term Capital Management, a failed hedge fund that threatened the entire financial system: This decade is strewn with examples of bright people who thought they had built a better mousetrap that could consistently extract an abnormal return from financial markets. Some succeed for a time. But while there may occasionally be misconfigurations among market prices that allow abnormal returns, they do not persist.9 Fund Termination Rates One interesting side study from persistence reports is fund termination rates.

French, “Luck versus Skill in the Cross Section of Mutual Fund Returns,” The Journal of Finance 65, no. 5 (October 2010): 1915–1947. 7. Jeroen Derwall and Joop Huij, “‘Hot Hands’ in Bond Funds,” ERIM Research Paper Series (April 16, 2007). 8. Marlena Lee, “Is There Skill among Bond Managers?” (working paper, Dimensional Fund Advisors, Austin, Texas, 2009). 9. Alan Greenspan, Private-Sector Refinancing of the Large Hedge Fund, Long-Term Capital Management, Testimony before the Committee on Banking and Financial Services, U.S. House of Representatives, October 1, 1998). 10. Mark M. Carhart, “On Persistence in Mutual Fund Performance,” The Journal of Finance 52, no. 1 (March 1997): 80. 11. Diane Del Guercio and Paula A. Tkac, “The Effect of Morningstar Ratings on Mutual Fund Flows” (working paper, University of Oregon Department of Finance, 2002). 12.


pages: 389 words: 109,207

Fortune's Formula: The Untold Story of the Scientific Betting System That Beat the Casinos and Wall Street by William Poundstone

Amazon: amazon.comamazon.co.ukamazon.deamazon.fr

Albert Einstein, anti-communist, asset allocation, Benoit Mandelbrot, Black-Scholes formula, Brownian motion, buy low sell high, capital asset pricing model, Claude Shannon: information theory, computer age, correlation coefficient, diversified portfolio, en.wikipedia.org, Eugene Fama: efficient market hypothesis, high net worth, index fund, interest rate swap, Isaac Newton, Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, John von Neumann, Long Term Capital Management, Louis Bachelier, margin call, market bubble, market fundamentalism, Marshall McLuhan, New Journalism, Norbert Wiener, offshore financial centre, publish or perish, quantitative trading / quantitative finance, random walk, risk tolerance, risk-adjusted returns, Robert Shiller, Robert Shiller, Ronald Reagan, short selling, speech recognition, statistical arbitrage, The Predators' Ball, The Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith, transaction costs, traveling salesman, value at risk, zero-coupon bond

Meriwether left Salomon Brothers during a scandal-driven shake-up in which Meriwether was, it appears, innocent of wrong-doing. He decided to start a hedge fund. It was a good time to do that. Princeton-Newport’s long run had convinced many wealthy investors of the possibility of beating the market while containing risk scientifically. Scores of new hedge funds were started in the early 1990s. Of all these new funds, Meriwether’s Long-Term Capital Management was to become the best known. Ed Thorp first heard of Meriwether’s fund through a mutual friend. The friend knew some of the people who were writing software for the new fund. “It’s gonna be a great investment,” Thorp was told, “and for ten million dollars you can get into it.” Like most of the new group of fund managers, Meriwether promised better-than-market returns through science and software.

It didn’t help that Merton was second only to Samuelson as a critic of the Kelly criterion. Thorp also had heard that Meriwether was a “martingale man.” “The general chatter was that he was a high roller, and it wasn’t clear that the size of his bets were justified,” Thorp recalled. “The story was that if he got in the hole, if things went against him, he’d bet more. If things still went against him, he’d bet more.” Kicking and Screaming LONG-TERM CAPITAL MANAGEMENT (LTCM) was the first fund to raise a billion dollars. It did this by projecting a 30 percent annual return net of fees—better than even Princeton-Newport had done. LTCM’s partners charged 25 percent of profits (rather than the usual 20) plus 1 percent of invested assets per year. The 25 percent fee was a deal-breaker for the trustees of the Rockefeller Foundation, who decided they did not have that kind of money to burn.

He persuaded many of them to roll their money over into a new fund that Koonmen was starting, Eifuku Master Trust. One of the first things Koonmen had to explain to his investors was how to pronounce “Eifuku.” It was ay-foo-koo. Eifuku means “eternal luck.” Soros invested in Eifuku. So did several high-net-worth Kuwaitis and UBS, a Swiss bank still smarting from the distinction of having been Long-Term Capital Management’s largest investor. Like Meriwether, Koonmen believed that his management was worth a 25 percent cut of the profits. He also intended to rake in 2 percent of the fund’s assets each year, profitable or not. Koonmen installed his LTCM pool table in Eifuku’s offices on the eleventh floor of the Kamiyacho MT Building. These lavish offices were the most extreme ostentation in Tokyo’s real estate market.

Griftopia: Bubble Machines, Vampire Squids, and the Long Con That Is Breaking America by Matt Taibbi

Amazon: amazon.comamazon.co.ukamazon.deamazon.fr

affirmative action, Affordable Care Act / Obamacare, Bernie Sanders, Bretton Woods, carried interest, clean water, collateralized debt obligation, collective bargaining, Credit Default Swap, credit default swaps / collateralized debt obligations, crony capitalism, David Brooks, desegregation, diversification, diversified portfolio, Donald Trump, financial innovation, Goldman Sachs: Vampire Squid, Gordon Gekko, greed is good, illegal immigration, interest rate swap, laissez-faire capitalism, London Interbank Offered Rate, Long Term Capital Management, margin call, market bubble, medical malpractice, moral hazard, mortgage debt, obamacare, passive investing, Ponzi scheme, prediction markets, quantitative easing, reserve currency, Ronald Reagan, Sergey Aleynikov, short selling, sovereign wealth fund, too big to fail, trickle-down economics, Y2K, Yom Kippur War

The first was the stock market correction of October of that year, and the next was the recession of the early 1990s, brought about by the collapse of the S&L industry. Both disasters were caused by phenomena Greenspan had a long track record of misunderstanding. The 1987 crash was among other things caused by portfolio insurance derivatives (Greenspan was still fighting against regulation of these instruments five or six derivative-based disasters later, in 1998, after Long-Term Capital Management imploded and nearly dragged down the entire world economy), while Greenspan’s gaffes with regard to S&Ls like Charles Keating’s Lincoln Savings have already been described. His response to both disasters was characteristic: he slashed the federal funds rate and flooded the economy with money. Greenspan’s response to the 1990s recession was particularly dramatic. When he started cutting rates in May 1989, the federal funds rate was 9 percent.

To say that this was a radical reinterpretation of the entire science of economics is an understatement—economists had never dared measure “value” except in terms of actual concrete production. It was equivalent to a chemist saying that concrete becomes gold when you paint it yellow. It was lunacy. Greenspan’s endorsement of the “new era” paradigm encouraged all the economic craziness of the tech bubble. This was a pattern he fell into repeatedly. When a snooty hedge fund full of self-proclaimed geniuses called Long-Term Capital Management exploded in 1998, thanks to its managers’ wildly irresponsible decision to leverage themselves one hundred or two hundred times over or more to gamble on risky derivative bets, Greenspan responded by orchestrating a bailout, citing “systemic risk” if the fund was allowed to fail. The notion that the Fed would intervene to save a high-risk gambling scheme like LTCM was revolutionary. “Here, you’re basically bailing out a hedge fund,” says Dr.

The new law, which Greenspan pushed aggressively, not only prevented the federal government from regulating instruments like collateralized debt obligations and credit default swaps, it even prevented the states from regulating them using gaming laws—which otherwise might easily have applied, since so many of these new financial wagers were indistinguishable from racetrack bets. The amazing thing about the CFMA was that it was passed immediately after the Long-Term Capital Management disaster, a potent and obvious example of the destructive potential inherent in an unregulated derivatives market. LTCM was a secretive hedge fund that was making huge bets without collateral and keeping massive amounts of debt off its balance sheet, à la Enron—the financial equivalent of performing open heart surgery with unwashed hands, using a Super 8 motel bedspread as an operating surface.


pages: 257 words: 13,443

Statistical Arbitrage: Algorithmic Trading Insights and Techniques by Andrew Pole

Amazon: amazon.comamazon.co.ukamazon.deamazon.fr

algorithmic trading, Benoit Mandelbrot, Chance favours the prepared mind, constrained optimization, Dava Sobel, Long Term Capital Management, Louis Pasteur, mandelbrot fractal, market clearing, market fundamentalism, merger arbitrage, pattern recognition, price discrimination, profit maximization, quantitative trading / quantitative finance, risk tolerance, Sharpe ratio, statistical arbitrage, statistical model, stochastic volatility, systematic trading, transaction costs

Analysis of a classic pair-trading strategy employing a first-order, dynamic linear model (see Chapter 3) and exhibiting a holding period of about two weeks applied to large capital equities shows a fascinating and revealing development. In March 2000 a trend to a lower frequency that began in 1996 was discovered. First hinted at in 1996, the scale of the change was within experienced local variation bounds, so the hint was only identifiable later. Movement in 1997 was marginal. In 1998, the problems with international credit defaults and the Long Term Capital Management debacle totally disrupted all patterns of performance making inference difficult and hazardous. Although the hint was detectable, the observation was considered unreliable. By early 2000, the hint, there for the fourth consecutive year and now cumulatively strong enough to outweigh expected noise variation, was considered a signal. Structural parameters of the ‘‘traded’’ model were recalibrated for the first time in five years, a move expected to improve return for the next few years by two or three points over what it would otherwise have been.

Such dramatic discriminatory action had not previously been described; certainly there was no prior episode in the history of statistical arbitrage. There are many hypotheses, fewer now entertained than was the case at the time, about the nature of the linkages between credit and equity markets in 1998, and why the price movements were so dramatic. Without doubt, the compounding factor of the demise of the hedge fund Long-Term Capital Management and the unprecedented salvage operation forced by the Federal Reserve upon unenthusiastic investment banks heightened prevalent fears of systemic failure of the U.S. financial system. At the naive end of the range of hypotheses is the true, but not by itself sufficient, notion that the Fed’s actions simply amplified normal panic reactions to a major economic failing. An important factor was the speed with which information, speculation, gossip, and twaddle was disseminated and the breadth of popular 146 STATISTICAL ARBITRAGE coverage from twenty-four hour ‘‘news’’ television channels to the Internet.

If it does not, then initial losses will be reversed before existing trades are unwound; damage is limited largely to (possibly stomach churning) P&L volatility. Destruction, when it occurs, is supercharged because both sides of spread bets are simultaneously adversely affected. In November 1994 Kidder Peabody, on being acquired, reportedly eliminated a pair trading portfolio of over $1 billion. Long Term Capital Management (LTCM), in addition to its advertized, highly leveraged, interest instrument bets, reportedly had a large pair trading portfolio that was liquidated (August 1998) as massive losses elsewhere threatened (and eventually undermined) solvency. 8.5 THE STORY OF REGULATION FAIR DISCLOSURE (FD) Regulation ‘‘Fair Disclosure’’ was proposed by the SEC on December 20, 1999 and had almost immediate practical impact.


pages: 468 words: 145,998

On the Brink: Inside the Race to Stop the Collapse of the Global Financial System by Henry M. Paulson

Amazon: amazon.comamazon.co.ukamazon.deamazon.fr

asset-backed security, bank run, banking crisis, Bretton Woods, collateralized debt obligation, corporate governance, Credit Default Swap, credit default swaps / collateralized debt obligations, Doha Development Round, fear of failure, financial innovation, housing crisis, income inequality, London Interbank Offered Rate, Long Term Capital Management, margin call, moral hazard, Northern Rock, price discovery process, price mechanism, regulatory arbitrage, Ronald Reagan, Saturday Night Live, short selling, sovereign wealth fund, technology bubble, too big to fail, trade liberalization, young professional

They couldn’t sell their Russian holdings, which had become worthless, so they started selling other investments, like mortgage securities, which drove down their value. Even if you had a conservatively managed mortgage business, as Goldman did, you lost heavily. The markets began to seize up, and securities that had been very liquid suddenly became illiquid. The biggest victim of this was the hedge fund Long-Term Capital Management, whose failure, it was feared, might lead to a broad collapse of the markets. The investment banking industry, prodded by the Federal Reserve, banded together to bail out LTCM, but the pain was broader. I remember watching some of our competitors struggling for survival because they had relied on short-term funding that they couldn’t roll over. Goldman made money—I think we ended up earning 12 percent on capital for the year—but we were hemorrhaging for a month or two, and it was frightening.

And while Bear hadn’t posted the massive losses of some of its rivals, its huge exposure to bonds and mortgages made it vulnerable. Bear had found itself in increasingly difficult straits since the previous summer, when, in one of the first signs of the impending crisis, it had been forced to shut down two hedge funds heavily invested in collateralized debt obligations. For all that, I also knew Bear as a scrappy firm that liked to do things its own way: alone on Wall Street it had refused to help rescue Long-Term Capital Management in 1998. Bear’s people were survivors. They had always seemed to find a way out of trouble. For months, Steel and I had been pushing Bear, and many other investment banks and commercial banks, to raise capital and to improve their liquidity positions. Some, including Merrill Lynch and Morgan Stanley, had raised billions from big investors such as foreign governments’ sovereign wealth funds.

We learned a lot doing Bear Stearns, and what we learned scared us. CHAPTER 6 Late March 2008 For the first few days after the Bear Stearns rescue, the markets calmed. Share prices firmed up, while credit default swap spreads on the investment banks eased. Some at Treasury, and in the market, thought that after seven long months, we had finally reached a turning point, just as the industry intervention in Long-Term Capital Management had marked the beginning of the end of 1998’s troubles. But I remained wary. Bear Stearns’s failure had called into question not only the business models but also the very viability of the other investment banks. This uncertainty was unfair for those firms that, after adjusting for accounting differences, had stronger capital positions and better balance sheets than many commercial banks.


pages: 515 words: 132,295

Makers and Takers: The Rise of Finance and the Fall of American Business by Rana Foroohar

Amazon: amazon.comamazon.co.ukamazon.deamazon.fr

3D printing, accounting loophole / creative accounting, additive manufacturing, Airbnb, algorithmic trading, Asian financial crisis, asset allocation, bank run, Basel III, bonus culture, Bretton Woods, British Empire, call centre, Capital in the Twenty-First Century by Thomas Piketty, Carmen Reinhart, carried interest, centralized clearinghouse, clean water, collateralized debt obligation, corporate governance, corporate social responsibility, credit crunch, Credit Default Swap, credit default swaps / collateralized debt obligations, crony capitalism, crowdsourcing, David Graeber, deskilling, Detroit bankruptcy, diversification, Double Irish / Dutch Sandwich, Emanuel Derman, Eugene Fama: efficient market hypothesis, financial deregulation, financial intermediation, Frederick Winslow Taylor, George Akerlof, gig economy, Goldman Sachs: Vampire Squid, Gordon Gekko, greed is good, High speed trading, Home mortgage interest deduction, housing crisis, Howard Rheingold, Hyman Minsky, income inequality, index fund, interest rate derivative, interest rate swap, Internet of things, invisible hand, joint-stock company, joint-stock limited liability company, Kenneth Rogoff, knowledge economy, labor-force participation, labour mobility, London Whale, Long Term Capital Management, manufacturing employment, market design, Martin Wolf, moral hazard, mortgage debt, mortgage tax deduction, new economy, non-tariff barriers, offshore financial centre, oil shock, passive investing, pensions crisis, Ponzi scheme, principal–agent problem, quantitative easing, quantitative trading / quantitative finance, race to the bottom, Ralph Nader, Rana Plaza, RAND corporation, random walk, rent control, Robert Shiller, Robert Shiller, Ronald Reagan, Second Machine Age, shareholder value, sharing economy, Silicon Valley, Silicon Valley startup, Snapchat, sovereign wealth fund, Steve Jobs, technology bubble, The Chicago School, The Spirit Level, The Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith, Tim Cook: Apple, Tobin tax, too big to fail, trickle-down economics, Tyler Cowen: Great Stagnation, Vanguard fund

By the late 1990s, the world was in the midst of yet another emerging-market crisis, this time brought on by the further deregulation of global capital flows orchestrated by the Clinton administration. (Treasury secretary Rubin and his deputy and then successor, Lawrence Summers, were principal architects of these measures, and finance lobbied vigorously for them.) Too much money had flowed into the markets too quickly, ending up in speculative projects that were now going bust. Dominos were falling in Asia, Brazil, Russia, and the West, eventually toppling an infamous hedge fund, Long-Term Capital Management (LTCM), which nearly tanked the US financial system. Citigroup alone lost half its quarterly profit, year over year, as a result. The Fed was once again left to pick up the pieces—though in that case, unlike with the bailouts of 2008, the banks themselves had to take responsibility for their losses. All of this underscored just how complex the system and its most powerful institutions had become.

According to former CFTC head Gary Gensler, also a former Goldman Sachs derivatives expert (and now CFO of Hillary Clinton’s presidential campaign), prior to the 2008 crisis around 90 percent of the entire derivatives market was in an unregulated space, not subject to oversight or central clearing on public exchanges.23 Gensler, who made it his business while at the CFTC to try to change that, has special insight into just how damaging that opacity can be. In 1998, while working in the Clinton administration for then–Treasury secretary Robert Rubin, he was assigned the task of trying to sort out the potential financial implications of the implosion of the hedge fund Long-Term Capital Management (LTCM). The culprit: a $1.25 trillion swaps portfolio gone bad. Gensler remembers going out to LTCM’s headquarters in Greenwich, Connecticut, on a Sunday to investigate. “It quickly became clear to me that we had no idea what the ramifications would be in our financial system, and where, because these trades were booked in the Cayman Islands,” he says. “It was a terrible feeling.”24 Derivatives—be they interest rate swaps, foreign exchange bets, or energy futures—have real-world impacts, as we’ve already seen.

The task is particularly difficult since in the thirty years leading up to the passage of the Dodd-Frank financial reform act in 2010, nobody in Washington paid much attention to such firms. As part of the shadow banking sector, they were presumed to operate in a sphere that wouldn’t touch the average consumer’s finances too much, which turned out to be untrue. Just think of the demise of the hedge fund Long-Term Capital Management and the global market ripples it created; the government’s intervention to offset the impact of the fund’s failure belies the notion that shadow banking entities don’t enjoy federal backstopping of the Too Big to Fail kind, albeit implicitly rather than explicitly. Since the financial crisis of 2008, it’s the shadow banking sector rather than the federally guaranteed banks that has grown like kudzu, as risk migrates to the darkest parts of the system.

Quantitative Trading: How to Build Your Own Algorithmic Trading Business by Ernie Chan

Amazon: amazon.comamazon.co.ukamazon.deamazon.fr

algorithmic trading, asset allocation, automated trading system, backtesting, Black Swan, Brownian motion, business continuity plan, compound rate of return, Elliott wave, endowment effect, fixed income, general-purpose programming language, index fund, Long Term Capital Management, loss aversion, p-value, paper trading, price discovery process, quantitative hedge fund, quantitative trading / quantitative finance, random walk, Ray Kurzweil, Renaissance Technologies, risk-adjusted returns, Sharpe ratio, short selling, statistical arbitrage, statistical model, systematic trading, transaction costs

., trading an overly large portfolio): In despair, one tries to recoup the losses by adding fresh capital; in greed, one adds capital too quickly after initial successes with a strategy. Therefore, the one golden rule in risk management is to keep the size of your portfolio under control at all times. This is, however, easier said than done. Large, well-known funds have succumbed to the temptation to overleverage and failed: Long-Term Capital Management in 2000 (Lowenstein, 2000) and Amaranth Advisors in 2006 (epchan. blogspot.com/2006/10/highly-improbable-event.html). In the Amaranth Advisors case, the leverage employed on one single strategy (natural gas calendar spread trade) due to one single trader (Brian Hunter) is so large that a $6 billion dollar loss was incurred, comfortably wiping out the fund’s equity—a textbook case of risk mismanagement.

P1: JYS c08 JWBK321-Chan August 27, 2008 15:20 Printer: Yet to come CHAPTER 8 Conclusion Can Independent Traders Succeed? uantitative trading gained notoriety in the summer of 2007 when some enormous hedge funds run by some of the most reputable money managers rung up losses measured in billions in just a few days (though some had recovered by the end of the month). They brought back bad memories of other notorious hedge fund debacles such as that of Long-Term Capital Management and Amaranth Advisors (both referenced in Chapter 6), except that this time it was not just one trader or one firm, but losses at multiple funds over a short period of time. And yet, ever since I began my career in the institutional quantitative trading business, I have spoken to many small, independent traders, working in shabby offices or their spare bedrooms, who gain small but steady and growing profits year-in and year-out, quite unlike the stereotypical reckless day traders of the popular imagination.

See Sharpe ratio Information, slow diffusion of, 117–118 Interactive Brokers, 15, 73, 82, 83 Investors, herdlike behavior of, 118–119 J January effect, 143–146 backtesting, 144–146 Java, 80, 85 P1: JYS ind JWBK321-Chan October 2, 2008 14:7 178 K Kalman filter, 116 Kavanaugh, Paul, 149 Kelly formula, 95, 97, 100–103, 105, 107, 153, 161 calculating the optimal allocation based on, 100–102 calculating the optimal leverage based on, 99 simple derivation of, when return distribution is Gaussian, 112–113 Kerviel, Jérôme, 160 Khandani, Amir, 104 Kirk Report, 10 L LeSage, James, 168 Leverage, 5, 95–103 Liquidnet, 73 Lo, Andrew, 104 Logical Information Machines, 35, 36 Long-only versus market-neutral strategies, calculating Sharpe ratio for, 45–47 Long-Term Capital Management, 110, 157 Long-term wealth, maximizing, 96 Look-ahead bias, 51–52 Loss aversion, 108–109 M Market impact, 22 MarketQA (Quantitative Analytics), 35 Markov models, hidden, 116, 121 Printer: Yet to come INDEX R , 21, 32–34, MATLAB 137–139 calculating optimal allocation using Kelly formula, 100–102 a quick survey of, 163–168 using in automated trading systems, 80, 81, 83, 85 using to avoid look-ahead bias, 51–52 using to backtest January effect, 144–146 mean-reverting strategy with and without transaction costs, 61–65 year-on-year seasonal trending strategy, 146–148 using to calculate maximum drawdown and its duration, 48–50 using to calculate Sharpe ratio for long-only strategies, 46–47 using for pair trading, 56–58, 59–60 using to scrape web pages for financial data, 34 MCSI Barra, 35, 136 Mean-reverting versus momentum strategies, 116–119 Mean-reverting time series, calculation of the half-life of, 141–142 Millennium Partners, 12 Model risk, 107 ModelStation (Clarifi), 35 Momentum strategies, mean-reverting versus, 116–119 P1: JYS ind JWBK321-Chan October 2, 2008 14:7 Index Money and risk management, 95–113 optimal capital allocation and leverage, 95–103 psychological preparedness, 108–111 risk management, 103–108 Murphy, Kevin, 168 N National Association of Securities Dealers (NASD) Series 7 examination, 70 National Bureau of Economic Research, 10 Neural networks, 116 New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), 16, 149 Northfield Information Services, 136 O Oanda, 37, 73 Octave, 33 O-Matrix, 33 Ornstein-Uhlenbeck formula, 140–141, 142 Out-of-sample testing, 53–55 P Pair trading of GLD and GDX, 55 Paper trading, 55 testing your system by, 89–90 Parameterless trading models, 54–55 PFG Futures, 73 Plus-tick rule, elimination of, 92, 120 Posit (ITG), 73 Position risk, 107 Printer: Yet to come 179 Post earnings announcement drift (PEAD), 118 Principal component analysis (PCA), 136–139 Profit and loss (P&L), 6, 89 curve, 20 Programming consultant, hiring a, 86–87 Psychological preparedness, 108–111 Q Qian, Edward, 154 Quantitative Analytics, 35 Quantitative Services Group, 136 Quantitative trading, 1–8 business case for, 4–8 demand on time, 5–7 marketing, nonnecessity of, 7–8 scalability, 5 the way forward, 8 special topics in, 115–156 exit strategy, 140–143 factor models, 133–139 high-frequency trading strategies, 151–153 high-leverage versus high-beta portfolio, 153–154 mean-reverting versus momentum strategies, 116–119 regime switching, 119–126 seasonal trading strategies, 143–151 stationarity and cointegration, 126–133 who can become a quantitative trader, 2–4 Quotes-plus.com, 37 P1: JYS ind JWBK321-Chan October 2, 2008 14:7 180 R Random walking, 116 REDIPlus trading platform (Goldman Sachs), 73, 82, 83, 84 Regime shifts, 25, 91–92 Regime switching, 119–126 academic attempts to model, 120–121 Markov, 121 using a machine learning tool to profit from, 122–126 Regulation T (SEC), 5, 14, 69–70 Renaissance Technologies Corporation, 104 Representativeness bias, 109 Reverse split, 38 Risk management, 103–108.


pages: 394 words: 85,734

The Global Minotaur by Yanis Varoufakis, Paul Mason

Amazon: amazon.comamazon.co.ukamazon.deamazon.fr

banking crisis, Berlin Wall, Big bang: deregulation of the City of London, Bretton Woods, business climate, capital controls, Carmen Reinhart, central bank independence, collapse of Lehman Brothers, collateralized debt obligation, colonial rule, corporate governance, correlation coefficient, credit crunch, Credit Default Swap, credit default swaps / collateralized debt obligations, debt deflation, declining real wages, deindustrialization, eurozone crisis, financial innovation, first-past-the-post, full employment, Hyman Minsky, industrial robot, Joseph Schumpeter, Kenneth Rogoff, labour market flexibility, liquidity trap, London Interbank Offered Rate, Long Term Capital Management, market fundamentalism, Mexican peso crisis / tequila crisis, mortgage debt, new economy, Northern Rock, paper trading, planetary scale, post-oil, price stability, quantitative easing, reserve currency, rising living standards, Ronald Reagan, special economic zone, Steve Jobs, structural adjustment programs, systematic trading, too big to fail, trickle-down economics, urban renewal, War on Poverty, Yom Kippur War

., New Frontier social programmes, 83, 84 Keynes, John Maynard: Bretton Woods conference, 59, 60, 62, 109; General Theory, 37; ICU proposal, 60, 66, 90, 109, 254, 255; influence on New Dealers, 81; on investment decisions, 48; on liquidity, 160–1; trade imbalances, 62–6 Keynsianism, 157 Kim Il Sung, 77 Kissinger, Henry, 94, 98, 106 Kohl, Helmut, 201 Korea, 91, 191, 192 Korean War, 77, 86 labour: as a commodity, 28; costs, 104–5, 104, 105, 106, 137; hired, 31, 45, 46, 53, 64; scarcity of, 34–5; value of, 50–2 labour markets, 12, 202 Labour Party (British), 69 labourers, 32 land: as a commodity, 28; enclosure, 64 Landesbanken, 203 Latin America: effect of China on, 215, 218; European banks’ exposure to, 203; financial crisis, 190 see also specific countries lead, prices, 96 Lebensraum, 67 Left-Right divide, 167 Lehman Brothers, 150, 152–3 leverage, 121–2 leveraging, 37 Liberal Democratic Party (Japan), 187 liberation movements, 79, 107 LIBOR (London Interbank Offered Rate), 148 liquidity traps, 157, 190 Lloyds TSB, 153, 156 loans: and CDOs, 7–8, 129–31; defaults on, 37 London School of Economics, 4, 66 Long-Term Capital Management (LTCM) hedge fund collapse, 13 LTCM (Long-Term Capital Management) hedge fund collapse, 2, 13 Luxembourg, support for Dexia, 154 Maastricht Treaty, 199–200, 202 MacArthur, Douglas, 70–1, 76, 77 machines, and humans, 50–2 Malaysia, 91, 191 Mao, Chairman, 76, 86, 91 Maresca, John, 106–7 Marjolin, Robert, 73 Marshall, George, 72 Marshall Plan, 71–4 Marx, Karl: and capitalism, 17–18, 19, 34; Das Kapital, 49; on history, 178 Marxism, 181, 182 Matrix, The (film), 50–2 MBIA, 149, 150 McCarthy, Senator Joseph, 73 mercantilism, in Germany, 251 merchant class, 27–8 Merkel, Angela, 158, 206 Merrill Lynch, 149, 153, 157 Merton, Robert, 13 Mexico: effect of China on, 214; peso crisis, 190 Middle East, oil, 69 MIE (military-industrial establishment), 82–3 migration, Crash of 2008, 3 military-industrial complex mechanism, 65, 81, 182 Ministry for International Trade and Industry (Japan), 78 Ministry of Finance (Japan), 187 Minotaur legend, 24–5, 25 Minsky, Hyman, 37 money markets, 45–6, 53, 153 moneylenders, 31, 32 mortgage backed securities (MBS) 232, 233, 234 NAFTA (North American Free Trade Agreement), 214 National Bureau of Economic Research (US), 157 National Economic Council (US), 3 national income see GDP National Security Council (US), 94 National Security Study Memorandum 200 (US), 106 nationalization: Anglo Irish Bank, 158; Bradford and Bingley, 154; Fortis, 153; Geithner–Summers Plan, 179; General Motors, 160; Icelandic banks, 154, 155; Northern Rock, 151 NATO (North Atlantic Treaty Organization), 76, 253 negative engineering, 110 negative equity 234 neoliberalism, 139, 142; and greed, 10 New Century Financial, 147 New Deal: beginnings, 45; Bretton Woods conference, 57–9; China, 76; Global Plan, 67–71, 68; Japan, 77; President Kennedy, 84; support for the Deutschmark, 74; transfer union, 65 New Dealers: corporate power, 81; criticism of European colonizers, 79 ‘new economy’, 5–6 New York stock exchange, 40, 158 Nietzsche, Friedrich, 19 Nixon, Richard, 94, 95–6 Nobel Prize for Economics, 13 North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), 214 North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO), 76 North Korea see Korea Northern Rock, 148, 151 Obama administration, 164, 178 Obama, Barack, 158, 159, 169, 180, 230, 231 OECD (Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development), 73 OEEC (Organisation for European Economic Co-operation), 73, 74 oil: global consumption, 160; imports, 102–3; prices, 96, 97–9 OPEC (Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries), 96, 97 paradox of success, 249 parallax challenge, 20–1 Paulson, Henry, 152, 154, 170 Paulson Plan, 154, 173 Penn Bank, 40 Pentagon, the, 73 Plaza Accord (1985), 188, 192, 213 Pompidou, Georges, 94, 95–6 pound sterling, devaluing, 93 poverty: capitalism as a supposed cure for, 41–2; in China, 162; reduction in the US, 84; reports on global, 125 predatory governance, 181 prey–predator dynamic, 33–5 prices, flexible, 40–1 private money, 147, 177; Geithner–Summers Plan, 178; toxic, 132–3, 136, 179 privatization, of surpluses, 29 probability, estimating, 13–14 production: cars, 70, 103, 116, 157–8; coal, 73, 75; costs, 96, 104; cuts in, 41; in Japan, 185–6; processes, 30, 31, 64; steel, 70, 75 production–distribution cycle, 54 property see real estate prophecy paradox, 46, 47, 53 psychology, mass, 14 public debt crisis, 205 quantitative easing, 164, 231–6 railway bubbles, 40 Rational Expectations Hypothesis (REH), 15–16 RBS (Royal Bank of Scotland), 6, 151, 156; takeover of ABN-Amro, 119–20 Reagan, Ronald, 10, 99, 133–5, 182–3 Real Business Cycle Theory (RBCT), 15, 16–17 real estate, bubbles, 8–9, 188, 190, 192–3 reason, deferring to expectation, 47 recession predictions, 152 recessions, US, 40, 157 recycling mechanisms, 200 regulation, of banking system, 10, 122 relabelling, 14 religion, organized, 27 renminbi (RMB), 213, 214, 217, 218, 253 rentiers, 165, 187, 188 representative agents, 140 Reserve Bank of Australia, 148 reserve currency status, 101–2 risk: capitalists and, 31; riskless, 5, 6–9, 14 Roach, Stephen, 145 Robbins, Lionel, 66 Roosevelt, Franklin D., 165; attitude towards Britain, 69; and bank regulation, 10; New Deal, 45, 58–9 Roosevelt, Theodore (‘Teddy’), 180 Royal Bank of Scotland (RBS), 6, 151, 156; takeover of ABN-Amro, 119–20 Rudd, Kevin, 212 Russia, financial crisis, 190 Saudi Arabia, oil prices, 98 Scandinavia, Gold Standard, 44 Scholes, Myron, 13 Schopenhauer, Arthur, 19 Schuman, Robert, 75 Schumpter, Joseph, 34 Second World War, 45, 55–6; aftermath, 87–8; effect on the US, 57–8 seeds, commodification of, 163 shares, in privatized companies, 137, 138 silver, prices, 96 simulated markets, 170 simulated prices, 170 Singapore, 91 single currencies, ICU, 60–1 slave trade, 28 SMEs (small and medium-sized enterprises), 186 social welfare, 12 solidarity (asabiyyah), 33–4 South East Asia, 91; financial crisis, 190, 191–5, 213; industrialization, 86, 87 South Korea see Korea sovereign debt crisis, 205 Soviet Union: Africa, 79; disintegration, 201; Marshall Plan, 72–3; Marxism, 181, 182; relations with the US, 71 SPV (Special Purpose Vehicle), 174 see also EFSF stagflation, 97 stagnation, 37 Stalin, Joseph, 72–3 steel production, in Germany, 70 Strauss-Kahn, Dominique, 60, 254, 255 Summers, Larry, 230 strikes, 40 sub-prime mortgages, 2, 5, 6, 130–1, 147, 149, 151, 166 success, paradox of, 33–5, 53 Suez Canal trauma, 69 Suharto, President of Indonesia, 97 Summers, Larry, 3, 132, 170, 173, 180 see also Geithner–Summers Plan supply and demand, 11 surpluses: under capitalism, 31–2; currency unions, 61; under feudalism, 30; generation in the EU, 196; manufacturing, 30; origin of, 26–7; privatization of, 29; recycling mechanisms, 64–5, 109–10 Sweden, Crash of 2008, 155 Sweezy, Paul, 73 Switzerland: Crash of 2008, 155; UBS, 148–9, 151 systemic failure, Crash of 2008, 17–19 Taiwan, 191, 192 Tea Party (US), 162, 230, 231, 281 technology, and globalization, 28 Thailand, 91 Thatcher, Margaret, 117–18, 136–7 Third World: Crash of 2008, 162; debt crisis, 108, 219; interest rate rises, 108; mineral wealth, 106; production of goods for Walmart, 125 tiger economies, 87 see also South East Asia Tillman Act (1907), 180 time, and economic models, 139–40 Time Warner, 117 tin, prices, 96 toxic theory, 13–17, 115, 133–9, 139–42 trade: balance of, 61, 62, 64–5; deficits (US), 111, 243; global, 27, 90; surpluses, 158 trades unions, 124, 137, 202 transfer unions, New Deal, 65 Treasury Bills (US), 7 Treaty of Rome, 237 Treaty of Versailles, 237 Treaty of Westphalia, 237 trickle-down, 115, 135 trickle-up, 135 Truman Doctrine, 71, 71–2, 77 Truman, Harry, 73 tsunami, effects of, 194 UBS, 148–9, 151 Ukraine, and the Crash of 2008, 156 UN Security Council, 253 unemployment: Britain, 160; Global Plan, 96–7; rate of, 14; US, 152, 158, 164 United States see US Unocal, 106 US economy, twin deficits, 22–3, 25 US government, and South East Asia, 192 US Mortgage Bankers Association, 161 US Supreme Court, 180 US Treasury, 153–4, 156, 157, 159; aftermath of the Crash of 2008, 160; Geithner–Summers Plan, 171–2, 173; bonds, 227 US Treasury Bills, 109 US (United States): aftermath of the Crash of 2008, 161–2; assets owned by foreign state institutions, 216; attitude towards oil price rises, 97–8; China, 213–14; corporate bond purchases, 228; as a creditor nation, 57; domestic policies during the Global Plan, 82–5; economy at present, 184; economy praised, 113–14; effects of the Crash of 2008, 2, 183; foreign-owned assets, 225; Greek Civil War, 71; labour costs, 105; Plaza Accord, 188; profit rates, 106; proposed invasion of Afghanistan, 106–7; role in the ECSC, 75; South East Asia, 192 value, costing, 50–1 VAT, reduced, 156 Venezuela, oil prices, 97 Vietnamese War, 86, 91–2 vital spaces, 192, 195, 196 Volcker, Paul: 2009 address to Wall Street, 122; demand for dollars, 102; and gold convertibility, 94; interest rate rises, 99; replaced by Greenspan, 10; warning of the Crash of 2008, 144–5; on the world economy, 22, 100–1, 139 Volcker Rule, 180–1 Wachowski, Larry and Andy, 50 wage share, 34–5 wages: British workers, 137; Japanese workers, 185; productivity, 104; prophecy paradox, 48; US workers, 124, 161 Wal-Mart: The High Cost of Low Price (documentary, Greenwald), 125–6 Wall Street: Anglo-Celtic model, 12; Crash of 2008, 11–12, 152; current importance, 251; Geithner–Summers Plan, 178; global profits, 23; misplaced confidence in, 41; private money, 136; profiting from sub-prime mortgages, 131; takeovers and mergers, 115–17, 115, 118–19; toxic theory, 15 Wallace, Harry, 72–3 Walmart, 115, 123–7, 126; current importance, 251 War of the Currents, 39 Washington Mutual, 153 weapons of mass destruction, 27 West Germany: labour costs, 105; Plaza Accord, 188 Westinghouse, George, 39 White, Harry Dexter, 59, 70, 109 Wikileaks, 212 wool, as a global commodity, 28 working class: in Britain, 136; development of, 28 working conditions, at Walmart, 124–5 World Bank, 253; origins, 59; recession prediction, 149; and South East Asia, 192 World Trade Organization, 78, 215 written word, 27 yen, value against dollar, 96, 188, 193–4 Yom Kippur War, 96 zombie banks, 190–1

POSTCRIPT TO THE NEW EDITION NOTES RECOMMENDED READING SELECT BIBLIOGRAPHY INDEX Abbreviations AC alternating current ACE aeronautic–computer–electronics complex AIG American Insurance Group ATM automated telling machine CDO collateralized debt obligation CDS credit default swap CEO chief executive officer DC direct current ECB European Central Bank ECSC European Coal and Steel Community EFSF European Financial Stability Facility EIB European Investment Bank EMH Efficient Market Hypothesis ERAB Economic Recovery Advisory Board EU European Union FDIC Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation GDP gross domestic product GM General Motors GSRM global surplus recycling mechanism IBRD International Bank for Reconstruction and Development ICU International Currency Union IMF International Monetary Fund LTCM Long-Term Capital Management (hedge fund) MIE military–industrial establishment NAFTA North American Free Trade Agreement NATO North Atlantic Treaty Organization OECD Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development OEEC Organisation for European Economic Co-operation OMT outright monetary operations OPEC Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries RBCT Real Business Cycle Theory RBS Royal Bank of Scotland REH Rational Expectations Hypothesis RMB renminbi – Chinese currency SME small and medium-sized enterprise SPV Special Purpose Vehicle TARP Troubled Asset Relief Program For Danae Stratou, my global partner Preface to the new edition This book originally aimed at pressing a useful metaphor into the service of elucidating a troubled world; a world that could no longer be understood properly by means of the paradigms that dominated our thinking before the Crash of 2008.

Unlike previous crises, such as the dotcom crash of 2001, the 1991 recession, Black Monday,1 the 1980s Latin American debacle, the slide of the Third World into a vicious debt trap, or even the devastating early 1980s depression in Britain and parts of the US, this crisis was not limited to a specific geography, a certain social class or particular sectors. All the pre-2008 crises were, in a sense, localized. Their long-term victims were hardly ever of importance to the powers-that-be, and when (as in the case of Black Monday, the Long-Term Capital Management (LTCM) hedge fund fiasco of 1998 or the dotcom bubble of two years later) it was the powerful who felt the shock, the authorities had managed to come to the rescue quickly and efficiently. In contrast, the Crash of 2008 had devastating effects both globally and across the neoliberal heartland. Moreover, its effects will be with us for a long, long time. In Britain, it was probably the first crisis in living memory really to have hit the richer regions of the south.


pages: 338 words: 106,936

The Physics of Wall Street: A Brief History of Predicting the Unpredictable by James Owen Weatherall

Amazon: amazon.comamazon.co.ukamazon.deamazon.fr

Albert Einstein, algorithmic trading, Antoine Gombaud: Chevalier de Méré, Asian financial crisis, bank run, Benoit Mandelbrot, Black Swan, Black-Scholes formula, Bonfire of the Vanities, Bretton Woods, Brownian motion, butterfly effect, capital asset pricing model, Carmen Reinhart, Claude Shannon: information theory, collateralized debt obligation, collective bargaining, dark matter, Edward Lorenz: Chaos theory, Emanuel Derman, Eugene Fama: efficient market hypothesis, financial innovation, George Akerlof, Gerolamo Cardano, Henri Poincaré, invisible hand, Isaac Newton, iterative process, John Nash: game theory, Kenneth Rogoff, Long Term Capital Management, Louis Bachelier, mandelbrot fractal, martingale, new economy, Paul Lévy, prediction markets, probability theory / Blaise Pascal / Pierre de Fermat, quantitative trading / quantitative finance, random walk, Renaissance Technologies, risk-adjusted returns, Robert Gordon, Robert Shiller, Robert Shiller, Ronald Coase, Sharpe ratio, short selling, Silicon Valley, South Sea Bubble, statistical arbitrage, statistical model, stochastic process, The Chicago School, The Myth of the Rational Market, tulip mania, V2 rocket, volatility smile

During the financial meltdown, even sophisticated investors, such as the banks that produced securitized loans in the first place, appear to have been mistaken about how risky these products were. In other words, the models that were supposed to make these products risk-free for their manufacturers failed, utterly. Models have failed in other market disasters as well — perhaps most notably when Long-Term Capital Management (LTCM), a small private investment firm whose strategy team included Myron Scholes among others, imploded. LTCM had a successful run from its founding in 1994 until the early summer of 1998, when Russia defaulted on its state debts. Then, in just under four months, LTCM lost $4.6 billion. By September, its assets had disappeared. The firm was heavily invested in derivatives markets, with obligations to every major bank in the world, totaling about $1 trillion.

And whatever your political position on the role of financial markets in global geopolitics, Sornette believes that the very fact that financial markets and the people who run them do have so much social power is a sufficient reason to look closely at how they work. Since first predicting the October 1997 crash, Sornette has had a remarkable track record of identifying when market crashes will occur. He saw the log-periodic pattern in advance of the September 2008 crash, for instance, and was able to predict the timing. Similarly, the 1998 collapse in the Russian ruble that brought Long-Term Capital Management to its knees showed the signs of an impending crash — indeed, Sornette has claimed that even though the largely unanticipated Russian debt default may have triggered the market turmoil that summer, the crash showed the log-periodic precursors characteristic of herding behavior. This means that a market crash would likely have occurred during that period whether the ruble had collapsed or not.

