union organizing

241 results back to index


pages: 423 words: 92,798

No Shortcuts: Organizing for Power in the New Gilded Age by Jane F. McAlevey

affirmative action, Affordable Care Act / Obamacare, Albert Einstein, anti-communist, call centre, clean water, collective bargaining, feminist movement, hiring and firing, immigration reform, informal economy, Mark Zuckerberg, mass incarceration, Naomi Klein, new economy, Occupy movement, precariat, Right to Buy, Ronald Reagan, Silicon Valley, Silicon Valley startup, single-payer health, The Chicago School, union organizing, Upton Sinclair, women in the workforce

Faith-based organizing has no such exigencies, and faith-based organizers and organizations often take several years to build to something like an initial majority or to take a first action.18 For all of these reasons, union organizers, much more than faith-based organizers, must hone their skills in identifying organic leaders, persuading constituents, and developing what union organizers call structure tests. Of course, since the McCarthy era, most unions haven’t even attempted to organize unorganized workers, run strikes, or win high-participation contract-ratification votes.19 This book’s purpose is to draw lessons for power building from the best examples of success under the most difficult conditions. This book is not about union organizing; it is about organizing. That unions are the focus is a hint to social scientists and the intelligentsia that the failure to study or understand unions as social movements has resulted in a lack of understanding of the most effective way to build power.

Today’s organizers of faith-based groups don’t face conditions anything like today’s union organizers; there is no well-funded effort to prevent them from engaging individual people of faith in their effort to win over a majority of the flock. On the contrary, faith-based organizers are generally welcomed with open arms.16 When the structure is the workplace, the official leader of that structure, the company’s chief executive, declares war on the employees at the first hint of a unionization effort, using tactics that often include threatening to fire any worker who talks with the organizers.17 Organizers, whether paid professionals or volunteers from another, already organized facility, are forbidden by law from entering an unorganized workplace. This alone is a radical difference from faith-based settings; it means union organizers have to be really good at the art of what is called the one-on-one conversation, often the first engagement between organizers and potential recruits.

Likewise, scholars assume that material gain is the primary concern of unions, missing that workplace fights are most importantly about one of the deepest of human emotional needs: dignity. The day in, day out degradation of peoples’ self-worth is what can drive workers to form the solidarity needed to face today’s union busters. Earning my doctorate after long practical experience—as a young, radical student leader, then as a community organizer, a full-time educator at the Highlander Center, and, eventually, a union organizer and chief negotiator and an electoral campaign manager—I find it impossible to sort the process of progressive social change into two distinct piles or traditions. All of the unions I worked with were by any definition social movements, characterized by progressive goals that reached well beyond the workplace; prefigurative decision-making; and robust participation by workers, their families, and their communities.


pages: 382 words: 107,150

We Are All Fast-Food Workers Now: The Global Uprising Against Poverty Wages by Annelise Orleck

airport security, American Legislative Exchange Council, anti-communist, Bernie Sanders, big-box store, British Empire, call centre, Capital in the Twenty-First Century by Thomas Piketty, card file, clean water, collective bargaining, corporate social responsibility, deindustrialization, Deng Xiaoping, Donald Trump, Ferguson, Missouri, financial deregulation, Food sovereignty, gig economy, global supply chain, global value chain, immigration reform, indoor plumbing, Kickstarter, land reform, land tenure, Mahatma Gandhi, mass immigration, McJob, means of production, new economy, payday loans, precariat, race to the bottom, Rana Plaza, rent-seeking, ride hailing / ride sharing, road to serfdom, Ronald Reagan, Rosa Parks, shareholder value, Skype, special economic zone, Triangle Shirtwaist Factory, union organizing, War on Poverty, women in the workforce, working poor

They’ve faced physical violence from police and company guards. And they have prevailed. When NagaWorld fired four hundred workers, Chhim negotiated hard and won them their jobs back. Journalists compared the women’s militancy to that of textile workers in the 1970s American South. “NagaWorld Staff Go Norma Rae,” one headline blared. Norma Rae was the fictional name given to North Carolina textile union organizer Crystal Lee Sutton, played by Sally Field in the 1979 Oscar-winning film. In Cambodia, where two-thirds of workers are under thirty, Norma Rae and the J. P. Stevens textile strike immortalized in the film are relics of a distant time and place. Still, the young Cambodian rebel girls enjoyed the comparison. Like so many in this new global uprising, Chhim is serious about teaching her members labor history.