.”: This story is based on an interview I performed with Clay Struve, as well as a published interview with Michael Greenbaum (Jung 2007), and Cone (1999). Greenbaum mentions that O’Connor was using jump diffusion models in the late 1970s; Struve confirmed it. Cone (1999), meanwhile, described how Struve saved O’Connor in October 1987. “Models have failed in other market disasters as well . . .”: For more on Long-Term Capital Management, see Lowenstein (2000). 6. The Prediction Company “When the Santa Fe Trail . . .”: For more on the Santa Fe Trail, see Duffus (1972). “A century and a half later, two men . . .”: The narrative history of the founding of the Prediction Company is from Bass (1999). Additional biographical details concerning the founders of the Prediction Company come from Bass (1985, 1999), Gleick (1987), Kelly (1994a, b), and Kaplan (2002), as well as interviews and e-mail exchanges with Doyne Farmer and others knowledgeable about the early history of the company.


pages: 431 words: 132,416

No One Would Listen: A True Financial Thriller by Harry Markopolos

Amazon: amazon.comamazon.co.ukamazon.deamazon.fr

backtesting, barriers to entry, Bernie Madoff, call centre, centralized clearinghouse, correlation coefficient, diversified portfolio, Emanuel Derman, Eugene Fama: efficient market hypothesis, family office, fixed income, forensic accounting, high net worth, index card, Long Term Capital Management, Louis Bachelier, offshore financial centre, Ponzi scheme, price mechanism, quantitative trading / quantitative finance, regulatory arbitrage, Renaissance Technologies, risk-adjusted returns, risk/return, rolodex, Sharpe ratio, statistical arbitrage, too big to fail, transaction costs

Fourth, his reported returns couldn’t come from the market performance or options hedging, but there was no indication of where they did come from. Fifth, Rampart’s returns from products similar to Madoff’s had been substantially less than those claimed by Madoff. As I wrote, “In down months, our ... program experienced losses ... whereas Madoff reports only 3 losing months out of 87, a claim I believe impossible to obtain using option income strategies. In August 1998, in the midst of the Russian default and the Long Term Capital Management twin crises, the S&P dropped 14.58 percent, yet Madoff earned 0.30 percent. In January 2000, the S&P 500 dropped 5.09 percent, yet Madoff earned 2.72 percent. Our current test portfolios do not support this....” And the sixth red flag specifically noted that while the market had 26 down months in the 87-month period presented, Madoff had only 3, and “the methods given for the return generation are not possible or even plausible.

So not only did he urge me to go public, but he also introduced me to John Wilke, an investigative reporter at the Wall Street Journal whom he greatly respected. “This is the guy,” he told me. “This is the guy.” Pat Burns made the initial contact with Wilke. In preparation for that I sent him a one-page memo suggesting a three-part package for the Journal, which that paper could promote as “the largest hedge fund blowup since that of Long-Term Capital Management in August-October 1998. And, in reality, since it will likely involve hundreds of billions in selling pressure, the losses to investors will be akin to the largest company in the S&P 500, General Electric (with a market capitalization of $373 billion) suddenly collapsing.” I sat in my office late into the night, and as I wrote this I could almost feel the hope igniting inside me again.

If the average hedge fund is assumed to be levered 4:1, it doesn’t take a rocket scientist to realize that there might be anywhere from a few hundred billion on up in selling pressure in the wake of a $20 - $50 billion hedge fund fraud. With the hedge fund market estimated to be $1 trillion, having one hedge fund with 2% - 5% of the industry’s assets under management suddenly blow up, it is hard to predict the severity of the resulting shock wave. You just know it’ll be unpleasant for anywhere from a few days to a few weeks but the fall out shouldn’t be anywhere near as great as that from the Long Term Capital Management Crises. Using the hurricane scale with which we’ve all become quite familiar with this year, I’d rate BM turning out to be a Ponzi Scheme as a Category 2 or 3 hurricane where the 1998 LTCM Crises was a Category 5. 2. Hedge fund, fund of funds with greater than a 10% exposure to Bernie Madoff will likely be faced with forced redemptions. This will lead to a cascade of panic selling in all of the various hedge fund sectors whether equity related or not.


pages: 466 words: 127,728

The Death of Money: The Coming Collapse of the International Monetary System by James Rickards

Amazon: amazon.comamazon.co.ukamazon.deamazon.fr

Affordable Care Act / Obamacare, Asian financial crisis, asset allocation, Ayatollah Khomeini, bank run, banking crisis, Ben Bernanke: helicopter money, bitcoin, Black Swan, Bretton Woods, BRICs, business climate, capital controls, Carmen Reinhart, central bank independence, centre right, collateralized debt obligation, collective bargaining, complexity theory, computer age, credit crunch, currency peg, David Graeber, debt deflation, Deng Xiaoping, diversification, Edward Snowden, eurozone crisis, fiat currency, financial innovation, financial intermediation, financial repression, Flash crash, floating exchange rates, forward guidance, George Akerlof, global reserve currency, global supply chain, Growth in a Time of Debt, income inequality, inflation targeting, invisible hand, jitney, Kenneth Rogoff, labor-force participation, labour mobility, Lao Tzu, liquidationism / Banker’s doctrine / the Treasury view, liquidity trap, Long Term Capital Management, mandelbrot fractal, margin call, market bubble, market clearing, market design, money: store of value / unit of account / medium of exchange, mutually assured destruction, obamacare, offshore financial centre, oil shale / tar sands, open economy, Plutocrats, plutocrats, Ponzi scheme, price stability, quantitative easing, RAND corporation, reserve currency, risk-adjusted returns, Rod Stewart played at Stephen Schwarzman birthday party, Ronald Reagan, Satoshi Nakamoto, Silicon Valley, Silicon Valley startup, Skype, sovereign wealth fund, special drawing rights, Stuxnet, The Market for Lemons, Thomas Kuhn: the structure of scientific revolutions, Thomas L Friedman, too big to fail, trade route, uranium enrichment, Washington Consensus, working-age population, yield curve

Washington Post, April 23, 2013, http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/worldviews/wp/2013/04/23/syrian-hackers-claim-ap-hack-that-tipped-stock-market-by-136-billion-is-it-terrorism. Knight Capital fiasco . . . : Scott Patterson, Jenny Strasburg, and Jacob Bunge, “Knight Upgrade Triggered Old Trading System, Big Losses,” Wall Street Journal, August 14, 2012, http://online.wsj.com/news/articles/SB10000872396390444318104577589694289838100. bailout of the hedge fund Long-Term Capital Management . . . : The author was general counsel of Long-Term Capital Management and the principal negotiator of the 1998 bailout arranged by the Federal Reserve Bank of New York. While LTCM was a well-known trader in fixed-income and derivatives markets, the extent of its trading in equity markets was not well known. LTCM was the largest risk arbitrageur in the world, with over $15 billion in equity positions on pending deals. Upon reviewing the books and records of LTCM with the author and CEO John Meriwether on September 20, 1998, Peter R.

Such behavior exists only in relatively calm, unperturbed markets, but in actual panic situations, selling pressure feeds on itself, and buyers are nowhere to be found. A major panic will spread exponentially and lead to total collapse absent an act of force majeure by government. This panic dynamic has actually commenced twice in the past sixteen years. In September 1998 global capital markets were hours away from total collapse before the completion of a $4 billion, all-cash bailout of the hedge fund Long-Term Capital Management, orchestrated by the Federal Reserve Bank of New York. In October 2008 global capital markets were days away from the sequential collapse of most major banks when Congress enacted the TARP bailout, while the Fed and Treasury intervened to guarantee money-market funds, prop up AIG, and provide trillions of dollars in market liquidity. In neither panic did the Fed’s imaginary bargain hunters show up to save the day.

Paper Money or the True Gold Standard: A Monetary Reform Plan Without Official Reserve Currencies. Lehrman Institute, 2012. Lind, Michael. Land of Promise: An Economic History of the United States. New York: Harper, 2012. Litan, Robert E., and Benn Steill. Financial Statecraft: The Role of Financial Markets in American Foreign Policy. New Haven, Conn.: Yale University Press, 2006. Lowenstein, Roger. When Genius Failed: The Rise and Fall of Long-Term Capital Management. New York: Random House, 2000. Luman, Ronald R., ed. Unrestricted Warfare Symposium. 3 vols. Laurel, Md.: Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, 2007–9. McGregor, James. No Ancient Wisdom, No Followers. Westport, Conn.: Prospecta Press, 2012. Mackay, Charles. Extraordinary Popular Delusions and the Madness of Crowds. New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 1932.


pages: 280 words: 73,420

Crapshoot Investing: How Tech-Savvy Traders and Clueless Regulators Turned the Stock Market Into a Casino by Jim McTague

Amazon: amazon.comamazon.co.ukamazon.deamazon.fr

algorithmic trading, automated trading system, Bernie Madoff, Bernie Sanders, Bretton Woods, buttonwood tree, credit crunch, Credit Default Swap, financial innovation, Flash crash, High speed trading, housing crisis, index arbitrage, locking in a profit, Long Term Capital Management, margin call, market bubble, market fragmentation, market fundamentalism, naked short selling, pattern recognition, Ponzi scheme, quantitative trading / quantitative finance, Renaissance Technologies, Ronald Reagan, Sergey Aleynikov, short selling, Small Order Execution System, statistical arbitrage, technology bubble, transaction costs, Vanguard fund, Y2K

The Division of Risk, Strategy and Financial Innovation was staffed with risk specialists, economists, and even some physicists to anticipate threats to the markets posed by new and existing investment activities and products. Schapiro recruited University of Texas professor Henry Hu to head the division. A renaissance man with degrees in science and law, Hu in 1993 had written a forward-looking piece for the Yale Law Review predicting that big financial institutions would make significant mistakes employing relatively new products called derivatives. This was 5 years before the blowup of Long Term Capital Management, a hedge fund that had made interest rate bets using the exotic products and 15 years before insurer AIG would blow itself up dealing in the exotic products. Part of Hu’s thinking was that credit default swaps, which decoupled loans from the actual lender, led to “empty creditor” situations, undermining what it meant to be a debt holder. The SEC had been dominated by lawyers who were more interested in writing regulations than actually riding herd on the markets.

High-frequency traders eagerly embraced this kind of pattern-recognition software. The Quants, who predated the HFT industry by 20 years, often founded hedge funds as opposed to trading exclusively on their own dime. This practice invited regulatory scrutiny and the associated expenses whenever a member of the Quant fraternity had an exceptional meltdown. The SEC tried to regulate hedge funds in the wake of the Long Term Capital Management (LTCM) hedge fund debacle in 1998, but the courts threw out its rules. Congress eventually stepped in and required regulation for some of the larger hedge funds in the Dodd-Frank Financial reform Law of 2010. So a spotlight had been shone on that industry. Quants in the late 1990s and early 2000s learned the hard way what should have been fairly obvious—the longer one’s time horizon, the more difficult it is to predict the future.

., 108 Island (ECN), 144-145 Ivandjiiski, Krassimir, 42 Ivandjiiski, Dan, 41-42 J–K Johnson, Lyndon, 114 Johnson, Simon, 186 Junger, Sebastian, 67 justifiable trades, 88 Kanjilal, Debases, 189 Kanjorski, Paul, 81-83 Kaufman, Ted, 37, 47-61, 103, 183-187, 193-198, 208-210 Kay, Bradley, 231-232 Kim, Edward, 142 King, Elizabeth, 196 Kirilenko, Andrei, 171, 201 Kotok, David, 234 Kotz, David, 197 L latency, 167 layering, 210-212 Leibowitz, Larry, 42 Lemov, Michael, 114 Levitt, Arthur, 14, 35, 50, 110, 118, 140-144 Lewis, Michael, 191 life-cycle funds, 230 LIFFE (London International Financial Futures and Options Exchange), 30 limit orders, market orders versus, 224 Lincoln, Abraham, 48 liquidity during Flash Crash, 72-73 Liquidity Replenishment Point (LPR), 78 Liquidnet, 173-174 Lo, Andrew W., 160 London International Financial Futures and Options Exchange (LIFFE), 30 Long Term Capital Management, 98, 159 Loomis, Philip A., 121 LPR (Liquidity Replenishment Point), 78 Luddites, 150 Lukken, Walt, 28 M Madoff, Bernie, 56 Malyshev, Misha, 39 market manipulation, HFT (high-frequency traders) accused of, 39-45 market orders, limit orders versus, 224 market volatility. See volatility Markman, Jon, 4 Massey, Raymond, 49 Mathisson, Dan, 36, 141 Maulden, John, 234 Mayer, Martin, 127 McCaughan, Jim, 178, 229-230 McGinty, Tom, 197 Mecane, Joseph M., 159 Melton, Mark, 151 Merrill Lynch, 99, 189-190 Merrin, Seth, 173-174 Merton, Robert C., 159 Mikva, Ab, 53 Minner, Ruth Ann, 48 momentum ignition, 18, 23 Moss, John E., 113-122 Murphy, Eddie, 29 mutual funds, ETFs (exchange-traded funds) versus, 232 N Nagy, Chris, 8, 225 naked puts, 127-128 naked short selling, banning, 47-59 naked sponsored access, 226 Nanex, 200 Narang, Manoj, 152-156 NASD (National Assocation of Securities Dealers), 102 regulation after Black Monday (October 19, 1987), 136-137 NASDAQ on Black Monday (October 19, 1987), 133 initial public offerings (IPOs), 142-144 investigation of price fixing, 139 modernization of, 33 Regulation NMS changes to, 21 regulation of ATSs (Automatic Trading Systems), 139-144 SOES (Small Order Execution System), 136-138 National Association of Securities Dealers.


pages: 741 words: 179,454

Extreme Money: Masters of the Universe and the Cult of Risk by Satyajit Das

Amazon: amazon.comamazon.co.ukamazon.deamazon.fr

affirmative action, Albert Einstein, algorithmic trading, Andy Kessler, Asian financial crisis, asset allocation, asset-backed security, bank run, banking crisis, banks create money, Basel III, Benoit Mandelbrot, Berlin Wall, Bernie Madoff, Big bang: deregulation of the City of London, Black Swan, Bonfire of the Vanities, bonus culture, Bretton Woods, BRICs, British Empire, capital asset pricing model, Carmen Reinhart, carried interest, Celtic Tiger, clean water, cognitive dissonance, collapse of Lehman Brothers, collateralized debt obligation, corporate governance, credit crunch, Credit Default Swap, credit default swaps / collateralized debt obligations, Daniel Kahneman / Amos Tversky, debt deflation, Deng Xiaoping, deskilling, discrete time, diversification, diversified portfolio, Doomsday Clock, Emanuel Derman, en.wikipedia.org, Eugene Fama: efficient market hypothesis, eurozone crisis, Fall of the Berlin Wall, financial independence, financial innovation, fixed income, full employment, global reserve currency, Goldman Sachs: Vampire Squid, Gordon Gekko, greed is good, happiness index / gross national happiness, haute cuisine, high net worth, Hyman Minsky, index fund, interest rate swap, invention of the wheel, invisible hand, Isaac Newton, job automation, Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, joint-stock company, Joseph Schumpeter, Kenneth Rogoff, Kevin Kelly, labour market flexibility, laissez-faire capitalism, load shedding, locking in a profit, Long Term Capital Management, Louis Bachelier, margin call, market bubble, market fundamentalism, Marshall McLuhan, Martin Wolf, merger arbitrage, Mikhail Gorbachev, Milgram experiment, Mont Pelerin Society, moral hazard, mortgage debt, mortgage tax deduction, mutually assured destruction, Naomi Klein, Network effects, new economy, Nick Leeson, Nixon shock, Northern Rock, nuclear winter, oil shock, Own Your Own Home, pets.com, Plutocrats, plutocrats, Ponzi scheme, price anchoring, price stability, profit maximization, quantitative easing, quantitative trading / quantitative finance, Ralph Nader, RAND corporation, random walk, Ray Kurzweil, regulatory arbitrage, rent control, rent-seeking, reserve currency, Richard Feynman, Richard Feynman, Richard Thaler, risk-adjusted returns, risk/return, road to serfdom, Robert Shiller, Robert Shiller, Rod Stewart played at Stephen Schwarzman birthday party, rolodex, Ronald Reagan, Ronald Reagan: Tear down this wall, savings glut, shareholder value, Sharpe ratio, short selling, Silicon Valley, six sigma, Slavoj Žižek, South Sea Bubble, special economic zone, statistical model, Stephen Hawking, Steve Jobs, The Chicago School, The Great Moderation, the market place, the medium is the message, The Myth of the Rational Market, The Nature of the Firm, The Predators' Ball, The Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith, Thorstein Veblen, too big to fail, trickle-down economics, Turing test, Upton Sinclair, value at risk, Yogi Berra, zero-coupon bond

In April 1973, shortly after publication of the Black Scholes paper, the Chicago Board of Option Exchange (CBOE), coincidentally, began trading stock options in its converted smoking lounge. The advent of handheld calculators, made by Texas Instruments and Hewlett-Packard, which could be programmed to calculate option prices using the model, appeared. Texas Instruments advertised in The Wall Street Journal: “you can find the Black-Scholes value using our...calculator.”12 Black went on to a long career at Goldman Sachs. Scholes moved to Salomon Brothers and Long Term Capital Management (LTCM), where Merton joined him. As the Nobel prize in Economics is not awarded posthumously, Fischer Black’s death in 1995 robbed him of a share of the award that went to Scholes and Merton for the development of option pricing models. During his life, when Black appeared infrequently on the floor of the CBOE, trading would halt momentarily and a loud cheer and clapping would break out.

A 24 percent fall in the value of the underlying bonds translated into a $1.8 billion loss for the lending banks. Bear Stearns agreed, under pressure, to provide a $1.6 billion loan (over 10 percent of the firm’s equity) to the less leveraged High Grade Structured Credit Fund, letting its more leveraged sibling fail. Jimmy Cayne, cigar-smoking, bridge-playing, and (allegedly) pot-smoking Bear Stearns’ CEO, sought a one-year moratorium on margin calls. In 1998, when Wall Street bailed out Long Term Capital Management (LTCM), Bear famously rejected a similar proposal. Merrill, a big lender, now seized and tried to auction off $800 million of collateral. There were few buyers in sight and the prices were in free fall. Shortly after the Bear funds collapsed, the UK hedge fund Peleton Partners (the name refers to the leading group in a bicycle road race) failed. Following a similar strategy to the Bear Stearns funds, Peleton had recently won an industry award for best new fixed-income hedge fund.

In recent years, many macro funds, like the fabled Quantum and Tiger Funds, restructured or disappeared. Some hedge fund managers are exceptionally skilful. Soros, Tudor Jones, and James Simons, an ex-mathematics professor and former code breaker, have outstanding records. For others, investment Viagra boosted performance. Some, like the Bear Stearns hedge funds, used leverage to increase returns. In 2009, in a Freudian slip, George Soros referred to Long Term Capital Management (LTCM) as “leveraged capital.”14 Others increased returns by investing in illiquid or complex securities. Some managers seek an information edge. The credo of SAC, a hedge fund operated by billionaire art collector Steve Cohen, is: “Get information before anyone else.”15 Hedge funds test the boundary of insider trading and market abuse. In 2010, U.S. Federal Investigators began investigating a spider-web of insider trading, involving billionaire investor Raj Rajaratnam, founder of the Galleon hedge fund.


pages: 823 words: 206,070

The Making of Global Capitalism by Leo Panitch, Sam Gindin

Amazon: amazon.comamazon.co.ukamazon.deamazon.fr

accounting loophole / creative accounting, airline deregulation, anti-communist, Asian financial crisis, asset-backed security, bank run, banking crisis, barriers to entry, Basel III, Big bang: deregulation of the City of London, bilateral investment treaty, Branko Milanovic, Bretton Woods, BRICs, British Empire, call centre, capital controls, Capital in the Twenty-First Century by Thomas Piketty, Carmen Reinhart, central bank independence, collective bargaining, continuous integration, corporate governance, Credit Default Swap, crony capitalism, currency manipulation / currency intervention, currency peg, dark matter, Deng Xiaoping, disintermediation, ending welfare as we know it, eurozone crisis, facts on the ground, financial deregulation, financial innovation, Financial Instability Hypothesis, financial intermediation, floating exchange rates, full employment, Gini coefficient, global value chain, guest worker program, Hyman Minsky, imperial preference, income inequality, inflation targeting, interchangeable parts, interest rate swap, Kenneth Rogoff, land reform, late capitalism, liquidity trap, London Interbank Offered Rate, Long Term Capital Management, manufacturing employment, market bubble, market fundamentalism, Martin Wolf, means of production, money: store of value / unit of account / medium of exchange, Monroe Doctrine, moral hazard, mortgage debt, mortgage tax deduction, new economy, non-tariff barriers, Northern Rock, oil shock, precariat, price stability, quantitative easing, Ralph Nader, RAND corporation, regulatory arbitrage, reserve currency, risk tolerance, Ronald Reagan, seigniorage, shareholder value, short selling, Silicon Valley, sovereign wealth fund, special drawing rights, special economic zone, structural adjustment programs, The Chicago School, The Great Moderation, the payments system, The Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith, too big to fail, trade liberalization, transcontinental railway, trickle-down economics, union organizing, very high income, Washington Consensus, Works Progress Administration, zero-coupon bond

But the depth of the contagion had already been registered on Wall Street, as a massive flight to the safety of US Treasury bonds after the Russian default precipitated a sharp upward revaluation of risk in bond and foreign-exchange markets, and in the derivative markets based on them. With the US commercial paper market in corporate debt already in turmoil, word quickly got out that the formerly remarkably profitable US hedge fund Long Term Capital Management (founded by two prestigious economists who had won Nobel prizes for their econometric contributions to the development of derivative markets) suddenly faced collapse. With the massive losses LTCM took on the $125 billion portfolio of securities it had amassed with money borrowed from many of Wall Street’s biggest banks, its default on a trillion dollars in over-the-counter derivatives contracts appeared imminent.77 Since it could not be known who would be left holding the bag if all the counterparties tried to liquidate their positions with LTCM, “this was a classic set up for a run: losses were likely, but nobody knew who would get burned.”78 Reflecting the concern that credit markets generally might freeze up, Wall Street’s leading CEOs were once again summoned to William McDonough’s office at the New York Federal Reserve.

Morgan’s ability to summon fellow bankers to his library and insist that “people who normally spend their lives trying to out-compete each other” look at the broader picture. There “simply was no other substitute for the New York Fed” in the crisis: The head of a securities firm or a bank is not paid to be a patriot; he or she is paid to serve the best interests of the shareholders, so the most that one could do in a position like mine is to say the public interest may well be served by Long Term Capital Management not failing . . . Now if somebody has had many years of experience like me, the people you’re talking to at least think, well, this guy knows what he is talking about; he’s been through some of these firefights himself, and so we’re not dealing with somebody who doesn’t understand how we think or what we can do.79 With the political implications of bailing out a private hedge fund ruling out public funds being brought into play in this instance (as they very much had been in the Korean bailout less than nine months earlier), and with the pressure on them from the Fed by most accounts rather heavier than McDonough suggests, fourteen of Wall Street’s leading financial institutions agreed to organize a creditors’ consortium to take over LCTM and the responsibility to meet its obligations.

The US Federal Reserve was indeed acting as the world central bank in the context of the crisis, trying to ensure thereby that interbank rates would decrease and normal mechanisms for access to dollar funding would be restored. For its part, the US Treasury organized, first, a consortium of international banks and investment funds, and then an overlapping consortium that included mortgage companies and financial securitizers, to take concrete measures to calm the markets. As they had done a decade earlier during the Long Term Capital Management (LTCM) crisis, Treasury officials convened the CEOs of the nation’s ten largest commercial banks in September 2007, with the goal of determining whether there were “market-based solutions that could help reduce the possibility of a disorderly solution in the marketplace.”37 Sovereign wealth funds of other countries were also encouraged to invest directly in Wall Street banks to beef up their capital.


pages: 407 words: 114,478

The Four Pillars of Investing: Lessons for Building a Winning Portfolio by William J. Bernstein

Amazon: amazon.comamazon.co.ukamazon.deamazon.fr

asset allocation, Bretton Woods, British Empire, buy low sell high, carried interest, corporate governance, cuban missile crisis, Daniel Kahneman / Amos Tversky, Dava Sobel, diversification, diversified portfolio, Edmond Halley, equity premium, estate planning, Eugene Fama: efficient market hypothesis, financial independence, financial innovation, fixed income, German hyperinflation, high net worth, hindsight bias, Hyman Minsky, index fund, invention of the telegraph, Isaac Newton, John Harrison: Longitude, Long Term Capital Management, loss aversion, market bubble, mental accounting, mortgage debt, new economy, pattern recognition, quantitative easing, railway mania, random walk, Richard Thaler, risk tolerance, risk/return, Robert Shiller, Robert Shiller, South Sea Bubble, transaction costs, Vanguard fund, yield curve

Only after you’ve formulated a program that focuses on asset classes and the behavior of asset-class mixtures will you have any chance for overall success. A deficiency in any of the Four Pillars will torpedo this program with brutal dispatch. Here are a couple of examples of how a failure to master the Four Pillars can bring grief to even the most sophisticated investors: Big time players: The principals of Long-Term Capital Management, the firm that in 1998 almost single handedly crippled the world financial system with their highly leveraged speculation, had no trouble with Pillar One—investment theory—as they were in many cases its Nobel Prize-winning inventors. Their appreciation of Pillars Three and Four—psychology and the investment business—was also top drawer. Unfortunately, despite their corporate name, none of them had a working knowledge of Pillar Two—the long-term history of the capital markets.

Walter Bagehot To many readers, this section on booms and busts will seem out of place. After all, this book is a humble how-to tome; it has no pretension of being a documentary work. But of the four key areas of investment knowledge—theory, history, psychology, and investment industry practices—the lack of historical knowledge is the one that causes the most damage. Consider, for example, the principals of Long Term Capital Management, whose ignorance of the vagaries of financial history almost single-handedly brought the Western financial system to its knees in 1998. A knowledge of history is not essential in many fields. You can be a superb physician, accountant, or engineer and not know a thing about the origins and development of your craft. There are also professions where it is essential, like diplomacy, law, and military service.

When you adjust for risk, their performance looks better, but their compensation structure alone should give pause—managers are often paid a hefty percentage of returns, and in some years, total fees can easily exceed 10%. These are the kinds of margins that even Lynch and Buffett in their heydays would have trouble overcoming. Lastly, there is the risk of picking the wrong hedge fund. The list of institutions and wealthy investors shorn by Long-Term Capital Management’s flameout in 1998, which almost single-handedly devastated the world economy, constituted the cream of the nation’s A List. If it could happen to them, it could happen to anybody. My experience is that the wealthier the client, the more likely he is to be badly abused. Brokerage customers are judged by their ability to generate revenues for the firm. Small clients are naturally not accorded the time and effort given to larger ones (or “whales,” as the biggest are known in the brokerage business).


pages: 402 words: 110,972

Nerds on Wall Street: Math, Machines and Wired Markets by David J. Leinweber

Amazon: amazon.comamazon.co.ukamazon.deamazon.fr

AI winter, algorithmic trading, asset allocation, banking crisis, barriers to entry, Big bang: deregulation of the City of London, butterfly effect, buttonwood tree, buy low sell high, capital asset pricing model, citizen journalism, collateralized debt obligation, corporate governance, Craig Reynolds: boids flock, credit crunch, Credit Default Swap, credit default swaps / collateralized debt obligations, Danny Hillis, demand response, disintermediation, distributed generation, diversification, diversified portfolio, Emanuel Derman, en.wikipedia.org, experimental economics, financial innovation, Gordon Gekko, implied volatility, index arbitrage, index fund, information retrieval, Internet Archive, John Nash: game theory, Khan Academy, load shedding, Long Term Capital Management, Machine translation of "The spirit is willing, but the flesh is weak." to Russian and back, market fragmentation, market microstructure, Mars Rover, moral hazard, mutually assured destruction, natural language processing, Network effects, optical character recognition, paper trading, passive investing, pez dispenser, phenotype, prediction markets, quantitative hedge fund, quantitative trading / quantitative finance, QWERTY keyboard, RAND corporation, random walk, Ray Kurzweil, Renaissance Technologies, Richard Stallman, risk tolerance, risk-adjusted returns, risk/return, Ronald Reagan, semantic web, Sharpe ratio, short selling, Silicon Valley, Small Order Execution System, smart grid, smart meter, social web, South Sea Bubble, statistical arbitrage, statistical model, Steve Jobs, Steven Levy, Tacoma Narrows Bridge, the scientific method, The Wisdom of Crowds, time value of money, too big to fail, transaction costs, Turing machine, Upton Sinclair, value at risk, Vernor Vinge, yield curve, Yogi Berra

It produced simpler, more reasonable models with better statistical and financial performance in the test periods. We tried to avoid data mining, but the market has only one past, and we knew what it was. The bias introduced by that knowledge cannot be removed. After they were developed, these models made money in some countries, but not in others. Arguably, there were structural changes in the markets that ran contrary to what any rearview model based on the past would predict. Long Term Capital Management, a veritable who’s who on Wall Street with multiple Nobel laureates as founders, had similar, though more spectacular, troubles. No matter how much we want to think otherwise, financial markets are not physics experiments. They reflect a shifting combination of economic forces and human emotion. Like all other facets of human 198 Nerds on Wall Str eet behavior, they are a mixture of the rational and the irrational, not necessarily the best target for the approach described here.

There was little or no leverage due to the institutional constraints we had for pension accounts, and our strong desire not to blow up our clients’ portfolios and our income stream by turning what would be a moderate drawdown into a disaster. Lehman Brothers’ leverage was widely reported to be more than 30:1 when they turned out the lights, and other firms were equally overextended, which, while not without precedent, proved particularly toxic when applied to what proved to be nearly incomprehensible securities. Robert Merton, who shared the Nobel Prize for economics in 1997, was also one of the founders of Long Term Capital Management, the firm at the center of a $5 billion crisis in 1998. At the time there was a sense of great peril, and the size of the rescue, which now seems quaint, seemed overwhelming. Merton wrote, As we all know, there have been financial “incidents” and even crises that cause some to raise questions about the innovations and scientific soundness of the financial theories used to engineer them.

Bottom line: this is akin to placing a burning match under a flammable carpet and pretending that it is not there. Still Mad, but Ever Hopeful It took great deal of imagination, in a negative sense, to create the Great Mess of ’08, and we will need a great deal of positive imagination to get out of it. The magnitude of the problem is staggering. Previous financial crises have involved dollar amounts that are lost in the roundoff for this one. Long Term Capital Management’s near failure was a $3.5 billion problem. The size of the federal rescue goes well beyond the $700 billion in the initial rescue plan. One estimate,9 including the 324 Nerds on Wall Str eet hidden tax breaks for banks and the Citigroup rescue, totals $4.62 trillion through November 2008, and compares this figure to total inflationadjusted dollar equivalents for virtually every major federal project in the history of the country, which add up to less than $4 trillion: Cost Inflation-Adjusted Cost Marshall Plan $12.7 billion $115.3 billion Louisiana Purchase $15 million $217 billion Race to the moon $36.4 billion $237 billion S&L crisis $153 billion $256 billion Korean War $54 billion $454 billion New Deal $32 billion (est


pages: 545 words: 137,789

How Markets Fail: The Logic of Economic Calamities by John Cassidy

Amazon: amazon.comamazon.co.ukamazon.deamazon.fr

Albert Einstein, Andrei Shleifer, anti-communist, asset allocation, asset-backed security, availability heuristic, bank run, banking crisis, Benoit Mandelbrot, Berlin Wall, Bernie Madoff, Black-Scholes formula, Bretton Woods, British Empire, capital asset pricing model, centralized clearinghouse, collateralized debt obligation, Columbine, conceptual framework, Corn Laws, correlation coefficient, credit crunch, Credit Default Swap, credit default swaps / collateralized debt obligations, crony capitalism, Daniel Kahneman / Amos Tversky, debt deflation, diversification, Elliott wave, Eugene Fama: efficient market hypothesis, financial deregulation, financial innovation, Financial Instability Hypothesis, financial intermediation, full employment, George Akerlof, global supply chain, Haight Ashbury, hiring and firing, Hyman Minsky, income per capita, incomplete markets, index fund, invisible hand, John Nash: game theory, John von Neumann, Joseph Schumpeter, laissez-faire capitalism, liquidity trap, London Interbank Offered Rate, Long Term Capital Management, Louis Bachelier, mandelbrot fractal, margin call, market bubble, market clearing, mental accounting, Mikhail Gorbachev, Mont Pelerin Society, moral hazard, mortgage debt, Naomi Klein, Network effects, Nick Leeson, Northern Rock, paradox of thrift, Ponzi scheme, price discrimination, price stability, principal–agent problem, profit maximization, quantitative trading / quantitative finance, race to the bottom, Ralph Nader, RAND corporation, random walk, Renaissance Technologies, rent control, Richard Thaler, risk tolerance, risk-adjusted returns, road to serfdom, Robert Shiller, Robert Shiller, Ronald Coase, Ronald Reagan, shareholder value, short selling, Silicon Valley, South Sea Bubble, sovereign wealth fund, statistical model, technology bubble, The Chicago School, The Great Moderation, The Market for Lemons, The Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith, too big to fail, transaction costs, unorthodox policies, value at risk, Vanguard fund

In 1994, Orange County was forced into bankruptcy after its treasurer, Bob Citron, took the county’s $7.6 billion investment pool, borrowed more money from Wall Street firms, and invested it in some derivative securities known as “inverse floaters.” A year later, the misplaced bets of a single derivatives trader, Nick Leeson, brought down the venerable Barings Bank. In 1998, the giant (and unregulated) hedge fund Long-Term Capital Management, which was a big player in many derivatives markets, had to be propped up and then wound down by a consortium of Wall Street banks, with the Fed playing a coordinating role. The demise of Long-Term Capital, which had two economics Nobel winners as partners—Robert Merton and Myron Scholes—demonstrated the limitations of counterparty regulation. When the secretive firm opened its books to its Wall Street lenders and counterparties, many of them were astonished to discover that its leverage ratio was close to thirty to one, and that its derivatives exposures totaled about $1.4 trillion.

VAR models take account of these offsetting effects. In estimating the worst-case losses of entire portfolios, or balance sheets, the models reward those that are widely diversified and punish those that are heavily invested in one or two assets. Unfortunately, during periods of great stress, the relationships between different asset classes tend to change dramatically. As the big hedge fund Long-Term Capital Management discovered to its cost during the international financial crisis of 1998, many assets that seem to have little or nothing in common suddenly move in the same direction. Prior to the blowup, for example, the correlation coefficient between certain bonds issued by the governments of the Philippines and Bulgaria was just 0.04: as the crisis unfolded, their correlation coefficient rose to 0.84.

With this sort of leverage, a mere 4 percent drop in the value of a firm’s assets can wipe out its entire capital base. Bear was the smallest of the top Wall Street banks, and its leading figures—such as its chairman, Jimmy Cayne, a championship bridge player, and its former CEO Alan “Ace” Greenberg, who at the age of eighty still came to work every day—had reputations as mavericks. In 1998, with Long-Term Capital Management on the brink of collapse, Bear had been the only Wall Street firm that refused to participate in the rescue. (As LTCM’s prime broker, it argued that it already had a big exposure to the firm.) In the period since 2000, Bear had established itself in the fast-growing hedge fund business, acting as the prime broker to dozens of funds, including some of the biggest. At the end of 2007, it had more than $60 billion in hedge fund deposits on its books, which it used to help pay for its own operations.


pages: 413 words: 117,782

What Happened to Goldman Sachs: An Insider's Story of Organizational Drift and Its Unintended Consequences by Steven G. Mandis

Amazon: amazon.comamazon.co.ukamazon.deamazon.fr

algorithmic trading, Berlin Wall, bonus culture, BRICs, business process, collapse of Lehman Brothers, collateralized debt obligation, complexity theory, corporate governance, Credit Default Swap, credit default swaps / collateralized debt obligations, crony capitalism, disintermediation, diversification, Emanuel Derman, financial innovation, fixed income, friendly fire, Goldman Sachs: Vampire Squid, high net worth, housing crisis, London Whale, Long Term Capital Management, merger arbitrage, new economy, passive investing, performance metric, risk tolerance, Ronald Reagan, Saturday Night Live, shareholder value, short selling, sovereign wealth fund, The Nature of the Firm, too big to fail, value at risk

But first with the transition to LLC and then with an IPO, they would be freed from this liability, which a number feared would lead to a stronger appetite for growth and risk and would quicken change. They had already seen evidence of greater risk-taking even before the IPO. In my interviews, many of the partners pointed to their personal liability as having been a constraining factor on “doing stupid things.” Some pointed to the risk Goldman took in bailing out the hedge fund Long-Term Capital Management (LTCM) in 1998 as an early case of taking on more risk than the firm had traditionally been comfortable with. LTCM was a speculative hedge fund that used a lot of leverage and faced failure that year. As LTCM teetered, Wall Street feared that its failure could have a ripple effect and cause catastrophic losses throughout the financial system. Unable to raise more money on its own, LTCM had its back against the wall.

One report quotes Robert Khuzami, the SEC’s enforcement director, as saying, “[H]igher-risk trading and business strategies require higher-order controls” and that “Goldman failed to implement policies and procedures that adequately controlled the risk that research analysts could preview upcoming ratings changes with select traders and clients.” Goldman agreed to pay the penalty, split between the SEC and FINRA, and to revise its policies.9 There are older examples as well. One is of allegations that Goldman mishandled information related to the Long-Term Capital Management (LTCM) books when Goldman was analyzing how it could potentially bail out LTCM in 1998. Roger Lowenstein writes in his account of the collapse of LTCM, When Genius Failed: In Greenwich, Goldman’s sleuths, who had the run of the office, left no stone unturned … A key member of the Goldman team … [who] appeared to be downloading Long-Term’s positions, which the fund had so zealously guarded, from Long-Term’s own computers directly into an oversized laptop (a detail that Goldman later denied).

At the time of its acquisition, CC had approximately $2 billion in assets under management, primarily as a fund of hedge funds: a fund investing in a variety of hedge funds to diversify risk. It was part of GSAM’s continued push into higher-margin, more-sophisticated products for its clients. The firm merges J. Aron with fixed income to create the division known as FICC, to be run by Blankfein (O, C). 1998: Long-Term Capital Management (LTCM), a hedge fund, is about to fail. Wall Street fears that LTCM is so big that its failure would cause a chain reaction in numerous markets, causing significant losses throughout the financial system. Goldman, AIG, and Berkshire Hathaway offer to buy out the fund’s partners for $250 million, to inject $3.75 billion, and to operate LTCM within Goldman’s own trading division. Many of the partners worry about the risk they would assume (O).

How I Became a Quant: Insights From 25 of Wall Street's Elite by Richard R. Lindsey, Barry Schachter

Amazon: amazon.comamazon.co.ukamazon.deamazon.fr

Albert Einstein, algorithmic trading, Andrew Wiles, Antoine Gombaud: Chevalier de Méré, asset allocation, asset-backed security, backtesting, bank run, banking crisis, Black-Scholes formula, Bonfire of the Vanities, Bretton Woods, Brownian motion, business process, buy low sell high, capital asset pricing model, centre right, collateralized debt obligation, corporate governance, correlation coefficient, Credit Default Swap, credit default swaps / collateralized debt obligations, currency manipulation / currency intervention, discounted cash flows, disintermediation, diversification, Emanuel Derman, en.wikipedia.org, Eugene Fama: efficient market hypothesis, financial innovation, fixed income, full employment, George Akerlof, Gordon Gekko, hiring and firing, implied volatility, index fund, interest rate derivative, interest rate swap, John von Neumann, linear programming, Loma Prieta earthquake, Long Term Capital Management, margin call, market friction, market microstructure, martingale, merger arbitrage, Nick Leeson, P = NP, pattern recognition, pensions crisis, performance metric, prediction markets, profit maximization, purchasing power parity, quantitative trading / quantitative finance, QWERTY keyboard, RAND corporation, random walk, Ray Kurzweil, Richard Feynman, Richard Feynman, Richard Stallman, risk-adjusted returns, risk/return, shareholder value, Sharpe ratio, short selling, Silicon Valley, six sigma, sorting algorithm, statistical arbitrage, statistical model, stem cell, Steven Levy, stochastic process, systematic trading, technology bubble, The Great Moderation, the scientific method, too big to fail, trade route, transaction costs, transfer pricing, value at risk, volatility smile, Wiener process, yield curve, young professional

What they didn’t understand is the unwritten rule that overrides all the other rules: If you screw enough people, eventually they will get you back. Have people learned since then? No, as the recent Citibank European government bond debacle, complete with a juvenile name for the strategy (Dr. Evil), demonstrates. JWPR007-Lindsey May 7, 2007 17:9 Julian Shaw 241 But the most spectacular example of all is Long Term Capital Management. Here we had the two most famous living quants supposedly helping to run an enormous hedge fund, which got blown to pieces when credit spreads blew out. Jorion provides a devastating analysis of LTCM’s risk management mistakes.7 Incidentally, LTCM demonstrated an enduring belief, that there are lots of really smart people who could make tons of money if only they weren’t inhibited by pesky regulators, unimaginative boards, and overbearing risk-management departments.

My insight was later recognized in Pensions & Investments by Editorial Director Michael Clowes, who noted that I was “one of the first to warn that portfolio insurance . . . probably would be destabilizing” (“More to say about crash,” July 12, 1999), and in the Wall Street Journal, where Roger Lowenstein (“Why Stock Options Are Really Dynamite,” November 6, 1997) said that I had “predicted before the 1987 crash that portfolio insurance would trigger chain-reaction selling.” After the crash, I saw the same dynamics behind portfolio insurance roiling the markets over and over again in other guises, including synthetic put options and the relative value arbitrage strategies pursued by hedge funds such as Long-Term Capital Management (LTCM). Prior to the collapse of LTCM, I had expressed my concerns in two Pensions & Investments pieces (Barry Burr, “Nobel-Winning Strategy Criticized,” December 8, 1997, and Bruce Jacobs, “Option Replication and the Market’s Fragility,” June 15, 1998), taking issue with Nobel laureates Merton Miller and Myron Scholes (an LTCM partner). I last debated Rubinstein on the subject as a participant in Derivatives Strategy’s “2000 Hall of Fame Roundtable: Portfolio Insurance Revisited.”

Li, “On Default Correlation: A Copula Function Approach,” http://www.riskmetrics.com/copulaovv.html. 6. Some of this “higher correlation in extremes” is fallacious. Boyer, Gibson, and Loretan show that the correlation of big market moves will measure higher even if the underlying correlation that generates the returns is constant: http://www.federalreserve.gov/pubs/ifdp/ 1997/597/default.htm. 7. Phillipe Jorion, “Risk Management Lessons from Long-Term Capital Management” http://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract id=169449. 8. Many people could have written this book but they didn’t. Hull’s genius was to pitch it at exactly the right level for the working quant. 9. Preprint http://math.nyu.edu/research/carrp/papers/pdf/faq2.pdf, to appear in Journal of Derivatives. Chapter 18 1. As I write this essay, Chester has taken a leave from his academic post at Carnegie Mellon University, in order to serve as chief economist at the Securities and Exchange Commission.

Culture and Prosperity: The Truth About Markets - Why Some Nations Are Rich but Most Remain Poor by John Kay

Amazon: amazon.comamazon.co.ukamazon.deamazon.fr

Albert Einstein, Asian financial crisis, Barry Marshall: ulcers, Berlin Wall, Big bang: deregulation of the City of London, California gold rush, complexity theory, computer age, constrained optimization, corporate governance, corporate social responsibility, correlation does not imply causation, Daniel Kahneman / Amos Tversky, David Ricardo: comparative advantage, Donald Trump, double entry bookkeeping, double helix, Edward Lloyd's coffeehouse, equity premium, Ernest Rutherford, European colonialism, experimental economics, Exxon Valdez, failed state, financial innovation, Francis Fukuyama: the end of history, George Akerlof, George Gilder, greed is good, haute couture, illegal immigration, income inequality, invention of the telephone, invention of the wheel, invisible hand, John Nash: game theory, John von Neumann, Kevin Kelly, knowledge economy, labour market flexibility, late capitalism, Long Term Capital Management, loss aversion, Mahatma Gandhi, market bubble, market clearing, market fundamentalism, means of production, Menlo Park, Mikhail Gorbachev, money: store of value / unit of account / medium of exchange, moral hazard, Naomi Klein, Nash equilibrium, new economy, oil shale / tar sands, oil shock, pets.com, popular electronics, price discrimination, price mechanism, prisoner's dilemma, profit maximization, purchasing power parity, QWERTY keyboard, Ralph Nader, RAND corporation, random walk, rent-seeking, risk tolerance, road to serfdom, Ronald Coase, Ronald Reagan, second-price auction, shareholder value, Silicon Valley, Simon Kuznets, South Sea Bubble, Steve Jobs, telemarketer, The Chicago School, The Death and Life of Great American Cities, The Market for Lemons, The Nature of the Firm, The Predators' Ball, The Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith, Thorstein Veblen, total factor productivity, transaction costs, tulip mania, urban decay, Washington Consensus, women in the workforce, yield curve, yield management

"This is a wet dream ... This is a new customer. That's the key. A customer that has never done structured leveraged proprietary trades before ... I am wallowing in a little glory right now. Yeah. In fact, I don't even have the desire to call my other clients and beat them up this afternoon." Hudson's boss, Jack Lavin, was cruder still: "I think my dick just fell of(" Transactions at Long-Term Capital Management were much more Culture and Prosperity { 237} sophisticated. Most investment funds simply buy portfolios of stocks and bonds. A hedge fund such as LTCM trades derivatives and arbitrages between similar securities in different markets. LTCM's partners included Robert Mertonn and Myron Scholes,n who won the Nobel Prize in 1997 for their contributions to financial economics. Merton and Scholes operated with experienced Wall Street traders.

Merton and Scholes operated with experienced Wall Street traders. Sophisticated investors can use derivative markets to insure their portfolios. By buying a put option at 10% below the current market price, you limit your maximum loss to 10%-the cost of the option is your insurance premium. After the Asian crisis and Russia's debt default in 1998, investors were particularly nervous. Long-Term Capital Management 10 sold insurance against large price changes-in either direction. In market jargon, they traded swaps and equity volatility. The $4 billion of assets that LTCM managed may seem a lot of money, but not in the context of all the share and bond markets of the world. With this capital base, LTCM held derivative contracts worth around $125 billion. The value of the underlying securities on which these derivative contracts were based was much larger.

"The Fable of the Keys." journal ofLaw and Economics 33 (April): 1-25. Little, I. 1996. Picking Winners: The East Asian Experience. London: Social Market Foundation. Loewenstein, G. 1999. "Because It Is There: The Challenge ofMountaineering ... for Utility Theory." Kyklos 52: 315-44. Lowenstein, R 1995. Buffett: The Making ofan American Capitalist. New York: Random House. ---. 2000. When Genius Failed: The Rise and Fall ofLong-Term Capital Management. New York: Random House. Lynch, L., and M. Kahn. 2000. California's Electricity Options and Challenges. San Francisco: California Public Utilities Commission. Lyotard,]. F. 1979. The Postmodern Condition: A Report on Knowledge. English translation. Manchester: Manchester University Press. MacFarquhar, R 1983. The Origins ofthe Cultural Revolution. Vol. 2, The Great Leap Forward. 1958-1960.


pages: 327 words: 103,336

Everything Is Obvious: *Once You Know the Answer by Duncan J. Watts

Amazon: amazon.comamazon.co.ukamazon.deamazon.fr

affirmative action, Albert Einstein, Amazon Mechanical Turk, Black Swan, butterfly effect, Carmen Reinhart, Cass Sunstein, clockwork universe, cognitive dissonance, collapse of Lehman Brothers, complexity theory, correlation does not imply causation, crowdsourcing, death of newspapers, discovery of DNA, East Village, easy for humans, difficult for computers, edge city, en.wikipedia.org, Erik Brynjolfsson, framing effect, Geoffrey West, Santa Fe Institute, happiness index / gross national happiness, high batting average, hindsight bias, illegal immigration, interest rate swap, invention of the printing press, invention of the telescope, invisible hand, Isaac Newton, Jane Jacobs, Jeff Bezos, Joseph Schumpeter, Kenneth Rogoff, lake wobegon effect, Long Term Capital Management, loss aversion, medical malpractice, meta analysis, meta-analysis, Milgram experiment, natural language processing, Netflix Prize, Network effects, oil shock, packet switching, pattern recognition, performance metric, phenotype, planetary scale, prediction markets, pre–internet, RAND corporation, random walk, RFID, school choice, Silicon Valley, statistical model, Steve Ballmer, Steve Jobs, Steve Wozniak, supply-chain management, The Death and Life of Great American Cities, the scientific method, The Wisdom of Crowds, too big to fail, Toyota Production System, ultimatum game, urban planning, Vincenzo Peruggia: Mona Lisa, Watson beat the top human players on Jeopardy!, X Prize

Publishers, producers, and marketers—experienced and motivated professionals in business with plenty of skin in the game—have just as much difficulty predicting which books, movies, and products will become the next big hit as political experts have in predicting the next revolution. In fact, the history of cultural markets is crowded with examples of future blockbusters—Elvis, Star Wars, Seinfeld, Harry Potter, American Idol—that publishers and movie studios left for dead while simultaneously betting big on total failures.4 And whether we consider the most spectacular business meltdowns of recent times—Long-Term Capital Management in 1998, Enron in 2001, WorldCom in 2002, the near-collapse of the entire financial system in 2008—or spectacular success stories like the rise of Google and Facebook, what is perhaps most striking about them is that virtually nobody seems to have had any idea what was about to happen. In September 2008, for example, even as Lehman Brothers’ collapse was imminent, Treasury and Federal Reserve officials—who arguably had the best information available to anyone in the world—failed to anticipate the devastating freeze in global credit markets that followed.

“The Dynamics of Informational Cascades: The Monday Demonstrations in Leipzig, East Germany, 1989–91.” World Politics 47 (1):42–101. Lombrozo, Tania. 2006. “The Structure and Function of Explanations.” Trends in Cognitive Sciences 10 (10):464–70. ———. 2007. “Simplicity and Probability in Causal Explanation.” Cognitive Psychology 55 (3):232–57. Lowenstein, Roger, 2000. When Genius Failed: The Rise and Fall of Long-Term Capital Management. New York: Random House. Lukes, Steven. 1968. “Methodological Individualism Reconsidered.” British Journal of Sociology 19 (2):119–29. Luo, Michael. 2004. “ ‘Excuse Me. May I Have Your Seat?’ ” New York Times, Sept. 14. Lyons, Russell. 2010. “The Spread of Evidence-Poor Medicine via Flawed Social-Network Analysis.” Working paper, Indiana University. Mackay, Charles. 1932. Extraordinary Popular Delusions and the Madness of Crowds.

General information about production in cultural industries is given in Caves (2000) and Bielby and Bielby (1994). 5. In early 2010, the market capitalization of Google was around $160B, but it has fluctuated as high as $220B. See Makridakis, Hogarth, and Gaba (2009a) and Taleb (2007) for lengthier descriptions of these and other missed predictions. See Lowenstein (2000) for the full story of Long-Term Capital Management. 6. Newton’s quote is taken from Janiak (2004, p. 41). 7. The Laplace quote is taken from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Laplace’s-demon. 8. Lumping all processes into two coarse categories is a vast oversimplification of reality, as the “complexity” of a process is not a sufficiently well understood property to be assigned anything like a single number. It’s also a somewhat arbitrary one, as there’s no clear definition of when a process is complex enough to be called complex.


pages: 350 words: 109,220

In FED We Trust: Ben Bernanke's War on the Great Panic by David Wessel

Amazon: amazon.comamazon.co.ukamazon.deamazon.fr

Asian financial crisis, asset-backed security, bank run, banking crisis, banks create money, Berlin Wall, Black Swan, central bank independence, credit crunch, Credit Default Swap, crony capitalism, debt deflation, Fall of the Berlin Wall, financial innovation, financial intermediation, full employment, George Akerlof, housing crisis, inflation targeting, London Interbank Offered Rate, Long Term Capital Management, market bubble, moral hazard, mortgage debt, new economy, Northern Rock, price stability, quantitative easing, Robert Shiller, Robert Shiller, Ronald Reagan, Saturday Night Live, savings glut, Socratic dialogue, too big to fail

OK, I’ll go to five hundred.” Morgan Stanley, Merrill Lynch, and Citigroup were assigned to see if the industry could band together to run what Geithner called “a liquidation consortium” to sell off Lehman in pieces. Their mission was to do essentially what had happened back in 1998 when the New York Fed had summoned the heads of Wall Street firms to prevent an untidy collapse of a hedge fund, Long Term Capital Management. That episode demonstrated how one large and leveraged institution, in this case a hedge fund that had recruited Nobel Prize-winning economists to hone its strategy, could threaten the entire financial system. But back then the Fed managed to cajole Wall Street firms into paying the tab; this time the problems were bigger and more widespread. Goldman and Credit Suisse, which had been working with Lehman for weeks, were assigned to look over Lehman’s commercial real estate assets to determine their worth.

It seemed to work in the past but, with much higher stakes, didn’t prove as successful a strategy in the Great Panic. Geithner wasn’t on anyone’s short list in 2003 when the New York Fed was looking for a successor to retiring William McDonough. The New York Fed’s search committee first considered more likely candidates: Peter Fisher, a former top New York Fed staffer who had coordinated the rescue of the Long Term Capital Management hedge fund, and then done a stint at the U.S. Treasury in the early George W. Bush years; Stanley Fischer, the former MIT professor who had been Bernanke’s adviser and had gone to the World Bank and the number two job at the International Monetary Fund; and John Taylor, a Stanford economist whose expertise in monetary policy earned him an international reputation. But Peter Fisher had rubbed some Fed insiders the wrong way.

Before Bear Stearns, the Fed was doing what central banks have done for generations: lending money for a few days, sometimes a few weeks, to solid commercial banks that couldn’t raise cash quickly on their own. The Fed lent readily, but only to banks, after the 1987 stock market crash and the September 11, 2001, terrorist attacks. It lent nothing in 1998 when it rallied Wall Street to rescue hedge fund giant Long Term Capital Management. That nearly sacrosanct principle was violated in March 2008 when the Fed lent billions not to a bank that it supervised but to Bear Stearns, a brokerage house that had never been required to play by the Fed’s rules about how much it borrowed or how it managed its business. And Bear Stearns wasn’t a one-shot deal: the Fed said other Wall Street securities firms and investment banks could drink from the Fed’s trough, too.


pages: 261 words: 103,244

Economists and the Powerful by Norbert Haring, Norbert H. Ring, Niall Douglas

Amazon: amazon.comamazon.co.ukamazon.deamazon.fr

accounting loophole / creative accounting, Affordable Care Act / Obamacare, Albert Einstein, asset allocation, bank run, barriers to entry, Basel III, Bernie Madoff, British Empire, central bank independence, collective bargaining, commodity trading advisor, corporate governance, credit crunch, Credit Default Swap, David Ricardo: comparative advantage, diversified portfolio, financial deregulation, George Akerlof, illegal immigration, income inequality, inflation targeting, Jean Tirole, job satisfaction, Joseph Schumpeter, knowledge worker, labour market flexibility, law of one price, Long Term Capital Management, low skilled workers, market bubble, market clearing, market fundamentalism, means of production, minimum wage unemployment, moral hazard, new economy, obamacare, open economy, pension reform, Ponzi scheme, price stability, principal–agent problem, profit maximization, purchasing power parity, Renaissance Technologies, rolodex, Sergey Aleynikov, shareholder value, short selling, Steve Jobs, The Chicago School, the payments system, The Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith, too big to fail, transaction costs, ultimatum game, union organizing, working-age population, World Values Survey

The techniques that hedge funds and brokers use to take advantage of weaker or less informed market participants work just as well against others of their kind if they are unlucky enough to run into a tight spot. In the words of former stockbroker and hedge fund manager Jim Cramer (2002): “When you smell blood in the water, you become a shark… when you know that one of your number is in trouble…you try to figure out what he owns and you start shorting those stocks.” A famous victim was hedge fund Long-Term Capital Management (LTCM). The troubles of this huge fund during the 1997/1998 Asian Crisis brought the world financial system to the brink of a collapse. Economists have found evidence that LTCM’s problems were exacerbated by brokers and business partners who had information about the short positions that the fund urgently needed to close and engaged in large-scale front running against the hedge fund.

Derivatives will continue to cause billions of dollars in losses by hundreds of derivatives victims, along the way destroying reputations, twisting lives and emptying bank books. And Wall Street will continue to argue that there is no compelling reason to regulate derivatives. Greenspan, Summers and Rubin cannot credibly claim that they remained unaware of the possible consequences. Already in the fall of 1998, the hedge fund Long-Term Capital Management (LTCM) was suddenly near bankruptcy. LTCM had piled a hundred billion dollars of debt and more than a trillion dollars of derivatives on top of a few billion dollars of equity from investors and had sold massive amounts of options (a type of derivative). LTCM’s derivatives positions were so large that a relatively small decline in the world financial markets was enough to wipe out its capital (Partnoy 1997/2009).

D. 13 American Economic Association ix, 10, 17, 20, 26–7, 44 American Economic Review 8, 20, 26–7 American International Group (AIG) 70, 90–91 Anglo-Saxon economics ix Arrow, Kenneth 7, 23–4, 212; see also impossibility theorem (Arrow’s) asset bubble 104 asymmetric information: see information, asymmetric AT&T 147 authoritarianism 24, 210 average cost 148, 151 Bank of America 77, 86, 94 barriers to entry 54, 160 Basel III Accord 104–5 Bear Stearns 90, 96, 107, 111 Becker, Gary S. 186 Bemis, Edward 9–10 Bentham, Jeremy 11 Berlin, Isaiah 25 Bernays, Edward 15–17 Bill of Rights (US) 208 Bolsa Família program 41 Boskin Commission 36 Bourdieu, Pierre 25, 115, 160 Bridgestone (tire manufacturer) 163–4, 166–7 British Empire ix, 16, 100 Buchanan, James 23–4 Buffett, Warren 93, 107–9 Bullionists 2 Bureau of Labor Statistics 32–3, 35 capitalism vii–viii, ix, 2, 5–6, 10, 18–19, 21, 31, 46, 142, 153, 158, 165 central bank 43, 67, 79–88, 104–5 CEO: see chief executive officer (CEO) Chicago, University of 10, 17, 19, 26, 27, 44, 80, 84, 168, 186, 193 chief executive officer (CEO) xi, 16, 47, 61, 70, 93, 95–6, 103, 107–13, 115–27, 132, 138–9, 215, 217 Chrysler xi, 113 Citicorp (bank) 43 Citigroup (bank) xi, 61, 63, 96, 105, 112, 125 Clark, John Bates 6, 10–11, 155, 193 classical value theory 5 Cold War 2, 18, 21, 25–8, 46 collective bargaining 185 Commodity Futures Trading Commission (CTFC) 90, 92 Commons, John R. 8–10 communism xii, 2, 19, 21, 25, 139 comparative advantage 4 Condorcet, Marquis de 23 conflict 165 consumption viii, 11, 13, 32, 78, 158, 192, 203, 211 control fraud 94–5 convergence vii 242 ECONOMISTS AND THE POWERFUL cooperation 73–5, 165, 167, 170, 198 cooperative 102 Cornell University 10 corporate elite x, xii, 115, 117, 140 corporate governance 92, 119, 127, 135, 136 corporate government 135 corporate management 109 corporation tax 139 corruption 220 credit x, xi, 29, 48–50, 59–60, 62, 65, 71, 73, 75, 77–84, 90–91, 95–8, 100, 104, 110, 149, 183 credit default swap 91, 93 CTFC: see Commodity Futures Trading Commission (CTFC) Darwinism 167 Debreu, Gerard 7 demand curve 146 democracy 18, 207, 211–13, 220 depreciation 33, 147 derivatives 67, 90–93, 96–7 Deutsche Bank 105, 121 disability adjusted life expectancy vii discrimination 130, 186–7 earnings management 129–30 economic growth xi, 80 economic policy xi, 46, 66, 76, 152 economic utility 4–5, 13 economics, mainstream viii, x–xi, xiii, 1, 29, 47, 136, 145, 164, 170, 208, 211, 214 economics, neoclassical ix, xii, 6, 8, 10–11, 13, 21–2, 25, 30, 38, 42, 45, 141, 143–4, 153–5, 157–60, 163–4, 168, 170–71, 173, 180–82, 188, 191–2, 210, 213 economies of scale 3, 54, 152, 161 economies of scope 54 Edgeworth, Francis Y. 10 efficiency vii, x, xi, xii, 13, 19, 25, 39, 43, 48, 62, 73, 101, 108, 136–7, 143, 144, 146–7, 149, 156, 160, 170, 176, 179, 183, 190, 193, 197, 202–4, 216, 219 efficient markets x Ely, Richard T. 9–10 employment protection 188, 200–203, 205 Enron 52, 92, 98, 110, 128, 132, 217 entrenchment 126, 135 equality of opportunity vii–ix, xii, 37, 39–41, 45, 53, 114, 124, 172 equality of outcome vii equilibrium x, 6–7, 37, 47, 146, 159, 161, 181–2, 197, 208 euro ix, 67, 82, 102 European Central Bank 103, 189, 215 European Commission/Union 67, 152 executive compensation 120–21, 138 exploitation 6, 156, 209, 212 exports 2, 34, 180–81 fairness ix, 13, 37, 39–40, 160, 164–6, 169–70, 177, 220 Fannie Mae (US government subsidizer of mortgages) 217 fear, uncertainty, doubt (FUD) 145 Federal Reserve (US) 43–4, 69–70, 85, 87–92, 143, 215 feedback loop 40, 216, 220 fiat money 75, 81 filibuster (US antilegislative maneuver) 218 financial industry xi, 44, 46–8, 51, 54–6, 64, 70, 89, 91–2, 121, 129, 217 financial markets xi, 47, 92, 108, 110, 128 financial rating agencies: see rating agencies financial sector xi, 43–4, 47–8, 53–4, 60, 64, 69, 79, 81, 83, 88–9, 100–101, 103, 105 Financial Stability Board 103 First (Workingmen’s) International 5 first mover advantage 132 Fisher, Irving 10, 13, 60, 75, 81, 83–4, 214 Fitch (ratings agency) 97 fixed costs 143 INDEX Fortune (magazine) 128 Fortune 500 (index) 49, 139 forwards (financial instrument) 67 founding fathers (of the United States) 207, 218 Freddie Mac (US government subsidizer of mortgages) 217 free market 6–7, 24, 46, 84, 147, 188, 193, 209 free riding 24, 37, 164 free trade 3–4, 16, 46, 209 freedom viii, 10, 18, 21, 25, 80, 94, 188, 191, 218 Freud, Sigmund 15 Friedman, Milton 44, 57, 81 front running (trading strategy) 65–6 FUD: see fear, uncertainty, doubt (FUD) fund managers 56–8, 63–4, 68, 134 futures (financial instrument) 67 Galbraith, John Kenneth 11, 74 GDP: see gross domestic product (GDP) General Motors xi, 16, 184–5 global financial crisis ix, 90; see also Great Financial Crisis God 24 gold 2, 72–7, 79–80, 86–7, 89 golden parachutes 112 Goldman Sachs 47, 49, 54, 56, 63, 66, 69, 88, 93, 105, 121, 215 goodwill 131 Great Depression 11, 70, 80, 138–9, 181, 204 Great Financial Crisis 79, 100, 111, 136; see also global financial crisis gross domestic product (GDP) vii–ix, xi, 28–31, 143 growth 27–8, 31, 33, 35, 39, 71, 90, 102, 108, 128, 132, 135, 151, 195, 203–4 Hadley, Arthur 10 happiness 202 Harvard Business Review 17–18 Harvard University 17–18, 26, 109, 208 243 hedge fund 29, 43, 46, 53, 58, 64–8, 92, 96, 101, 107 hedonic method 33–6 Hicks, John 13–14, 21 Homo economicus 164–6, 173 hostile takeovers 126 human capital 128 imports 2, 12, 34, 35 impossibility theorem (Arrow’s) 23–4, 212–13 incentives 39–40, 42–5, 52, 91, 93, 109, 114–15, 129, 132, 140, 172–4, 177, 182, 214 income guarantee 41 incompleteness viii, 12, 49, 145, 169, 184 incumbency 121, 134, 149 index tracking fund 55, 58 indifference 141, 168 industrial goods 2–3, 142 industrial production 2, 179 Industrial Revolution 5, 143, 181 inequality vii, 40, 138, 140 inflation 32–3, 36, 50, 78, 81, 104, 109, 120 information advantage 48, 131 information, asymmetric x, 191 information costs 144 information goods 143 information, imperfect x, xii, 142, 145, 149, 220 information technology 34, 218 innovation 34, 43, 147, 150–52, 160, 208 insider information 53–4, 62–3, 131 insider knowledge 131 insider trading 63–4, 131 institutionalism 8, 21 insurance xi, 39, 69, 82, 89–91,152, 189, 198, 204, 210 interest rate, real 50, 159 International Monetary Fund 27, 31, 48, 69, 74 International Workingmen’s Association 5 244 ECONOMISTS AND THE POWERFUL investment 32–3, 37, 41, 51, 56–7, 68, 78, 96–100, 103–4, 128–30, 133, 135, 140, 157, 184, 217 advice 51, 54, 56, 129 banking 29, 43, 47, 51, 52, 54, 55, 60–62, 64, 70–71, 89–90, 93, 94, 96, 97, 101, 107, 111–12, 125, 132 personal viii irrationality vii, 1, 13, 16, 38, 40, 151, 205, 211–12 Ivy League 27 Jevons, William Stanley 5, 16 job security viii, 108, 199–200, 202–4 J.P. Morgan (bank) 54, 59, 70, 87, 105 labor xii, 4–6, 8, 10, 18, 33–4, 137, 139, 141, 143, 146, 153–5, 157–9, 163–5, 167–73, 176, 178–83, 189–94, 197, 200, 203–5 legitimacy 16, 25 Lehman Brothers 17, 90, 94, 96 Leviathan (government) 210 liberty 8, 25, 207 liquidity xi, 66, 103–5, 112 London School of Economics 20, 27, 40, 144 Long-Term Capital Management (LCTM) 66, 92 macroeconomics 14 Madoff, Bernard 217 managerial power approach 119, 120, 124, 126, 132 marginal cost 142–4 marginal product 156–8, 189, 192 marginal rate of substitution 14 marginal utility 5–6, 13, 214 marginalism 1, 4–5 market forces x, 126, 169, 171–2, 180–82 market power xii, 154, 161, 164, 170, 203 Marshall, Alfred 5, 10, 16, 188, 193 Marx, Karl 5, 188, 198 Marxism 5–6, 10, 165 mass production 7, 15, 143, 161 Mazur, Paul 17–18 median voter theory 212, 214 Menger, Carl 5, 12 mercantilism 2–3 Merrill Lynch 90, 112, 133 Methuen Treaty 3 military vii, 3, 19–20, 22, 25, 45, 116, 208, 215 minimum wage 140–41, 154, 158, 183, 188–9, 192–7, 203–4 Mises, Ludwig von 12 monopoly viii, 9, 18, 26, 41, 86–7, 97–9, 142, 145–7, 149–54, 161, 171, 177 monopsony 153–4 Moody’s (ratings agency) 97–9 Morgan Stanley 49, 63, 90, 217 mutual fund 56, 58, 64–6, 68, 97, 134 NASDAQ 55 natural selection 167 negotiating power 160, 179, 205 net present value 159 new welfare economics 14, 19 news 53, 56, 114, 122, 143, 220 Nobel Prize 7, 17, 20, 22–4, 26, 44, 170, 186 Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) 20, 30, 41, 187, 189, 203 Olson, Mancur 23–4 optimal contracting 109, 119–20, 124, 126–7, 132 ordinalism 1, 11, 17, 21 outrage constraint 119–21, 124, 126–7, 136 outsourcing 165, 177, 184–6 over the counter (OTC) (derivatives) 90 Paretian welfare economics 14 Pareto, Vilfredo 12–13, 21, 157 INDEX pay-for-performance 95, 107–8, 111–12, 115, 119, 121–2, 126, 128, 139 pensions viii, 36, 39, 57, 58, 98, 113, 140, 134 perfect competition (economic) x, xii, 141–2, 145–6, 168, 187, 193 perfectly substitutable (economically) x performance-related pay 109, 111; see also pay-for-performance perverse incentive 113, 133 Pigou, Arthur C. 10, 188, 192–3, 198 Pimco (fund) 96, 215 Ponzi (scheme) 95, 217 poststructuralism 8 power viii–xii, 1–4, 8–9, 18, 25, 27–32, 42, 145, 147, 153–4, 159–61, 164, 166–8, 171, 174, 177–9, 184–7, 193, 198, 203–4 corporate 107–40 economic xii, 1, 32, 45, 46, 54, 208, 219 financial 47–106 informational 207–20 managerial (see managerial power approach) political ix, xii, 32, 86, 208, 210, 219 principal–agent theory 107 prisoner’s dilemma 38 private equity 68, 136 productivity (economic) ix, 10, 32, 34–6, 48, 79–80, 101, 137, 141, 146–7, 156, 171, 173, 176, 178, 180, 186, 189, 192, 194, 196, 201, 204–5 professions, the viii, 1, 25 profit xii, 2, 7, 43, 46, 54–6, 59, 61–2, 65, 68, 76, 82–3, 85, 91, 97, 99– 100, 105, 109–10, 112–13, 118, 127–8, 130, 135, 137, 141–3, 145–50, 153, 155, 157, 159–60, 164, 166, 171, 173, 175, 177–9, 184, 186, 197, 205, 215–16 profitability 49, 53, 60, 74, 84, 95, 97, 100, 132–3, 139, 143, 151, 183, 191, 194 245 profit margin 3, 195 profit maximization 120, 143, 147, 149–51 property rights 22, 215 public relations (PR) 15–16 quadratic weighting (inflation) 33 rating agencies x, 97–100 rational choice movement 1, 21–3, 25, 214 raw materials 2–3, 184 redistribution 10, 12, 19, 39, 161, 186, 210, 213 representative agent 14 reserve requirement 82–4, 103–4 risk management 94 Robbins, Lionel 12–13, 17, 21, 210–11 Robinson, Joan 146, 159–60, 208 Ross, Edward 9–10, 18, 38 Rothschild, Mayer Amschel 72–3, 75 S&P 500 110, 120 Samuelson, Paul 159–60 Sarbanes–Oxley Act 92, 99, 123 Schumpeter, Joseph 19 Second (Workingmen’s) International 5 Second World War 2, 18–19, 30, 79–80 Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) 52–3, 69, 90, 93–4, 97–8, 115, 123–4, 130, 217 securitization 112 selfishness 7, 38, 40, 108, 167, 170, 211, 213 shareholder franchise 133 shareholders xii, 93, 102, 107–10, 112–15, 120–22, 128, 131, 133–6, 138 SMD assumptions/conditions 7, 14 Smith, Adam 3–4, 42, 155, 163, 188, 198 social norms 38, 108, 117, 120, 135, 138–9, 164 social security 36, 39, 188, 198–9 246 ECONOMISTS AND THE POWERFUL socialism 5–6 , 9–10, 19, 24, 27, 193 Solow, Robert 159 Sonnenschein–Mantel–Debreu theorem: see SMD assumptions/ conditions Soros, George 47, 67, 105 spring loading (stock options) 122 Squam Lake Group 44 Sraffa, Piero 141, 144, 159–60 staggered board (of directors) 126, 134 stagnation 32, 101, 218 stakeholders xii, 107–8, 117, 136–7 Standard & Poor’s (rating agency) 97, 99 Stanford University 10, 18, 93 stock option backdating 122 stock options 43, 67, 92–3, 96, 108–10, 112–13, 120, 122–5, 128, 131–3 structural reforms 188–9 subprime xi, 43, 47, 69–71, 82, 88, 90, 95, 97–8, 101, 105, 108, 111, 113, 120, 133, 136, 205, 217 supply and demand 108, 167 sustainability ix, 13 Syracuse University 9 takeover 70, 102, 113, 126, 135 tariffs 3, 16, 84 TARP: see Troubled Asset Relief Program (TARP) taxation 83, 109, 139, 214 Thatcher, Margaret 40 “too big to fail” 83, 105 transaction costs 7, 74, 168–9 transportation 7, 41, 73, 118, 143, 144–5, 169, 186 treasury secretary xi, 69, 71, 87, 90, 96 Troubled Asset Relief Program (TARP) 70 UBS (bank) 105 unemployment 170, 180–81, 188–9, 197–200, 203–5, 213 university 9, 16–17, 20–21, 27, 41, 101, 117, 142 University of Chicago: see Chicago, University of value added 31, 136 Wall Street xi, 38, 42, 54, 63, 67, 69–70, 88, 92–3, 96, 99, 105, 122–3 Walras, Leon 5–7 Warwick Commission 100–101, 103 Washington Mutual (bank) 95–6 wealth viii, xii, 2, 9, 42, 45, 69, 71–2, 96, 101, 110–11, 120, 135, 207–10 welfare economics 14–15 welfarism 10–11 Wieser, Friedrich von 12–13 worker representatives 137 World Bank 27–8, 31 Worldcom 52, 61, 92, 98, 110, 113, 128, 132 Yale University 10, 13


pages: 377 words: 97,144

Singularity Rising: Surviving and Thriving in a Smarter, Richer, and More Dangerous World by James D. Miller

Amazon: amazon.comamazon.co.ukamazon.deamazon.fr

23andMe, affirmative action, Albert Einstein, artificial general intelligence, Asperger Syndrome, barriers to entry, brain emulation, cloud computing, cognitive bias, correlation does not imply causation, crowdsourcing, Daniel Kahneman / Amos Tversky, David Brooks, David Ricardo: comparative advantage, Deng Xiaoping, en.wikipedia.org, feminist movement, Flynn Effect, friendly AI, hive mind, impulse control, indoor plumbing, invention of agriculture, Isaac Newton, John von Neumann, knowledge worker, Long Term Capital Management, low skilled workers, Netflix Prize, neurotypical, pattern recognition, Peter Thiel, phenotype, placebo effect, prisoner's dilemma, profit maximization, Ray Kurzweil, recommendation engine, reversible computing, Richard Feynman, Richard Feynman, Rodney Brooks, Silicon Valley, Singularitarianism, Skype, statistical model, Stephen Hawking, Steve Jobs, supervolcano, technological singularity, The Coming Technological Singularity, the scientific method, Thomas Malthus, transaction costs, Turing test, Vernor Vinge, Von Neumann architecture

I believe that many will come to expect the Singularity, but even if I’m wrong, Singularity expectations will still have a massive impact on the economy if a few thousand hedge fund managers and venture capitalists become Singularity predictors. Hedge funds take money from rich people and invest in financial instruments such as stocks and bonds. These funds collectively control trillions of dollars in assets. In 1998, the hedge fund Long Term Capital Management had, all by itself, financial positions of around $1.3 trillion.323 Because of the huge sums involved, hedge funds attract the best and brightest as employees. Consider a hedge fund that has convinced rich people to invest $100 billion with it. The hedge fund then uses this $100 billion to borrow $900 billion from banks, allowing the fund to make financial bets totaling $1 trillion.

Pretend that if this fund were run by the second-most-qualified person on Earth, it would earn a 10 percent yearly return, but if the fund were managed by the best person, it would have a 10.2 percent return. This difference amounts to $2 billion a year, meaning that the fund would greatly benefit from employing the best manager for a salary of $1 billion a year, a salary that would tempt almost anyone. Hedge funds do sometimes screw up. Long Term Capital Management, for example, lost billions in 1998, and the US government so feared what would happen to the world economy if the fund imploded that it arranged a bailout. The ever-present possibility of failure motivates hedge funds to eagerly seek out all relevant information. Hence, if a very smart, rational, and well-informed person should be able to see a signpost to the Singularity, then you can bet that several hedge fund managers will read and act on such a sign.

., 124 Khan, Genghis, 22, 24, 77–78 Khrushchev, Nikita, 220 Kling, Arnold, 107 Kool-Aid, 38 Korean study on autism, 91 Krishna (Hindu God), 3 Kurzweil, Ray billions of nanobots in our brains will record real-time data on how our brains work, 11 computing power, limits to exponential growth in, 6 computing speed, exponential improvements in, 4 Cryonics Institute, 214 on exponential growth, 1 Fantastic Voyage: Live Long Enough to Live Forever, 179 humans will be fantastically productive and earn higher wages, 189 investor and Singularity writer, 35 mankind will colonize the universe at maximum speed allowed by the laws of physics, 9 merger of man and machine, 188 quote, 164 resources of the solar system, mankind will use significant percentage of, 9 rocks, reorganization of, x Singularity by 2045, 200 Singularity by a steady merger of man and machines, 23 The Singularity is Near, 3, 207 Singularity will probably be utopian, 179 Transcend: Nine Steps to Living Well Forever, 179 ultimate laptop computer operations per second, 6 Kurzweilian Merger babysitters, earnings of, 134–35 dangers of, 21 human brains will provide starter software for a Singularity, 8–10 opportunities to correct mistakes, 22 property rights expectations, 190 rate of return expectations, 190 savings, cumulative effect on, 190 wealth expectations, 190 Kurzweilian scenario, 189 L landed aristocracy, 147 landowning nobility, 137 land resale value, 181–82 language processing skills, 64–65 laser rifle, 204 lawn mower, perfect, 24 Legg, Shane, 13 Lesbian feminists, 195 libertarian AI, 41 libertarian government, ideal, 41 libertarianism, 40–41 libertarian ultra-intelligent ruler, 40–41 life span, 180, 212 life span of products, 183 liquid nitrogen preserved body, 139. See also cryonics Long Term Capital Management, 185 long-term planning, 79 lottery tickets, IQ, 113 Louis XIV, King, 165, 167 Ludd, Ned, 131 Luddites, 131 Lumosity (brain fitness website), 113, 115 Lumosity games, 113–14 M Macbeth (Shakespeare), 21, 175 machine intelligence, ix, x, xv, xvii, 13, 21, 119 machine-learning software, xi Mafia, 217 maggot-free, 166 magic wands, 137 magnetic resonance imaging, 91 Malthus, Thomas, xv, 141 Malthusian emulation society, 149 Malthusian trap, 141–45 Mandarin, 8, 193 Manhattan Project, xii manic state, 93 mankind’s annihilation, 45 mankind’s short-term survival prospects, 199 Mao Zedong, 122 marginal costs of production, 168 marijuana, 105 market economy, 132 marriage decision, 83 marriage market, 194 Mars, 138 Martian land, 138 Marxist dictate, 41 “massive embryo selection,” 94—95 McCabe, Tom, 90, 163, 215 media content, 182 Medicare costs, 116 Medicare taxes, 157 memes, 80, 97 memory drugs, 108.


pages: 337 words: 89,075

Understanding Asset Allocation: An Intuitive Approach to Maximizing Your Portfolio by Victor A. Canto

Amazon: amazon.comamazon.co.ukamazon.deamazon.fr

accounting loophole / creative accounting, airline deregulation, Andrei Shleifer, asset allocation, Bretton Woods, buy low sell high, capital asset pricing model, commodity trading advisor, corporate governance, discounted cash flows, diversification, diversified portfolio, fixed income, frictionless, high net worth, index fund, inflation targeting, invisible hand, law of one price, liquidity trap, London Interbank Offered Rate, Long Term Capital Management, market bubble, merger arbitrage, new economy, passive investing, price mechanism, purchasing power parity, risk tolerance, risk-adjusted returns, risk/return, Ronald Reagan, shareholder value, Sharpe ratio, short selling, statistical arbitrage, the market place, transaction costs, Y2K, yield curve

See also elasticity elasticity and, 187-189 large-cap stocks and, 190-193, 202-204, 273-274 regional stock indices and, 198-202 small-cap stocks and, 193-198, 202-204, 213, 273-274 location portfolios, Sharpe ratio, 61-63 location-based asset allocation cyclical asset allocation and, 34-37, 125-126 optimal mixes, 24-25 London Interbank Offered Rate (LIBOR), 257 long-run asset allocation. See also strategic asset allocation (SAA) length of sample period, 285n optimal mixes, 40-43, 118, 127, 274-275 Long-Term Capital Management (LTCM) example, 228 low cost-managed index funds, 110 LTCM (Long-Term Capital Management) example, 228 M M&As (mergers and acquisitions), 77 market allocations for benchmark portfolio, 108-115, 266-269 312 market breadth, size cycles and, 168-170, 237-238 market portfolio, 3 market risk, 19 market valuation, CEM (capitalized earnings model), 90-94 modifying for earnings growth, 94-96 performance indicators and, 96-100 market-timing strategy, value-timing strategy versus, 243-250, 276-277 markets, correlation of, 186 mean return, Sharpe ratio, 2 mean-reversion hypothesis, 4, 18, 46, 59 mergers and acquisitions (M&As), 77 Meriwether, John, 228 Microsoft, 84 Milkin, Michael, 75-76 mobile factors, immobile factors versus, 187-189, 273-274 mobility, elasticity and, 208 monetary policy style cycles and, 55-56 tax rates and, 88-90 Monte Carlo simulations, 4-6 N national factor, 191 negative incentives, 81 new-economy view, mean-reversion hypothesis versus, 59 NIPA (National Income and Product Accounts), 77 Nixon, Richard, 89 nominal interest rate, 128 O-P oil prices global economy and, 219-224 location effect and, 200-201 supply shift and tax increase example, 216-219 OPEC (Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries), 220 P/E ratio, 79, 90-94 passive management, 164.

Typically, they go long on targeted companies and sell short the acquiring companies. Relative Value strategies look to take advantage of the relative price differentials between related instruments. Short Selling strategies maintain a net or simple short exposure relative to the market. Chapter 12 Keeping the Wheels on the Hedge-Fund ATV 227 The potential downside of hedge-fund strategies is, if misapplied, they can bring disastrous results. The Long-Term Capital Management (LTCM) debacle is such an example. John Meriwether, a bond trader from Salomon Brothers with a well-known and favorable track record, founded LTCM in 1993. Investment banks quickly poured more than $1 billion into the fund, yet in only a few years the fund was well overexposed to risk and near belly-up. Many consider LTCM to be a worst-case scenario—the hedge-fund ghost haunting the sector to this day.


pages: 354 words: 26,550

High-Frequency Trading: A Practical Guide to Algorithmic Strategies and Trading Systems by Irene Aldridge

Amazon: amazon.comamazon.co.ukamazon.deamazon.fr

algorithmic trading, asset allocation, asset-backed security, automated trading system, backtesting, Black Swan, Brownian motion, business process, capital asset pricing model, centralized clearinghouse, collapse of Lehman Brothers, collateralized debt obligation, collective bargaining, diversification, equity premium, fault tolerance, financial intermediation, fixed income, high net worth, implied volatility, index arbitrage, interest rate swap, inventory management, law of one price, Long Term Capital Management, Louis Bachelier, margin call, market friction, market microstructure, martingale, New Journalism, p-value, paper trading, performance metric, profit motive, purchasing power parity, quantitative trading / quantitative finance, random walk, Renaissance Technologies, risk tolerance, risk-adjusted returns, risk/return, Sharpe ratio, short selling, Small Order Execution System, statistical arbitrage, statistical model, stochastic process, stochastic volatility, systematic trading, trade route, transaction costs, value at risk, yield curve

Bervas (2006) further suggests the distinction between the trading liquidity risk and the balance sheet liquidity risk, the latter being the inability to finance the shortfall in the balance sheet either through liquidation or borrowing. In mild cases, liquidity risk can result in minor price slippages due to the delay in trade execution and can cause collapses of market systems in its extreme. For example, the collapse of Long-Term Capital Management (LTCM) in 1998 can be attributed to the firm’s inability to promptly offload its holdings. The credit crisis of 2008 was another vivid example of liquidity risk; as the credit crisis spread, seemingly high-quality debt instruments such as high-grade CDOs lost most of their value when the markets for these securities vanished. Many firms holding long positions in these securities suffered severe losses.

“Transactions, Volume and Volatility.” Review of Financial Studies 7, 631–651. Jones, C.M., O. Lamont and R.L. Lumsdaine, 1998. “Macroeconomic News and Bond Market Volatility.” Journal of Financial Economics 47, 315–337. Jorion, Philippe, 1986. “Bayes-Stein Estimation for Portfolio Analysis.” Journal of Financial and Quantitative Analysis 21, 279–292. Jorion, Philippe, 2000. “Risk Management Lessons from Long-Term Capital Management.” European Financial Management 6, Issue 3, 277–300. Kahneman, D. and A. Tversky, 1979. “Prospect Theory: An Analysis of Decision under Risk.” Econometrica 47, 263–291. Kan, R. and C. Zhang, 1999. “Two-Pass Tests of Asset Pricing Models with Useless Factors.” Journal of Finance 54, 203–235. Kandel, E. and I. Tkatch, 2006. “Demand for the Immediacy of Execution: Time Is Money.” Working paper, Georgia State University.

., 162 “Liquid instrument,” 3 Liquidity: aggregate size of limit orders, 62 financial market suitability, 37–38, 41 inventory trading and, 133–134, 139–143 Liquidity arbitrage, 195–196 Liquidity pools (ECNs), 12 Liquidity risk, 252, 254 hedging and, 270 measuring of, 262–264 stop losses and, 266 334 Liquidity traders, inventory trading and, 131, 132 Liu, H., 133 Ljung-Box test, 95–97 Llorente, Guillermo, 196 Lo, Andrew, 59, 67, 83–84, 196, 274 Löflund, A., 180 Log returns, 92–94 Long-Term Capital Management (LTCM), 263 Lorenz curves, 228–229 Love, R., 162, 178 Lower partial moments (LPMs), 56 Low-latency trading, 24 Lunde, A., 121 Lyons, Richard K., 129, 150–151, 160–161, 197 MacKinlay, A. Craig, 67, 83–84, 169, 196 Macroeconomic news, event arbitrage, 174–175 Madhavan, Ananth N., 67, 157, 295 Mahdavi, M., 55 Maier, S., 130 Maintenance stage, of automated system development, 234, 236 Makarov, I., 59 Malamut, R., 274, 275, 277, 281, 292–293, 298 Management fees, 32 Margin call close order, 70 Market-aggressiveness selection, 274, 275–276 Market breadth, 62 Market depth, 62, 133 Market efficiency: predictability and, 78–79 profit opportunities and, 75–78 testing for, 79–89 MarketFactory, 25 Market impact costs, 290–293 Market microstructure trading, 4, 127–128 Market microstructure trading, information models, 129, 145–164 asymmetric information measures, 146–148 INDEX bid-ask spreads, 149–157 order aggressiveness, 157–160 order flow, 160–163 Market microstructure trading, inventory models, 127–143 liquidity provision, 133–134, 139–143 order types, 130–131 overview, 129–130 price adjustments, 127–128 profitable market making problems, 134–139 trader types, 131–133 Market-neutral arbitrage, 192–195 Market orders, versus limit orders, 61–63 Market participants, 24–26 Market resilience, inventory trading, 133 Market risk, 252, 253 hedging and, 269–270 measuring of, 254–260 stop losses and, 266 Markov switching models, 110–111 Markowitz, Harry, 202, 209, 213, 214, 295 Mark to market, risk measurement and, 263 Martell, Terrence, 158–159 Martingale hypothesis, market efficiency tests based on, 86–88 MatLab, 25 Maximum drawdown, 50–51 McQueen, Grant V., 179 Mean absolute deviation (MAD), 220–221 Mean absolute percentage error (MAPE), 221 Mean-reversion.


pages: 355 words: 92,571

Capitalism: Money, Morals and Markets by John Plender

Amazon: amazon.comamazon.co.ukamazon.deamazon.fr

Andrei Shleifer, asset-backed security, bank run, Berlin Wall, Big bang: deregulation of the City of London, Black Swan, bonus culture, Bretton Woods, business climate, Capital in the Twenty-First Century by Thomas Piketty, central bank independence, collapse of Lehman Brothers, collective bargaining, computer age, Corn Laws, corporate governance, credit crunch, Credit Default Swap, David Ricardo: comparative advantage, deindustrialization, Deng Xiaoping, discovery of the americas, diversification, Eugene Fama: efficient market hypothesis, eurozone crisis, failed state, Fall of the Berlin Wall, fiat currency, financial innovation, financial intermediation, Fractional reserve banking, full employment, Gordon Gekko, greed is good, Hyman Minsky, income inequality, inflation targeting, invention of the wheel, invisible hand, Isaac Newton, James Watt: steam engine, Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, John Maynard Keynes: Economic Possibilities for our Grandchildren, joint-stock company, Joseph Schumpeter, labour market flexibility, London Interbank Offered Rate, London Whale, Long Term Capital Management, manufacturing employment, Mark Zuckerberg, market bubble, market fundamentalism, means of production, Menlo Park, moral hazard, moveable type in China, Nick Leeson, Northern Rock, Occupy movement, offshore financial centre, paradox of thrift, Plutocrats, plutocrats, price stability, principal–agent problem, profit motive, quantitative easing, railway mania, regulatory arbitrage, Richard Thaler, rising living standards, risk-adjusted returns, Robert Gordon, Robert Shiller, Robert Shiller, Ronald Reagan, savings glut, shareholder value, short selling, Silicon Valley, South Sea Bubble, spice trade, Steve Jobs, technology bubble, The Chicago School, The Great Moderation, the map is not the territory, The Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith, Thorstein Veblen, time value of money, too big to fail, tulip mania, Upton Sinclair, We are the 99%, Wolfgang Streeck

And it poses a serious challenge to the efficient markets hypothesis. Another reason prices can diverge from fundamentals for a considerable period is that arbitrage, whereby investors simultaneously buy and sell identical or similar financial instruments which are temporarily mis-priced and thus bring prices back into line, is rarely free of risk. This was amply demonstrated by the near-collapse in 1998 of Long-Term Capital Management, a hedge fund run by former Salomon Brothers trader John Meriwether, which counted two distinguished finance academics, Robert Merton and Myron Scholes, on its strength. LTCM used complex mathematical models to exploit minute divergences in the relative value of different bonds. It was betting on the idea that the valuations would inevitably converge by buying the underpriced security and selling the overpriced security in the hope of making a small margin on the trade when convergence took place.

id=o00JAAAA QAAJ&pg=PA76&lpg=PA76&dq=Defoe 81 Irrational Exuberance, second edition, Princeton University Press, 2005. 82 See, for example, ‘From Efficient Markets Theory to Behavioral Finance’, Cowles Foundation for Research in Economics at Yale University, Paper No. 1055, 2003. 83 The title also caused serious concern to academics at the London School of Economics, who feared that it would deter potential sources of funds in the financial sector. Paul Woolley – who had accumulated a fair-sized fortune as a fund manager – made the title an absolute condition of his financing of the centre. The LSE backed down and took the money. 84 When Genius Failed: The Rise and Fall of Long-Term Capital Management, Random House Trade Paperbacks, 2000. 85 Dogs and Demons: The Fall of Modern Japan, Farrar, Straus & Giroux and Penguin Books, 2001. 86 ‘Letter from Chicago: After the Blow-up’, 11 January 2010. 87 In Going Off the Rails: Global Capital and the Crisis of Legitimacy, John Wiley, 2003, I argued that Federal Reserve chairman Alan Greenspan’s asymmetric and morally hazardous approach to monetary policymaking, which involved the repeated extension of a safety net to markets, was undermining capitalism’s immune system; the use of highly complex financial instruments meant that central banks and bank supervisors were over-dependent on experts in private banks to monitor the plumbing of the system and that supervision had been semi-privatised by default; financial institutions’ risk management was fundamentally flawed; financial innovation had failed to come up with any way of hedging against liquidity risk in banking; and the system’s pro-cyclicality was being exacerbated by the Basel capital adequacy regime.