In Johannesburg, Accra, Providence, Karachi, and London, hotel housekeepers demanded lighter duties for pregnant workers, and panic buttons that housekeepers can push to bring help if a man corners them inside a room. In Chicago, workers staged “Hands Off, Pants On” protests. Before the protests, UNITE HERE released a study showing that half of hotel housekeepers and three-quarters of casino workers experience unwanted sexual advances. The need is clear.16 Philippine garment union organizer Asuncion Binos held a press conference condemning politicians for placing corporate profits over the safety of women workers. “It is lamentable that our lawmakers have always struggled to pass laws and craft policies for . . . global competitiveness,” she said, “but leave behind women’s protection.” Failure to grant generous maternity leave harms women and children, she said. “Studies show that mothers need 120 days to fully recover from giving birth, to breast-feed and establish the routine for her newborn, and to make arrangements necessary for a smooth transition back to work.”

Housekeepers showed up at city council hearings when the Procaccianti Group sought permits to construct new buildings. In October 2015, when workers at the Renaissance voted to unionize, Brito felt victorious. She still struggles with pain, but life is now getting better, she says. Union housekeepers clean fewer rooms and have more time to finish their work, so they no longer feel like cleaning machines. Union organizing has also made Brito feel more human, she says. She enjoys speaking at rallies, bargaining, helping other workers give their children a brighter future. By 2017, with Rhode Island’s minimum still only $9.60 an hour, service workers seeking raises began reaching out to sympathetic business owners. Jeremiah Tolbert, owner of Jerry’s Beauty Salon in Providence, became a spokesperson. He upped his workers’ wages to $15, then invited the press to explain why.


pages: 152 words: 40,733

A Few Red Drops: The Chicago Race Riot of 1919 by Claire Hartfield

desegregation, Ferguson, Missouri, indoor plumbing, new economy, Ralph Waldo Emerson, refrigerator car, strikebreaker, union organizing

The bosses maintained the upper hand by staying united, decade after decade. When Gustavus Swift died suddenly in 1903, acknowledged by the Tribune as having “revolutionized the industry,” his son Louis filled his shoes without missing a beat. In contrast, time after time, quarrels between skilled and unskilled laborers left the work force weak and defeated. In 1903, the meatpacking laborers got a new leader, a passionate union organizer named Michael Donnelly. Their union, the Amalgamated Meat Cutters and Butcher Workmen of North America, also got a new motto: Unity of all rank and file workers, “from the man who takes the bullock on the hoof until it goes into the hands of the consumer.” It was a new day. Interpreters were enlisted to reach out to workers in their own native languages and to translate speeches for them at rallies.

President Wilson needed a steady production of meat from the Stock Yard to feed the hungry troops. A workers’ strike could cut off food supplies, jeopardizing the war effort. Wilson was not about to let that happen. He took charge, stripping away the right to strike and appointing Judge Samuel Alschuler as federal administrator to arbitrate all disputes between the packers and the union. In February 1918, the union organized the people of Packingtown to tell their story to Judge Alschuler. Referring to a novel published in 1906 about Packingtown’s crumbling, disease-ridden community, union leader William Z. Foster commented, “It was as if the characters in The Jungle, quickened to life, had come to tell their story from the witness chair.” Union lawyers highlighted the inequities of the laborers’ lot by putting Louis Swift and other packinghouse owners on the witness stand to describe their own luxurious homes and lifestyles.

The Defender called them out: “Capital has not played square with us; it has used us as strikebreakers, then when the calm came turned us adrift.” Union leaders continued to press for unity, but they were talking against a tide of hate and mistrust. Whites wanted to force blacks to join the union. Blacks continued to resist. On the shop floor, fights broke out on a regular basis—barrages of racial and ethnic slurs, sometimes supported by guns and knives. Whites complained of black agitators who physically intimidated union organizers. One white union man accused a black laborer of threatening to split him open with a meat cleaver. Blacks complained of having bricks thrown at them. One man recalled, “Six or seven or eight Polocks [sic] grabbed a colored fellow out there . . . and said, ‘you son-of-a-bitch, you will join the union,’ . . . and one had him by this arm, and the other by this arm, and one fellow had him by the neck.”