H. 1 Laws (Plato) 1, 2 Lay, Kenneth 1 Lazard Brothers 1 Le Rêve (Picasso) 1 Leeson, Nick 1 Lehman Brothers 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 Lenin 1, 2 Leonardo da Vinci 1 Letters on the Aesthetic Education of Mankind (Friedrich Schiller) 1 Lettres Philosophiques (Voltaire) 1 Lewis, John Spedan 1 Lewis, Michael 1, 2 Lewis, Sinclair 1 Liar’s Poker (Michael Lewis) 1 liberal internationalism 1, 2, 3 limited liability 1, 2, 3, 4 Little Dorrit (Dickens) 1, 2 Livermore, Jesse 1 Lloyd George, David 1 ‘Locksley Hall’ (Tennyson) 1 London Interbank Offered Rate 1 Long-Term Capital Management (hedge fund) 1 Louis XIV of France 1, 2 Lowenstein, Roger 1 Lucas, Robert 1 Lunar Society 1 McDonald’s theory of conflict 1 McDonough, William 1 Machiavelli 1, 2 Mackay, Charles 1, 2, 3, 4 McKenna, Reginald 1, 2 McKinley, William 1 Madame Nui’s toad 1 Maddison, Angus 1 madness of crowds 1 Madouros, Vasileios 1 Major Barbara (George Bernard Shaw) 1 Making of the English Working Class (E.


pages: 318 words: 85,824

A Brief History of Neoliberalism by David Harvey

Amazon: amazon.comamazon.co.ukamazon.deamazon.fr

affirmative action, Asian financial crisis, Berlin Wall, Bretton Woods, business climate, capital controls, centre right, collective bargaining, crony capitalism, debt deflation, declining real wages, deglobalization, deindustrialization, Deng Xiaoping, Fall of the Berlin Wall, financial deregulation, financial intermediation, financial repression, full employment, George Gilder, Gini coefficient, global reserve currency, illegal immigration, income inequality, informal economy, labour market flexibility, land tenure, late capitalism, Long Term Capital Management, low-wage service sector, manufacturing employment, market fundamentalism, means of production, Mexican peso crisis / tequila crisis, Mont Pelerin Society, mortgage tax deduction, neoliberal agenda, new economy, phenotype, Ponzi scheme, price mechanism, race to the bottom, rent-seeking, reserve currency, Ronald Reagan, Silicon Valley, special economic zone, structural adjustment programs, the built environment, The Chicago School, transaction costs, union organizing, urban renewal, urban sprawl, Washington Consensus, Winter of Discontent

The state has to step in and replace ‘bad’ money with its own supposedly ‘good’ money—which explains the pressure on central bankers to maintain confidence in the soundness of state money. State power has often been used to bail out companies or avert financial failures, such as the US savings and loans crisis of 1987–8, which cost US taxpayers an estimated $150 billion, or the collapse of the hedge fund Long Term Capital Management in 1997–8, which cost $3.5 billion. Internationally, the core neoliberal states gave the IMF and the World Bank full authority in 1982 to negotiate debt relief, which meant in effect to protect the world’s main financial institutions from the threat of default. The IMF in effect covers, to the best of its ability, exposures to risk and uncertainty in international financial markets.

The second and much broader wave of financial crises began in Thailand in 1997 with the devaluation of the baht in the wake of the collapse of a speculative property market. The crisis first spread to Indonesia, Malaysia, and the Philippines, and then to Hong Kong, Taiwan, Singapore, and South Korea. Estonia and Russia were then hit hard, and shortly afterwards Brazil fell apart, with serious and long-lasting consequences for Argentina. Even Australia, New Zealand, and Turkey were affected. Only the US seemed immune, although even there a hedge fund, Long Term Capital Management (with two Nobel prizewinning economists as key advisers), which had bet the wrong way on Italian currency movements, had to be bailed out to the tune of $3.5 billion. The whole ‘East Asian regime’ of accumulation facilitated by ‘developmental states’ was being put to the test in 1997–8. The social effects were devastating: As the crisis progressed, unemployment soared, GDP plummeted, banks closed.

The stock market crash of 1987 deleted nearly 30 per cent of asset values, and at the trough of the crash that followed the bursting of the new economy bubble in the late 1990s more that $8 trillion in paper assets was lost, before the recovery to former levels. The bank and savings and loan failures of 1987 cost nearly $200 billion to remedy, and in that year matters became so bad that William Isaacs, chairman of the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, warned that ‘the US may be headed towards the nationalization of banking’. And the huge bankruptcies of Long Term Capital Management, Orange County, and others who speculated and lost, followed by the collapse of several major companies in 2001–2 in the midst of astonishing accounting lapses, not only cost the public dear but also demonstrated how fragile and fictitious much of neoliberal financialization has become. The fragility is by no means confined to the US, of course. Most countries, including China, face financial volatility and uncertainty.


pages: 309 words: 95,495

Foolproof: Why Safety Can Be Dangerous and How Danger Makes Us Safe by Greg Ip

Amazon: amazon.comamazon.co.ukamazon.deamazon.fr

Affordable Care Act / Obamacare, Air France Flight 447, air freight, airport security, Asian financial crisis, asset-backed security, bank run, banking crisis, Bretton Woods, capital controls, central bank independence, cloud computing, collateralized debt obligation, credit crunch, Credit Default Swap, credit default swaps / collateralized debt obligations, currency peg, Daniel Kahneman / Amos Tversky, diversified portfolio, double helix, endowment effect, Exxon Valdez, financial deregulation, financial innovation, Financial Instability Hypothesis, floating exchange rates, full employment, global supply chain, hindsight bias, Hyman Minsky, Joseph Schumpeter, Kenneth Rogoff, London Whale, Long Term Capital Management, market bubble, moral hazard, Network effects, new economy, offshore financial centre, paradox of thrift, pets.com, Ponzi scheme, quantitative easing, Ralph Nader, Richard Thaler, risk tolerance, Ronald Reagan, savings glut, technology bubble, The Great Moderation, too big to fail, transaction costs, union organizing, Unsafe at Any Speed, value at risk

I asked a Fed governor that fall: should the Fed repeatedly intervene when the market was in trouble? Well, I remember her answering, it’s a central bank’s duty to act when the financial system is threatened. In the following decades, I saw a fiscal crisis convulse interest rates and the dollar in my native Canada, an exchange rate crisis erupt in Europe in 1992, the Asian financial crisis, the near failure of Long-Term Capital Management in 1998, and then the rise and fall of the technology bubble. By 2007, I was looking for the next crisis everywhere: in home prices, leveraged buyouts, the trade deficit. I was not, however, looking for catastrophe. I had by now developed a deep respect for the authorities’ ability to counteract mayhem; I assumed that the economy, though it might get bumped around a bit, would come out okay.

At the market’s nadir many suffered crippling losses on the stocks they had bought that then went down in value. Subsequent reforms created circuit breakers to halt sudden drops in the markets, while the dealers who handled stock trading were required to bulk up their capital. Stock markets faced numerous bear markets over the subsequent decades, but not since 1987 have they again come close to total meltdown. In 1998, when Russia defaulted and Long-Term Capital Management, a giant hedge fund, threatened to fail and inflict chaos on the markets, the Fed cut interest rates three times and brokered a bailout of LTCM by the banks that were its principal creditors. The Fed was alarmed at how little it, and the banks it oversaw, knew about LTCM, and so it began instructing banks to keep much closer tabs on the leverage its hedge fund customers were allowed to accumulate.

When inflation was high and volatile, the Fed would drag its feet about cutting interest rates even if unemployment was high, fearing a rapid reacceleration in price pressure. But once inflation became anchored at such a low level, the Fed felt far more comfortable cutting interest rates when threats to growth materialized. This became apparent when the Fed briefly slashed interest rates in the fall of 1998 to deal with the turmoil of Long-Term Capital Management. Inflation barely budged. It cut them even further and faster in 2001 and 2002, after the collapsing dot-com bubble and then the 9/11 terrorist attacks. The 2001 recession was the mildest since the Second World War. With steady growth and stable inflation, the 1990s became known as the “Goldilocks” economy: not too hot, not too cold. In 2002 economists Mark Watson and James Stock came up with a grander label.


pages: 297 words: 91,141

Market Sense and Nonsense by Jack D. Schwager

Amazon: amazon.comamazon.co.ukamazon.deamazon.fr

asset allocation, Bernie Madoff, Brownian motion, collateralized debt obligation, commodity trading advisor, conceptual framework, correlation coefficient, Credit Default Swap, credit default swaps / collateralized debt obligations, Daniel Kahneman / Amos Tversky, diversification, diversified portfolio, fixed income, high net worth, implied volatility, index arbitrage, index fund, London Interbank Offered Rate, Long Term Capital Management, margin call, market bubble, market fundamentalism, merger arbitrage, pattern recognition, performance metric, pets.com, Ponzi scheme, quantitative trading / quantitative finance, random walk, risk tolerance, risk-adjusted returns, risk/return, Robert Shiller, Robert Shiller, Sharpe ratio, short selling, statistical arbitrage, statistical model, transaction costs, two-sided market, value at risk, yield curve

Although hedge funds experienced a substantial decline, during the exact same period both the S&P 500 and NASDAQ indexes lost more than half their value. How is it that an investment with a one-time worst loss of 22 percent is considered much riskier than one that has lost more than double that amount on two separate occasions during the same time frame? Perhaps no single event contributed more to the lasting distorted perception of the risk in hedge fund investment than the collapse of Long-Term Capital Management (LTCM), no doubt the most famous hedge fund failure in history.2 In its first four years of operation, this multibillion-dollar hedge fund generated steady profits, quadrupling the starting net asset value. Then in a five-month period (May to September 1998), it all unraveled, with the net asset value of the fund plunging a staggering 92 percent. Moreover, LTCM’s positions had been enormously leveraged, placing the banks and brokerage firms that provided the credit at enormous risk.

Although biased for all the reasons we detailed, sector indexes can be used in comparisons with each other based on the implicit simplifying assumption that they will be about equally impacted by these biases. Indeed, we used such comparisons in the hedge fund performance analysis in Chapter 3. Chapter 15 The Leverage Fallacy Leverage can be dangerous. There is no shortage of hedge funds that have collapsed as a result of excessive leverage, with Long-Term Capital Management, detailed in Chapter 13, being the classic example. Investors have learned the lesson that leverage is dangerous rather than leverage can be dangerous. In this sense, they are much like the cat that sits on a hot stove. As Mark Twain observed, “She will never sit down on a hot stove-lid again—and that is well; but also she will never sit down on a cold one any more.” Investors always seem to ask hedge funds the question: “How much leverage do you use?”

Treasury bills types of Hedge funds investment about advantages of hidden risk managed futures perception vs. reality rationale for single fund risk Hedge selling Hedgers Hedging Hidden risk Hidden risk evaluation qualitative assessment quantitative measures High-water mark Housing bubble (mid-2000s) Hseigh, David Hulbert Financial Digest Human emotions Idiosyncratic risk Illiquid portfolio Illiquid trades Illiquidity risk Incentive fees Index funds Indicators contrarian credit quality of differentiation of diversification of future performance futures market as interest rates merger arbitrage past as past returns return levels risk volatility Inflation Information availability efficient use of Initial public offerings (IPO) Insider trading Institutional investors Interest rates Internet bubble In-the-money options Inverse correlated fund Inverse relationship Investment analysis Investment decisions Investment durations Investment insights correlation diversification hedge fund of funds hedge funds leverage managed accounts past performance portfolio allocations portfolio considerations portfolio rebalancing pro-forma statistics track records volatility Investment principle Investment size, maximum Investment strategies Investment timing Investor behavior Investor fees Investor requirements IPO price Irrational behavior Irrational choices Jones, Alfred Winslow Junk bonds Kahneman, Daniel Knowledge use Kudlow, Larry Lack, Simon Lagged shifts in supply Leverage about danger from investor performance and and risk Leverage risk Leveraged EFTs Leveraged/rebalanced funds Liar loans Life, Liberty and Property (Jones) Limit orders Linear relationships Liquidation selling Liquidations Liquidity of futures Liquidity crunch Liquidity risk Lockups London interbank offered rate (LIBOR) London Metal Exchange Long bias position Long only hedge funds Long-Term Capital Management (LTCM) Long-term investment Look-back period Loomis, Carol J. Lowenstein, Roger Luck Mad Money Madoff scandal Managed accounts advantages of vs. funds in hedge funds individual vs. indirect management objections to Managed futures Management fees Manager performance Managers hedge funds vs. CTA risk taking vs. skill MAR. See Minimum acceptable return (MAR) ratio Marcus, Michael Margin Margin calls Marginal production loss Market bubbles Market direction Market neutral fund Market overvaluation Market panics Market price delays and inventory model of Market price response Market pricing theory Market psychology Market risk Market sector convertible arbitrage hedge funds and CTA funds hidden risk long-only funds market dependency past and future correlation performance impact by strategy Market timing skill Market-based risk Maximum drawdown (MDD) Mean reversion Mean-reversion strategy Merger arbitrage funds Mergers, cyclical tendency Metrics Minimum acceptable return (MAR) ratio and Calmar ratio Mispricing Mocking Monetary policy Mortgage standards Mortgage-backed securities (MBSs) Mortgages Multifund portfolio, diversified Mutual fund managers, vs. hedge fund managers Mutual funds National Futures Association (NFA) Negative returns Negative Sharpe ratio, and volatility Net asset valuation (NAV) Net exposure New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) Newsletter recommendation NINJA loans Normal distribution Normally distributed returns Notional funding October 1987 market crash Offsetting positions Option ARM Option delta Option premium Option price, underlying market price Option timing Optionality Out-of-the-money options Outperformance Pairs trading Palm Palm IPO Palm/3 Com Past high-return strategies Past performance back-adjusted return measures evaluation of going forward with incomplete information visual performance evaluation Past returns about and causes of future performance hedge funds high and low return periods implications of investment insights market sector past highest return strategy relevance of sector selection select funds and sources of Past track records Performance-based fees Portfolio construction principles Portfolio fund risk Portfolio insurance Portfolio optimization past returns volatility as risk measure Portfolio optimization software Portfolio rebalancing about clarification effect of reason for test for Portfolio risks Portfolio volatility Price aberrations Price adjustment timing Price bubble Price change distribution The price in not always right dot-com mania Pets.com subprime investment Pricing models Prime broker Producer short covering Professional management Profit incentives Pro-forma statistics Pro-forma vs. actual results Program sales Prospect theory Puts Quantitative measures beta correlation monthly average return Ramp-up period underperformance Random selection Random trading Random walk process Randomness risk Rare events Rating agencies Rational behavior Redemption frequency notice penalties Redemption liquidity Relative velocity Renaissance Medallion fund Return periods, high and low long term investment S&P performance Return retracement ratio (RRR) Return/risk performance Return/risk ratios vs. return Returns comparison measures relative vs. absolute objective Reverse merger arbitrage Risk assessment of for best strategy and leverage measurement vs. failure to measure measures of perception of vs. volatility Risk assessment Risk aversion Risk evaluation Risk management Risk management discipline Risk measurement vs. no risk measurement Risk mismeasurement asset risk vs. failure to measure hidden risk hidden risk evaluation investment insights problem source value at risk (VaR) volatility as risk measure volatility vs. risk Risk reduction Risk types Risk-adjusted allocation Risk-adjusted return Risk/return metrics Risk/return ratios Rolling window return charts Rubin, Paul Rubinstein, Mark Rukeyser, Louis S&P 500, vs. financial newsletters S&P 500 index S&P returns study of Sasseville, Caroline Schwager Analytics Module SDR Sharpe ratio Sector approach Sector funds Sector past performance Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) Select funds, past returns and Selection bias Semistrong efficiency Shakespearian monkey argument Sharpe ratio back-adjusted return measures vs.


pages: 111 words: 1

Fooled by Randomness: The Hidden Role of Chance in Life and in the Markets by Nassim Nicholas Taleb

Amazon: amazon.comamazon.co.ukamazon.deamazon.fr

Antoine Gombaud: Chevalier de Méré, availability heuristic, backtesting, Benoit Mandelbrot, Black Swan, complexity theory, corporate governance, currency peg, Daniel Kahneman / Amos Tversky, discounted cash flows, diversified portfolio, endowment effect, equity premium, global village, hindsight bias, Long Term Capital Management, loss aversion, mandelbrot fractal, mental accounting, meta analysis, meta-analysis, quantitative trading / quantitative finance, QWERTY keyboard, random walk, Richard Feynman, Richard Feynman, road to serfdom, Robert Shiller, Robert Shiller, shareholder value, Sharpe ratio, Steven Pinker, stochastic process, too big to fail, Turing test, Yogi Berra

Now, I explained the point to a cab driver who laughed at the fact that someone ever thought that there was any scientific method to understanding markets and predicting their attributes. Somehow when one gets involved in financial economics, owing to the culture of the field, one becomes likely to forget these basic facts (pressure to publish to keep one’s standing among the other academics). An immediate result of Dr. Markowitz’s theory was the near collapse of the financial system in the summer of 1998 (as we saw in Chapters 1 and 5) by Long Term Capital Management (“LTCM”), a Greenwich, Connecticut, fund that had for principals two of Dr. Markowitz’s colleagues,“Nobels”as well. They are Drs. Robert Merton (the one in Chapter 3 trouncing Shiller) and Myron Scholes. Somehow they thought they could scientifically “measure” their risks. They made absolutely no allowance in the LTCM episode for the possibility of their not understanding markets and their methods being wrong.

: Two strains of literature. (1) The recent “stranger to ourselves” line of research in psychology (Wilson 2002). (2) The literature on “immune neglect,” Wilson, Meyers and Gilbert (2001) and Wilson, Gilbert and Centerbar (2003). Literally, people don’t learn from their past reactions to good and bad things. Literature on bubbles: There is a long tradition, see Kindleberger (2001), MacKay (2002), Galbraith (1991), Chancellor (1999), and of course Shiller (2000). Shiller with a little work may be convinced to do a second edition. Long-term capital management: See Lowenstein (2000). Stress and randomness: Sapolsky (1998) is a popular, sometimes hilarious presentation. The author specializes among other things on the effect of glucocorticoids released at times of stress on the atrophy of the hycocampus, hampering the formation of new memory and brain plasticity. More technical, Sapolsky (2003). Brain asymmetries with gains/losses: See Gehring and Willoughby (2002).

Lannon, 2000, A General Theory of Love. New York: Vintage Books. Lichtenstein, S., B. Fischhoff, and L. Phillips, 1977, “Calibration of Probabilities: The State of the Art.” In Kahneman, Slovic, and Tversky (1982). Loewenstein, G. F., E. U. Weber, C. K. Hsee, and E. S. Welch, 2001, “Risk As Feelings.” Psychological Bulletin, 127, 267–286. Lowenstein, Roger, 2000, When Genius Failed: The Rise and Fall of Long-Term Capital Management. New York: Random House. Lucas, Robert E., 1978, “Asset Prices in an Exchange Economy.” Econometrica, 46, 1429–1445. Luce, R. D., and H. Raiffa, 1957, Games and Decisions: Introduction and Critical Survey. New York: Dover. Machina, M. J., and M. Rothschild, 1987, “Risk.” In Eatwell, J., Milgate, M., and Newman P., eds., 1987, The New Palgrave: A Dictionary of Economics. London: Macmillan.


pages: 145 words: 43,599

Hawai'I Becalmed: Economic Lessons of the 1990s by Christopher Grandy

Amazon: amazon.comamazon.co.ukamazon.deamazon.fr

Bretton Woods, business climate, dark matter, inventory management, Long Term Capital Management, market bubble, Maui Hawaii, minimum wage unemployment, open economy, purchasing power parity, Silicon Valley, Telecommunications Act of 1996

The declining yen meant that Japanese purchasing power in Hawai‘i weakened further. By July 1997, when the Thai baht collapsed, the Fed’s maximum target for the U.S. federal funds rate (the rate at which banks lend to each other) stood at 5.5%, having been raised a quarter of a percentage point in March. The Fed held to the 5.5% rate for 13 more months. Then, in September 1998, following the collapse of Long-Term Capital Management, a prominent U.S. hedge fund, the Fed lowered the target rate by a quarter point. The Fed continued lowering the rate in quarter-point increments for the next two months until the federal funds target stood at 4.75% in November. This action probably contributed to the continued expansion of the stock market, consumption, and the U.S. economy. To some degree, the Fed’s actions bolstered the Asian economies as the United States served as importer of last resort.

., 8n. 1 Keynesian fiscal policy, 27, 36–37, 38, 39, 44n. 5 King, Charles, 65 Koki, Stan, 82, 84 Krueger, Alan, 98 Krugman, Paul, 30–31, 33n. 18 Kuwait, 23 La Croix, Sumner, ix, x Laffer curve, 26 Land Use Commission. See LUC land use regulation, 1, 4, 18, 48, 51–52, 79, 104, 105 Laney, Leroy, 43 Leppert, Thomas, 66 lessons of 1990s, 7, 101, 104, 108–110 Lingle, Linda, 5, 77, 79–81, 82, 84–85, 106, 119–122 Long-Term Capital Management, 74 Loui, Patricia, 65 low-income tax credit, 67, 99, 115 LUC (Land Use Commission), 18, 51, 52, 58n. 13, 67, 70, 116 Lucas, Robert, 102n. 8 mainland economy, 30, 34, 56, 74, 82, 91, 96, 99; recession, 3, 6, 23, 26–30, 33n. 17, 36, 105, 112–113; unemployment, 26, 30, 41, 56, 99 Mak, James, ix, x, 53, 54 Malaysia, 33n. 18, 71, 72, 73, 93 Malcolm, Donald, 65 maritime regulation, 48, 50–51, 79, 105, 111 mass transit.


pages: 159 words: 45,073

GDP: A Brief but Affectionate History by Diane Coyle

Amazon: amazon.comamazon.co.ukamazon.deamazon.fr

Asian financial crisis, Berlin Wall, big-box store, Bretton Woods, BRICs, clean water, computer age, conceptual framework, crowdsourcing, Diane Coyle, double entry bookkeeping, en.wikipedia.org, Erik Brynjolfsson, Fall of the Berlin Wall, falling living standards, financial intermediation, global supply chain, happiness index / gross national happiness, income inequality, income per capita, informal economy, John von Neumann, Kevin Kelly, Long Term Capital Management, mutually assured destruction, Nathan Meyer Rothschild: antibiotics, new economy, Occupy movement, purchasing power parity, Robert Shiller, Robert Shiller, Ronald Reagan, shareholder value, Silicon Valley, Simon Kuznets, The Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith, Thorstein Veblen, University of East Anglia, working-age population

On one side of the Atlantic, there was a good deal of agonizing among economic policymakers: computers were available for any business in any country to use, so why did the productivity benefits of the computer revolution appear to be confined to the United States? On the American side of the Atlantic, there was a sense of triumphalism about the superiority of the U.S. economy and its “New Paradigm,” with its Silicon Valley heroes and soaring stock market. Shocks like the 1995 Mexican near-default, the 1997–1998 Asian financial crisis and the collapse of Long Term Capital Management, and even the technology stock crash of 2001 and the horrors of 9/11 that year, were shrugged off after brief periods of crisis management. The economy appeared to be strong enough to weather anything, and GDP continued to expand for years to come, after a mild and brief downturn in 2001. The questions about GDP raised by the New Economy episode still stand. GDP has never measured service-sector activity well, and services have been growing constantly as a proportion of what we spend our money on.

See also production boundary Landes, David, 63 Layard, Richard, 112 legal traditions, 134 Leontief, Wassily, 29 Lewis, C. S., The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe, 112 life expectancy, 61, 74, 117 lighting, 86 The Limits to Growth, 60, 70 living standards: British, 46; in communist countries, 57, 67; in developing countries, 54; GDP as indicator of, 140; postwar Western, 62–63, 69; PPP and, 49–52 Long Term Capital Management, 90 Love Canal, 69 low-income countries. See developing/low-income countries Luxembourg, 25 luxury taxes, 112 MacArthur, Douglas, 71 Macmillan, Harold, 46 macroeconomics, 19–21, 23 Maddison, Angus, 11–12, 34, 79–80, 96 Mandel, Michael, 130 Mao Zedong, 67 Marshall, Alfred, 11, 12 Marshall, George, 18 Marshall Aid, 18–19, 42, 47, 57 Marx, Karl, 10 Material Product System, 47.


pages: 237 words: 50,758

Obliquity: Why Our Goals Are Best Achieved Indirectly by John Kay

Amazon: amazon.comamazon.co.ukamazon.deamazon.fr

Andrew Wiles, Asian financial crisis, Berlin Wall, bonus culture, British Empire, business process, Cass Sunstein, computer age, credit crunch, Daniel Kahneman / Amos Tversky, discounted cash flows, discovery of penicillin, diversification, Donald Trump, Fall of the Berlin Wall, financial innovation, Gordon Gekko, greed is good, invention of the telephone, invisible hand, Jane Jacobs, Long Term Capital Management, Louis Pasteur, market fundamentalism, Nash equilibrium, pattern recognition, purchasing power parity, RAND corporation, regulatory arbitrage, shareholder value, Simon Singh, Steve Jobs, The Death and Life of Great American Cities, The Predators' Ball, The Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith, ultimatum game, urban planning, value at risk

The models aided the practiced judgment of foresters but did not replace it. Good decision making is pragmatic and eclectic. Oblique approaches rely on a tool kit of models and narratives rather than any simple or single account. To fit the world into a single model or narrative fails to acknowledge the universality of uncertainty and complexity. The reputation of financial economics has never recovered from the blow of the virtual collapse of Long-Term Capital Management, a sophisticated practitioner of the risk models outlined in chapter twelve, and the involvement of two Nobel Prize winners, Robert C. Merton and Myron Scholes. The fund built huge positions on the basis of estimated mispricings, relying on its models to control its exposures. When the Asian financial crisis blew up in 1997, the fund managers extended their positions. They believed their own models.

Keynes, John Maynard Khan, Genghis Khmer Rouge Klein, Gary Kubrick, Stanley lactose lateral thinking leadership Le Corbusier Lehman Brothers Lenin, V. I. leprosy Levitt, Theodore Lewis, Michael Liar’s Poker (Lewis) life expectancy Lincoln, Abraham Lindblom, Charles literacy rate Litton Industries Lives of the Painters (Vasari) loans lobsters local goals logic London Business School London Underground Long-Term Capital Management McDonnell Douglas Machiavelli, Niccolò MacIntyre, Alasdair McKeen, John McNamara, Robert Maginot Line Malaya Mallory, George Malthusianism management management consultants man-and-dog problem manuals maps market capitalization market economies market fundamentalism market research market segments Marks, Simon Marks & Spencer marriage Marxism mass production materialism mathematics Mean Business (Dunlap) Merck Merck, George Merton, Robert C.


pages: 726 words: 172,988

The Bankers' New Clothes: What's Wrong With Banking and What to Do About It by Anat Admati, Martin Hellwig

Amazon: amazon.comamazon.co.ukamazon.deamazon.fr

Andrei Shleifer, asset-backed security, bank run, banking crisis, Basel III, Bernie Madoff, Big bang: deregulation of the City of London, Black Swan, bonus culture, Carmen Reinhart, central bank independence, centralized clearinghouse, collapse of Lehman Brothers, collateralized debt obligation, corporate governance, credit crunch, Credit Default Swap, credit default swaps / collateralized debt obligations, crony capitalism, diversified portfolio, en.wikipedia.org, Exxon Valdez, financial deregulation, financial innovation, financial intermediation, George Akerlof, Growth in a Time of Debt, income inequality, invisible hand, Jean Tirole, joint-stock company, joint-stock limited liability company, Kenneth Rogoff, London Interbank Offered Rate, Long Term Capital Management, margin call, Martin Wolf, moral hazard, mortgage debt, mortgage tax deduction, Nick Leeson, Northern Rock, open economy, peer-to-peer lending, regulatory arbitrage, risk tolerance, risk-adjusted returns, risk/return, Robert Shiller, Robert Shiller, shareholder value, sovereign wealth fund, technology bubble, The Market for Lemons, the payments system, too big to fail, Upton Sinclair, Yogi Berra

See bank lending; bank loans; borrowing lobbying, bank, 192–207; on Basel III, 96, 97, 187, 194, 315n79; campaign contributions in, 203, 205, 324n46; on capital regulation, 96, 97, 99, 310n51; on Dodd-Frank Act, 3, 231n13, 326n60; effectiveness of, 3, 193–94, 213–14, 231n12, 324n46; fallacies in (See fallacies); after financial crisis of 2007–2009, 1; and home-team bias, 195, 205, 324n44, 326n59; “level playing field” rhetoric in, 194–99; liquidity narrative in, 330n12; reasons for success of, 2, 213–14; regulatory capture by, 194, 203–7; and revolving doors, 203, 204–5, 324n44, 325n56; in savings and loan crisis of 1980s, 55, 252n35; on single-counterparty credit limit proposal, 268n24; as source of funds for politicians, 193–94; spending on, 229n4, 324n46, 326n60; on Volcker Rule, 3, 231n10, 231n13, 270n34 London Economics, on covered-bond markets, 255n48 London interbank offered rate. See LIBOR Long Term Capital Management (LTCM), as systemically important financial institution, 72, 90, 219 long-term refinancing operations (LTRO), 138, 289n16 looting, of savings banks, 252n33 Lopez, Robert S., 250n16 LoPucki, Lynn, 245n12, 247n19 Lowenstein, Roger, 261n46, 262n53 low-income families, mortgages for, 323n38. See also subprime mortgage(s) Lown, Cara S., 249n15, 253n38 Lowrey, Annie, 327n66 LTCM. See Long Term Capital Management LTCM crisis of 1998, 72; bailout in, 72, 74, 90, 219; contagion in, 72, 258n20, 261n45; unanticipated risks in, 73 LTRO. See long-term refinancing operations Lustig, Hanno, 291n32, 291n34 Luxembourg, bank bailouts by, 237n38 lying, culture of, 328n5.

For example, large gambles involving complicated formulas and trading strategies were one reason that a small change in interest rates set by the Federal Reserve gave a large shock to the financial system in 1994; the size of the shock came as a surprise because most people were unaware how sensitive the positions of many derivatives investors were to the Federal Reserve’s policy.44 Another early example of this risk magnification was seen in the so-called LTCM crisis of 1998, named after the hedge fund Long Term Capital Management (LTCM). With $4.7 billion in equity and $125 billion in debt at the end of 1997, LTCM was a relatively small institution. However, when LTCM incurred large losses in 1998, the Federal Reserve was afraid that an LTCM bankruptcy might trigger a chain reaction, pushing other institutions into insolvency as well. LTCM had huge derivatives positions, and the fear that LTCM’s partners in these contracts might suffer greatly from an LTCM bankruptcy was exacerbated by significant legal uncertainty about the treatment of these con-tracts.45 Moreover, because investors were afraid of a major financial crisis, attempts to sell LTCM’s assets might have caused the prices of these assets to fall dramatically, with potentially disastrous effects on the many other institutions that had been following strategies similar to those of LTCM.

Banks choose this method if it allows them to worsen the position of senior creditors. In Chapter 11 we discuss how this form of “deleveraging” worked in Europe in the fall of 2011. 20. As we discuss later in the chapter, the fear of a systemic chain reaction associated with asset liquidations and price declines was also an important reason that in 1998 the Federal Reserve did not want the insolvent hedge fund Long Term Capital Management (LTCM) to be put into bankruptcy. A historical example of how liquidation sales in bankruptcy triggered contagion in a crisis is analyzed by Schnabel and Shin (2004). 21. This role of expectations in the developments of 2007–2008 is noted by BIS (2008). 22. See Reinhart and Rogoff (2009, Table A.3.1). Their Table A.4.1 gives a brief historical account of each crisis. The only two banking crises between 1940 and 1970 occurred in India following that country’s independence in 1947 and in Brazil in connection with a downturn of the Brazilian economy in 1963. 23.


pages: 76 words: 20,238

The Great Stagnation by Tyler Cowen

Amazon: amazon.comamazon.co.ukamazon.deamazon.fr

Asian financial crisis, Bernie Madoff, en.wikipedia.org, financial innovation, Flynn Effect, income inequality, indoor plumbing, life extension, liquidity trap, Long Term Capital Management, Mark Zuckerberg, meta analysis, meta-analysis, Peter Thiel, RAND corporation, school choice, Tyler Cowen: Great Stagnation, urban renewal

In the early 1980s, we had a lot of apparently bad events that actually didn’t work out so tragically, at least not for most Americans. Let me list a few:• The savings and loan crisis of the early 1980s • The failure of Continental Illinois (then a major U.S. bank) in 1984 • The stock market crash of 1987—Black Monday, a 22.5 percent drop in one day • The bursting of the real estate bubble in the late 1980s • The Mexican financial crisis of 1994 • The Asian financial crisis of 1997-1998 • The Long-Term Capital Management (a hedge fund) crisis of 1998 • The bursting of the dot.com bubble in 2001 In each case, it seemed initially that something really terrible was happening to the economy. When all was said and done, however, these events ended up looking like smaller problems. In most of these cases, we did patchwork rather than addressing the dilemmas of overleverage and excess risk at a more fundamental level.


pages: 267 words: 71,123

End This Depression Now! by Paul Krugman

Amazon: amazon.comamazon.co.ukamazon.deamazon.fr

airline deregulation, Asian financial crisis, asset-backed security, bank run, banking crisis, Bretton Woods, capital asset pricing model, Carmen Reinhart, centre right, correlation does not imply causation, credit crunch, Credit Default Swap, currency manipulation / currency intervention, debt deflation, Eugene Fama: efficient market hypothesis, financial deregulation, financial innovation, Financial Instability Hypothesis, full employment, German hyperinflation, Gordon Gekko, Hyman Minsky, income inequality, inflation targeting, invisible hand, Joseph Schumpeter, Kenneth Rogoff, labour market flexibility, labour mobility, liquidationism / Banker’s doctrine / the Treasury view, liquidity trap, Long Term Capital Management, low skilled workers, Mark Zuckerberg, moral hazard, mortgage debt, paradox of thrift, price stability, quantitative easing, rent-seeking, Robert Gordon, Ronald Reagan, Upton Sinclair, We are the 99%, working poor, Works Progress Administration

Nor was the savings and loan mess the only signal that deregulation was more dangerous than its advocates let on. In the early 1990s there were major problems at big commercial banks, Citi in particular, because they had overextended themselves in lending to commercial real estate developers. In 1998, with much of the emerging world in financial crisis, the failure of a single hedge fund, Long Term Capital Management, froze financial markets in much the same way that the failure of Lehman Brothers would freeze markets a decade later. An ad hoc rescue cobbled together by Federal Reserve officials averted disaster in 1998, but the event should have served as a warning, an object lesson in the dangers of out-of-control finance. (I got some of this into the original, 1999 edition of The Return of Depression Economics, where I drew parallels between the LTCM crisis and the financial crises then sweeping through Asia.

., 112 Latvia, 181 Lehman Brothers collapse, 3, 4, 69, 100, 111, 114, 115, 115, 155, 157, 188, 191 Lehman effect, 115 lenders of last resort, 59 lending, loans, 30 lend-lease program, 39 leverage, 43, 44, 47, 48 in financial crisis of 2008–09, 44–46 Liberal Democrats, U.K., 200 liberals, 89 liquidationists, 204–5 liquidity, 33 euro and, 182–84, 185 returns vs., 57 liquidity traps, 135–36, 137, 138, 143, 144 in depression of 2008–, 32–34, 38, 51, 136, 155, 163 money supply and, 152, 155 unemployment and, 33, 51, 152 Lizza, Ryan, 125 Long Term Capital Management (LTCM) failure, 69 Lucas, Robert, 91–92, 102, 107 Lucas project, 102, 103 macroeconomics, 91–92, 227, 231 “dark age” of, 92 “freshwater,” 101–3, 110–11 “real business cycle” theory in, 103 “saltwater,” 101, 103–4 magneto trouble, Keynes’s analogy of, 22, 23, 35–36 Mankiw, N. Gregory, 227 manufacturing capacity, 16 marginal product, 78 markets: “efficient” hypothesis of, 97–99, 100, 101, 103–4 inflation and, 202 investor rationality and, 97, 101, 103–4 Keynes on, 97, 98 1987 crash in, 98 panic in, 4 speculative excess in, 97, 98 in 2008 financial crisis, 117 McCain, John, 113 McConnell, Mitch, 109 McCulley, Paul, 48 McDonald’s, 6, 7 Medicaid, 120, 120, 121 Medicare, 18, 172 Meltzer, Allan, 151–52 Mencken, H.


pages: 295 words: 66,824

A Mathematician Plays the Stock Market by John Allen Paulos

Amazon: amazon.comamazon.co.ukamazon.deamazon.fr

Benoit Mandelbrot, Black-Scholes formula, Brownian motion, business climate, butterfly effect, capital asset pricing model, correlation coefficient, correlation does not imply causation, Daniel Kahneman / Amos Tversky, diversified portfolio, Donald Trump, double entry bookkeeping, Elliott wave, endowment effect, Erdős number, Eugene Fama: efficient market hypothesis, four colour theorem, George Gilder, global village, greed is good, index fund, invisible hand, Isaac Newton, John Nash: game theory, Long Term Capital Management, loss aversion, Louis Bachelier, mandelbrot fractal, margin call, mental accounting, Nash equilibrium, Network effects, passive investing, Paul Erdős, Ponzi scheme, price anchoring, Ralph Nelson Elliott, random walk, Richard Thaler, Robert Shiller, Robert Shiller, short selling, six sigma, Stephen Hawking, transaction costs, ultimatum game, Vanguard fund, Yogi Berra

They can short-sell, buy on margin, use various other sorts of leverage, or engage in complicated arbitrage (the near simultaneous buying and selling of the same stock, bond, commodity, or anything else, in order to profit from tiny price discrepancies). They’re called “hedge funds” because many of them try to minimize the risks of wealthy investors. Others fail to hedge their bets at all. A prime example of the latter is the collapse in 1998 of Long-Term Capital Management, a hedge fund, two of whose founding partners, Robert Merton and Myron Scholes, were the aforementioned Nobel prize winners who, together with Fischer Black, derived the celebrated formula for pricing options. Despite the presence of such seminal thinkers on the board of LTCM, the debacle roiled the world’s financial markets and, had not emergency measures been enacted, might have seriously damaged them.

Petersburg paradox ultimatum games WorldCom board game Gans, Herbert Gates, Bill geometric mean illustrated by IPO purchases/sales rate of return “ghosts,” investors Gilder, George Gilovich, Thomas Godel, Kurt Goethe golden ratio Goodman, Nelson gossip Gould, Steven Jay Graham, Benjamin Greek mathematics Greenspan, Alan impact on stock and bond markets on irrational exuberance of investors growth investing vs. value investing growth stocks Grubman, Jack guessing games guilt and despair over market losses Hart, Sergiu “head and shoulders” pattern hedge funds herd-like nature, of stock market Hill, Ted How Nature Works (Bak) How We Know What Isn’t So (Gilovich) “The Imp in the Bottle” (Stevenson) In Search of Excellence (Peters) incompleteness theorem of mathematical logic index funds Efficient market theorists investing in as safe investment inflationary universe hypothesis Innumeracy (Paulos) insider trading attraction of stock manipulation by unexplained price movements and Institutional Investor insurance company example, expected value insurance put options interest rates, market predictability and internal rate of return Internet diameter (or interconnectedness) of “flocking effect,” as network of associations investment clubs investment strategies. see also predictability, of stock market based on Parrondo’s paradox contrarian investing dogs of the Dow fundamental analysis. see fundamental analysis momentum investing secrecy and value investing. see value investing investments. see also margin investments confirmation bias and considering utility of dollars invested vs. dollars themselves counter-intuitive emotions dictating guilt and despair over losses ignoring uniformity of positive ratings protective measures randomness vs. predictability and rumors and safe windfall money and investors. see also traders behavior as nonlinear systems beliefs of impact Efficient Market Hypothesis “blow up” and becoming “ghosts,” buying/selling puts on S&P common knowledge and gauging investors as important as gauging investments irrational exuberance/irrational despair online trading and price oscillation created by investor reactions to each other self description in bear and bull markets short-term IPOs alternative rates of return from as a pyramid scheme Salomon Smith Barney benefitting illegally from stock market in 1990s and strategy for buying and selling Jegadeesh, Narsimhan Jeong, Hawoong Judgment Under Uncertainty (Tversky, Kahneman, and Slovic) Kahneman, Daniel Keynes, John Maynard Kolmogorov, A. N. Kozlowski, Dennis Kraus, Karl Krauthammer, Charles Kudlow, Larry Lakonishok, Josef Landsburg, Steven Lay, Ken LeBaron, Blake Lefevre, Edwin Leibweber, David linguistics, power law and Lo, Andrew logistic curve lognormal distribution Long-Term Capital Management (LTCM) losing through winning loss aversion lotteries present value and as tax on stupidity Lynch, Peter MacKinlay, Craig mad money Malkiel, Burton management, manipulating stock prices Mandelbrot, Benoit margin calls margin investments buying on the margin as investment type margin calls selling on the margin market makers decimalization and World Class Options Market Maker (WCOMM) Markowitz, Harry mathematics, generally Greek movies and plays about outguessing the average guess risk and stock markets and Mathews, Eddie “maximization of expected value” principle mean value. see also expected value arithmetic mean deviation from the mean geometric mean regression to the mean using interchangeably with expected value media celebrities and crisis mentality and impact on market volatility median rate of return Merrill Lynch Merton, Robert mnemonic rules momentum investing money, categorizing into mental accounts Morgenson, Gretchen Motley Fool contrarian investment strategy PEG ratio and moving averages complications with evidence supporting example of generating buy-sell rules from getting the big picture with irrelevant in efficient market phlegmatic nature of mu (m) multifractal forgeries mutual funds expert picks and hedge funds index funds politically incorrect rationale for socially regressive funds mutual knowledge, contrasted with common knowledge Nash equilibrium Nash, John Neff, John negatively correlated stocks as basis of mutual fund selection as basis of stock selection stock portfolios and networks Internet as example of price movements and six degrees of separation and A New Kind of Science (Wolfram) Newcomb, Simon Newcombe, William Newcombe’s paradox Niederhoffer, Victor Nigrini, Mark nominal value A Non-Random Walk Down Wall Street (Lo and MacKinlay) nonlinear systems billiards example “butterfly effect” or sensitive dependence of chaos theory and fractals and investor behavior and normal distribution Nozick, Robert numbers anchoring effect Benford’s Law and Fibonacci numbers and off-shore entities, Enron Once Upon a Number (Paulos) online chatrooms online trading optimal portfolio balancing with risk-free portfolio Markowitz efficient frontier of options. see stock options Ormerod, Paul O’Shaughnessy, James P/B (price-to-book) ratio P/E ratio interpreting measuring future earnings expectations PEG variation on stock valuation and P/S (price to sales) ratio paradoxes Efficient Market Hypothesis and examples of Newcombe’s paradox Parrondo’s paradox St.


pages: 289 words: 77,532

The Secret Club That Runs the World: Inside the Fraternity of Commodity Traders by Kate Kelly

Amazon: amazon.comamazon.co.ukamazon.deamazon.fr

Bakken shale, bank run, Credit Default Swap, diversification, fixed income, Gordon Gekko, index fund, locking in a profit, London Interbank Offered Rate, Long Term Capital Management, margin call, paper trading, peak oil, Ponzi scheme, risk tolerance, Ronald Reagan, side project, Silicon Valley, sovereign wealth fund, supply-chain management, the market place

He never quite managed to make it work, though, so with one unpaid tuition bill standing in the way of getting his degree, he joined the army, where he finally earned enough to pay UT. Arriving on Citi’s bond and commodities trading floor in 1997, Ruggles was immediately smitten. He loved the high-octane ambiance and the camaraderie. Plus, he witnessed some major market meltdowns right up close. He was there for the Russian currency crisis of August 1998 and the Long-Term Capital Management hedge-fund bailout a month later, periods when the traders sprang into action and hundreds of millions, even billions, were lost in a single day. It seemed to Ruggles that the market was a living organism in itself, with moments of complacency, fear, and sadness, just like people had. When crisis was stirring, “you could almost sniff it out,” he says of those wild days on the floor at Citi.

On October 28, facing $175 million in overdrafts to MF’s banks, Corzine directed his treasurer, Edith O’Brien, to move $200 million of customer money into a firm account in an effort to pay off those debts and move toward a last-minute deal. That Jon Corzine could preside over such a grand failure seemed shocking. He had run Goldman Sachs and the state of New Jersey. His brains and knack for persuasion had served him in scenarios with much higher stakes. In 1998, he had collaborated with Goldman’s rivals on Wall Street to construct a bailout package for the failing hedge-fund Long-Term Capital Management that saved the stock markets from a potentially devastating disruption, and his ability to convince his fellow partners of the need for more permanent bank funding had cemented Goldman’s plans for an initial public offering, which would be held in 1999. (That IPO, which had been accompanied by his ouster from the firm, also made Corzine $400 million.) His accomplishments as governor during a period of global recession and state fiscal crisis were far fewer, but even there, his reputation was for inertia, not political brinksmanship.


pages: 280 words: 79,029

Smart Money: How High-Stakes Financial Innovation Is Reshaping Our WorldÑFor the Better by Andrew Palmer

Amazon: amazon.comamazon.co.ukamazon.deamazon.fr

Affordable Care Act / Obamacare, algorithmic trading, Andrei Shleifer, asset-backed security, availability heuristic, bank run, banking crisis, Black-Scholes formula, bonus culture, Bretton Woods, call centre, Carmen Reinhart, cloud computing, collapse of Lehman Brothers, collateralized debt obligation, corporate governance, credit crunch, Credit Default Swap, credit default swaps / collateralized debt obligations, Daniel Kahneman / Amos Tversky, David Graeber, diversification, diversified portfolio, Edmond Halley, Edward Glaeser, Eugene Fama: efficient market hypothesis, eurozone crisis, family office, financial deregulation, financial innovation, fixed income, Flash crash, Google Glasses, Gordon Gekko, high net worth, housing crisis, Hyman Minsky, implied volatility, income inequality, index fund, Innovator's Dilemma, interest rate swap, Kenneth Rogoff, Kickstarter, late fees, London Interbank Offered Rate, Long Term Capital Management, loss aversion, margin call, Mark Zuckerberg, McMansion, mortgage debt, mortgage tax deduction, Network effects, Northern Rock, obamacare, payday loans, peer-to-peer lending, Peter Thiel, principal–agent problem, profit maximization, quantitative trading / quantitative finance, railway mania, randomized controlled trial, Richard Feynman, Richard Feynman, Richard Thaler, risk tolerance, risk-adjusted returns, Robert Shiller, Robert Shiller, short selling, Silicon Valley, Silicon Valley startup, Skype, South Sea Bubble, sovereign wealth fund, statistical model, transaction costs, Tunguska event, unbanked and underbanked, underbanked, Vanguard fund, web application

Making things safer is fine—indeed, it is part of the way that markets reach real scale. But as the sedating effects of the AAA credit rating showed during the mortgage crisis, lulling people into a state of complacency is not. *** AS LO DESCRIBES his megafund idea to me, a head pokes around the door to ask if he wants to grab some lunch. The head belongs to Robert Merton, one of the people who enabled the derivatives market to explode and a former director of Long-Term Capital Management, the hedge fund whose geniuses failed in 1998. But when you meet Merton, the thing that comes across most strongly is that he is a car nut. His conversation is peppered with analogies from the automobile industry. Discussing the adjustable-rate mortgage, whose interest rate jumps up and down and exposes home owners to the risk of sudden leaps in their payments, he compares it to “General Motors developing the one-door car because it suits the car firm.”

., 32 Keys, Benjamin, 48 Kharroubi, Enisse, 79 Kickstarter, 172 King, Stephen, 99 Klein, David, 182 Krugman, Paul, xv Lahoud, Sal, 166 Lang, Luke, 153, 161–162 Laplanche, Renaud, 179, 184, 188, 190, 193–194, 196–197 Latency, 53 Law of large numbers, 17 Layering, 57 Left-digit bias, 46 Lehman Brothers, x, 44, 65 Lending direct, 84 marketplace, 184 payday, 200 relationship-based, 11, 151, 206–208 secured, xiv, 76 unsecured, 206 See also Loans; Peer-to-peer lending Lending Club, 172, 179–180, 182–184, 187, 189, 194–195, 197 Leonardo of Pisa (Fibonacci), 19 Lerner, Josh, 59 Lethal pandemic, risk-modeling for demographic profile, 230 exceedance-probability curve, 231–232, 232 figure 3 historical data, 228–229 infectiousness and virulence, 229–230 location of outbreak, 230–231 Leverage, 51, 70–71, 80, 186, 188 Leverage ratio, 76–77 Lewis, Michael, 57 Liber Abaci or Book of Calculation (Fibonacci), 19 LIBOR (London Interbank Offered Rate), 41 Liebman, Jeffrey, 98 Life expectancy government reaction to, 128–129 projections of, 124–127, 126 figure 2 ratio of young to older people, 127–128 Life-insurance policies, 142 Life-settlements industry, 142–143 Life table, 20 Limited liability, 212 Liquidity, 12–14, 39, 185–186 List, John, 109 The Little Book of Behavioral Investing (Montier), 156 Lo, Andrew, 113–115, 117–123 Loans low-documentation, 48–49 secured, 76 small business, 181, 216 student, 164, 166–167, 169–171, 182 syndicated, 41 Victory Loans, 28 See also Lending; Peer-to-Peer lending Logistic regression, 201 London, early fire insurance in, 16–17 London, Great Fire of, 16 London Interbank Offered Rate (LIBOR), 41 Long-Term Capital Management, 123 Longevity, betting on, 143–144 Loss aversion, 136 Lotteries, 212, 213 Low-documentation loans, 48–49 Lumni, 165, 168, 175 Lustgarten, Anders, 111 Lynn, Jeff, 160–161 Mack, John, 180 Mahwah, New Jersey, 52, 53 Marginal borrowers assessment of, 216–217 behavioral finance and, 208–214 industrialization of credit, 206 microfinance and, 203 savings schemes, 209–214 small businesses, 215–219 unsecured lending to, 206 Wonga, 203, 205, 208 Marginal borrowers (continued) ZestFinance, 199, 202, 205–206 Maritime piracy, solutions to, 151–152 Maritime trade, role of in history of finance, 3, 7–8, 14, 17, 23 Market makers, 15–16, 55 MarketInvoice, 195, 207, 217–218 Marketplace lending, 184 Markowitz, Harry, 118 Massachusetts, use of inflation-protected bonds in, 26 Massachusetts, use of social-impact bonds in, 98 Matching engine, 52 Maturity transformation, 12–13, 187–188, 193 McKinsey & Company, ix, 42 Mercator Advisory Group, 203 Merrill, Charles, 28 Merrill, Douglas, 199, 201 Merrill Lynch, 28 Merton, Robert, 31, 113–114, 123–124, 129–132, 142, 145 Mian, Atif, 204 Michigan, University of, financial survey by, 134–135 Microfinance, 203 Micropayment model, 217 Microwave technology, 53 The Million Adventure, 213–214 Minsky, Hyman, 42 Minsky moment, 42 Mississippi scheme, 36 Mitchell, Justin, 166–167 Momentum Ignition, 57 Monaco, modeling risk of earthquake in, 227 Money, history of, 4–5 Money illusion, 73–74 Money laundering, 192 Money-market funds, 43, 44 Monkeys, Yale University study of loss aversion with, 136 Montier, James, 156–157 Moody, John, 24 Moody’s, 24, 235 Moore’s law, 114 Morgan Stanley, 188 Mortgage-backed securities, 49, 233 Mortgage credit by ZIP code, study of, 204 Mortgage debt, role of in 2007–2008 crisis, 69–70 Mortgage products, unsound, 36–37 Mortgage securitization, 47 Multisystemic therapy, 96 Munnell, Alicia, 129 Naked credit-default swaps, 143 Nature Biotechnology, on drug-development megafunds, 118 “Neglected Risks, Financial Innovation and Financial Fragility” (Gennaioli, Shleifer, and Vishny), 42 Network effects, 181 New York, skyscraper craze in, 74–75 New York City, prisoner-rehabilitation program in, 108 New York Stock Exchange (NYSE), 31, 52, 53, 61, 64 New York Times, Merrill Lynch ad in, 28 Noncorrelated assets, 122 Nonprofits, growth of in United States, 105–106 Northern Rock, x NYMEX, 60 NYSE Euronext, 52 NYSE (New York Stock Exchange), 31, 52, 53, 61, 64 OECD (Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development), 128, 147 Oldfield, Sean, 67–68, 80–84 OnDeck, 216–218 One Service, 94–95, 105, 112 Operating expense ratio, 188–189 Options, 15, 124 Order-to-trade ratios, 63 Oregon, interest in income-share agreements, 172, 176 Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), 128, 147 Overtrading, 24 Packard, Norman, 60 Pandit, Vikram, 184 Park, Sun Young, 233 Partnership mortgage, 81 Pasion, 11 Pave, 166–168, 173, 175, 182 Payday lending Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, survey on, 200 information on applicants, acquisition of, 202 underwriting of, 201 PayPal, 219 Peak child, 127 Peak risk, 228 Peer-to-peer lending advantages of, 187–189 auction system, 195 big investors in, 183 borrowers, assessment of, 197 in Britain, 181 commercial mortgages, 181 CommonBond, 182, 184, 197 consumer credit, 181 diversification, 196 explained, 180 Funding Circle, 181–182, 189, 197 investors in, 195 Lending Club, 179–180, 182–184, 187, 189, 194–195, 197 network effects, 181 ordinary savers and, 184 Prosper, 181, 187, 195 RateSetter, 181, 187, 196 Relendex, 181 risk management, 195–197 securitization, 183–184, 196 Peer-to-peer lending (continued) small business loans, 181 SoFi, 184 student loans, 182 Zopa, 181, 187, 188, 195 Pensions, cost of, 125–126 Perry, Rick, 142–143 Peterborough, England, social-impact bond pilot in, 90–92, 94–95, 104–105, 112 Petri, Tom, 172 Pharmaceuticals, decline of investment in, 114–115 Piracy Reporting Centre, International Maritime Bureau, 151 Polese, Kim, 210 Poor, Henry Varnum, 24 “Portfolio Selection” (Markowitz), 118 Prediction Company, 60–61 Preferred shares, 25 Prepaid cards, 203 Present value of cash flows, 19 Prime borrowers, 197 Prince, Chuck, 50–51, 62 Principal-agent problem, 8 Prisoner rehabilitation programs, 90–91, 94–95, 98, 108, 112 Private-equity firms, 69, 85, 91, 105, 107 Projection bias, 72–73 Property banking crises and, xiv, 69 banking mistakes involving, 75–80 behavioral biases and, 72–75 dangerous characteristics of, 70–72 fresh thinking, need for, xvii, 80 investors’ systematic errors in, 74–75 perception of as safe investment, 76, 80 Prosper, 181, 187, 195 Provisioning funds, 187 Put options, 9, 82 Quants, 19, 63, 113 QuickBooks, 218 Quote stuffing, 57 Raffray, André-François, 144 Railways, affect of on finance, 23–25 Randomized control trials (RCTs), 101 Raphoen, Christoffel, 15–16 Raphoen, Jan, 15–16 RateSetter, 181, 187, 196 RCTs (randomized control trials), 101 Ready for Zero, 210–211 Rectangularization, 125, 126 figure 2 Regulation NMS, 61 Reinhart, Carmen, 35 Reinsurance, 224 Relendex, 181 Rentes viagères, 20 Repurchase “repo” transactions, 15, 185 Research-backed obligations, 119 Reserve Primary Fund, 44 Retirement, funding for anchoring effect, 137–138 annuities, 139 auto-enrollment in pension schemes, 135 auto-escalation, 135–136 conventional funding, 127–128 decumulation, 138–139 government reaction to increased longevity, 128–129 home equity, 139–140 life expectancy, projections of, 124–127, 126 figure 2 life insurance policies, cash-surrender value of, 142 personal retirement savings, 128–129, 132–133 replacement rate, 125 reverse mortgage, 140–142 savings cues, experiment with, 137 SmartNest, 129–131 Reverse mortgages, 140–142 Risk-adjusted returns, 118 Risk appetite, 116 Risk assessment, 24, 45, 77–78, 208 Risk aversion, 116, 215 Risk-based capital, 77 Risk-based pricing model, 176 Risk management, 55, 117–118, 123, 195–197 Risk Management Solutions, 222 Risk sharing, 8, 82 Risk-transfer instrument, 226 Risk weights, 77–78 Rogoff, Kenneth, 35 “The Role of Government in Education” (Friedman), 165 Roman Empire business corporation in, 7 financial crisis in, 36 forerunners of banks in, 11 maritime insurance in, 8 Rotating Savings and Credit Associations (ROSCAs), 209–210 Roulette wheel, use of in experiment on anchoring, 138 Royal Bank of Scotland, 186 Rubio, Marco, 172 Russia, mortgage market in, 67 S-curve, in diffusion of innovations, 45 Salmon, Felix, 155 Samurai bonds, 27 Satsuma Rebellion (1877), 27 Sauter, George, 58 Save to Win, 214 Savings-and-loan crisis in US (1990s), 30 Savings cues, experiment with, 137 Scared Straight social program, 101 Scholes, Myron, 31, 123–124 Science, Technology, and Industry Scoreboard of OECD, 147 Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC), 54, 56, 57, 58, 64 Securities markets, 14 Securitization, xi, 20, 37–38, 117–122, 183–184, 196, 236 Seedrs, 160–161 Sellaband, 159 Shared equity, 80–84 Shared-equity mortgage, 84 Shepard, Chris, xii–xiii Shiller, Robert, xv–xvi, 242 Shleifer, Andrei, 42, 44 Short termism, 58 SIBs.


pages: 244 words: 79,044

Money Mavericks: Confessions of a Hedge Fund Manager by Lars Kroijer

Amazon: amazon.comamazon.co.ukamazon.deamazon.fr

Bernie Madoff, capital asset pricing model, diversification, diversified portfolio, family office, fixed income, forensic accounting, Gordon Gekko, hiring and firing, implied volatility, index fund, Jeff Bezos, Just-in-time delivery, Long Term Capital Management, merger arbitrage, new economy, Ponzi scheme, risk-adjusted returns, risk/return, shareholder value, Silicon Valley, six sigma, statistical arbitrage, Vanguard fund, zero-coupon bond

It was an unusual experience for a Danish boy from north of Copenhagen but, in general, the rules, process and path of a banking career were well understood and somewhat predictable. Hedge funds, it seemed, were very different. I attended classes by Robert Merton, who had just won the Nobel Prize in economics for his work in options. Merton was already famous for developing the Black–Scholes–Merton option-pricing formula and was getting even more attention for the phenomenal returns of Long Term Capital Management (LTCM) where he was a partner. I knew him well enough to go to his office and ask him about hedge funds. The meeting was inconsequential, as he could only vouch for LTCM, and they were not hiring at the time. LTCM collapsed soon afterwards with multi-billion dollar losses (described in Lowenstein’s excellent book When Genius Failed) and Merton was widely derided as the public face of the failed hedge fund, even though his day-to-day involvement had been limited.

Index Abramovich, Roman Absolute Returns for Kids (ARK) added value, 2nd, 3rd, 4th, 5th Africa poverty alleviation projects Aker Yards, 2nd, 3rd, 4th, 5th, 6th alpha and beta, 2nd, 3rd AP Fondet arbitrage, merger 2nd asset-stripping assets under management (AUM), 2nd, 3rd, 4th, 5th background checking bank bailouts 2008–09 Bank of Ireland Bear Stearns Berkeley Square, 2nd, 3rd Berkshire Hathaway Bezos, Jeff Black-Scholes-Merton option-pricing formula Blair, Tony Bloomberg, 2nd bonds corporate, 2nd government, 2nd, 3rd zero-coupon bonuses, 2nd, 3rd British Airways Buffett, Warren Bure burn-out Busson, Arpad capital gross invested, 2nd, 3rd regulatory seed, 2nd capital asset pricing model (CAPM) cascade effect, 2nd cash deposits, 2nd insurance The Children’s Investment Fund Management (TCI) churning Collery, Peter compensation structures, 2nd, 3rd, 4th see also bonuses competitive edge, 2nd, 3rd, 4th, 5th Conti, Massimo, 2nd corporate bonds, 2nd correlation, market, 2nd, 3rd, 4th, 5th, 6th, 7th country indices Credit Suisse, 2nd, 3rd Cuccia, Enrico Dagens Industry debt crises (2011) debt investments derivative trading discounted fees, 2nd discounts to net asset value diversification, 2nd, 3rd, 4th dividends, 2nd early investors edge, competitive, 2nd, 3rd, 4th, 5th efficient market frontier Enskilda Baken entertainment events entrepreneurship, 2nd equity redistribution Eurohedge, 2nd, 3rd European Fund Manager of the Year Award event assessment, 2nd exchange traded funds (ETFs), 2nd, 3rd, 4th expenses firm, 2nd, 3rd, 4th, 5th fund-related, 2nd, 3rd, 4th, 5th, 6th, 7th, 8th family life, 2nd fees see incentive fees; management fees; performance fees Fidelity Financial Times firm costs, 2nd, 3rd, 4th, 5th Ford, Tom Fresenius FSA (Financial Services Authority), 2nd, 3rd, 4th, 5th fundamental value analysis funds of funds, 2nd, 3rd, 4th, 5th, 6th futures gearing, 2nd, 3rd, 4th, 5th, 6th Gentry, Baker, 2nd, 3rd Goldman Sachs, 2nd government bonds, 2nd, 3rd gross invested capital, 2nd, 3rd Gross, Julian Grosvenor Square HBK Investments, 2nd, 3rd headhunting health, 2nd hedge funds collapse of, 2nd expenses see expenses fees see incentive fees; management fees; performance fees industry growth, 2nd, 3rd mid-cap/large-cap bias nature of operational planning opportunities for young managers ownership structures partnership break-ups short-term performance staff recruitment, 2nd starting up top managers value generated by Henkel herd mentality, 2nd Hohn, Chris holding company discounts incentive fees, 2nd, 3rd, 4th index funds, 2nd, 3rd, 4th, 5th, 6th insurance, cash deposit insurance sector, 2nd interviews investor activism Italian finance JP Morgan Keynes, John Maynard Korenvaes, Harlen, 2nd Lage, Alberto, 2nd, 3rd large-cap bias Lazard Frères, 2nd, 3rd, 4th, 5th Lebowitz, Larry leverage, 2nd Liechtenstein, Max liquidity London bombings (7 July 2005) long run, 2nd, 3rd long securities Long Term Capital Management (LTCM) Lyle, Dennis Macpherson, Elle managed accounts management fees, 2nd, 3rd, 4th, 5th, 6th, 7th, 8th discounted, 2nd funds of funds, 2nd mutual funds tracker funds Mannesmann market capitalisation, 2nd, 3rd market correlation, 2nd, 3rd, 4th, 5th, 6th, 7th market exposure, 2nd, 3rd, 4th, 5th, 6th market neutrality, 2nd mean variance optimisation Mediobanca merger arbitrage, 2nd Merrill Lynch Merton, Robert mid-cap bias Montgomerie, Colin Morgan Stanley, 2nd, 3rd, 4th, 5th, 6th, 7th TMT (telecom, media and technology) conferences Morland, Sam, 2nd, 3rd MSCI World index, 2nd, 3rd mutual funds NatWest Nelson, Jake net asset-value (NAV), 2nd Nokia Norden O’Callaghan, Brian, 2nd, 3rd, 4th, 5th, 6th, 7th, 8th, 9th, 10th, 11th, 12th, 13th Och, Dan oil tanker companies oilrig sector, 2nd options trading out-of-the-money put options ownership structure partnership break-ups pension funds, 2nd performance fees, 2nd, 3rd, 4th Perry, Richard personal networks Philips, David portfolio theory poverty alleviation prime brokerage private jet companies Ramsay, Gordon Rattner, Steve recruitment, 2nd redemption notices regulatory capital returns, 2nd rights issues risk, 2nd, 3rd risk profile, 2nd, 3rd, 4th, 5th, 6th, 7th Rohatyn, Felix Ronaldo Rosemary Asset Management Rothschild, Mayer Royal Bank of Scotland Rubenstein, David rump (stub) trades salaries see compensation structures Samson, Peter SAS airline SC Fundamental seed capital, 2nd shipping companies short securities short-term performance six-stigma events Smith Capital Partners, 2nd softing special situations stakeholders Standard & Poor’s 500 index, 2nd, 3rd, 4th standard deviation, 2nd, 3rd, 4th star managers Start-up of the Year awards Stern, Dan stub trades Superfos Svantesson, Lennart talent introduction groups tax, 2nd, 3rd, 4th Telefonica Moviles time horizon for investments, 2nd, 3rd Torm Totti, David tracker funds trade commission trade sourcing trade theses US market value investing Vanguard index fund, 2nd VIX index, 2nd Vodafone warrants, 2nd, 3rd Westbank Wien, Byron Wilson, Susan world indices, 2nd zero-coupon bonds Zilli, Aldo PEARSON EDUCATION LIMITED Edinburgh Gate Harlow CM20 2JE Tel: +44 (0)1279 623623 Fax: +44 (0)1279 431059 Website: www.pearson.com/uk First published in Great Britain in 2010 Second edition 2012 Electronic edition published 2012 © Pearson Education Limited 2012 (print) © Pearson Education Limited 2012 (electronic) The right of Lars Kroijer to be identified as author of this work has been asserted by him in accordance with the Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988.


pages: 240 words: 73,209

The Education of a Value Investor: My Transformative Quest for Wealth, Wisdom, and Enlightenment by Guy Spier

Amazon: amazon.comamazon.co.ukamazon.deamazon.fr

Albert Einstein, Atul Gawande, Benoit Mandelbrot, big-box store, Black Swan, Checklist Manifesto, Clayton Christensen, Daniel Kahneman / Amos Tversky, Exxon Valdez, Gordon Gekko, housing crisis, Isaac Newton, Long Term Capital Management, Mahatma Gandhi, mandelbrot fractal, NetJets, pattern recognition, pre–internet, random walk, Ronald Reagan, South Sea Bubble, Steve Jobs, winner-take-all economy, young professional

As a conservative, risk-averse investor, I had intentionally placed all of our securities in Bear Stearns cash accounts that were fully owned by our fund. I knew that borrowing money and investing on margin can be catastrophic since a brokerage firm can then take control of the assets in a margin account and sell them at the worst possible moment. This is effectively what had happened years earlier to Long-Term Capital Management. I had been maniacally focused on avoiding such risks, acutely aware that I needed to protect our assets, and I didn’t have a single cent of leverage or debt—either personally or in the fund. Bear Stearns was simply our custodian, which meant that our cash accounts were theoretically not vulnerable at all. Even so, the unpredictability of the situation was terrifying. In reality, who could say what would happen to these segregated accounts if Bear went under?

Morgan, 6–7, 30 Jacobs, Ian, 182 Jain, Ajit, 61, 176 Jobs, Steve, 131 Journey to the Ants (Hölldobler and Wilson), 104 JPMorgan Chase, 87, 126, 128, 172 K-Swiss, 145 Kahneman, Daniel, 102, 136 Keough, Don, 178 Klarman, Seth, 106, 112 Lasker, Edward, 129–30 Latticework Club, 124, 194 LeDoux, Joseph, 102 Lehman Brothers, 16, 87–9, 91 letter writing campaign, 61–3, 65, 73 letters to shareholders, 91, 93, 149–50, 153. See also annual reports Li Lu, 73, 125–6, 176 Libet, Benjamin, 102 Lichter, John, 59 London Mining PLC, 97–8, 149 Long-Term Capital Management, 86 Lowenstein, Roger, 19, 30, 63, 116, 142 Made in America (Walton), 142 Malone, John, 130 management, rule for talking to, 139–40 Marcus Aurelius, 96 Marinoff, Lou, 192 Marks, Howard, 64 mastermind groups, 52–4, 124, 193–4 mentoring. See modeling habits of successful people Merrill Lynch, 17 Mihaljevic, John, 106, 124, 177, 184 Miller, Bill, 104, 122 mirror neurons, 115 mirroring, 39–40, 74, 113, 115.


pages: 305 words: 69,216

A Failure of Capitalism: The Crisis of '08 and the Descent Into Depression by Richard A. Posner

Amazon: amazon.comamazon.co.ukamazon.deamazon.fr

Andrei Shleifer, banking crisis, Bernie Madoff, collateralized debt obligation, collective bargaining, corporate governance, credit crunch, Credit Default Swap, credit default swaps / collateralized debt obligations, debt deflation, diversified portfolio, equity premium, financial deregulation, financial intermediation, Home mortgage interest deduction, illegal immigration, laissez-faire capitalism, Long Term Capital Management, market bubble, moral hazard, mortgage debt, oil shock, Ponzi scheme, price stability, profit maximization, race to the bottom, reserve currency, risk tolerance, risk/return, Robert Shiller, Robert Shiller, savings glut, shareholder value, short selling, statistical model, too big to fail, transaction costs, very high income

A particularly sharp warning against the Federal Reserve's policy of allowing asset-price bubbles to expand in the belief that the consequences could always be handled by flooding the economy with money—a warning that actually invoked the Great Depression—was issued by the prestigious Bank for International Settlements in June 2007; it was ignored too. There had been many other warnings as well, especially after Bear Stearns' collapse in March 2008, and, almost a year earlier, after two mortgage hedge funds operated by Bear Sterns and three by the French bank BNP Paribas collapsed. The biggest warning sign of all had appeared much earlier—when Long-Term Capital Management faltered in 1998, was taken over by its creditors in a deal arranged by the Federal Reserve, and then expired. LTCM was a highly leveraged hedge fund that as a result of heavy trading in derivatives (securities based on other securities, such as futures contracts, options, and swaps) was entwined with other financial firms all over the world, just like Lehman Brothers. LTCM overestimated the degree to which it had diversified the risks that it took with its investments, and as a result of its mistake lost heavily when Russia's sudden repudiation of its public and private debt caused the value of speculative securities to plummet as investors sought refuge in safe assets.

Greenspan's tremendous prestige gave him a largely free hand, which he did not use, to choke off the housing bubble by raising interest rates and to rein in risky lending by exercising more assertively the control that the Federal Reserve has over commercial banks. He thought he could avoid political controversy by waiting for bubbles to form and pop and cleaning up afterward by lowering interest rates. He was the prisoner of past successes— the strategy had worked when Long-Term Capital Management collapsed in 1998, when the dot-com bubble burst in 2000, and when the stock market dipped as a result of the 9/11 attacks. But each flood of money into the economy set the stage for the next bubble, while at the same time lulling the business community into believing that the Federal Reserve would always assure a soft landing from a burst bubble by a timely reduction in interest rates.

The Techno-Human Condition by Braden R. Allenby, Daniel R. Sarewitz

Amazon: amazon.comamazon.co.ukamazon.deamazon.fr

airport security, augmented reality, carbon footprint, clean water, cognitive dissonance, conceptual framework, Credit Default Swap, decarbonisation, facts on the ground, friendly fire, invisible hand, Isaac Newton, Jane Jacobs, land tenure, life extension, Long Term Capital Management, market fundamentalism, mutually assured destruction, nuclear winter, Peter Singer: altruism, planetary scale, prediction markets, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Ray Kurzweil, Silicon Valley, smart grid, stem cell, Stewart Brand, technoutopianism, the built environment, The Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith, transcontinental railway, Whole Earth Catalog

The insular deliberations of this group of extremely intelligent men gave rise to the theory that justified the war in Iraq-a theory of democratic nation building that looked good for a few months but then turned out to be incapable of encompassing the widening gyre of consequences of the war-consequences that in turn helped to undermine the power of the 92 Chapter 5 Neocons (and, through debt and leaching of moral standards, that of the United States). If this example strikes you as partisan, you might prefer to consider the super-intelligent Kremlinites who thought it was a good idea for the Soviet Union to invade Afghanistan but instead helped to hasten the demise of their own empire. Or, forgetting about war, consider the two Nobel-prize-winning economists who helped to found the riskfree hedge fund Long-Term Capital Management but were unable to anticipate the downturns in the East Asian and then Russian economies that led to the fund's collapse in 1998 after it incurred a loss of $4 billion, or the brilliant systems dynamics theoretical structure developed for complicated technology design environments by Jay Forrester at the MIT Sloan School of Management that was then applied to urban systems, where it has generally failed; or the distributed cognitive network of bankers and corporate investors that gave mortgages to millions of people who might not be able to pay them back because, after all, housing prices could never go down!

., 168 James, W, 81 Japan, 131,133, 150 Jenner, Eo, 16 John Paul II, 101 Joy, W, 68 Kass, L., 21 Kepler,]., 101, 173 Kondratieff waves, 79ff, 192 Koniggriitz, Battle of, 75, 76 Krishna, 119 Kurzweil, Ro, 8, 18,68 Kyoto Protocol, 67, 109, 111, 193 Land mines, 150 Las Vegas, 152 Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 89 Leopold, Ao, 181 Libertarian approach to human enhancement,21ff 220 Index Lindblom, c., 93 Long-Term Capital Management,92 "Long waves" of innovation, 79££ Maginot Line, 135 Malaria, 47££, 53 Malaysia, 139 Maoism, 31, 121 Marlboro Man, 135 Marne, Battle of, 76 Marxism, 110, 114, 121, 172 Marx, K., 64, 70, 173 Maslow, A., 33 McKibben,~.,21, 101 McKinsey & Company, 49 McNeill, ]. R., 80 Medical Journal of Australia, 122 Memory-enhancing pharmaceuticals, 113 Mexico, 125, 133 Microsoft, 173 Millenarian utopianism, 120 Modafinil, 24 Moltke, H. von, 75, 105, 106 Money, 80, 81 Moravec, H., 8, 18 Mumford, L., 33, 36, 45 Mutually assured destruction, in cyberspace, 140 Nanotechnology, 8, 80, 178 National Institute of Health, 89 National Science Foundation, 8, 89,90 Natural Born Cyborgs, 9 Nature, as sacred, 100ff Nature's Metropolis, 115 Nazi Germany, 22, 31,121,131 Needle gun, 75 Negligible senescence, engineered,82 Neoconservatives, 91, 110 Neuropharmaceuticals, 3, 18, 24,88,95 New Atlantis, 18 New Jerusalem, 11, 77, 78 New Scientist, 122, 124 Newton, I., 101, 173, 179 Nitrogen cycle, 10, 110, 192 Noble, D., 18 Notice-and-comment rulemaking, 165 Nuclear power, 174ff Nuclear winter, 67, 78 Occupational health and safety, 52 Office of Naval Research, 89 Olympic Games, 3, 4 Oppenheimer,].

The Intelligent Asset Allocator: How to Build Your Portfolio to Maximize Returns and Minimize Risk by William J. Bernstein

Amazon: amazon.comamazon.co.ukamazon.deamazon.fr

asset allocation, backtesting, capital asset pricing model, computer age, correlation coefficient, diversification, diversified portfolio, Eugene Fama: efficient market hypothesis, fixed income, index arbitrage, index fund, Long Term Capital Management, p-value, passive investing, prediction markets, random walk, Richard Thaler, risk tolerance, risk-adjusted returns, risk/return, South Sea Bubble, the scientific method, time value of money, transaction costs, Vanguard fund, Yogi Berra, zero-coupon bond

Further, there is a degree of asymmetry about the mean (skew) as well as a somewhat higher frequency of events at the extremes of range (kurtosis).The most important criticism of standard deviation as a measure of risk is that it assigns equal importance to returns both above and below the mean, whereas clearly only events occurring below the mean are of importance to any measurement of investment risk.This has prompted some academics and practitioners to suggest “semivariance,” or the mean variance of events occurring below the mean, as a more realistic measurement of risk. In practice, however, both variance and semivariance yield very similar results,and variance/standard deviation is still an excellent measure of risk. In fact, simple variance/SD has the additional advantage of giving you two chances of catching excessive volatility. In the recent notorious case of Long Term Capital Management, the firm did not develop a significantly negative semivariance until shortly before bankruptcy. Simple calculation of the plain-vanilla SD/variance of monthly returns would have warned of trouble years before the ottoman hit the fan. There are nearly as many definitions of risk as there are finance academics. Other possible measures include the probability of a nominal loss,or an inflation-adjusted loss,a “loss standard deviation,” or the probability of underperforming a given index, such as the S&P 500 or T-bill yield.

.): of small-company stocks, 101, 102, 148–149 theoretical advantage of, 95–96 Inflation, and real return, 80, 168 Institutional investors: evaluation of, 123–124 market-impact costs and, 86–90, 91–92, 96 pension funds, 103 persistence of investment performance, 90 small investors versus, 59–61 (See also Benchmarking; Mutual funds) Intelligent Investor, The (Graham), 106, 176–177 International diversification: case against, 72 correlation and, 46–53, 72–73 with small stocks, 74–75 sovereign risk and, 72 Inverse correlation, 31, 37 Investment climate, 124–127 Investment Company Institute, 103 Investment fraud, 4 Investment newsletters, 104–105 January effect, 92–94 Japanese bonds, 152 Japanese stocks, 19, 20, 25, 38, 39, 40, 48, 55, 56, 57, 59, 160 Jensen, Michael, 86 Jorion, Phillipe, 49–50 Keynes, John Maynard, 18 Lakonishok, Josef, 120 Large-company stocks, 13 indexing advantage with, 96, 97–98 small-company stocks versus, 53–55, 75 Law of diminishing returns, 76 Lehman Long Bond Index, 162 Local return, 133 Long Term Capital Management, 7 Mackay, Charles, 178 Malkiel, Burton, 101–102, 109, 175 Market capitalization, 13 Market efficiency, 85–110 expenses of funds and, 90–92, 96, 146 indexing and, 94–101 investment newsletters and, 104–105 January effect, 92–94 market-impact costs and, 88–90, 91–92, 96 and persistence of investment performance, 85–88 random walk and, 101, 106–108 rebalancing and, 108–109 survivorship bias and, 101–102 taxes and, 102–103 Market-impact costs: extent of, 91, 92, 96 illustration of, 88–90 Market multiple (See P/E ratio) Market risk premium, 121, 122 Market timing, 104–105, 160 Market valuation, 111–115, 163–164, 174 Markowitz, Harry, 64–65, 71, 177–178 Maximum-return portfolios, 69 Mean reversion, 70, 107, 109 Mean-variance analysis, 44–45, 64–71, 181–182 Mean-variance optimizers (MVOs), 64–71, 181–182 Memoirs of Extraordinary Popular Delusions and the Madness of Crowds (Mackay), 178 Miller, Paul, 115 Minimum-variance portfolios, 65–69 Momentum investing, 101, 108, 109, 123 Money managers (See Institutional investors; Mutual funds) Money market, standard deviation of annual returns, 6 Morgan-Stanley Capital Indexes, 19–20, 133, 149 Index Morningstar: long-term returns, 21 Principia database, 61, 96–97, 101–102, 120, 163–164, 177 standard deviation and, 6, 19 MSCI World Index, 162 Multiple (See P/E ratio) Multiple-asset portfolios, 29–40 coin toss and, 36 correlation in, 36–40 diversification and, 31–36 simple portfolios versus, 31–36 Multiple change, 24 Mutual funds: asset-allocation, 162–164 bond, 151–152 exchange traded (ETFs), 149–151 expenses of, 90–92, 96, 146 hedging, 135 indexing with, 145–151, 174 standard deviation and, 6 supermarkets, 148 turnover of, 130–131 Vanguard Group, 97–100, 146–148, 149, 150, 152, 156, 161–163 MVOPlus, 65–71, 181–182 National Association of Real Estate Investment Trusts (NAREIT), 21 Negative correlation, 31, 37 New era of investing: components of, 124–127 Glassman-Hassett model and, 127–132 New Finance: the Case Against Efficient Markets (Haugen), 119, 176 Newsletters, investment, 104–105 Nonsystematic risk, 12–13 Normal distribution, 7 Oakmark Fund, 88–90 Optimal asset allocation, 63–83 asset-allocation funds in, 162–164 asset classes in, 76–78 calculation of, 64–71 conventionality and, 78–79 203 Optimal asset allocation (Cont.): correlation coefficients, 71–74 international diversification with small stocks, 74–75 risk tolerance and, 79–80, 143 three-step approach to, 75–83 Out of sample, 87 Overbalancing, 138 Overconfidence, 139–140 P/B ratio (See Book value) P/E ratio: data on ranges of, 113, 114 earnings yield as reverse of, 119 in new era of investing, 124 in value investing, 112, 119–120 Pacific Rim stocks, 19, 20, 21, 25, 55–59, 147, 156 Pension funds, 103 (See also Institutional investors) Perfectly reasonable price (PRP), 127–128 Performance measurement: alpha in, 89–90, 98 three-factor model in, 123–124 (See also Benchmarking) Perold, Andre, 141 Persistence of performance, 85–88 Peters, Tom, 118 Piscataqua Research, 103 Policy allocation, 59 Portfolio insurance, 141 Portfolio Selection (Markowitz), 177–178 Precious metals stocks, 19–20, 21, 48, 55, 57, 59 Price, Michael, 162 Professional investors (See Institutional investors) Prudent man test, 60 Random Walk Down Wall Street, A (Malkiel), 101–102, 175 Random walk theory, 106–108, 119 positive autocorrelation and, 106–108 204 Index Random walk theory (Cont.): random walk defined, 106 rebalancing and, 109 Raskob, John J., 16–17 Real estate investment trusts (REITs), 38, 40, 100, 145 defined, 19 index fund, 148 returns on, 19, 21, 25 Real return, 26, 80, 168, 170 Rebalancing: frequency of, 108–109 importance of, 32–33, 35–36, 59, 63, 174 and mean-variance optimizer (MVO), 65 overbalancing in, 138 random walk theory and, 109 rebalancing bonus, 74, 159–160 of tax-sheltered accounts, 159–160 of taxable accounts, 160–161 Recency effects, 47–48, 52, 53, 58–59, 140–141 Regression analysis, 89–90 Reinvestment risk, 23 Representativeness, 118 Research expenses, 92, 95 Residual return, 98 Retirement, 165–172 asset allocation for, 153–154 duration risk and, 165–167 shortfall risk and, 167–172 (See also Tax-sheltered accounts) Return: annualized, 2–3, 5 average, 2–3 coin toss and, 1–5 company size and, 116–117 correlation between risk and, 21 dividend discount method, 23–24, 26, 127–132 efficient frontier and, 55–58 expected investment, 26 historical, problems with, 21–27 Return (Cont.): impact of diversification on, 31–36, 63 market, 168 real, 26, 80, 168, 170 return and risk plot, 31–36, 41–45 risk and high, 18 uncorrelated, 29–31 variation in, 116–117 Risk: common stock, 1–5 correlation between return and, 21 currency, 132–137 duration, 165–167 efficient frontier and, 55–58 excess, 12–13 high returns and, 18 impact of diversification on, 31–36, 63 nonsystematic, 12–13 reinvestment, 23 return and risk plot, 31–36, 41–45 shortfall, 167–172 sovereign, 72 systematic, 13 (See also Standard deviation) Risk aversion myopia, 141–142 Risk dilution, 45–46 Risk-free investments, 10, 15, 152 Risk-free rate, 121 Risk time horizon, 130, 131, 143–144, 167 Risk tolerance, 79–80, 143 Roth IRA, 172 Rukeyser, Lou, 174 Rule of 72, 27 Sanborn, Robert, 88–90 Securities Act of 1933, 92–93 Security Analysis (Graham and Dodd), 93, 118, 125, 176 Selling forward, 132–133 Semivariance, 7 Sharpe, William, 141 Shortfall risk, 167–172 Siegel, Jeremy, 19, 136 Index Simple portfolios, 31–36 Sinquefield, Rex, 148 Small-cap premium, 53, 121, 122 Small-company stocks, 13–16, 25 correlation with large-company stocks, 53–55 efficient frontier and, 55–59 indexing, 101, 102, 148–149 international diversification with, 74–75 January effect and, 92–94 large-company stocks versus, 53–55, 75 “lottery ticket” premium and, 127 tracking error of, 75 Small investors, institutional investors versus, 59–61 Solnik, Bruno, 72 Sovereign risk, 72 S&P 500, 13, 38, 39, 55 as benchmark, 60, 78, 79, 80, 86, 88–89, 145 efficient frontier, 56–57 Spiders (SPDRS), 149 Spot rate, 135 Spread, 91, 92, 93, 96 Standard deviation, 5–8 defined, 6, 63 limitations of, 7 of manager returns, 96 in mean-variance analysis, 65 Standard error (SE), 87 Standard normal cumulative distribution function, 7 Stocks, Bonds, Bills, and Inflation (Ibbotson Associates), 9–10, 41–42, 178 Stocks for the Long Run (Siegel), 19, 136 Strategic asset allocation, 58–59 Survivorship bias, 101–102 Systematic risk, 13 t distribution function, 87 Tax-sheltered accounts: asset allocation for, 153–154 rebalancing, 108–109, 159–160 (See also Retirement accounts) 205 Taxable accounts: asset allocation for, 153–154 rebalancing, 160–161 Taxes: in asset allocation strategy, 145 capital gains capture, 102, 108 foreign tax credits, 161 market efficiency and, 102–103 Technological change: historical, impact of, 125 in new era of investing, 125 Templeton, John, 164 Thaler, Richard, 131, 142 Three-factor model (Fama and French), 120–124 Time horizon, 130, 131, 143–144, 167 Tracking error: defined, 75 determining tolerance for, 83, 145 of small-company stocks, 75 of various equity mixes, 79 Treasury bills: 1926–1998, 10–11 returns on, 25–26 as risk-free investments, 10, 15, 152 Treasury bonds: 1926–1998, 11–13, 42–45 ladders, 152 Treasury Inflation Protected Security (TIPS), 80, 131–132, 172 Treasury notes, 11 Turnover, 95, 102, 130–131, 145 Tweedy, Browne, 148–149, 162, 176 Utility functions, 7 Value averaging, 155–159 Value Averaging (Edleson), 176 Value index funds, 145 Value investing, 77, 111–124 defined, 118 growth investing versus, 117, 118–120 measures used in, 112–114 studies on, 115–118 three-factor model of, 120–124 Value premium, 121–123 206 Index VanEck Gold Fund, 21 Vanguard Group, 97–100, 146–148, 149, 150, 152, 156, 161–163 Variance, 7, 108–109 mean-variance analysis, 44–45, 64–71, 181–182 minimum-variance portfolios, 65–69 Variance drag, 69 Walz, Daniel T., 169 Websites, 178–180 Wilkinson, David, 56, 57, 181–182 Williams, John Burr, 127 Wilshire Associates, 120, 147, 162 World Equity Benchmark Securities (WEBS), 149–151 z values, 87 Zero correlation, 31 About the Author William Bernstein, Ph.D, M.D., is a practicing neurologist in Oregon.


pages: 363 words: 28,546

Portfolio Design: A Modern Approach to Asset Allocation by R. Marston

Amazon: amazon.comamazon.co.ukamazon.deamazon.fr

asset allocation, Bretton Woods, capital asset pricing model, capital controls, carried interest, commodity trading advisor, correlation coefficient, diversification, diversified portfolio, equity premium, Eugene Fama: efficient market hypothesis, family office, financial innovation, fixed income, German hyperinflation, high net worth, hiring and firing, housing crisis, income per capita, index fund, inventory management, Long Term Capital Management, mortgage debt, passive investing, purchasing power parity, risk-adjusted returns, Robert Shiller, Robert Shiller, Ronald Reagan, Sharpe ratio, Silicon Valley, superstar cities, transaction costs, Vanguard fund

If you invest in Russian bonds and Brazilian bonds and Chinese bonds, it would seem that your portfolio is diversified. But when Russia defaulted on its bonds, there was a reassessment of risk worldwide. Spreads on bonds widened sharply both in the emerging bond markets and in the high-yield U.S. bond market (for so-called junk bonds). The most dramatic effect of this reassessment of risks was the collapse of Long-term Capital Management, which had to be rescued by the major investment banks in September 1998. The Argentine crisis began as early as 2000 when the long-established peg to the U.S. dollar began to be seriously questioned. In the early 1990s, the Argentine government had established a currency board to permanently fix the peso to the dollar.15 Argentine inflation, which had soared more than 1000 percent in the late 1980s, almost completely disappeared with this peg.