Magical Urbanism: Latinos Reinvent the US City by Mike Davis

affirmative action, Berlin Wall, business cycle, clean water, collective bargaining, deindustrialization, desegregation, edge city, illegal immigration, immigration reform, Internet Archive, invisible hand, job automation, longitudinal study, manufacturing employment, market bubble, mass immigration, new economy, occupational segregation, postnationalism / post nation state, Ronald Reagan, Silicon Valley, strikebreaker, union organizing, upwardly mobile, urban renewal, War on Poverty, white flight, white picket fence, women in the workforce, working poor

Economy," paper presented to the 17th International Congress of the Latin American Studies Association, Los Angeles, 253. Catherine Fisk, Daniel Mitchell Immigrant Janitors in Southern California," conference paper, 'Immigrants and Union Organizing in California," 254. The Sept. 1992. and Christopher Erickson, "Union Representation of May 1998. labor joumalist David Bacon has written scores of insightful articles covering both the labor upsurge in Southern California and the first stirrings of independent union- New Immigrants, Old Unions: Organizing Undocumented Workers in Los Angeles, Philadelphia 1993; "The Los Ange- ism les in the border maquiladoras. In addition, see Hector Delgado, Manvifacturing Action Project: Lessons Learned, an Opportunity Squandered?" (about at a tortilla company); Jose Vadi, "From 'Scabs' to Pathfinders: Workers in Southern California and Global Economic Restructuring," paper presented to Western Social Science Association, Albuquerque, N.M., April 1994; an organizing campaign Militant Latino SEIU, A PennyforJustice: Janitors and L.A.

Equally, renaissance of American labor close at hand, it if will for there be emis a a story in which Latinos, along with Blacks and other new immigrants, play a central role. UPRISING OF THE MILLION Ana Alvarado is a Salvadorean fifteen years she kyo's luxurious New made beds and scrubbed hub of the toilets in Little To- Otani Hotel - one of the crown jewels of the thirty-year crusade to redevelop rate immigrant to Los Angeles. For Pacific downtown Los Angeles as a corpo- Rim. In 1995 she was fired for supporting a New union organizing drive. Suites at the owned by Kajima, the world's second largest construction conglom- erate) Otani (developed and go for anywhere from $475 to $1800 per night, but most of the hotel's staff (70 percent Latino, 25 percent Asian) earn Motel Six wages. After repeated pleas for help from a group of pro-union workers, Hotel Employees and Restaurant Employees (HERE) Local 11- led by a dynamic young full-scale the Latina, Maria-Elena organizing drive in 1993.

Sarah Mahier, American Dreaming: Immigrant Life on the Margins, Princeton, N.J. 1995, p. 21. C£ Carol Zabin, "Organizing Latino Workers in the Los Angeles Manufacturing The Case of American Racing Equipment Company," unpubhshed research paper, U.C. Berkeley Labor Center, 1998; Ruth Milkman and Kent Wong, "The 1992 Southern 140. Sector: California Drywall Strike," conference paper, "Immigrants May fornia," 1998; and David Bacon, Unions and and Union Organizing in the Upsurge of Immigrant Workers, Cali- North- em California Coalition for Immigrant Rights, n.p., n.d. 141. Diana Marcum, "The Busboys of San Miguel," Los Angeles Times Magazine, 14 Dec. 1997. 142. Robert Rouse, "Mexican Migration," in David Guiterrez, Mexican Immigrants 143. Maria de los in the United States, Wilmington, Del. 1996, ed., Between Two Worlds, p. 253. Angeles CrummeU, "Gender, Class and Households," in Adela de Tone and Beatriz Pesquera, eds..


pages: 572 words: 134,335

The Making of an Atlantic Ruling Class by Kees Van der Pijl

anti-communist, banking crisis, Berlin Wall, Boycotts of Israel, Bretton Woods, British Empire, business cycle, capital controls, collective bargaining, colonial rule, cuban missile crisis, deindustrialization, deskilling, diversified portfolio, European colonialism, floating exchange rates, full employment, imperial preference, Joseph Schumpeter, liberal capitalism, mass immigration, means of production, North Sea oil, plutocrats, Plutocrats, profit maximization, RAND corporation, strikebreaker, trade liberalization, trade route, union organizing, uranium enrichment, urban renewal, War on Poverty