The market simply did not believe that Italy could satisfy all of the conditions for the union, and therefore a huge interest rate premium was required to induce investors to buy Italian bonds.6 In particular, there was skepticism that the Italian government could bring its fiscal deficit down from more than 9 percent of GDP in 1995 to 3 percent of GDP as required by the Treaty. Some hedge funds, notably Long Term Capital Management (LTCM), believed otherwise. These funds trusted that Italy would do whatever was necessary to qualify for the union by the end of 1997. So these funds bought Italian bonds. To hedge their positions and ensure market neutrality, they simultaneously borrowed and sold short German bonds (or equivalent derivatives). With offsetting positions in two European bond markets, it did not matter whether or not European currencies rose or fell against the dollar.

., 1996, “The Equity Premium: It’s Still a Puzzle,” Journal of Economic Literature (March) pp. 42–47. Kravis, Irving B., Z. Kenessey, Allan Heston, and Robert Summers, 1975, A System of International Comparisons of Gross Product and Purchasing Power. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins Press. Lerner, Josh, 2007, “Yale University Investments Office: August 2006,” HBS Case Study 9-807-073, revised May 8, 2007. Lowenstein, Roger, 2000, When Genius Failed: the Rise and Fall of Long-term Capital Management, Random House. Malkiel, Burton G., and Atanu Saha, 2004, “Hedge Funds: Risk and Return,” working paper. Malkiel, Burton G., and Atanu Saha, 2005, “Hedge Funds: Risk and Return,” Financial Analyst Journal, (November/December), 80–88. Markowitz, Harry, 1952, “Portfolio Selection,” Journal of Finance (March), pp. 77–91. Marston, Richard, 2004, “Risk-Adjusted Performance of Portfolios,” Journal of Investment Consulting, Vol. 7, No. 1, (Summer): pp. 46–54.


pages: 459 words: 118,959

Confidence Game: How a Hedge Fund Manager Called Wall Street's Bluff by Christine S. Richard

Amazon: amazon.comamazon.co.ukamazon.deamazon.fr

Asian financial crisis, asset-backed security, banking crisis, Bernie Madoff, cognitive dissonance, collateralized debt obligation, corporate governance, credit crunch, Credit Default Swap, credit default swaps / collateralized debt obligations, diversification, Donald Trump, family office, financial innovation, fixed income, forensic accounting, glass ceiling, Long Term Capital Management, market bubble, moral hazard, Ponzi scheme, profit motive, short selling, statistical model, white flight

“We did not understand that while most hospitals are essential, not all hospitals are essential,” Jay Brown had explained to Ackman in August 2002. MBIA’s guarantee of hundreds of millions of dollars of hospital bonds had been a miscalculation, and it came back to bite the bond insurer at the worst possible time. Russia had recently defaulted on more than $30 billion of debt and severed the ruble’s link to the U.S. dollar. Asia’s year-old currency crisis was morphing into political and social chaos in Indonesia and Malaysia. Long Term Capital Management, a hedge fund run by a team of Nobel Prize-winning mathematicians, was unraveling and threatening to take the financial system with it. Almost immediately after the AHERF bankruptcy filing, MBIA sought to reassure investors by stating that it had $75 million of reserves that would be adequate to absorb the loss. Yet confidence in the bond insurer continued to falter that summer on a combination of AHERF concerns and the Asian financial crisis.

“You can’t go ahead with the press release,” one of the attorneys told him when they’d settled back on the veranda. What if revelations in the press release caused MBIA to get downgraded? The attorney answered his own question: Investors might start liquidating MBIA-insured debt, and pension plans and retirees could lose huge amounts of money on bonds they thought were triple-A rated. The financial markets, only recently recovered from the upheaval caused by the failure of Long Term Capital Management, could be thrown into turmoil again. They were silent for a few minutes, looking out over the tranquil waterway that winds through Admiral’s Cove and to the nature reserve beyond. “You’re going to go down in the history books,” another of the lawyers suggested. “You’ll be as well known as Lee Harvey Oswald. You’re going to cause a major collapse.” Then one of the attorneys cautioned that if Heitmeyer did go public, he should have 24-hour security.

Kozlowski, Dennis Kravec, Tamara Kreyssig, Erika Kroll, Zolfo, Cooper Kucinich, Dennis Kynikos Associates LaCrosse Financial Products Laing, Jonathan Lane, Mark Lankler Siffert & Wohl LLP Larkin, Richard Las Colinas business park (Texas) bonds Lay, Ken Lazard Frères & Company Leach, Brian Lebenthal, James Lebenthal & Company Lee, Kewsong Lehman Brothers ARS and bankruptcy of Capital Asset Research Management and CDOs and mortgage crisis and rescue proposals for bond insurers and LeMay, David Leno, Jay Leonard, Sean Leucadia National Corporation Pershing Square, investment in Levenstein, Laura Levy, Leon LexisNexis Lippman, Greg liquidity support, defined Loeb, Dan Long, Christopher Long Beach Mortgage Long Term Capital Management “long-term stand-by purchase commitment,” Farmer Mac’s Lopp, Jim Loreley Purchasing Companies Louisiana State University Lowenstein, Roger Luminent Mortgage Capital Lynch, Peter Lyss, Greg Madison, William A. Mad Money Madoff, Bernie Maher brothers Maher Terminals Mahoney, Chris Malakoff, Michael Malvey, Jack Mantello, Frank Marcu, Aaron advice to Ackman re NYS attorney general’s office background of Margin of Safety: Risk Averse Value Investing Strategies for the Thoughtful Investor (Klarman) Markopolos, Harry mark-to-market ACA Capital and Ambac and Gotham Partners / Ackman and MBIA and Pershing Square / Ackman and Marshall Club Martin Act Mason, Joe Massie, Jerry Masters, Blythe Mattress Discounters Maxwell House Coffee Mayer, Rafael MBIA AHERF bankruptcy/ reinsurance Ambac and annual reports ARS and Barron’s and Buffett comments on Buffett rumor business described Capital Asset Research Management “Caulis Negris” (“Black Hole”) deal CDOs and CDSs and Channel Reinsurance Congress and downgraded Fitch Ratings and future of GICs and Gotham Partners / Ackman and Grady County (Oklahoma) bonds and Hurricane Katrina and Is MBIA Triple-A?


pages: 543 words: 147,357

Them And Us: Politics, Greed And Inequality - Why We Need A Fair Society by Will Hutton

Amazon: amazon.comamazon.co.ukamazon.deamazon.fr

Andrei Shleifer, asset-backed security, bank run, banking crisis, Benoit Mandelbrot, Berlin Wall, Bernie Madoff, Big bang: deregulation of the City of London, Bretton Woods, capital controls, carbon footprint, Carmen Reinhart, Cass Sunstein, centre right, choice architecture, cloud computing, collective bargaining, conceptual framework, Corn Laws, corporate governance, credit crunch, Credit Default Swap, debt deflation, decarbonisation, Deng Xiaoping, discovery of DNA, discovery of the americas, discrete time, diversification, double helix, Edward Glaeser, financial deregulation, financial innovation, financial intermediation, first-past-the-post, floating exchange rates, Francis Fukuyama: the end of history, Frank Levy and Richard Murnane: The New Division of Labor, full employment, George Akerlof, Gini coefficient, global supply chain, Growth in a Time of Debt, Hyman Minsky, I think there is a world market for maybe five computers, income inequality, inflation targeting, interest rate swap, invisible hand, Isaac Newton, James Dyson, James Watt: steam engine, joint-stock company, Joseph Schumpeter, Kenneth Rogoff, knowledge economy, knowledge worker, labour market flexibility, Long Term Capital Management, Louis Pasteur, low-wage service sector, mandelbrot fractal, margin call, market fundamentalism, Martin Wolf, means of production, Mikhail Gorbachev, millennium bug, moral hazard, mortgage debt, new economy, Northern Rock, offshore financial centre, open economy, Plutocrats, plutocrats, price discrimination, private sector deleveraging, purchasing power parity, quantitative easing, race to the bottom, railway mania, random walk, rent-seeking, reserve currency, Richard Thaler, rising living standards, Robert Shiller, Robert Shiller, Ronald Reagan, Rory Sutherland, shareholder value, short selling, Silicon Valley, Skype, South Sea Bubble, Steve Jobs, The Market for Lemons, the market place, The Myth of the Rational Market, the payments system, the scientific method, The Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith, too big to fail, unpaid internship, value at risk, Washington Consensus, working poor, éminence grise

In December 1997 JP Morgan succeeded in securitising $10 billion of its existing portfolio of loans in a so-called BISTRO (broad index secured trust offering) deal and thus reducing the amount of capital it had to hold from $800 million to just $160 million. In the markets the joke was that the acronym actually stood for ‘BIS Total Rip Off’, in honour of the BIS (Bank of International Settlements), whose rules had been so easily avoided. Yet alarm bells should have been ringing. The following year, the Long Term Capital Management (LTCM) hedge fund very nearly collapsed when an investment strategy built on the mathematical models of Myron Scholes and Robert Merton (who had won the Nobel Prize for economics for his theories on how to price options) went spectacularly wrong. LTCM had anticipated the crisis in the Russian bond market as part of the fallout from the Asian crisis; but it had been unable to predict the behaviour of other assets.

See also Thomas Lee Hazen (2009) ‘Filling a Regulatory Gap: It is Time to Regulate Over-the-Counter Derivatives’, University of North Carolina Legal Studies Research Paper No. 1338339. 28 Satyajit Das (2006) Traders, Guns and Money: Knowns and Unknowns in the Dazzling World of Derivatives, Prentice-Hall. 29 Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs, Permanent Subcommittee on Investigations (2010) ‘Wall Street and the Financial Crisis: The Role of Investment Banks’, at http://hsgac.senate.gov/public/_files/ Financial_Crisis/042710Exhibits.pdf. 30 Joseph Stiglitz, ‘The Insider: What I Learned at the World Economic Crisis’, New Republic, 17 April 2000. 31 David Jones (2000) ‘Emerging Problems with the Basel Capital Accord: Regulatory Capital Arbitrage and Related Issues’, Journal of Banking & Finance 24: 35–58. 32 Roger Lowenstein (2001) When Genius Failed: The Rise and Fall of Long-Term Capital Management, Random House. 33 Allen Berger, Richard Herring and Giorgio Szego (1995) ‘The Role of Capital in Financial Institutions’, Journal of Banking and Finance 19 (3–4): 393–430. 34 Gary Gorton (2010) Slapped by the Invisible Hand: The Panic of 2007, Oxford University Press. Chapter Seven: Communism for the Rich 1 Thomas Philippon and Ariell Reshef (2009) ‘Wages and Human Capital in the US Financial Industry: 1909–2006’, NBER Working Paper No. 14644. 2 See also Viral Acharya, Jennifer Carpenter, Xavier Gabaix, Kose John, Matthew Richardson, Marti Subrahmanyam, Rangarajan Sundaram and Eitan Zemel, ‘Corporate Governance in the Modern Financial Sector’, and Gian Luca Clementi, Thomas F.

., 17, 36, 135, 177 Cabinet Office, 218–19, 336, 337 Cable, Vincent, 220 Cambridge University, 9, 363 Cameron, David, 20, 179, 233–4, 235, 318, 338, 342; ‘Big Society’ policy, 19–20, 234, 271, 280 Campbell, Alastair, 141, 142, 224, 312 Canada, 121, 354, 358–9, 383 capital controls, abolition of, 32, 161 capitalism: see also entrepreneurs; innovation; amorality of, 16–19; ‘arms race’ effects, 105; boom and bust cycle, 181–7, 392; deregulation (from 1970s), 159–63, 388; fairness and, ix, x, 23–7, 41, 106, 122–3, 206–7, 210, 249, 385, 386, 394; as immutable force of nature, ix, 23, 40–2; incumbent firms, 29–30, 31, 105, 106, 110, 111–12, 253–5, 257, 297; interconnectedness of markets, 200–2, 204; knowledge-entrepreneurship dynamic, 27–8, 31, 103, 110–11, 112–13; liquidity as totemic, 199, 200, 202, 240, 243; need for ‘circuit breakers’, 197, 199, 202, 203; network theory and, 199–204, 206; required reforms of, 205–9, 215–16; stakeholder, x, 148–9; undue influence of, 32–3 Carlaw, Kenneth, 108, 263 Carnegie, Andrew, 195, 303 cars, motor, 91, 108, 109, 134, 269 Castells, Manuel, 317 Cayne, Jimmy, 173–4 CCTV cameras, 10 celebrity culture, 282, 314 central banks, 154, 157, 158, 160, 182, 185, 187, 208; see also Bank of England; Federal Reserve, 169–70, 176, 177, 183 Cerberus Capital Management, 177 Cervantes, Miguel de, 274 Channel 4, 330, 350 Charles I, King of England, 124–5 Charter One Financial, 150 chavs, mockery of, 25, 83, 272, 286–8 child poverty, 12, 21, 74–5, 83, 278, 279, 288–90, 291 China, x, 101, 112, 140, 144, 160, 226, 230, 354–5, 385; consumption levels, 375–6, 379, 380, 381; economic conflict with USA, 376–7, 378–80, 381, 382, 383; export led growth, 36, 169, 208, 226, 355–6, 375–7, 379–81, 382–3; rigged exchange rates, 36, 169, 355, 377, 378–9; surpluses of capital and, 149, 154, 169, 171, 208, 226, 375; unfairness of world system and, 383, 385 Christianity, 53, 54, 352, 353 Church of England, 128 Churchill, Winston, 138, 273, 313 Churchill Insurance, 150 Cisco, 253 Citigroup, 152, 158, 172, 177, 184, 202, 203, 242, 247 city academies, 278, 307 City of London, 34, 137, 138, 178–9, 252, 359; as incumbent elite, 14, 26, 31, 32–3, 210, 249, 355; in late nineteenth-century, 128–30; light-touch regulation of, 5, 32, 138, 145, 146–7, 151, 162, 187, 198–9; New Labour and, x–xi, 5, 19, 22, 142, 144–5, 355; remuneration levels see pay of executives and bankers civic engagement, 86, 313 civil service, 13, 221, 273, 312, 343 Clasper, Mike, 178 Clayton Act (USA, 1914), 133 Clegg, Nick, 22, 218, 318, 327–8, 342, 391 Clifton, Pete, 321 Clinton, Bill, 140, 177, 183 coalition government (from May 2010), 14, 20, 22, 37, 307, 311, 343, 346, 390–2; abolition of child trust fund, 302; capital spending cuts, 370–1; deficit reduction programme, xi, 19, 34, 214, 227, 357, 360–1, 364, 369–71, 373, 390–2; emergency budget (June 2010), 369–70; market fundamentalism and, 370; political reform commitment, 35, 341, 343–4, 346, 350, 390, 391; proposed financial reforms, 208, 209, 245, 252, 371; repudiation of Keynesian economics, xi, 390–1 Cohan, William, 158–9 Cohen, Ronald, 12, 245 collapse/crash of financial system, x, xi, 4, 9, 41, 144, 146, 152–4, 158–9, 168; costs of, 7, 19, 138, 152–3, 172, 214–15; errors responsible for, 136, 187–96, 197–204; global interconnectedness, 375, 382–3; lessening of internationalism following, 376–83; need to learn from/understand, 36–7; predictions/warnings of, 148, 153, 180, 182–5; recommended policy responses, 215–16; results of previous credit crunches, 358, 359–60, 361–2 collateralised debt obligations (CDOs), 155, 167–8, 174 colonialism, 109, 124 Commodity Future Trading Commission, 182–3 communism, collapse of in Eastern Europe, 16, 19, 135, 140, 163 competition, 29, 30, 33, 51, 156, 185, 186, 207–8, 251; see also ‘open-access societies’; City of London and, 160, 178, 179, 198–9; deregulated banking and, 160, 161, 163, 164, 178, 179, 181; European Union and, 251, 258, 259; fairness and, 89–90, 99, 272; incumbent elites/oligarchs and, 104, 114, 129–30, 131–4, 257; innovation and, 40, 114, 257–60; national authorities/regimes, 201–2, 257–60, 316, 318; state facilitation of, 31 Competition Commission, 257–8 computer games, 233 Confederation of British Industry (CBI), 4, 6–7 Conservative Party, xi, 5, 11, 14, 97–8, 220, 343, 378; broken Britain claims, 16, 227, 271; budget deficit and, 19, 224, 357, 360–1, 368, 379; City/private sector funding of, 179, 257, 344; decline of class-based politics, 341; deregulation and, 32, 160, 161; fairness and, 83, 302, 374, 390; general election (1992) and, 140–1; general election (2010) and, 20, 97, 227, 234, 271, 357, 374, 379, 390; Conservative Party – continued government policies (1979-97), 32, 81, 275–6, 290; inheritance/wealth taxes and, 74, 302–3; market fundamentalism and, 5, 17, 138, 147, 160, 161; poverty and, 21, 279; reduced/small state policy, 20, 22, 233–4, 235 construction industry, 5, 33, 268 consumer goods, types of, 266–7 Continental Illinois collapse, 152, 162 Convention on Modern Liberty, 340 Cook, Robin, 142 Cootner, Paul, 194–5 Copenhagen climate change talks (2009), 226, 231, 385 Corporate Leadership Council, US, 93 Corzine, Jon, 177 county markets, pre-twentieth-century, 90 Coutts, Ken, 363 Cowell, Simon, 314, 315 ‘creative destruction’ process, 111, 112, 134 creative industries, 11, 71, 355 credit cards, 64, 354 credit crunch: see collapse/crash of financial system credit default swaps, 151, 152, 166–8, 170, 171, 175, 176, 191, 203, 207 Crédit Lyonnais collapse, 152 credit-rating agencies, 151, 165, 175, 196, 197, 248, 269, 362, 388; funding of, 151, 196, 207 criminal activity/allegations, 7, 101, 103, 104–5, 138, 167–8 Crosby, James, 178 Cuba, 61 culture, British, 12, 187, 282, 314 Dacre, Paul, 324, 326, 329 Daily Mail, 218, 286, 288, 315, 324, 325–7, 339, 342 Daily Telegraph, 288, 317, 319, 327 Darling, Alistair, 149, 204, 252 Darwin, Charles, 31 Data Monitor, 186 Davies, Howard, 198 Davies, Nick, Flat Earth News, 319, 321, 323–4, 326, 331–2 de Gaulle, Charles, 65 debt, 33, 155, 209, 351–63; corporate/commercial, 8, 29, 181, 245, 248, 352, 354, 359, 363, 374; moral attitudes towards, 351–4, 357, 360–1; necessity of, 155, 351, 353, 354; private, 5, 186, 187, 210, 226, 279–80, 354–7, 359, 363, 373; public, 9, 34, 164, 166, 167, 182, 203, 214, 224–6, 356–7, 362–3, 375, 388, 393; sustainable level of, 356–7, 368–9 Defence Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA), 265 defence and armed forces, 34, 372 deficit, public, 4, 34, 213, 224–6, 335, 364–74; coalition’s reduction programme, xi, 19, 34, 214, 227, 357, 360–1, 364, 369–71, 373, 390–2, 393; need for fiscal policy, 224–5, 226, 357–8, 364, 365–9, 370, 374; speed of reduction of, 213, 224–5, 360–1, 368, 371 Delingpole, James, 287 Delong, Brad, 27, 106 democracy, 13–15, 235, 310–16, 333–48; centralisation of power and, 14–15, 35, 217, 313, 334, 337, 342; fair process and, 86, 89, 96–9; incumbent elites and, 35, 99; industrial revolution and, 128; media undermining of, 315–16, 317–18, 321–9, 333, 350; ‘open-access societies’ and, 136, 314 Democratic Party, US, 18, 140, 183, 379 Demos, 289 Deng Xiao Ping, 140 Denham, John, 21 deprivation and disadvantage, 10, 34, 288–93, 307–8, 393; low-earning households, 11–12, 13, 291, 361; weight of babies and, 13; young children and, 74–5, 83, 288–90 derivatives, 140, 145, 150–1, 164–8, 171, 175, 188, 207, 209; City of London and, 32, 137, 150–1, 157, 199; mathematical models (‘quants’) and, 188, 191; regulation and, 183, 197–8, 199 desert, due, concept of, 4, 24, 38–43, 45–7, 50–63, 64–8, 73–7, 80–2, 223, 395; see also effort, discretionary; proportionality; big finance and, 40–2, 82, 167, 174, 176, 210; debt and, 351–2; diplomacy/international relations and, 385–6; Enlightenment notions of, 53–6, 58–9, 112; luck and, 70, 73–7, 273; poverty relief systems and, 80–2, 277–8; productive entrepreneurship and, 102–3, 105–6, 112, 222, 392–3; taxation and, 40, 220, 266 Deutsche Bank, 170 developing countries, 71–2, 160, 354–5, 375, 376, 385 Diamond, Bob, 24 Dickens, Charles, 353 digitalisation, 34, 231, 320, 349, 350 Doepke, Matthias, 115–16 dot.com bubble, 9, 193 Drugs Advisory Panel, 11 Duffy, Gillian, 394 Durham University, 263 Dworkin, Ronald, 70 Dyson, James, 28, 33 East India Company, 130 Easyjet, 28, 233 eBay, 136 economic theory, 43–4, 188–9, 366; see also Keynesian economics; market fundamentalism economies of scale, 130–1, 254–5, 258 The Economist, 326, 330, 349 economy, British: see also capitalism; financial system, British; annual consumption levels, 375; balance of payments, 363–4; as ‘big firm’ economy, 254; change in landscape of trading partners, 230–1; coalition capital spending cuts, 370–1; collapse of tax base, 224, 368; cumulative loss of output caused by crash, 138, 153, 172, 214–15; desired level of state involvement, 234–5; domination of market fundamentalism, 16–17; economic boom, 3–4, 5–6, 12, 143, 173, 181–7, 244–5; fall in volatility, 365; fiscal deficit, 368; fiscal policy, 208, 224–5, 226, 357–8, 364–9, 370, 374; growth and, 9–10, 214–15, 218–19, 224, 359, 363; inefficient public spending, 335; investment in ‘intangibles’, 232–3; in late nineteenth-century, 128–30; ‘leading-edge’ sectors, 218–19; need for engaged long term ownership, 240–4, 249–51; as non-saver, 36, 354; potential new markets/opportunities, 231–3; public-private sector interdependence and, 219–22, 229–30, 261, 265–6, 391, 392; required reforms of, 20, 239–44, 249–52, 264–6, 371–4 see also national ecosystem of innovation; ‘specialising sectors’, 219; urgent need for reform, 36–7; volatility of, 297–8; vulnerability of after credit crunch, 358–64 economy, world: acute shortfall of demand, 375–6; Asian and/or OPEC capital surpluses and, 149, 153–4, 169, 171, 208, 226, 354, 375; conflicts of interest and, 137, 138; deregulation (from 1970s), 159–63; emerging powers’ attitudes to, 226; entrenched elites and, 137–8, 210; fall in volatility, 365; international institutions as unfair, 383, 385; London/New York axis, 149, 150–1, 157–8, 160, 187, 202; need for international cooperation, 357–8, 379–80, 381–3, 384, 385–6; post-crunch deleverage pressures, 359–60, 374–5; protectionism dangers, 36, 358, 376–7, 378, 379, 382, 386; savers/non-savers imbalance, 36, 169, 208, 222, 355, 356, 375–6, 378–83; shift of wealth from West to East, 36, 383–4; sovereign debt crises, 167, 203, 214; unheeded warnings, 182–5; wrecking of European ERM, 140, 144 Edinburgh University, 145 education, 10, 20–1, 128, 131, 272–4, 276, 278, 292–5, 304–8, 343; Building Schools for the Future programme, 371; cognitive and mental skills, 288–90, 304–6; private, 13, 114, 264–5, 272–3, 276, 283–4, 293–5, 304, 306 effort, discretionary, 50, 53, 54–5, 58–60, 80, 90–1, 114, 134; see also desert, due, concept of; fair process and, 91–4; indispensability and, 65–7; innovation and invention, 62, 65, 102–3, 105–6, 112, 117, 131, 223, 262–3, 392–3; luck and, 26–7, 65, 67, 70, 71, 73–4, 75–7; productive/unproductive, 43, 46–7, 51–2, 62, 64–5, 102–3, 392–3; proportionate reward for, 26, 39–40, 44, 47, 61, 74, 76–7, 84, 122, 272, 273, 2 84 egalitarianism, 27, 53–4, 55–6, 61, 75, 78–80, 144, 341, 343; Enlightenment equal worth concept, 53, 55, 59–60 Ehrenfeld, Rachel, 333 Eisman, Steve, 207 electoral politics: see also general election (6 May 2010); general elections, 97, 138, 277, 315; fair process and, 96–9; franchise, 128; general election (1992), x, 138, 140–1, 144, 148, 277; general election (1997), x, 138, 141 electricity, 134, 228, 256 electronic trading, 105 elites, incumbent, 23, 31–3, 99, 131; City of London, 14, 26, 31, 32–3, 210, 249, 355; competition and, 104, 113, 114, 129–30, 131–4, 257; democracy and, 35, 99; Enlightenment and, 122; history of (from 1880s), 131–4; history of in Britain (to 1900), 124–30; innovation and, 29–30, 110, 111–12, 113, 114, 115, 116; modern big finance and, 135, 137–8, 180, 210, 387–9; in ‘natural states’, 111, 113, 114–15, 116, 123–4, 127; New Labour’s failure to challenge, x–xi, 14, 22, 388, 389–90; world economy and, 137–8, 210 EMI, 28, 247, 248 employment and unemployment, 6, 75, 291–3, 295, 300, 373, 393; employment insurance concept, 298–9, 301, 374; lifelong learning schemes, 300, 301; lifelong savings plans, 300; unemployment benefit, 81, 281 Engels, Friedrich, 121–2 English language as lingua franca, 124 Enlightenment, European, 22, 30–1, 146, 261, 314–15; economics and, 104, 108–9, 116–17, 121–3; notions of fairness/desert, 53–6, 58–9, 112, 122–3, 394; science and technology and, 31, 108–9, 112–13, 116–17, 121, 126–7 Enron affair, 147 entrepreneurs: see also innovation; productive entrepreneurship; capitalist knowledge dynamic, 27–8, 31, 110–11, 112–13; challenges of the status quo, 29–30; Conservative reforms (1979-97) and, 275; private capital and, 241; public-private sector interdependence and, 219–22, 229–30, 261, 265–6, 391, 392; rent-seeking and, 61–2, 63, 78, 84, 101, 105, 112, 113–14, 116, 129, 135, 180; unproductive, 28–9, 33, 61–2, 63, 78, 84, 101–2, 103–5, 180 environmental issues, 35–6, 71–2, 102, 226, 228, 231, 236, 385, 390, 394; due desert and, 68; German Greens and, 269 Erie Railroad Company, 133 Essex County Council, 325, 332 European Commission, 298 European Exchange Rate Mechanism (ERM), 140, 144, 166 European Union (EU), 11, 82, 179, 379–80, 383–4, 385; British media and, 15, 328, 378; Competition Commissioner, 251, 258, 259; scepticism towards, 15, 36, 328, 377, 378, 386 eurozone, 377 Fabian Society, 302–3 factory system, 126 fairness: see also desert, due, concept of; proportionality; abuse/playing of system and, 24–5, 27; asset fairness proposals, 301–3, 304; behavioural psychology and, 44, 47–50, 59–61; Blair’s conservative view of, 143; Britishness and, 15–16, 392–3, 395; capitalism and, ix, x, 23–7, 41, 106, 122–3, 206–7, 210, 249, 385, 386, 394; challenges to political left, 78–83; coalition government (from May 2010) and, 22, 37; commonly held attitudes, 44, 45–7; deficit reduction and, 226, 227, 374; economic and social determinism and, 56–8; Enlightenment notions of, 53–6, 58–9, 112, 122–3, 394; fair process, 84–94, 96, 98–9, 272; as foundation of morality, 24, 26, 45, 50; individual responsibility and, 39, 78–9; inequality in Britain, 78, 80, 275–6, 277–8, 342; international relations and, 226, 385–6; ‘Just World Delusion’, 83; luck and, 72–7; management-employee relationships, 90–2; models/frameworks of, 43–58; need for shared understanding of, 25, 37, 43; partisanship about, 42–3; politicians/political parties and, 22, 83, 271–2, 302–3, 374, 391–2; popular support for NHS and, 75, 77, 283; pre-Enlightenment notions, 52–3; shared capitalism and, 66, 92–3; state facilitation of, ix–x, 391–2, 394–5; welfare benefits to migrants and, 81–2, 282, 283, 284 Farnborough Sixth Form College, 294 Federal Reserve, 169–70, 176, 177, 183 Fees Act (1891), 128 Fertile Crescent, 106 feudalism, European, 53–4, 74, 104, 105 financial instruments, 103, 148, 157, 167–8 Financial Services and Markets Act (2001), 198 Financial Services Authority (FSA), 24, 147, 162, 178, 198–9, 208 financial system, British: see also capitalism; economy, British; Asian and/or OPEC capital surpluses and, 149, 154, 354; big finance as entrenched elite, 136, 137–8, 176, 178–80, 210, 387–9; declining support for entrepreneurship, 241; deregulation (1971), 161; fees and commissions, 33; importance of liquidity, 240, 243; lack of data on, 241; London/New York axis, 149, 150–1, 157–8, 160, 187, 202; massive growth of, 137, 138, 209, 219; need for tax reform, 209–10; regulation and see regulation; required reforms to companies, 249–50; savings institutions’ share holdings, 240–1; short termism of markets, 241, 242–3; unfairness of, 138, 210 Financial Times, 12, 149, 294, 330, 349, 361 Fink, Stanley, 179 fiscal policy, 208, 224–5, 226, 357–8, 364–9, 374; coalition rejection of, 370 fish stocks, conservation of, 394 Fitch (credit-rating agencies), 248 flexicurity social system, 299–301, 304, 374 Forbes’ annual list, 30 Ford, Henry, 195, 302 foreign exchange markets, 32, 161, 164, 165, 168, 363, 367; China’s rigged exchange rate, 36, 169, 355, 377, 378–9; currency options, 166, 191; eurozone, 377 foreign takeovers of British firms, 8, 388 Fortune magazine, 94 Foster, Sir Christopher, 313 foundation schools, 307 France, 51–2, 123–4, 163, 372, 375, 377 free trade, 163, 334, 379 Frey, Bruno, 60, 86 Friedman, Benjamin, 282–3 Fukuyama, Francis, 140 Fuld, Dick, 192 Future Jobs Fund, 373 G20 countries, 209, 358, 368, 374 Galliano, John, 143 Gardner, Howard, 274, 305–6 gated communities, 13 Gates, Bill, 71 Gates, Bill (Senior), 222 Gaussian distribution, 190–1, 194 ‘gearing’, 6 general election (6 May 2010), 97, 142, 179, 214, 217, 227, 234, 271, 314, 318, 327–8, 334, 378; Gillian Duffy incident, 394; result of, xi, 20, 345–6, 390 ‘generalised autoregressive conditional heteroskedasicity’ (GARCH), 194 genetically modified crops, 232 Germany, 36, 63, 244, 262, 269, 375–6, 379, 380; export led growth, 355–6, 375, 381–2; Fraunhofer Institutes, 252, 264; Greek bail-out and, 377; pre-1945 period, 128, 129, 134, 382, 383 Gieve, Sir John, 339–40 Gilligan, Andrew, 329 Gladwell, Malcolm, 76–7 Glasgow University, 323 Glass-Steagall Act, 162, 170, 202–3 Glastonbury festival, 143 globalisation, 32, 98, 140, 143, 144, 153–4, 163, 182, 297, 363, 366, 380 Goldman Sachs, 42, 63, 103, 150, 167–8, 174, 176, 177, 205 Goodwin, Sir Fred, 7, 150, 176, 340 Google, 131, 136, 253, 255, 258, 262 Goolsbee, Austin, 52 Gorbachev, Mikhail, 140 Gough, Ian, 79 Gould, Jay, 133 Gould, Philip, 142 government: see also democracy; political system, British; cabinet government, 312, 334, 337; centralisation of power, 14–15, 35, 217, 313, 334, 337, 341, 342; control of news agenda, 14, 224, 313; disregard of House of Commons, 14–15, 223, 339, 345; Number 10 Downing Street as new royal court, 14, 337, 338, 346, 347; press officers/secretaries, 14, 180, 224, 312; Prime Ministerial power, 337, 344, 345, 346 GPS navigation systems, 233, 265 Gray, Elisha, 221 Great Depression, 159, 162, 205, 362 Greece: classical, 25, 26, 38, 39, 44–5, 52–3, 59, 96, 107, 108; crisis and bail-out (2010), 167, 371, 377, 378 Green, Sir Philip, 12, 29, 33 Green Investment Bank, proposed, 252, 371 Greenhead College, Huddersfield, 294 Greenspan, Alan, 145–6, 165, 177, 183, 184, 197–8 Gregory, James, 277 growth, economic: Britain and, 9–10, 214–15, 219, 221, 359, 364; education and, 305–6; export led growth, 36, 169, 208, 226, 355–6, 375–7, 378–83; social investment and, 280–1 GSK, 219, 254 the Guardian, 319, 330, 349 Gupta, Sanjeev, 367 Gutenberg, Johannes, 110–11 Habsburg Empire, 127 Haines, Joe, 312 Haji-Ioannous, Stelios, 28 Haldane, Andrew, 8, 151, 153, 193, 214, 215 the Halifax, 186, 251 Hamilton, Lewis, 64, 65 Hammersmith and Fulham, Borough of, 167 Hampton, Sir Philip, 173 Hands, Guy, 28, 178, 246–8 Hanley, Lynsey, 291, 293, 302 Hanushek, Eric, 305–6 Hart, Betty, 289 Harvard University, 47, 62, 198 Hashimoto administration in Japan, 362 Hastings, Max, 217–18 Hauser, Marc, 47–50 Hawley, Michael, 65–6 Hayward, Tony, 216–17 HBOS, 157, 158, 178, 251 health and well-being, 9, 75, 77, 106, 232, 233, 290–1; see also National Health Service (NHS) Heckman, James, 290 hedge funds, 6, 21, 103, 157–8, 167–8, 172, 203, 205, 206, 240; collapses of, 152, 173–4, 187, 202; as destabilisers, 166–7, 168; destruction of ERM, 140, 144, 166; near collapse of LTCM, 169–70, 183, 193, 200–1 hedging, 164, 165–6 Heinz, Henry John, 302 Hermes fund management company, 242 Herrman, Edwina, 179 Herstatt Bank collapse, 152 Hetherington, Mark, 84 Hewitt, Patricia, 180 Hewlett-Packard, 30 Hills Report on social housing, 290 Hilton, Paris, 304 Himmelfarb, Gertrude, 146 Hirst, Damien, 12 history, economic, 121–36, 166, 285–6, 353–4 Hobhouse, Leonard, 220, 222, 234, 235, 261, 266 Hobsbawm, Eric, 100 Hoffman, Elizabeth, 60 Holland, 113, 124, 230 Honda, 91, 269 Hong Kong, 168 Hopkins, Harry, 300 Horton, Tim, 277 House of Commons, 14–15, 223, 312–13, 337–9, 345 House of Lords, 15, 128, 129, 312, 334, 344, 346–7 housing, social, 10, 289, 290–1, 292, 308–9 housing cost credits, 308–9 HSBC, 181, 251 Huhne, Chris, 346 Hunt family, sale of cattle herds, 201 Hurka, Thomas, 45–6 Hutton, Will, works of, x; The State We’re In, x, 148–9 IBM, 29, 164, 254 Iceland, 7, 138 ICT industry, 9, 29–30, 109, 134, 135–6, 182, 229 immigration, 11, 143, 326, 328, 342, 343, 386, 394; from Eastern Europe, 82, 281–2, 283; welfare state and, 81–2, 281–2, 283, 284 incapacity benefit, 27 the Independent, 93, 330 Independent Safeguarding Authority, 339 India, 144, 226, 230, 254, 354–5 individual responsibility, 17, 38, 39, 78–9 individualism, 54, 57, 66, 111, 221, 281, 341, 366; capitalism/free market theories and, ix, 17, 19, 27, 40, 145, 221, 234–5 Indonesia, 168 Industrial and Commercial Finance Corporation (now 3i), 250 industrial revolution, 28, 112, 115, 121–3, 124, 126–8, 130, 315 inflation, 6, 32, 355, 364, 365; targets, 163, 165, 208, 359 Ingham, Bernard, 312 innovation: see also entrepreneurs; national ecosystem of innovation; as collective and social, 40, 131, 219–22, 261, 265–6, 388; comparisons between countries, 67; competition and, 40, 114, 257–60; development times, 240, 243; discretionary effort and, 62, 65, 102–3, 105–6, 131, 222, 392–3; dissemination of knowledge and, 110–11, 112–13, 219–22, 265–6; due desert and, 40, 62, 67, 112, 117; ‘financial innovation’, 63–4, 138, 147, 149, 153–4, 182; general-purpose technologies (GPTs), 107–11, 112, 117, 126–7, 134, 228–9, 256, 261, 384; high taxation as deterrent, 104, 105; history of, 107–17, 121–7, 131–4, 221; increased pace of advance, 228–9, 230, 266–7; incremental, 108, 254, 256; incumbent elites and, 29–30, 104, 106, 109, 111–12, 113, 114, 115, 116, 257; large firms and, 251–2, 254–5; as natural to humans, 106–7, 274; need for network of specialist banks, 251–2, 265, 371; in ‘open-access societies’, 109–13, 114, 116–17, 122–3, 126–7, 131, 136, 315; patents and copyright, 102, 103, 105, 110, 260–1, 263; private enterprise and, 100–1; regulation and, 268–70; risk-taking and, 6, 103, 111, 189; short term investment culture and, 33, 242–3, 244; small firms and, 252, 253–4, 255–6; universities and, 261–5 Innovation Fund, 21, 251, 252 Institute of Fiscal Studies, 275–6, 363, 368–9, 372 Institute of Government, 334, 335, 337, 343 insurance, 165–6, 187, 240, 242 Intel, 255, 256 intellectual property, 260–1 interest rates, 164, 191, 352–3, 354, 357, 359, 360, 361, 362, 367, 380 internal combustion engine, 28, 109, 134 International Monetary Fund (IMF), 9, 152–3, 177–8, 187, 207, 226, 383, 384; Asian currency crisis (1997) and, 168–9; proposed bank levy and financial activities tax, 209; support for fiscal policy, 367 internet, 11, 28, 52, 109, 134, 227, 256, 265; news and politics on, 316–17, 321, 349; pay-walls, 316, 349; as threat to print media, 324, 331, 349 iPods, 105, 143 Iraq War, 14–15, 18, 36, 144, 329 Ireland, 138 iron steamships, 126 Islam, 352, 353 Islamic fundamentalism, 283, 384 Israel, 251, 322–3 Italy, 101, 103, 317, 328 ITN, 330, 331 James, Howell, 180 Japan, 36, 67, 140, 163, 168, 244, 369, 375, 376, 385, 386; credit crunch (1989-92), 359–60, 361–2, 382; debt levels, 356, 362, 363; incumbent elites in early twentieth-century, 134; Tokyo Bay, 254; Top Runner programme, 269 Jenkins, Roger, 296 Jobcentre Plus, 300 Jobs, Steve, 29–30, 65–6, 71 John Lewis Group, 66, 67, 93, 246 Johnson, Boris, 179 Johnson, Simon, 177 Jones, Tom, 242 Joseph Rowntree Foundation, 21, 278–9 journalism, 318–21, 323–4, 326–7 Jovanovic, Boyan, 256 JP Morgan, 169, 191–2, 195–6 judges, 15 justice systems, 30–1, 44–5, 49; symbolised by pair of scales, 4, 40 Kahneman, Daniel, 94–5 Kant, Immanuel, 73, 112, 274 Kay, John, 175 Kennedy, Helena, 340 Keynesian economics, x, xi, 184, 190, 196–7, 354, 362, 390–1 Kindleberger, Charles, 184 King, Mervyn, 213 Kinnock, Neil, 142 kitemarking, need for, 267 Klenow, Peter, 52 Knetsch, Jack, 94–5 Knight, Frank, Risk, Uncertainty and Profit (1921), 189, 191, 196–7 knowledge: capitalist advance of, 27–8, 31, 110–11, 112–13; public investment in learning, 28, 31, 40, 131, 220, 235, 261, 265 knowledge economy, 8, 11–12, 34, 135–6, 229–33, 258, 273–4, 341, 366; credit growth and, 355; graduate entry to, 295; large firms and, 251–2, 254–5; small firms and, 252, 253–4, 255–6, 261; state facilitation of, 219–22, 229–30 Koizumi administration in Japan, 362 Koo, Richard, 360, 361–2 Kuper, Simon, 352 Kwak, James, 64, 177 labour market, 52, 62, 83, 95; flexibility, 5, 275, 276, 299, 364–5, 387 laissez-faire ideology, 153, 198–9, 259 Laker, Freddie, 30 Lambert, Richard, 6–7 language acquisition and cognitive development, 288, 289 Large Hadron Collider, 263 Latin American debt crisis, 164 Lavoisier, Antoine, 31 Lazarus, Edmund, 179 Leahy, Sir Terry, 295 Learning and Skills Council, 282, 300 left wing politics, modern, 17, 38, 78–83 Lehman Brothers, 150, 152, 165, 170, 181, 192, 204 lender-of-last-resort function, 155, 158, 160, 187 Lerner, Melvin, 83 leverage, 6, 29, 154–6, 157, 158, 172, 179, 180, 198, 204, 209–10, 254, 363; disguised on balance sheet, 181, 195; effect on of credit crunches, 358, 359, 360, 361, 374–5; excess/massive levels, 7, 147–8, 149, 150–1, 158, 168, 170, 187, 192, 197, 203; need for reform of, 206, 207, 208; private equity and, 245–6, 247 Lewis, Jemima, 282, 287 Lewis, Joe, 12 libel laws, 332–3, 348–9 Liberal Democrats, xi, 11, 98, 141, 343, 360–1, 368; general election (2010) and, 97, 142, 179, 271, 390 libertarianism, 234 Likierman, Sir Andrew, 180 limited liability (introduced 1855), 353–4, 363 Lind, Allan, 85 Lindert, Peter, 280–1 Lipsey, Richard, 108, 263 Lisbon earthquake (1755), 54 Lisbon Treaty Constitution, 328 literacy and numeracy, 20–1 livestock fairs, pre-twentieth-century, 90 Lloyds Bank, 176, 178, 186, 202, 204, 251, 259 Lo, Andrew, 195 loan sharks, illegal, 291 local government, 307, 347–8 Locke, John, 54–5, 59 London School of Economics (LSE), 246 London Stock Exchange, 90, 162 London Underground, financing of, 336, 389 lone parent families, 292 Long Term Capital Management (LTCM), 169–70, 183, 193, 194, 200–1 long-term incentive plans (LTIPs), 6 Loomes, Graham, 59 luck, 23, 26–7, 38, 39, 40, 41, 67, 68, 69–77, 222, 273, 393–4; diplomacy/international relations and, 385–6; disadvantaged children and, 74–5, 83, 288–90; executive pay and, 138; taxation and, 73–4, 75, 78, 303 Luxembourg, 138 MacDonald, Ramsey, 315 Machiavelli, Niccolo, 62 Machin, Steve, 283–4 Macmillan Committee into City (1931), 179 Madoff, Bernie, 7 mafia, Italian, 101, 104–5 Major, John, 138, 180, 279, 334 Malaysia, 168 malls, out-of-town, 143 Mandelbrot, Benoit, 194, 195 Mandelson, Peter, 21, 24, 142, 148, 220 manufacturing sector, decline of, 5, 8, 219, 272, 292, 341, 363 Manza, Jeff, 281, 282 Marconi, 142–3 market fundamentalism, 9–19, 32–3, 40–2, 366; belief in efficiency of markets, 188–9, 190, 193, 194, 235–9, 366; coalition government (from May 2010) and, 370; collapse of, 3–4, 7–9, 19, 20, 219–20, 235, 392; Conservative Party and, 5, 17, 138, 147, 160, 161; domination of, 5–6, 14, 16–17, 163, 364–5, 387–90; likely resurgence of, 5, 8; New Labour and, x–xi, 5, 19, 144–9, 388, 389–90; post-communist fiasco in Russia, 135; rejection of fiscal policy, 224–5, 364–5, 367 mark-to-market accounting convention, 175 Marland, Lord Jonathan, 179 Marquand, David, 328 Marsh, Jodie, 64, 65 Marx, Karl, 56–8, 121–2 Maslow’s hierarchy of needs, 232, 274–5 mass production, 109, 134, 182 Masters, Blythe, 196 mathematical models (‘quants’), 105, 149, 151, 152, 165, 169, 188, 190–6, 203; extensions and elaborations, 194; Gaussian distribution, 190–1, 194; JP Morgan and, 195–6 Matthewson, Sir George (former chair of RBS), 25 Maude, Francis, 180 Mayhew, Henry, 285–6 McCartney, Paul, 247 McGoldrick, Mark, 174 McKinsey Global Institute, 253, 358–9, 360, 363 McQueen, Alexander, 143 media, mainstream, 6, 35, 312, 315–20, 321–32, 348–50; commoditisation of information, 318–20, 321; communications technology and, 316, 320, 349; domination of state by, 14, 16, 223–4, 338, 339, 343; fanatical anti-Europeanism, 15, 328, 378; foreign/tax exile ownership of, 218; hysterical tabloid campaigns, 10–11, 298, 319–20; ‘info-capitalism’, 317–18, 327, 328, 342; lauding of celebrity, 281, 314; modern 24/7 news agenda, 13, 224, 321, 343; regional newspapers, 331; as setter of agenda/narrative, 327–31, 342; television news, 330–1; undermining of democracy, 315–16, 317–18, 321–9, 333, 350; urgent need for reform, 35, 218, 344, 348–50, 391; view of poverty as deserved, 25, 53, 83, 281, 286; weakness of foreign coverage, 322, 323, 330 Mencken, H.L., 311 mergers and takeovers, 8, 21, 33, 92, 245, 251, 258, 259, 388 Merkel, Angela, 381–2 Merrill Lynch, 150, 170, 175, 192 Merton, Robert, 169, 191 Meucci, Antonnio, 221 Mexico, 30, 385 Meyer, Christopher, 332 Michalek, Richard, 175 Microsoft, 71, 114, 136, 253, 254, 258–9 Milburn, Alan, 273 Miles, David, 186–7 Milgram, Stanley, 200 millennium bug, 319 Miller, David, 70, 76, 77 minimum wage, 142, 278 Minsky, Hyman, 183, 185 Mirror newspapers, 319, 329 Mlodinow, Leonard, 72–3 MMR vaccine, 327 mobile phones, 30, 134, 143, 229, 349 modernity, 54–5, 104 Mokyr, Joel, 112 monarchy, 15, 312, 336 Mondragon, 94 monetary policy, 154, 182, 184, 185, 208, 362, 367 monopolies, 74, 102, 103, 160, 314; history of, 104, 113, 124, 125–6, 130–4; in the media, 30, 317, 318, 331, 350; modern new wave of, 35, 135–6, 137–8, 201–2, 258–9; ‘oligarchs’, 30, 65, 104 Monopolies and Mergers Commission, 258, 318 Moody’s (credit-ratings agency), 151, 175 morality, 16–27, 37, 44–54, 70, 73; see also desert, due, concept of; fairness; proportionality; debt and, 351–4, 357, 360–1 Morgan, JP, 67 Morgan, Piers, 329 Morgan Stanley, 150 Mulas-Granados, Carlos, 367 Murdoch, James, 389 Murdoch, Rupert, 317–18, 320, 327 Murphy, Kevin, 62, 63 Murray, Jim ‘Mad Dog’, 321 Myners, Paul, 340 Nash bargaining solution, 60 National Audit Office, 340 National Child Development Study, 289–90 national ecosystem of innovation, 33–4, 65, 103, 206, 218, 221, 239–44, 255–9, 374; state facilitation of, 102, 219–22, 229–30, 233, 251–2, 258–66, 269–70, 392 National Health Service (NHS), 21, 27, 34, 92, 265, 277, 336, 371–2; popular support for, 75, 77, 283 national insurance system, 81, 277, 302 national strategy for neighbourhood renewal, 278 Navigation Acts, abolition of, 126 Neiman, Susan, 18–19 neo-conservatism, 17–18, 144–9, 387–90 network theory, 199–201, 202–4, 206; Pareto curve and, 201–2 New Economics Foundation, 62 New Industry New Jobs strategy, 21 New Labour: budget deficit and, 224, 335, 360, 368, 369; business friendly/promarket policies, x–xi, 139–40, 142, 145, 146–7, 162, 198–9, 382; City of London and, x–xi, 5, 19, 22, 142–3, 144–5, 355; decline of class-based politics, 341; failure to challenge elites, x–xi, 14, 22, 388, 389–90; general election (1992) and, 138, 140–1, 144, 148, 277; general election (2005) and, 97; general election (2010) and, 20, 271, 334, 374, 378; light-touch regulation and, 138, 145, 146–7, 162, 198–9; New Industry New Jobs strategy, 21; one-off tax on bank bonuses, 26, 179, 249; record in government, 10–11, 19, 20–2, 220, 276–80, 302, 306, 334–6, 366–7, 389–90; reforms to by ‘modernisers’, 141; responses to newspaper campaigns, 11 New York markets, 140, 152, 162; Asian and/or OPEC capital surpluses and, 169, 171, 354; London/New York axis, 149, 150–1, 157–8, 160, 188, 202 Newsweek, 174 Newton, Isaac, 31, 127, 190 NHS Direct, 372 Nicoli, Eric, 13 non-executive directors (NEDs), 249–50 Nordhaus, William, 260 Nordic countries, 262; Iceland, 7, 138; Norway, 281; Sweden, 264, 281 North, Douglas, 113, 116, 129–30 Northern Rock, 9, 156, 157, 158, 186, 187–8, 202, 204, 251, 340–1 Norton Publishing, 93 Nozick, Robert, 234, 235 nuclear non-proliferation, 226, 384, 394 Nussbaum, Martha, 79 Obama, Barack, 18, 183, 380, 382–3, 394–5 the Observer, 141, 294, 327 Office for Budget Responsibility, 360 Office of Fair Trading (OFT), 257, 258 OFSTED, 276 oil production, 322; BP Gulf of Mexico disaster (2010), 216–17, 392; finite stocks and, 230, 384; OPEC, 149, 161, 171; price increase (early 1970s), 161; in USA, 130, 131, 132 Olsen, Ken, 29 Olympics (2012), 114 open markets, 29, 30, 31, 40, 89, 92, 100–1, 366, 377, 379, 382, 384; see also ‘open-access societies’; as determinants of value, 51–2, 62; fairness and, 60–1, 89–91, 94–6; ‘reference prices’ and, 94–6 ‘open-access societies’, 134, 135, 258, 272, 273, 275, 276, 280–1, 394; Britain as ‘open-access society’ (to 1850), 124, 126–7; democracy and, 136, 314; Enlightenment and, 30–1, 314–15, 394; innovation and invention in, 109–13, 114, 116–17, 122–3, 126–7, 131, 136, 315; partial political opening in, 129–30; US New Freedom programme, 132–3 opium production, 102 options, 166, 188, 191 Orange County derivatives losses, 167 Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), 180, 337, 373 Orwell, George, 37 Osborne, George, 147, 208, 224, 245, 302, 338 Overend, Gurney and Co., 156–7 Oxbridge/top university entry, 293–4, 306 Oxford University, 261 Page, Scott, 204 Paine, Tom, 347 Pareto, Vilfredo, 201–2 Paribas, 152, 187 Parkinson, Lance-Bombardier Ben, 13 participation, political, 35, 86, 96, 99 Paulson, Henry, 177 Paulson, John, 103, 167–8 pay of executives and bankers, 3–4, 5, 6–7, 22, 66–7, 138, 387; bonuses, 6, 25–6, 41, 174–5, 176, 179, 208, 242, 249, 388; high levels/rises of, 6–7, 13, 25, 82–3, 94, 172–6, 216, 296, 387, 393; Peter Mandelson on, 24; post-crash/bail-outs, 176, 216; in private equity houses, 248; remuneration committees, 6, 82, 83, 176; shared capitalism and, 66, 93; spurious justifications for, 42, 78, 82–3, 94, 176, 216 pension, state, 81, 372, 373 pension funds, 240, 242 Pettis, Michael, 379–80 pharmaceutical industry, 219, 255, 263, 265, 267–8 Phelps, Edmund, 275 philanthropy and charitable giving, 13, 25, 280 Philippines, 168 Philippon, Thomas, 172–3 Philips Electronics, Royal, 256 Pimco, 177 piracy, 101–2 Plato, 39, 44 Player, Gary, 76 pluralist state/society, x, 35, 99, 113, 233, 331, 350, 394 Poland, 67, 254 political parties, 13–14, 340, 341, 345, 390; see also under entries for individual parties political system, British: see also democracy; centralised constitution, 14–15, 35, 217, 334; coalitions as a good thing, 345–6; decline of class-based politics, 341; devolving of power to Cardiff and Edinburgh, 15, 334; expenses scandal, 3, 14, 217, 313, 341; history of (to late nineteenth-century), 124–30; lack of departmental coordination, 335, 336, 337; long-term policy making and, 217; monarchy and, 15, 312, 336; politicians’ lack of experience outside politics, 338; required reforms of, 344–8; select committee system, 339–40; settlement (of 1689), 125; sovereignty and, 223, 346, 347, 378; urgent need for reform, 35, 36–7, 218, 344; voter-politician disengagement, 217–18, 310, 311, 313–14, 340 Pommerehne, Werner, 60 population levels, world, 36 Portsmouth Football Club, 352 Portugal, 108, 109, 121, 377 poverty, 278–9; child development and, 288–90; circumstantial causes of, 26, 283–4; Conservative Party and, 279; ‘deserving’/’undeserving’ poor, 276, 277–8, 280, 284, 297, 301; Enlightenment views on, 53, 55–6; need for asset ownership, 301–3, 304; political left and, 78–83; the poor viewed as a race apart, 285–7; as relative not absolute, 55, 84; Adam Smith on, 55, 84; structure of market economy and, 78–9, 83; view that the poor deserve to be poor, 25, 52–3, 80, 83, 281, 285–8, 297, 301, 387; worldwide, 383, 384 Power2010 website, 340–1 PR companies and media, 322, 323 Press Complaints Commission (PCC), 325, 327, 331–2, 348 preventative medicine, 371 Price, Lance, 328, 340 Price, Mark, 93 Prince, Chuck, 184 printing press, 109, 110–11 prisoners, early release of, 11 private-equity firms, 6, 28–9, 158, 172, 177, 179, 205, 244–9, 374 Procter & Gamble, 167, 255 productive entrepreneurship, 6, 22–3, 28, 29–30, 33, 61–2, 63, 78, 84, 136, 298; in British history (to 1850), 28, 124, 126–7, 129; due desert/fairness and, 102–3, 105–6, 112, 223, 272, 393; general-purpose technologies (GPTs) and, 107–11, 112, 117, 126–7, 134, 228–9, 256, 261, 384 property market: baby boomer generation and, 372–3; Barker Review, 185; boom in, 5, 143, 161, 183–4, 185–7, 221; bust (1989-91), 161, 163; buy-to-let market, 186; commercial property, 7, 356, 359, 363; demutualisation of building societies, 156, 186; deregulation (1971) and, 161; Japanese crunch (1989-92) and, 361–2; need for tax on profits from home ownership, 308–9, 373–4; property as national obsession, 187; residential mortgages, 7, 183–4, 186, 356, 359, 363; securitised loans based mortgages, 171, 186, 188; shadow banking system and, 171, 172; ‘subprime’ mortgages, 64, 152, 161, 186, 203 proportionality, 4, 24, 26, 35, 38, 39–40, 44–6, 51, 84, 218; see also desert, due, concept of; contributory/discretionary benefits and, 63; diplomacy/ international relations and, 385–6; job seeker’s allowance as transgression of, 81; left wing politics and, 80; luck and, 73–7, 273; policy responses to crash and, 215–16; poverty relief systems and, 80–1; profit and, 40, 388; types of entrepreneurship and, 61–2, 63 protectionism, 36, 358, 376–7, 378, 379, 382, 386 Prussia, 128 Public Accounts Committee, 340 Purnell, James, 338 quantitative easing, 176 Quayle, Dan, 177 race, disadvantage and, 290 railways, 9, 28, 105, 109–10, 126 Rand, Ayn, 145, 234 Rawls, John, 57, 58, 63, 73, 78 Reagan, Ronald, 135, 163 recession, xi, 3, 8, 9, 138, 153, 210, 223, 335; of 1979-81 period, 161; efficacy of fiscal policy, 367–8; VAT decrease (2009) and, 366–7 reciprocity, 43, 45, 82, 86, 90, 143, 271, 304, 382; see also desert, due, concept of; proportionality Reckitt Benckiser, 82–3 Regional Development Agencies, 21 regulation: see also Bank of England; Financial Services Authority (FSA); Bank of International Settlements (BIS), 169, 182; Basel system, 158, 160, 163, 169, 170–1, 196, 385; big as beautiful in global banking, 201–2; Big Bang (1986), 90, 162; by-passing of, 137, 187; capital requirements/ratios, 162–3, 170–1, 208; dismantling of post-war system, 149, 158, 159–63; economists’ doubts over deregulation, 163; example of China, 160; failure to prevent crash, 154, 197, 198–9; Glass-Steagall abolition (1999), 170, 202–3; light-touch, 5, 32, 138, 151, 162, 198–9; New Deal rules (1930s), 159, 162; in pharmaceutical industry, 267–8; as pro-business tool, 268–70; proposed Financial Policy Committee, 208; required reforms of, 267, 269–70, 376, 377, 384, 392; reserve requirements scrapped (1979), 208; task of banking authorities, 157; Top Runner programme in Japan, 269 Reinhart, Carmen, 214, 356 Repo 105 technique, 181 Reshef, Ariell, 172–3 Reuters, 322, 331 riches and wealth, 11–13, 272–3, 283–4, 387–8; see also pay of executives and bankers; the rich as deserving of their wealth, 25–6, 52, 278, 296–7 Rickards, James, 194 risk, 149, 158, 165, 298–302, 352–3; credit default swaps and, 151, 152, 166–8, 170, 171, 175, 176, 191, 203, 207; derivatives and see derivatives; distinction between uncertainty and, 189–90, 191, 192–3, 196–7; employment insurance concept, 298–9, 301, 374; management, 165, 170, 171, 189, 191–2, 193–4, 195–6, 202, 203, 210, 354; securitisation and, 32, 147, 165, 169, 171, 186, 188, 196; structured investment vehicles and, 151, 165, 169, 171, 188; value at risk (VaR), 171, 192, 195, 196 Risley, Todd, 289 Ritchie, Andrew, 103 Ritter, Scott, 329 Robinson, Sir Gerry, 295 Rogoff, Ken, 214, 356 rogue states, 36 Rolling Stones, 247 Rolls-Royce, 219, 231 Rome, classical, 45, 74, 108, 116 Roosevelt, Franklin D., 133, 300 Rothermere, Viscount, 327 Rousseau, Jean-Jacques, 56, 58, 112 Rousseau, Peter, 256 Rowling, J.K., 64, 65 Rowthorn, Robert, 292, 363 Royal Bank of Scotland (RBS), 25, 150, 152, 157, 173, 181, 199, 251, 259; collapse of, 7, 137, 150, 158, 175–6, 202, 203, 204; Sir Fred Goodwin and, 7, 150, 176, 340 Rubin, Robert, 174, 177, 183 rule of law, x, 4, 220, 235 Russell, Bertrand, 189 Russia, 127, 134–5, 169, 201, 354–5, 385; fall of communism, 135, 140; oligarchs, 30, 65, 135 Rwandan genocide, 71 Ryanair, 233 sailing ships, three-masted, 108 Sandbrook, Dominic, 22 Sands, Peter (CEO of Standard Chartered Bank), 26 Sarkozy, Nicolas, 51, 377 Sassoon, Sir James, 178 Scholes, Myron, 169, 191, 193 Schumpeter, Joseph, 62, 67, 111 science and technology: capitalist dynamism and, 27–8, 31, 112–13; digitalisation, 34, 231, 320, 349, 350; the Enlightenment and, 31, 108–9, 112–13, 116–17, 121, 126–7; general-purpose technologies (GPTs), 107–11, 112, 117, 126–7, 134, 228–9, 256, 261, 384; increased pace of advance, 228–9, 253, 297; nanotechnology, 232; New Labour improvements, 21; new opportunities and, 33–4, 228–9, 231–3; new technologies, 232, 233, 240; universities and, 261–5 Scotland, devolving of power to, 15, 334 Scott, James, 114–15 Scott Bader, 93 Scott Trust, 327 Second World War, 134, 313 Securities and Exchanges Commission, 151, 167–8 securitisation, 32, 147, 165, 169, 171, 186, 187, 196 self-determination, 85–6 self-employment, 86 self-interest, 59, 60, 78 Sen, Amartya, 51, 232, 275 service sector, 8, 291, 341, 355 shadow banking system, 148, 153, 157–8, 170, 171, 172, 187 Shakespeare, William, 39, 274, 351 shareholders, 156, 197, 216–17, 240–4, 250 Sher, George, 46, 50, 51 Sherman Act (USA, 1890), 133 Sherraden, Michael, 301 Shiller, Robert, 43, 298, 299 Shimer, Robert, 299 Shleifer, Andrei, 62, 63, 92 short selling, 103 Sicilian mafia, 101, 105 Simon, Herbert, 222 Simpson, George, 142–3 single mothers, 17, 53, 287 sixth form education, 306 Sky (broadcasting company), 30, 318, 330, 389 Skype, 253 Slim, Carlos, 30 Sloan School of Management, 195 Slumdog Millionaire, 283 Smith, Adam, 55, 84, 104, 112, 121, 122, 126, 145–6 Smith, John, 148 Snoddy, Ray, 322 Snow, John, 177 social capital, 88–9, 92 social class, 78, 130, 230, 304, 343, 388; childcare and, 278, 288–90; continued importance of, 271, 283–96; decline of class-based politics, 341; education and, 13, 17, 223, 264–5, 272–3, 274, 276, 292–5, 304, 308; historical development of, 56–8, 109, 115–16, 122, 123–5, 127–8, 199; New Labour and, 271, 277–9; working-class opinion, 16, 143 social investment, 10, 19, 20–1, 279, 280–1 social polarisation, 9–16, 34–5, 223, 271–4, 282–5, 286–97, 342; Conservative reforms (1979-97) and, 275–6; New Labour and, 277–9; private education and, 13, 223, 264–5, 272–3, 276, 283–4, 293–5, 304; required reforms for reduction of, 297–309 social security benefits, 277, 278, 299–301, 328; contributory, 63, 81, 283; flexicurity social system, 299–301, 304, 374; to immigrants, 81–2, 282, 283, 284; job seeker’s allowance, 81, 281, 298, 301; New Labour and ‘undeserving’ claimants, 143, 277–8; non-contributory, 63, 79, 81, 82; targeting of/two-tier system, 277, 281 socialism, 22, 32, 38, 75, 138, 144, 145, 394 Soham murder case, 10, 339 Solomon Brothers, 173 Sony, 254–5 Soros, George, 166 Sorrell, Martin, 349 Soskice, David, 342–3 South Korea, 168, 358–9 South Sea Bubble, 125–6 Spain, 123–4, 207, 358–9, 371, 377 Spamann, Holger, 198 special purpose vehicles, 181 Spitzer, Matthew, 60 sport, cheating in, 23 stakeholder capitalism, x, 148–9 Standard Oil, 130–1, 132 state, British: anti-statism, 20, 22, 233–4, 235, 311; big finance’s penetration of, 176, 178–80; ‘choice architecture’ and, 238, 252; desired level of involvement, 234–5; domination of by media, 14, 16, 221, 338, 339, 343; facilitation of fairness, ix–x, 391–2, 394–5; investment in knowledge, 28, 31, 40, 220, 235, 261, 265; need for government as employer of last resort, 300; need for hybrid financial system, 244, 249–52; need for intervention in markets, 219–22, 229–30, 235–9, 252, 392; need for reshaping of, 34; pluralism, x, 35, 99, 113, 233, 331, 350, 394; public ownership, 32, 240; target-setting in, 91–2; threats to civil liberty and, 340 steam engine, 110, 126 Steinmueller, W.


pages: 393 words: 115,263

Planet Ponzi by Mitch Feierstein

Amazon: amazon.comamazon.co.ukamazon.deamazon.fr

Affordable Care Act / Obamacare, Albert Einstein, Asian financial crisis, asset-backed security, bank run, banking crisis, barriers to entry, Bernie Madoff, centre right, collapse of Lehman Brothers, collateralized debt obligation, credit crunch, Credit Default Swap, credit default swaps / collateralized debt obligations, Daniel Kahneman / Amos Tversky, disintermediation, diversification, Donald Trump, energy security, eurozone crisis, financial innovation, financial intermediation, Flash crash, floating exchange rates, frictionless, frictionless market, high net worth, High speed trading, illegal immigration, income inequality, interest rate swap, invention of agriculture, Long Term Capital Management, moral hazard, mortgage debt, Northern Rock, obamacare, offshore financial centre, oil shock, pensions crisis, Plutocrats, plutocrats, Ponzi scheme, price anchoring, price stability, purchasing power parity, quantitative easing, risk tolerance, Robert Shiller, Robert Shiller, Ronald Reagan, too big to fail, trickle-down economics, value at risk, yield curve

Bubble bounces back,’ New York Observer, Sept. 7, 2011. 4 See an interesting discussion by Steven Malliaris and Hongjun Yan of the Yale School of Management: ‘Nickels versus black swans: reputation, trading strategies and asset prices,’ March 2009. Document available online via www.ssrn.com. Also see Reuters, ‘Nickels and black swans,’ May 26, 2009. 5 ‘Many unhappy returns,’ The Economist, Aug. 20, 2011. 6 Roger Lowenstein, ‘Long-Term Capital Management: it’s a short-term memory,’ New York Times, Sept. 6, 2008. See also ‘The story of Long-Term Capital Management,’ Canadian Investment Review, Winter 1999, accessible via www.investmentreview.com. 7 Alternative payment models could be envisaged. See e.g. Larry Harris, ‘Pay the rating agencies according to results,’ Financial Times, June 3, 2010. 8 Rupert Neate, ‘Ratings agencies suffer “conflict of interest”, says former Moody’s boss,’ Guardian, Aug. 22, 2011. 9 Gillian Tett, ‘Rating agencies in a bind as pressures mount,’ Financial Times, Dec. 16, 2010. 10 ‘One non-default Greek rating enough for ECB – report,’ Reuters, July 5, 2011. 11 Financial Stability Board, ‘Principles for reducing reliance on CRA ratings,’ Oct, 2010. 12 Andrew Ross Sorkin, ‘Revolving door at S.E.C. is hurdle to crisis cleanup,’ New York Times, Aug. 1, 2011. 13 George Packer, ‘A dirty business,’ New Yorker, June 27, 2011. 14 Project on Government Oversight, ‘Revolving regulators: SEC faces ethical challenges with revolving door,’ May 2011, www.pogo.org. 15 Arthur Levitt, Take on the Street (Random House, 2002), p. 236. 16 Jean Eaglesham and Victoria McGrane, ‘Budget rift at CFTC pulls plug on alarm,’ Wall Street Journal, Feb. 25, 2011. 17 Sewell Chan and Eric Dash, ‘Financial crisis inquiry wrestles with setbacks,’ New York Times, April 5, 2010. 18 Chan and Dash, ‘Financial crisis inquiry wrestles with setbacks.’ 19 John King, ‘Starr investigation costs just shy of $30 million,’ CNN, April 1, 1998. 20 ‘NASA puts cost of shuttle inquiry, cleanup at $400 million,’ Los Angeles Times, Sept. 12, 2003. 21 IMF, ‘Fiscal implications of the global economic and financial crisis,’ June 2009. 22 Andrew Haldane, ‘The $100 billion question,’ Bank of England, March 2010. 23 See www.planetponzi.com. 24 Transcribed from YouTube video, ‘2010-11-09 Greenspan Admission,’ or enter: www.youtube.com/watch?

In 2008 some of that gloss was removed when the industry lost money in calamitous markets‌—‌but it still lost less than the market overall.5 (And of course, some fund managers saw the collapse coming and made money out of it. I was one of them.) The overall, average result, however, conceals the danger lurking at the fringes. Poorly designed performance fees, or even well-designed fee structures applied by idiots, can cause immense harm by encouraging high-risk, high-reward strategies which may be directly contrary to investors’ interests. The poster-child for irresponsible risk-taking was Long-Term Capital Management, which failed in 1998 under a senior management too impressed by its own academic excellence. Unfortunately, the real world is no respecter of academic reputations. The firm took on too much debt and bet the proceeds with too little thought for what might happen if things didn’t turn out as expected. When the Asian financial crisis was followed by a Russian one, LTCM found that its ‘safe’ bets had turned sour on a colossal scale.

Commodity Trading Advisors: Risk, Performance Analysis, and Selection by Greg N. Gregoriou, Vassilios Karavas, François-Serge Lhabitant, Fabrice Douglas Rouah

Amazon: amazon.comamazon.co.ukamazon.deamazon.fr

Asian financial crisis, asset allocation, backtesting, capital asset pricing model, collateralized debt obligation, commodity trading advisor, compound rate of return, constrained optimization, corporate governance, correlation coefficient, Credit Default Swap, credit default swaps / collateralized debt obligations, discrete time, distributed generation, diversification, diversified portfolio, dividend-yielding stocks, fixed income, high net worth, implied volatility, index arbitrage, index fund, interest rate swap, iterative process, linear programming, London Interbank Offered Rate, Long Term Capital Management, market fundamentalism, merger arbitrage, Mexican peso crisis / tequila crisis, p-value, Ponzi scheme, quantitative trading / quantitative finance, random walk, risk-adjusted returns, risk/return, Sharpe ratio, short selling, stochastic process, systematic trading, technology bubble, transaction costs, value at risk

., Eichengreen and Mathieson 1998). Hedge fund trading has been blamed for many financial distresses, including the 1992 European Exchange Rate Mechanism crisis, the 1994 Mexican peso crisis, the 1997 Asian financial crisis, and the 2000 bust in U.S. technology stock prices. A spectacular example of concerns about hedge funds can be found in the collapse and subsequent financial bailout of Long-Term Capital Management (e.g., Edwards 1999). The concerns about hedge fund and CTA trading extend beyond financial markets to other speculative markets, such as commodity futures markets. These concerns were nicely summarized in a meeting between farmers and executives of the Chicago Board of Trade, where farmers expressed the view that “the funds— managed commodity investment groups with significant financial and technological resources—may exert undue collective influence on market direction without regard to real world supply-demand or other economic factors” (Ross 1999, p. 3).

The mean-variance approach to the portfolio selection problem developed by Markowitz (1952) has been criticized often due to its utilization of variance as a measure of risk exposure when examining the nonnormal returns of CTAs. The value at risk (VaR) measure for financial risk has become accepted as a better measure for investment firms, large banks, and pension funds. As a result of the recurring frequency of down markets since the collapse of Long-Term Capital Management (LTCM) in August 1998, VaR has played a paramount role as a risk management tool and is considered a mainstream technique to estimate a CTA’s exposure to market risk. 377 378 PROGRAM EVALUATION, SELECTION, AND RETURNS With the large acceptance of VaR and, specifically, the modified VaR as a relevant risk management tool, a more suitable portfolio performance measure for CTAs can be formulated in term of the modified Sharpe ratio.1 Using the traditional Sharpe ratio to rank CTAs will underestimate the tail risk and overestimate performance.

H. (1995) “Mean-Variance as an Approximation to Expected Utility Maximization: Semi Ex-Ante Results.” In Mark Hirschey and M. Wayne Marr, eds., Advances in Financial Economics, Vol. 1, pp. 81–98 Greenwich, CT: JAI Press Inc. Ederington, L. H., and J. H. Lee (2002) “Who Trades Futures and How? Evidence from the Heating Oil Futures Market.” Journal of Business, Vol. 75, No. 2, pp. 353–373. Edwards, F. R. (1999) “Hedge Funds and the Collapse of Long-Term Capital Management.” Journal of Economic Perspectives, Vol. 13, No. 2, pp. 189–210. Edwards, F. R., and M. O. Caglayan. (2001) “Hedge Fund and Commodity Fund Investment Styles in Bull and Bear Markets.” Journal of Portfolio Management, Vol. 27, No. 4, pp. 97–108. Edwards, F. R., and J. Liew. (1999) “Hedge Funds versus Managed Futures as Asset Classes.” Journal of Derivatives, Vol. 6, No. 4, pp. 45–64. Edwards, F.


pages: 500 words: 145,005

Misbehaving: The Making of Behavioral Economics by Richard H. Thaler

Amazon: amazon.comamazon.co.ukamazon.deamazon.fr

Albert Einstein, Amazon Mechanical Turk, Andrei Shleifer, Apple's 1984 Super Bowl advert, Atul Gawande, Berlin Wall, Bernie Madoff, Black-Scholes formula, capital asset pricing model, Cass Sunstein, Checklist Manifesto, choice architecture, clean water, cognitive dissonance, conceptual framework, constrained optimization, Daniel Kahneman / Amos Tversky, delayed gratification, diversification, diversified portfolio, Edward Glaeser, endowment effect, equity premium, Eugene Fama: efficient market hypothesis, experimental economics, Fall of the Berlin Wall, George Akerlof, hindsight bias, Home mortgage interest deduction, impulse control, index fund, invisible hand, Jean Tirole, John Nash: game theory, John von Neumann, late fees, law of one price, libertarian paternalism, Long Term Capital Management, loss aversion, market clearing, Mason jar, mental accounting, meta analysis, meta-analysis, More Guns, Less Crime, mortgage debt, Nash equilibrium, Nate Silver, New Journalism, nudge unit, payday loans, Ponzi scheme, presumed consent, pre–internet, principal–agent problem, prisoner's dilemma, profit maximization, random walk, randomized controlled trial, Richard Thaler, Robert Shiller, Robert Shiller, Ronald Coase, Silicon Valley, South Sea Bubble, statistical model, Steve Jobs, technology bubble, The Chicago School, The Myth of the Rational Market, The Signal and the Noise by Nate Silver, The Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith, Thomas Kuhn: the structure of scientific revolutions, transaction costs, ultimatum game, Walter Mischel

Unlike the case of Palm and 3Com, both versions of the stock were widely traded and easy to borrow, so what prevented the smart money from assuring that the shares traded at their appropriate ratio of 1.5? Strangely, nothing! And crucially, unlike the Palm example, which was sure to end in a few months, the Royal Dutch Shell price disparity could and did last for decades.‡ Therein lies the risk. Some smart traders, such as the hedge fund Long Term Capital Management (LTCM), did execute the smart trade, selling the expensive Royal Dutch shares short and buying the cheap Shell shares. But the story does not have a happy ending. In August 1998, because of a financial crisis in Asia and a default on Russian bonds, LTCM and other hedge funds started to lose money and needed to reduce some of their positions, including their Royal Dutch Shell trade. But, not surprisingly, LTCM was not the only hedge fund to have spotted the Royal Dutch Shell pricing anomaly, and the other hedge funds had also lost money in Russia and Asia.

Lohr, Steve. 1992. “Lessons From a Hurricane: It Pays Not to Gouge.” New York Times, September 22. Available at: http://www.nytimes.com/1992/09/22/business/lessons-from-a-hurricane-it-pays-not-to-gouge.html. Lott, John R. 1998. More Guns, Less Crime: Understanding Crime and Gun Control Laws. Chicago: University of Chicago Press. Lowenstein, Roger. 2000. When Genius Failed: The Rise and Fall of Long-Term Capital Management. New York: Random House. ———. 2001. “Exuberance Is Rational.” New York Times Magazine, February 11. Available at: http://partners.nytimes.com/library/magazine/home/20010211 mag-econ.html. Machlup, Fritz. 1946. “Marginal Analysis and Empirical Research.” American Economic Review 36, no. 4: 519–54. MacIntosh, Donald. 1969. The Foundations of Human Society. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

., 332 libertarian paternalism, 322, 323–25 “Libertarian Paternalism Is Not an Oxymoron” (Sunstein and Thaler), 323–25 Lichtenstein, Sarah, 36, 48 life, value of, see value of a life life-cycle hypothesis, 95–96, 97, 98, 106, 164 “Life You Save May Be Your Own, The” (Schelling), 12–13, 14 limits of arbitrage, 249, 288, 349 Lintner, John, 166, 226, 229 Liquid Assets (Ashenfelter), 68 List, The, 10, 20–21, 24, 25, 31, 33, 36, 39, 43, 58, 68, 303, 347 List, John, 354 lives, statistical vs. identified, 13 loans, for automobiles, 121–23 Loewenstein, George, 88, 111, 176, 180–81, 362 in Behavioral Economics Roundtable, 181 effort project of, 199–201 paternalism and, 323 London, 248 Long Term Capital Management (LTCM), 249, 251 loss aversion, 33–34, 52, 58–59, 154, 261 dividends and, 166 of managers, 187–89, 190 myopic, 195, 198 Lott, John, 265–66 Lovallo, Dan, 186, 187 Lowenstein, Roger, xv–xvi, 12 LSV Asset Management, 228 Lucas, Robert, 159 Luck, Andrew, 289 MacArthur Foundation, 184 Machiguenga people, 364 Machlup, Fritz, 45 macroeconomics: behavioral, 349–52 rational expectations in, 209 Macy’s, 62, 63 Madrian, Brigitte, 315–17 Magliozzi, Ray, 32 Magliozzi, Tom, 32–33 Major League Baseball, 282 “make it easy” mantra, 337–38, 339–40 Malkiel, Burton, 242 managers: growth, 214–15 gut instinct and, 293 loss aversion of, 187–89, 190 risk aversion of, 190–91 value, 214–15 mandated choice, 328–29 marginal, definition of, 27 marginal analysis, 44 marginal propensity to consume (MPC), 94–95, 98 markets, in equilibrium, 44, 131, 150, 207 Markowitz, Harry, 208 marshmallow experiment, 100–101, 102n, 178, 314 Marwell, Gerald, 145 Mas, Alexandre, 372 Massey, Cade, 194, 278–79, 282, 289 Matthew effect, 296n McCoy, Mike, 281–82 McDonald’s, 312 McIntosh, Donald, 103 mean reversion, 222–23 Mechanical Turk (Amazon), 127 Meckling, William, 41, 105 Mehra, Raj, 191 mental accounting, 54, 55, 98, 115, 116, 118, 257 bargains and rip-offs, 57–63 budgeting, 74–79 and equity premium puzzle, 198 on game show, 296–301, 297 getting behind in, 80–84 house money effect, 81–82, 83–84, 193n of savings, 310 sunk costs, 21, 52, 64–73 “two-pocket,” 81–82 Merton, Robert K., 296n “Methodology of Positive Economics, The” (Friedman), 45–46 Mian, Atif, 78 Miljoenenjacht, see Deal or No Deal Miller, Merton, 159, 167–68, 206, 208 annoyed at closed-end fund paper, 242–43, 244, 259 irrelevance theorem of, 164–65, 166–67 Nobel Prize won by, 164 Thaler’s appointment at University of Chicago, reaction to, 255, 256 Minnesota, 335 Mischel, Walter, 100–101, 102, 103, 178, 314 mispricing, 225 models: beta–delta, 110 of homo economicus, 4–5, 6–7, 8–9, 23–24, 180 imprecision of, 23–24 optimization-based, 5–6, 8, 27, 43, 207 Modigliani, Franco: consumption function of, 94, 95–96, 97, 98, 309 irrelevance theorem of, 164–65 Nobel Prize won by, 163–64 Moore, Michael, 122 More Guns, Less Crime (Lott), 265 Morgenstern, Oskar, 29 mortgage brokers, 77–78 mortgages, 7, 77–79, 252, 345 mugs, 153, 155, 263, 264–66, 264 Mullainathan, Sendhil, 58n, 183–84, 366 Mulligan, Casey, 321–22 Murray, Bill, 49–50 mutual fund portfolios, 84 mutual funds, 242 myopic loss aversion, 195, 198 Nagel, Rosemarie, 212 naïve agents, 110–11 Nalebuff, Barry, 170 narrow framing, 185–91 and effort project, 201 NASDAQ, 250, 252 Nash, John, 212 Nash equilibrium, 212, 213n, 367 National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER), 35, 236, 244, 349 National Football League, 139n draft in, 11, 277–91, 281, 283, 285, 286 rookie salaries in, 283 salary cap in, 282–83 surplus value of players in, 285–86, 285, 286, 288 National Public Radio, 32, 305 naturally occurring experiments, 8 NESTA, 343 Net Asset Value (NAV) fund, 238–39, 241 Netherlands, 248, 296–301 neuro-economics, 177, 182 New Contrarian Investment Strategy, The (Dreman), 221–22 New Orleans Saints, 279 New York, 137 New Yorker, 90–91, 91, 92 New York Stock Exchange, 223, 226, 232, 248 New York Times, 292, 327, 328 New York Times Magazine, xv–xvi, 12 Next Restaurant, 138–39 NFL draft, 11, 277–91, 281, 283, 285, 286, 295 Nick (game show contestant), 304–5 Nielsen SoundScan, 135 Nixon, Richard, 363 Nobel, Alfred, 23n Nobel Prize, 23, 40, 207 no free lunch principle, 206, 207, 222, 225, 226n, 227, 230, 233–36, 234, 236, 251, 255 noise traders, 240–42, 247, 251 nomenclature, importance of, 328–29 Norman, Don, 326 normative theories, 25–27 “Note on the Measurement of Utility, A” (Samuelson), 89–94 no trade theorem, 217 Nudge (Thaler and Sunstein), 325–26, 330, 331–32, 333, 335, 345 nudges, nudging, 325–29, 359 number game, 211–14, 213 Obama, Barack, 22 occupations, dangerous, 14–15 Odean, Terry, 184 O’Donnell, Gus, 332–33 O’Donoghue, Ted, 110, 323 Odysseus, 99–100, 101 Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs (OIRA), 343–44 Office of Management and Budget, 343 offices, 270–76, 278 “one-click” interventions, 341–42 open-end funds, 238 opportunity costs, 17, 18, 57–58, 59, 73 of poor people, 58n optimal paternalism, 323 optimization, 5–6, 8, 27, 43, 161, 207, 365 Oreo experiment, 100–101, 102n, 178, 314 organizations, theory of, 105, 109 organs: donations of, 327–28 markets for, 130 Osborne, George, 331 Oullier, Olivier, 333 outside view, inside view vs., 186–87 overconfidence, 6, 52, 124, 355 and high trading volume in finance markets, 217–18 in NFL draft, 280, 295 overreaction: in financial markets, 219–20, 222–24, 225–29 generalized, 223–24 to sense of humor, 218, 219, 223 value stocks and, 225–29 Oxford Handbook of Behavioral Economics and the Law, 269 Palm and 3Com, 244–49, 246, 250, 348 paradigms, 167–68, 169–70 Pareto, Vilfredo, 93 parking tickets, 260 passions, 7, 88, 103 paternalism, 269, 322 dislike of term, 324 libertarian, 322, 323–25 path dependence, 298–300 “pay as you earn” system, 335 payment depreciation, 67 Pearl Harbor, Japanese bombing of, 232 P/E effect, 219–20, 222–23, 233, 235 pensions, 9, 198, 241, 320, 357–58 permanent income hypothesis, 95 Peter Principle, 293 pharmaceutical companies, 189–90 Pigou, Arthur, 88, 90 plane tickets, 138 planner-doer model, 104–10 Plott, Charlie, 40, 41, 48, 49, 148, 149, 177, 181 poker, 80, 81–82, 99 poor, 58n Posner, Richard, 259–61, 266 Post, Thierry, 296 poverty, decision making and, 371 Power, Samantha, 330 “Power of Suggestion, The” (Madrian and Shea), 315 practice, 50 predictable errors, 23–24 preferences: change in, 102–3 revealed, 86 well-defined, 48–49 pregnancy, teenage, 342 Prelec, Drazen, 179 Prescott, Edward, 191, 192 present bias (hyperbolic discounting), 91–92, 110, 227n and NFL draft, 280, 287 savings and, 314 presumed consent, in organ donations, 328–29 price controls, 363 price/earnings ratio (P/E), 219–20, 222–23, 233, 235 prices: buying vs. selling, 17, 18–19, 20, 21 rationality of, 206, 222, 230–33, 231, 237, 251–52 variability of stock, 230–33, 231, 367 price-to-rental ratios, 252 principal-agent model, 105–9, 291 Prisoner’s Dilemma, 143–44, 145, 301–5, 302 “Problem of Social Cost, The” (Coase), 263–64 profit maximization, 27, 30 promotional pricing strategy, 62n prompted choice (in organ donation), 327–29 prospect theory, 25–28, 295, 353 acceptance of, 38–39 and “as if” critique of behavioral economics, 46 and consumer choice, 55 and equity premium puzzle, 198 expected utility theory vs., 29 surveys used in experiments of, 38 psychological accounting, see mental accounting “Psychology and Economics Conference Handbook,” 163 “Psychology and Savings Policies” (Thaler), 310–13 Ptolemaic astronomy, 169–70 public goods, 144–45 Public Goods Game, 144–46 Punishment Game, 141–43, 146 Pythagorean theorem, 25–27 qualified default investment alternatives, 316 quantitative analysis, 293 Quarterly Journal of Economics, 197, 201 quasi-hyperbolic discounting, 91–92 quilt, 57, 59, 61, 65 Rabin, Matthew, 110, 181–83, 353 paternalism and, 323 racetracks, 80–81, 174–75 Radiolab, 305 randomized control trials (RCTs), 8, 338–43, 344, 371 in education, 353–54 Random Walk Down Walk Street, A (Malkiel), 242 rational expectations, 98, 191 in macroeconomics, 209 rational forecasts, 230–31 rationality: bounded, 23–24, 29, 162 Chicago debate on, 159–63, 167–68, 169, 170, 205 READY4K!