‘By holding out the possibility of international trade unionism’, a trade-union leader wrote, ‘the ITSs and WCCs have simultaneously held back the development of stronger forms of working-class organisation and smoothed the way for the further growth of the Transnational Corporations.’77 Pointing out the selective solidarity of the WCC’s, Etty and Tudyka in their study quote a UAW pamphlet stating that the WCC’s are ‘an insurance for the strong and at the same time the best hope of strength for the weak’.78 However, the Kennedy offensive stopped far short of the full internationalization of US industrial relations, and by the late 1960s Atlantic unity at the level of the comprehensive international trade union organizations was breaking down. As we shall see in the next chapter, in line with the brief hegemony of an independent-spirited corporate-liberal bourgeoisie in Europe, the Fordist compromise would be recast in a European framework, in which the German co-determination tradition would become the frame of reference for European trade-union organization. The Flow of Portfolio Capital The acceleration of the internationalization of American capital after the establishment of the EEC affected the various segments of the bourgeoisie associated with it differently. Interacting with different forms of foreign investment and national differences in profitability, the prominence of either rentier or real capital in the American economy may be tentatively associated with particular concepts of Atlantic unity through the profit-distribution process.

Between 1920 and 1930, the Rockefellers acquired the Equitable Life insurance group and the Chase National Bank, putting Winthrop Aldrich, John D. Rockefeller Jr.’s brother-in-law, in charge of their operation.7 The contribution of the Rockefellers to the characteristic profile of the state-monopoly tendency in the USA lay in two areas. In the field of labour relations, they developed a strategy of preempting trade-union organization via industrial representation schemes. After the Ludlow massacre of 1914, in which a tent camp of Colorado Fuel & Iron strikers was machine-gunned and burnt down, killing eleven children, J.D. Rockefeller, Jr., who was the principal owner of the company, began to venture into the labour-relations field. Having been publicly exposed as supporting the CF &I management throughout the conflict, Rockefeller hired the Canadian politician Mackenzie King to work out the eventual Industrial Representation Plan.

Therefore, although the political influence of these parties grew immensely due to their resistance record and the heroic struggle of the Soviet armies on the Eastern Front, the conciliatory policy towards the United States and Britain had the effect, as Claudin rightly observes, of ‘spreading among the masses the illusion that equality and fraternity between nations were compatible with the survival of the principal imperialist states; the illusion that these states, by virtue of their being at war with their capitalist rivals alongside the Soviet Union, really intended to build an ideal world.’89 This, exactly, was the message Roosevelt was trying to get across, and American idealism, thus, found a paradoxical resonance in the Western Communist parties. At the very level of international trade-union cooperation, the Soviet Union also found itself on the defensive. At the high tide of wartime Allied cooperation in December 1943, the TUC announced plans to hold a world trade-union conference for 1944. Its proposal to include the Soviet trade unions in the preparations for a new international trade-union organization led to the AFL’s refusal to take part and ushered in the CIO. In the course of 1945, two conferences led to the foundation of the World Federation of Trade Unions (WFTU) in September. United Nations recognition of the new organization, however, was withheld after the AFL galvanized British and American opposition.90 On the other hand, the Americans invested greater energy in reviving the old International Labor Organization (ILO), which was integrated into the United Nations framework.


pages: 200 words: 72,182

Nickel and Dimed: On (Not) Getting by in America by Barbara Ehrenreich

business process, full employment, housing crisis, income inequality, McMansion, place-making, post-work, sexual politics, telemarketer, union organizing, wage slave, women in the workforce, working poor, zero day

Rules against “gossip,” or even “talking,” make it hard to air your grievances to peers or—should you be so daring—to enlist other workers in a group effort to bring about change, through a union organizing drive, for example. Those who do step out of line often face little unexplained punishments, such as having their schedules or their work assignments unilaterally changed. Or you may be fired; those low-wage workers who work without union contracts, which is the great majority of them, work “at will,” meaning at the will of the employer, and are subject to dismissal without explanation. The AFL-CIO estimates that ten thousand workers a year are fired for participating in union organizing drives, and since it is illegal to fire people for union activity, I suspect that these firings are usually justified in terms of unrelated minor infractions.