Stocks for the Long Run, 4th Edition: The Definitive Guide to Financial Market Returns & Long Term Investment Strategies by Jeremy J. Siegel

Amazon: amazon.comamazon.co.ukamazon.deamazon.fr

asset allocation, backtesting, Black-Scholes formula, Bretton Woods, buy low sell high, California gold rush, capital asset pricing model, cognitive dissonance, compound rate of return, correlation coefficient, Daniel Kahneman / Amos Tversky, diversification, diversified portfolio, dividend-yielding stocks, equity premium, Eugene Fama: efficient market hypothesis, fixed income, German hyperinflation, implied volatility, index arbitrage, index fund, Isaac Newton, joint-stock company, Long Term Capital Management, loss aversion, market bubble, mental accounting, new economy, oil shock, passive investing, prediction markets, price anchoring, price stability, purchasing power parity, random walk, Richard Thaler, risk tolerance, risk/return, Robert Shiller, Robert Shiller, Ronald Reagan, shareholder value, short selling, South Sea Bubble, technology bubble, The Great Moderation, The Wisdom of Crowds, transaction costs, tulip mania, Vanguard fund

CNBC became so popular that major investment houses made sure that all their brokers watched the station on television or their desktop computers so that they could be one step ahead of clients calling in with breaking business news. The bull market psychology appeared impervious to financial and economic shocks. The first wave of the Asian crisis, discussed further in Chapter 10, sent the market down a record 554 points on October 27, 1997, and closed trading temporarily. But this did little to dent investors’ enthusiasm for stocks. The following year, the Russian government defaulted on its bonds, and Long-Term Capital Management, considered the world’s premier hedge fund, found itself entangled in speculative positions measured in the trillions of dollars that it could not trade. Markets temporarily seized up, and the Federal Reserve facilitated a rescue of the fund in order to resuscitate financial markets. These events sent the Dow Industrials down almost 2,000 points, but three quick Fed rate cuts sent the market soaring again.

See the CBOE Web site (www.cboe.com) for more details on its calculation. 282 PART 4 Stock Fluctuations in the Short Run FIGURE 16–4 The CBOE Volatility Index (VIX), 1986 to 2006 170 90 October 19, 1987 Stock Crash LTCM Hedge Fund Bailout and Russia Default Terrorist Attacks 80 70 Collapse of UAL Buyout Asian Currency Crisis Oct. ’02 Market Trough 60 50 40 30 Iraq Invades Kuwait Iraq Invasion Beginning of Gulf War 20 10 0 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 In the early and mid-1990s, the Volatility Index sank to between 10 and 20. But with the onset of the Asian crises in 1997, the VIX moved up to a 20 to 30 range. Spikes between 50 and 60 in the VIX occurred on three occasions: when the Dow fell 550 points during the attack on the Hong Kong dollar in October 1987; in August 1998 when Long-Term Capital Management (LTCM) was liquidated; and in the week following the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001. In recent years, buying when the VIX is high and selling when it is low has proved to be a profitable strategy for the short term. But so has buying during market spills and selling during market peaks. The real question is how high is high and how low is low. For instance, an investor might have been tempted to buy into the market on Friday, October 16, 1987, when the VIX reached 40.

., 47, 48 374 Lakonishok, Josef, 295n, 304n, 308n Lampert, Eddie, 57 Lander, Joel, 113n Lane Bryant, 60i Large-cap stocks, small-cap stocks versus, 141–144, 142i LeBaron, Blake, 295n, 304n Legg Mason Value Trust, 348 Leroy, M., 65n Leverage, futures contracts and, 261 Liberty Acorn Fund, 346 Lichtenstein, S., 326n The Limited Stores, 156 Lintner, John, 140n Litzenberger, Robert, 145 Lo, Andrew, 304n, 327n Local risk, 169 London Stock Exchange, 188 Long-Term Capital Management (LTCM), 88, 282 Long-term returns, 12–14, 13i Lorie, James, 45, 84 Lorillard, 60i “The Loser’s Game” (Ellis), 350 Losing trades, holding on to, 328–330 Loss aversion, 328–330 myopic, 332–333 Lowenstein, Roger, 77q, 86 Lynch, Peter, 207q, 251q, 268, 346, 348 Lyondell Chemical, 48 Ma Bell, 57, 58 MacCauley, Frederick, 291 Mackay, Charles, 324 MacKinlay, Craig, 327n Maddison, Angus, 181n Magellan Fund, 345–346, 348 Major Market Index, stock market crash of 1987 and, 273 Malkiel, Burton, 303, 345n, 348 Mamaysky, Harry, 304n Marathon Oil Company, 57 Market capitalization, ratio to GDP, 120 Index Market expectation, 239 Market movements: causes of, 223–226, 224i, 225i political parties and, 227–228, 228i–230i, 230 terrorist attacks and, 221–223, 222i, 226 uncertainty and, 226–227 war and, 225, 231–235 Market orders, 275 Market peaks, returns from, 27, 28i Market timers, 27 Market valuation, 110–120 book value and, 117 corporate profits and national income and, 115–116, 116i Fed model and, 113–115, 114i price-earnings ratio for, 110–112, 111i, 112i Tobin Q and, 117–119, 118i value relative to GDP and other ratios and, 119–120, 119i, 120i Market value, 117 ratio to dividend yield, 120, 120i ratio to GDP, 120, 120i ratio to price-earnings ratio, 120, 120i Market volatility, 14, 269–287 circuit breakers and, 276–277 distribution of large daily changes and, 283–284, 284i economics of, 285–286 historical trends of, 278–279, 279i, 280i, 281 implied, 281 nature of, 277–278 recent, low, 283 significance of, 286–287 stock market crash of 1987 and, 271–276 VIX and, 281–282, 282i Markowitz, Harry, 159n Marsh, Paul, 18, 19n, 20 Marshall, John, 65q Martingale, 292n Materials sector, in GICS, 53 Matsushita Electric Industrial, 176 Mayer, Martin, 165n, 274n McGraw-Hill Book Co., 59i, 61 The McGraw-Hill Companies, 37 McGraw, James H., 61 McKinley, William, 226–227 McNees, Stephen K., 216 McQuaid, Charles, 346 Mean aversion, 30 Mean reversion, of equity returns, 13 Mean-variance efficiency, 354 Measuring Business Cycles (Mitchell), 209 Melamed, Leo, 165, 251q, 274 Melville, Frank, 61 Melville Shoe Corp., 59i, 61 MENA (Middle East and North Africa), 179 Mental accounting, 329 Mercantile Exchange, 256 Merck, 59i, 177 Merrill, Lynch, Pierce, Fenner & Smith, 45 Merton, Robert, 35n, 266n Metz, Michael, 86, 253 Meyers, Thomas A., 295–296 Michelin Group, 49 Microsoft, 38, 57n, 118, 144, 156, 158, 176i on Nasdaq, 44 Middle East: growing market share of, 178 oil reserves of, 178 Millennium Chemicals, 48 Miller, Bill, 348 Miller, G.


pages: 475 words: 155,554

The Default Line: The Inside Story of People, Banks and Entire Nations on the Edge by Faisal Islam

Amazon: amazon.comamazon.co.ukamazon.deamazon.fr

Asian financial crisis, asset-backed security, balance sheet recession, bank run, banking crisis, Basel III, Ben Bernanke: helicopter money, Berlin Wall, Big bang: deregulation of the City of London, British Empire, capital controls, carbon footprint, Celtic Tiger, central bank independence, centre right, collapse of Lehman Brothers, credit crunch, Credit Default Swap, crony capitalism, dark matter, deindustrialization, Deng Xiaoping, disintermediation, energy security, Eugene Fama: efficient market hypothesis, eurozone crisis, financial deregulation, financial innovation, financial repression, floating exchange rates, forensic accounting, forward guidance, full employment, ghettoisation, global rebalancing, global reserve currency, hiring and firing, inflation targeting, Irish property bubble, Just-in-time delivery, labour market flexibility, London Whale, Long Term Capital Management, margin call, market clearing, megacity, Mikhail Gorbachev, mini-job, mittelstand, moral hazard, mortgage debt, mortgage tax deduction, mutually assured destruction, North Sea oil, Northern Rock, offshore financial centre, open economy, paradox of thrift, pension reform, price mechanism, price stability, profit motive, quantitative easing, quantitative trading / quantitative finance, race to the bottom, regulatory arbitrage, reserve currency, reshoring, rising living standards, Ronald Reagan, savings glut, shareholder value, sovereign wealth fund, The Chicago School, the payments system, too big to fail, trade route, transaction costs, two tier labour market, unorthodox policies, uranium enrichment, urban planning, value at risk, working-age population

A clue was to be provided nine months later, not so far away – in Cyprus (see here). 2 Of Fiscal Criminals and Bond Vigilantes Dramatis personae Nick Clegg, UK Liberal Democrat leader Sir Mervyn King, governor of the Bank of England (2003–13) David Cameron, then leader of the UK Opposition James Carville, adviser to President Clinton Brian Edmonds, bond trader, Cantor Fitzgerald Anonymous hedge fund credit default swap trader George Soros, financier and philanthropist Jim Rickards, ex-Long-Term Capital Management (LTCM), lawyer, economist, trader Gordon Brown, British prime minister (2007–10) Jesse Norman, Conservative MP, member of the Treasury Select Committee Rachel Lomax, deputy governor of the Bank of England (2003–08) Dick Moore, mayor of Elkhart, Indiana, USA Robert Lucas, Nobel Prize in Economics. University of Chicago George Osborne, UK chancellor of the exchequer (2010– ) Robert Stheeman, chief executive, Debt Management Office Lord James Sassoon, commercial secretary to the UK Treasury John Moody, founder of Moody’s rating agency Corey Lovell, unemployed auto worker, selling his blood plasma Perhaps Antonio Clegg had picked up more of what was going on in Greece than his father.

Still, with returns of 800 to 1000 per cent possible, the gambit proved irresistible. Some senior bond-market participants believed that the very act of buying the insurance aggressively in markets that are less liquid than that of the underlying bonds actually contributed directly to the rise in interest rates paid on government bonds, and the sense of fear and panic. The market has at least an element of dangerous circularity. Jim Rickards used to work for Long-Term Capital Management (LTCM), which went belly-up in 1998. He describes the Big Euro Short as a ‘piñata party’ in which hedge funds were hunting as a feral pack, snapping at the soft underbellies of Greece, Italy and Spain. And then they watched as the money dropped out. He worried that the practice has ‘national security implications’, in that these three countries are all important Nato allies of the USA.

The arc of credit complexity that led to the crisis began more benignly here, at 1620 Montgomery Street, San Francisco. Vasicek’s first innovation was to assess the probability of individual corporate loans defaulting. He used information from share prices to calculate ‘asset values’, also known as ‘enterprise values’. It drew on the theories of two of his friends, the Nobel prize-winners Robert Merton and Myron Scholes (later to come to grief at Long Term Capital Management). Vasicek’s formula estimated a probability of default based on the movement and volatility of the share price. It was a more timely and useful measure than, say, a credit rating. KMV was surprisingly successful at selling these default predictions for vast sums to financiers sceptical about the assessments of the Big Three credit-ratings agencies. ‘We saved a lot of clients a lot of money on assorted Enrons,’ Vasicek told me.


pages: 1,336 words: 415,037

The Snowball: Warren Buffett and the Business of Life by Alice Schroeder

Amazon: amazon.comamazon.co.ukamazon.deamazon.fr

affirmative action, Albert Einstein, anti-communist, Ayatollah Khomeini, barriers to entry, Bonfire of the Vanities, Brownian motion, capital asset pricing model, card file, centralized clearinghouse, collateralized debt obligation, corporate governance, Credit Default Swap, credit default swaps / collateralized debt obligations, desegregation, Donald Trump, Eugene Fama: efficient market hypothesis, global village, Golden Gate Park, Haight Ashbury, haute cuisine, Honoré de Balzac, If something cannot go on forever, it will stop, In Cold Blood by Truman Capote, index fund, indoor plumbing, interest rate swap, invisible hand, Isaac Newton, Jeff Bezos, joint-stock company, joint-stock limited liability company, Long Term Capital Management, Louis Bachelier, margin call, market bubble, Marshall McLuhan, medical malpractice, merger arbitrage, Mikhail Gorbachev, moral hazard, NetJets, new economy, New Journalism, North Sea oil, paper trading, passive investing, pets.com, Plutocrats, plutocrats, Ponzi scheme, Ralph Nader, random walk, Ronald Reagan, Scientific racism, shareholder value, short selling, side project, Silicon Valley, Steve Ballmer, Steve Jobs, supply-chain management, telemarketer, The Predators' Ball, The Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith, Thomas Malthus, too big to fail, transcontinental railway, Upton Sinclair, War on Poverty, Works Progress Administration, Y2K, zero-coupon bond

Meriwether had to have supervision. He could return to his old position but would have to report to Maughan, with less freedom to run his operation. Unwilling to work under a shorter leash, Meriwether had broken off negotiations and in 1994 went off to found his own hedge fund, Long-Term Capital Management. It would operate the same way as the bond arbitrage unit at Salomon, except that Meriwether and his partners got to keep the profits. One by one, Meriwether’s key lieutenants left Salomon to join him at the new harbor-front offices of Long-Term Capital Management in Greenwich, Connecticut. Deprived of his biggest moneymakers, Deryck Maughan saw the “for sale” sign heading for Buffett’s block of stock and began planning for the day when Buffett would wash his hands of Salomon.13 In his 1996 shareholder letter, Buffett said that “virtually all stocks” were overvalued.

Right now he wears a subtle smile, which lends the wayward eyebrow a captivating air. Nonetheless, his pale-blue eyes are focused and intent. He sits surrounded by icons and mementos of fifty years. In the hallways outside his office, Nebraska Cornhuskers football photographs, his paycheck from an appearance on a soap opera, the offer letter (never accepted) to buy a hedge fund called Long-Term Capital Management, and Coca-Cola memorabilia everywhere. On the coffee table inside the office, a classic Coca-Cola bottle. A baseball glove encased in Lucite. Over the sofa, a certificate that he completed Dale Carnegie’s public-speaking course in January 1952. The Wells Fargo stagecoach, westbound atop a bookcase. A Pulitzer Prize, won in 1973 by the Sun Newspapers of Omaha, which his investment partnership owned.

Image 64 Warren and his sisters, Roberta Buffett Bialek (left) and Doris Buffett. Image 65 Totally focused on bridge while playing for the Corporate America bridge team against the U.S. Congress team in 1989. Image 66 With Kay Graham at her home on Martha’s Vineyard. Image 67 Improvising a toast at Bill and Melinda Gates’s wedding reception in 1994. Image 68 While on vacation with the Gateses during the Long-Term Capital Management crisis in 1998, Buffett tries to get satellite phone reception in the Grand Canyon. Image 69 Reunion of the original Graham Group in 1995. From the left: Buffett, Tom Knapp, Munger, Roy Tolles, Sandy Gottesman, Bill Scott, Marshall Weinberg, Walter Schloss, Ed Anderson, Bill Ruane. Image 70 Warren and Susie as Mickey and Minnie Mouse at an ABC-Cap Cities Event, 1997. Image 71 Buffett rides a camel in China during a 1995 trip with Bill and Melinda Gates.


pages: 272 words: 19,172

Hedge Fund Market Wizards by Jack D. Schwager

Amazon: amazon.comamazon.co.ukamazon.deamazon.fr

asset-backed security, backtesting, banking crisis, barriers to entry, Bernie Madoff, Black-Scholes formula, British Empire, Claude Shannon: information theory, cloud computing, collateralized debt obligation, commodity trading advisor, credit crunch, Credit Default Swap, credit default swaps / collateralized debt obligations, delta neutral, diversification, diversified portfolio, family office, financial independence, fixed income, Flash crash, hindsight bias, implied volatility, index fund, James Dyson, Long Term Capital Management, margin call, market bubble, market fundamentalism, merger arbitrage, oil shock, pattern recognition, pets.com, Ponzi scheme, private sector deleveraging, quantitative easing, quantitative trading / quantitative finance, risk tolerance, risk-adjusted returns, risk/return, riskless arbitrage, Sharpe ratio, short selling, statistical arbitrage, Steve Jobs, systematic trading, technology bubble, transaction costs, value at risk, yield curve

See also Greenblatt, Joel Graham, Ben Grantham, Jeremy Great Depression Greenblatt, Joel on education reform Magic Formula Value and Special Situation Investing course Value Investors Club Halcyon Investments Hand, Eddie Hedge funds Banyan Equity Management (see also Benedict, Larry) Baring Asset Management BlueCrest (see Platt, Michael) Bridgewater (see Dalio, Ray) Denali Asset Management (see Ramsey, Scott) Gotham Capital (see also Greenblatt, Joel) LTCM (Long Term Capital Management) Manalapan Oracle Capital Management (see also Vidich, Joe) Nevsky Fund (see also Taylor, Martin) Omni Global Fund (see Clark, Steve) Princeton Newport Partners (PNP) (see Thorp, Edward) Ridgeline Partners High-conviction trades Hockett, Ben Horizon Lines Host Marriott House, Gerry Housing bubble. See also Financial bubble of 2005–2007 Insurance Auto Auctions (IAAI) Intrinsic value Investment misconceptions Investors, pleasing James, Bill Jones, Paul Tudor Kassouf, Sheen Kellogg, Peter Kelly criterion Key3Media Keynes, John Maynard Kimmell, Emmanuel Klein, Joel Kovner, Bruce LEAPS Ledley, Charlie Lehman Brothers Lewis, Michael Liquidity vs. solvency The Little Book That Beats the Market (Greenblatt) Long, Simon Long Term Capital Management (LTCM) Long-term cycles LTCM (Long Term Capital Management) Macro outlook Madoff, Bernard Mai, Jamie Brazilian interest-rate trade investment strategy pillars subprime mortgages/bonds Manager selection Manalapan Oracle Capital Management Market behavior Marriott Mean reversion Measurement Specialties Merger arbitrage Micron Technology Milken, Michael Mistakes, learning from Mobius, Mark Monthly returns Mortgage-backed securities (MBSs).

We are not a force in pricing. One reason I like macro so much is because I am a small fish swimming in a sea of real money. Fundamentals matter. I am not playing a game against people like me. That would be a zero-sum, difficult game. Does there have to be an identifiable reason for every trade? Not necessarily. For example, before the 1998 financial crisis began, I didn’t even know who LTCM was. Long Term Capital Management (LTCM) was the most famous hedge fund failure in history. (Madoff may have been even more prominent, but his operation was a Ponzi scheme rather than a hedge fund. Madoff simply made up performance results and never did any trading.) In its first four years of operation, LTCM generated steady profits, quadrupling the starting net asset value. Then in a five-month period (May to September 1998), it all unraveled, with the net asset value of the fund plunging a staggering 92 percent.

See also Financial bubble of 2005–2007 Insurance Auto Auctions (IAAI) Intrinsic value Investment misconceptions Investors, pleasing James, Bill Jones, Paul Tudor Kassouf, Sheen Kellogg, Peter Kelly criterion Key3Media Keynes, John Maynard Kimmell, Emmanuel Klein, Joel Kovner, Bruce LEAPS Ledley, Charlie Lehman Brothers Lewis, Michael Liquidity vs. solvency The Little Book That Beats the Market (Greenblatt) Long, Simon Long Term Capital Management (LTCM) Long-term cycles LTCM (Long Term Capital Management) Macro outlook Madoff, Bernard Mai, Jamie Brazilian interest-rate trade investment strategy pillars subprime mortgages/bonds Manager selection Manalapan Oracle Capital Management Market behavior Marriott Mean reversion Measurement Specialties Merger arbitrage Micron Technology Milken, Michael Mistakes, learning from Mobius, Mark Monthly returns Mortgage-backed securities (MBSs). See also Subprime mortgages/bonds Moscowitz, Eva Net exposure indicator Net exposure ranges Net working capital Nevsky Fund Newberg, Bruce Newport Corporation New revenue sources News, market response to 9/11 Nomura Normal distribution assumption Obama, Barack October 1987 crash Omni Global Fund Optionality, free Options carry currencies vs. CDSs overview of O’Shea, Colm OTC (over-the-counter) markets Overnight index swap (OIS) Paramount Resources P/E ratio Performance, correlation between past and future Petrominerales Petry, John Planet Money (radio show) Platinum Platt, Michael Position size Princeton Newport Partners (PNP) Productivity growth Pure Alpha fund Put option.


pages: 310 words: 90,817

Paper Money Collapse: The Folly of Elastic Money and the Coming Monetary Breakdown by Detlev S. Schlichter

Amazon: amazon.comamazon.co.ukamazon.deamazon.fr

bank run, banks create money, British Empire, capital controls, Carmen Reinhart, central bank independence, currency peg, Fractional reserve banking, German hyperinflation, global reserve currency, inflation targeting, Kenneth Rogoff, Long Term Capital Management, market clearing, Martin Wolf, means of production, moral hazard, mortgage debt, open economy, Ponzi scheme, price discovery process, price mechanism, price stability, pushing on a string, quantitative easing, reserve currency, rising living standards, risk tolerance, savings glut, the market place, The Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith, Thorstein Veblen, transaction costs, Y2K

As the new money mainly lifted the prices of stocks, bonds, and increasingly houses, and as the ongoing but comparatively moderate price increases in the standard “consumption basket” were judged to be acceptable, money-fueled credit expansion was tolerated and actively supported by the central bank. Since the late 1990s the Fed has on various occasions successfully extended the credit boom: in 1998, when the collapse of the Long Term Capital Management hedge fund and the default of Russia threatened to kick off a wave of international deleveraging; toward the end of 1999, when the Fed injected substantial amounts of money prohibitively out of concern about potential computer problems related to Y2K; between 2001 and 2004, after the Enron and WorldCom corporate failures and the bursting of the NASDAQ bubble, when the Fed left interest rates at 1 percent for three years.

See also money, paper money individualism industrial commodities Industrial Revolution inelastic money inelastic, elastic versus inflation commodity money and paper money and inflationary meltdown inflationism international policy coordination and interest interest rates rising international capital flows international market exchange International Monetary Fund (IMF) interventionism investing investment activity J Jackson, Andrew Jacobson Schwartz, Anna Jefferson, Thomas Jevons, William Stanley Jin Dynasty K Keynes, John Maynard Keynesianism Keynesians L laissez-faire Law, John Lehman Brothers lender of last resort lending activity, money as enhancer liquidity, tightening loan market, money injection via Long Term Capital Management M macroeconomics political appeal of problems with Malthus, Robert market economy Marx, Karl Massachusetts, paper money and medium of exchange money as multiple supply meltdown, inflationary Menger, Carl Mill, James Ming Dynasty misallocation of capital Mises, Ludwig von Monetarism monetary base monetary crisis theory Monetary History of the United States monetary intervention monetary policy Monetary Regimes and Inflation monetary stability, price level and monetization, of debt of government debt money as enhancer of lending activity bank versus individual ownership demand for evolution of functions of nationalization of origin of ownership of purpose of money balances money creation money demand money supply without wealth demand versus money injections even and nontransparent even, instant, and transparent price stability and uneven and nontransparent via loan market money production cost other goods versus money supply controlling expanding money demand without relative prices and N Napoleonic Wars NASDAQ nationalization, credit and money Neoclassical School of Economics New Deal Nixon, Richard M.


pages: 342 words: 99,390

The greatest trade ever: the behind-the-scenes story of how John Paulson defied Wall Street and made financial history by Gregory Zuckerman

Amazon: amazon.comamazon.co.ukamazon.deamazon.fr

1960s counterculture, banking crisis, collapse of Lehman Brothers, collateralized debt obligation, Credit Default Swap, credit default swaps / collateralized debt obligations, financial innovation, fixed income, index fund, Isaac Newton, Long Term Capital Management, margin call, Mark Zuckerberg, Menlo Park, merger arbitrage, mortgage debt, mortgage tax deduction, Ponzi scheme, Renaissance Technologies, rent control, Robert Shiller, Robert Shiller, rolodex, short selling, Silicon Valley, statistical arbitrage, Steve Ballmer, Steve Wozniak, technology bubble

The hedge-fund honchos disclosed very little of what they were up to, even to their own clients, creating an air of mystery about them. Each of the legendary hedge-fund managers suffered deep losses in the late 1990s or in 2000, however, much as Hall of Fame ballplayers often stumble in the latter years of their playing days, sending a message that even the “"stars”" couldn’'t best the market forever. The 1998 collapse of mega–-hedge fund Long-Term Capital Management, which lost 90 percent of its value over a matter of months, also put a damper on the industry, while cratering global markets. By the end of the 1990s, there were just 515 hedge funds in existence, managing less than $500 billion, a pittance of the trillions managed by traditional investment managers. It took the bursting of the high-technology bubble in late 2000, and the resulting devastation suffered by investors who stuck with a conventional mix of stocks and bonds, to raise the popularity and profile of hedge funds.

“"Well, we just want to see a level of stability,”" one investor said. “"John didn’'t fit the profile of the average hedge-fund manger. He was living downtown in SoHo and in the Hamptons. He had a different lifestyle than [what the] institutional investors were used to seeing,”" Novello says. Paulson’'s fund was hurt by 1998’'s Russian-debt default, the implosion of the giant hedge fund Long-Term Capital Management, and the resulting market tumult. His patience wore thin with one employee, Dennis Chu, who was left frazzled and unable to make clear recommendations to his boss. “"Just tell me what you think,”" Paulson screamed at Chu, who eventually left the firm. Sometimes Paulson hinted at what might have been aggravating him, claiming that competitors and friends seemed to be pulling away.


pages: 311 words: 17,232

Living in a Material World: The Commodity Connection by Kevin Morrison

Amazon: amazon.comamazon.co.ukamazon.deamazon.fr

barriers to entry, Berlin Wall, carbon footprint, clean water, commodity trading advisor, diversified portfolio, Doha Development Round, Elon Musk, energy security, European colonialism, flex fuel, food miles, Hernando de Soto, Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall, hydrogen economy, Long Term Capital Management, new economy, North Sea oil, oil rush, oil shale / tar sands, oil shock, out of africa, peak oil, price mechanism, Ronald Coase, Ronald Reagan, Silicon Valley, sovereign wealth fund, the payments system, The Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith, trade liberalization, transaction costs, uranium enrichment, young professional

Amaranth lost $2 billion on its natural gas positions over a two-week period to the middle of September 2006, which led to the Greenwich Connecticut-based hedge fund liquidating its entire $8 billion portfolio US Senate Permanent Subcommittee on Investigations and Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs (2007). Amaranth reported the single greatest losses TRADERS | 247 ever by a hedge fund, even more than the losses of Long Term Capital Management (LTCM). The collapse of Amaranth highlighted the vast sums that are moved in commodity markets, the fact that the US natural gas markets are notoriously volatile, the predatory nature that some funds display when they are able to borrow large amounts of money and the secretive nature in which some of the markets still operate. But, as with the Hunt brothers’ attempt to corner the silver market, Amaranth (Mr Hunter) was not bigger than the market.

(Comex) 255 Commodity Future Trading Commission (CFTC) (US) 74, 253, 263 commodity indices 240–2 commodity market manipulation 245–7 Commodity Trading Advisors (CTAs) 238 Congo, copper in 201, 202, 210–11 | 293 Connaughton, James 29, 31 ConocoPhilips 57, 79 Conservation International 93 Continental Power Exchange (CPE) 257, 258 Cooke, Jay 198, 222 n. 18 copper 4, 9, 11 applications 187–90 Congo 201, 202, 210–11 cost 211–13, 214–17 demand 182–5 electrical applications 186–7 in electricity generation 194–5 history 185–6 prices 199–201, 222 n. 17 production 195–8, 199 recycling 183, 184–5 theft 179–82 trade 211–13 under-sea extraction 217 in vehicles 190–4 Copper Export Association 201 Copper Exporters Incorporated 201 Copper Producers’ Association 200 coralconnect.com 260 corn 68–84, 96–8, 98–9, 99–101 hybrids 101–3 GM 104–6 diversity 106–10 Corn Products 233 cotton 166 Countryside Alliance 146 credit crisis (2007) 7 Crocker, Thomas 138 Cruse, Richard 111 D1 Oils 57, 58, 59 Dabhol gas-fired power plant 35 Dales, John 138 Daly, Herman 136 Darwin, Charles 67 Davis, Adam 157 Davis, Miles 183 Day after Tomorrow, The 15 n. 1 De Angelis, Anthony ‘Tino’ 245 De Beers 200, 210 De Soto, Hernando 136 Deere, John 100 deforestation 87, 147 Dennis, Richard 237 Deripaska, Oleg 199 Deutsche Bank 246, 261 294 | INDEX Diamond, Jared 97 DiCaprio, Leonardo 130 Dimas, Stavros 160 distillers’ dried grains with solubles (DDGS) 81 Dittar, Thomas 231 Donchian, Richard 237–8 Donson, Harry 199 dot.com bubble 7, 14, 241, 243 Doud, Gregg 82, 83 Dow Jones-AIG Commodity Index 240 Dresdner Kleinwort 47 Drexel Burnham Lambert 254 Dreyfus, Louis 89 Duke Energy 258 Dunavant, Billy 237 DuPont 102 E85 79 Ealet, Isabelle 259, 260 Earth Sanctuatires 157 Earth Summit Bali 142 Rio 1992 141 Ebay 38 Ecosystem Marketplace 157 Edison, Thomas 17, 95, 186 Ehrlich, Paul 13, 14, 16 n. 9 Population Bomb, The 14 Eisenhower, President 40 El Paso 258 Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) 153 electric vehicles 54, 191–3 11th Hour, The 130 Elf 261 Elton, Ben 135 Emissions Trading Program 139 Energy Information Administration (EIA) 38 Energy Policy Act 2005 (US) 28 energy security 28–9 Energy Security Act 1980 (US) 74 Enron 35, 164, 165, 213, 246, 257–64 Enron Online 213, 225 n. 40, 257, 258, 259 Environmental Protection Agency (US) 27, 62 n. 17, 75, 139 ethanol 69–70, 73–81, 92, 119 n. 6 see also biofuels Eurex 262 European Climate Exchange 146 European Union 142, 158, 160 Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment (WEEE) 185 Evelyn, John 127 exchange-traded funds (ETFs) 13, 270 Exxon 32, 50, 52, 261 ExxonMobil 13, 79, 242, 254 Faraday, Michael 186 Farm Credit Administration 76 farm debt crisis 114–15 farm payments 115–16 farm sinks 154–5 Fearnley-Whittingstall 86 Federal Bureau of Investigation 246 Federal Clean Water Act (US) 156 F-gases 131 Firewire 260 Fisher, Mark 266, 269 Fleming, Roddy 219 flex-fuel cars 92–3 Fonda, Jane 114 Food and Agricultural Organization 148, 159 Ford, Bill 267 Ford, President Gerald 30, 115 Ford, Henry 73, 95, 195 Fordlandia 195 forest economics 149–50 forestry carbon credits 147 forests 147–51 Forrest, Andrew 199 Forward Contracts (Regulations) Act 1952 (US) 249 Forward Markets Commission (FMC) 249 Four Winds Capital Management 149, 159, 184 Franklin, Benjamin 157 Freese, Barbara 27 Friedland, Robert 199 Frost Fairs 127 fuel cell vehicles 53, 192–3 Futures Inc. 237 futures trading 235–6, 245, 247–50 gas 21–2 Gas Exporting Countries Forum (GECF) 61 n. 8 gasohol 73 gene shuffling 105 General Atlantic 267, 269 General Motors 53, 54, 191, 193 INDEX genetically modified organism (GMO) seeds 105–6 Glencore 199, 211 Global Forest Resources Assessment 2005 148 Global Initiatives173 n. 28 Global Positioning Systems (GPS) 191 global warming 24–6, 75 Globex 267 glycerin 82 Golder and Associates 206 Goldman 255, 260, 261 Goldman Sachs 57, 146, 254, 259 Goldman Sachs Commodity Index (GSCI) 240, 241 Goldstein Samuelson 245 Google 37, 38 Gore, Al 16 n. 5, 28, 38, 126, 129, 143 Government National Mortgage Association (Ginnie Mae) certificates 146 Grant, President Ulysses S. 214 Greenburg, Marty 269 greenhouse effect 131 greenhouse gas emissions 25, 131 see also carbon dioxide; nitrous oxide Greenspan, Alan 244 Gresham Investment Management 242, 243 Guggenheim brothers 197 Guttman, Lou 251, 255, 259 Hamanaka, Yasuo 246 Hanbury-Tension, Robin 146 Harding, President Warren 103 hedge funds 23640 Henry Moore Foundation 180, 181 Herfindahl, Orris 215, 226 n. 46 Heston, Charlton 15, n. 4 Hezbollah 46 Hi-Bred Corn Company 102 high fructose corn syrup (HFCS) 89–90 Highland Star 219 Hill, James Jerome 215 Homestead Act 1862 (US) 100 Honda 53 Howard, John 133, 171 n. 16 Hu Jintao, President 219 Hub, Henry 257 Humphries, Jon 181 Hunt Brothers 245 Hunter, Brian 246, 247 | 295 Hurricane Katrina 135 Hurricane Rita 134 Hussein, Saddam 48 hybrid cars 53 hydroelectric power 34 hydrogen cars 54 hypoxia zone 111 iAqua 165 IEA 32 IMF 16 n. 6 Inconvenient Truth, An 16 n. 5, 129 Indonesia palm oil 93–4 Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) 31–2 intelligent lighting 38 IntercontinentalExchange (ICE) 246, 261, 262, 265, 266, 267 Intergovernmental Council of Copper Exporting Countries (CIPEC) 203, 204 International Bauxite Association (IBA) 203 International Carbon Action Partnership (ICAP) 144 International Commercial Exchange (ICE) 273 n. 15 International Copper Cartel 201 International Energy Agency (IEA) 19, 25, 26, 40, 140–1, 153, 194 International Monetary Fund 57 International Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) (UN) 24, 132, 134, 147, 149, 170 n. 3 International Petroleum Exchange (IPE) 250, 256, 257, 262, 263, 264, 265 International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) 41 International Tin Council 203 International Treaty on Plant Genetic Resources for Food and Agriculture 107 Iowa Farm Bureau 36, 76, 155 Iowa Stored Energy Park 36 Japanese car market 18 Jardine Matheson 225 n. 40 Jarecki, Dr Henry 242, 243, 244 jatropha 57–9 Jefferson, Thomas 109 Jevons, William Stanley 20 Joint, Charles 181 296 | INDEX Joint Implementation (JI) 151 Jones, Paul Tudor 237, 238 Kabila, Joseph 210 Kanza, T.R. 211 Katanga of Congo 201, 225 n. 37 Kennecott Copper 199 Kennedy, Joseph (Joe) 264 Khosla Partners 38 Khosla, Vinod 37 Kitchen, Louise 258 Kleiner Perkins, Caufield & Byers 37 Kooyker, Willem 237, 238 Kovner, Bruce 237, 238 Krull, Pete 81 Kyoto Protocol 24, 27, 50, 140, 141, 142, 143, 147, 151, 169 n. 2, 194 clean development mechanism (CDM) 151 Lamkey, Kendall 112 Land and Water Resources, Inc. 155 Land Grant College Act (US) 101 Lange, Jessica 114 lead credits 172 n. 20 LED (light-emitting diodes) 38 Lehman brothers 241 Leiter, Joseph 245 Leopold II, King 210 Liebreich, Michael 39 Liffe 267 Lincoln, President Abraham 69, 100, 101, 119 n. 1 Lintner, Dr John 243 liquid coal 33–4 London Clearing House 263 London International Financial Futures and Options Exchange (Liffe) 262 London Metal Exchange (LME) 16 n. 10, 43, 196, 204, 212, 213, 246 Long Term Capital Management (LTCM) 247 Louisiana Light Sweet 253 Lourey, Richard 166, 168 Lovelock, James 131 Lyme Timber Company, The 149 Mackintosh, John 232, 234, 270 Madonna 6 malaria 156 Malthus, Thomas 130 manure lagoons 154–5 Mao, Chairman 210 Markowitz, Harry 243 Marks, Jan 268 Marks, Michel 252, 253, 254, 268 Marks, Rebecca 164, 165 Mars, Forrest E., Jr 60 Matheson, Hugh 225 n. 40 Matif 262 McCain, John 80 McDonalds 89 Megatons to Megawatts programme 42 Melamed, Leo 249–50, 264 Mendel, Gregor (Johann) 102, 122 n. 30 Merrill Lynch 241, 246 Mesa Water 163–4 methane 128, 131, 152, 154 methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE) 74 Microsoft 13 Midwestern Regional Greenhouse Gas Reduction Accord 143 milk 88–9 Milken, Michael 254 Millennium Ecosystem Assessment Board 156 Mittal, Laskma 212 Mobile 261 Mocatta Metals 242 Monsanto 106, 108 Montéon, Michael 199 Montgomery, David 138 Moor Capital 237 Moore, Henry 179, 182 Morgan, J.P. 246 Morgan Stanley 254, 255, 259, 260, 261 Muir, John 125 Mulholland, William 162 Murphy, Eddie 256 Murray Darling Basin 165–6 Musk, Elon 38 Nabisco 238–9 Nanosolar 38 Nasdaq 262 Nassar, President 210 National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) 192 National Alcohol Programme (Brazil) 92 National Cattlemen’s Beef Association 82 National Commission on Supplies and Shortages (US) 7, 16 n. 5 National Corn Growers’ Association 80 National Energy Policy (US) 28 INDEX National Petroleum Council (NPC) 30, 50 National Security Space Office (NSSO) (US) 39 NCDEX 248, 249 Nelson, Willie 115 New Deal Farm Laws 103 New Deal for Agriculture 76, 89 New Energy Finance 39 New Farm and Forest Products Task Force 95 New York Board of Trade 240, 255 New York Cocoa Exchange 255 New York Coffee and Sugar Exchange 255 New York Cotton Exchange 237, 252, 255 New York Mercantile Exchange (Nymex) 43, 156, 246, 248, 251, 252, 253, 254, 255, 256, 257, 261, 262, 263, 264, 265, 266, 267, 268, 269 New York Metal Exchange 226 n. 42 New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) 198, 253, 255, 256, 264, 268, 270 Newman, Paul 265 Nicholson, Jack 162 nickel 217–18, 227 n. 50, 227 n. 52 nitrates 110–11 nitrogen oxide emissions 139 nitrous oxide 131, 139, 140, 152 Nixon, President 27, 30, 115, 231, 252 Noble Group 199 North, John Thomas 198, 199, 209 Norton, Gale 163 nuclear energy 34 nuclear power 21, 39–44 Nuexco Trading Corporation 42 Nybot 255, 256, 265 Obama, Barack 79, 80, 143 obesity 121 n. 19 O’Connor, Edmund 231 O’Connor, William 231 OECD 158, 159 oil 44–53 energy content 51–2 palm 93 prices 8–9, 10, 52–3 sands 49–50 shale 50–1, 64 n. 33 shocks 5, 7 soya 82 trading 250–5, 266 Oliver, Jamie 86 onion futures trading 245 | 297 Ontario Teachers’ Fund 244, 272 n. 8 Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (Opec) 4, 9, 10, 22, 44–7, 203, 204, 251, 254 over-the-counter (OTC) trading 16 n. 8, 254–5 Owens Valley rape (1908) 162 Pachauri, Dr Rajendra K. 59 Page, Larry 38 Paley Commission 8 palm oil 93 Palmer, Fred 62 n. 14 Parthenon Capital 156, 267 PayPal 38 Peadon, Brian 165 perfluorocarbon 131 PGGM 244 Phaunos Timber Fund 149 Phelps Dodge 199 Phibro 254 Pickens, T.


pages: 223 words: 10,010

The Cost of Inequality: Why Economic Equality Is Essential for Recovery by Stewart Lansley

Amazon: amazon.comamazon.co.ukamazon.deamazon.fr

banking crisis, Basel III, Big bang: deregulation of the City of London, Bonfire of the Vanities, borderless world, Branko Milanovic, Bretton Woods, British Empire, business process, call centre, capital controls, collective bargaining, corporate governance, correlation does not imply causation, credit crunch, Credit Default Swap, crony capitalism, David Ricardo: comparative advantage, deindustrialization, Edward Glaeser, falling living standards, financial deregulation, financial innovation, Financial Instability Hypothesis, floating exchange rates, full employment, Goldman Sachs: Vampire Squid, high net worth, hiring and firing, Hyman Minsky, income inequality, James Dyson, Jeff Bezos, job automation, Joseph Schumpeter, Kenneth Rogoff, knowledge economy, laissez-faire capitalism, Long Term Capital Management, low skilled workers, manufacturing employment, market bubble, Martin Wolf, mittelstand, mobile money, Mont Pelerin Society, new economy, Nick Leeson, North Sea oil, Northern Rock, offshore financial centre, oil shock, Plutocrats, plutocrats, Plutonomy: Buying Luxury, Explaining Global Imbalances, rising living standards, Robert Shiller, Robert Shiller, Ronald Reagan, savings glut, shareholder value, The Great Moderation, The Spirit Level, The Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith, Thomas Malthus, too big to fail, Tyler Cowen: Great Stagnation, Washington Consensus, Winter of Discontent, working-age population

While the funds made big money, they helped deepen the economic turbulence facing the countries concerned, from South Korea to Indonesia. Mahathir Mohamad, the Malaysian Prime Minister, called them ‘rogue speculators’ for helping to precipitate the crisis. What had been created was a financial system in which emerging countries could suffer great floods of ‘hot money’ followed by great droughts, hardly a sound basis for stability or growth. A year later, the largest of America’s hedge funds—the Greenwich-based Long Term Capital Management—had to be bailed out by a consortium of Wall Street banks to the tune of $3.6 billion to save the fund. It had been brought to its knees by a mix of poor investments and massive over-leverage. Leveraging offers potentially higher profits but only by greatly increasing the risk. As traders describe the risk, funds can ‘eat like chickens but shit like elephants’. Leveraged one hundred times, LTCM had been turned into an elephant.

According to their architects, by anticipating and controlling the level of risk, finance could increase the level of liquidity in the markets and improve the level of efficiency with which resources were allocated, thus enabling a higher level of national and world economic activity. This claim seemed to be vindicated when two hedge fund partners, Myron Scholes and Robert Merton, won the Nobel Prize for economics in 1997. Their Greenwichbased firm, Long Term Capital Management had been founded by John Meriwether, a former highly successful bond trader at Salomon, Lewis’s boss and widely believed to be the inspiration for the Bonfire of the Vanities , Tom Wolf’s 1980s novel of Wall Street excess. For a while the heavily-leveraged operation grew to be one of the most lucrative of the American hedge funds. Even when their award-winning formula failed and LTCM collapsed in 1998, nearly bringing Wall Street down with it, the modelling and recruitment continued.


pages: 576 words: 105,655