My next stop is Winn-Dixie, the supermarket, which turns out to have a particularly onerous application process, featuring a twenty-minute “interview” by computer since, apparently, no human on the premises is deemed capable of representing the corporate point of view. I am conducted to a large room decorated with posters illustrating how to look “professional” (it helps to be white and, if female, permed) and warning of the slick promises that union organizers might try to tempt me with. The interview is multiple-choice: Do I have anything, such as child care problems, that might make it hard for me to get to work on time? Do I think safety on the job is the responsibility of management? Then, popping up cunningly out of the blue: How many dollars' worth of stolen goods have I purchased in the last year? Would I turn in a fellow employee if I caught him stealing?

It whittles you down to he up to fifty times in the space of the fifteen minutes or so it takes to do a “survey,” even when there's a higher moral purpose to serve. Equally draining is the effort to look both perky and compliant at the same time, for half an hour or more at a stretch, because while you need to evince “initiative,” you don't want to come across as someone who might initiate something like a union organizing drive. Then there is the threat of the drug tests, hanging over me like a fast-approaching SAT It rankles—at some deep personal, physical level—to know that the many engaging qualities I believe I have to offer—friendliness, reliability, willingness to learn—can all be trumped by my pee.[23] In a spirit of contrition for multiple sins, I decide to devote the weekend to detox. A Web search reveals that I am on a heavily traveled path; there are dozens of sites offering help to the would-be drug-test passer, mostly in the form of ingestible products, though one site promises to send a vial of pure, drugfree urine, battery-heated to body temperature.


pages: 196 words: 55,862

Riding for Deliveroo: Resistance in the New Economy by Callum Cant

Airbnb, call centre, collective bargaining, deskilling, Elon Musk, future of work, gig economy, housing crisis, illegal immigration, information asymmetry, invention of the steam engine, Mark Zuckerberg, means of production, new economy, Pearl River Delta, race to the bottom, ride hailing / ride sharing, sharing economy, Silicon Valley, strikebreaker, union organizing, Winter of Discontent, women in the workforce

Someone in Paris had told us how fascist gangs travelled to Calais to beat up people in the jungle, and the police didn’t stop them. About a week later, a friend of mine designed us a parody logo. It was the Deliveroo Kangaroo, but the V-shaped ears were joined by a V-shaped two finger salute, meaning it looked like the kangaroo (i.e. the worker) was swearing at you. We wanted to link it to the two main unions organizing in Deliveroo, so we approached the IWW and IWGB and asked for their support. They happily gave it. The next step was to set up a network of workers to help produce and distribute it. There was no point in writing this thing and putting it out online in the hope someone picked it up – it had to go directly into the hands of workers across the country, and it had to be written by workers across the country.

Workers in Leeds who had been organizing with the IWW took heart from our example. They had begun organizing in similar conditions to us, as their pay declined. They were an hourly paid zone, and many of them were facing cuts to their regular hours week-on-week. In December, rumours of a move to a full piece rate had led to a concerted effort to organize. They built a union base of around thirty workers. Then things started to go wrong. Two of the main union organizers in the city had their contracts terminated, and five more organizers had their fixed hours cut even further. However, they didn’t give up. They launched a campaign of strikes and demonstrations demanding the changes were reversed. As a result, the terminated organizers were given their jobs back, and the rest had their hours returned to normal. The local manager moved on to become the area manager for York.

Alfred DeMaria ‘specialises in combating union organisational campaigns and in developing programs to keep companies operating in a union-free environment’.13 He is, in short, a leading scab lawyer. DeMaria has written in a union-busting journal that: ‘Employer awareness of how employees can use new media tools, including social media and dedicated apps, to interact among themselves and with union organizers is absolutely necessary for maintaining nonunion status. Employers who ignore this potential stealth activity risk their union free status’ [emphasis mine].14 Alquati’s concept of invisible organization has a parallel in the bosses’ own literature. The 2018 Brazilian truck strike was one of the strongest examples of this phenomenon so far. The deregulation of diesel prices by the neoliberal government of Michel Temer, which came to power after leading a congressional coup against the leftist Dilma Rousseff, led to a 38.4 per cent increase in prices and the subsequent explosion of a huge national strike.


pages: 324 words: 86,056

The Socialist Manifesto: The Case for Radical Politics in an Era of Extreme Inequality by Bhaskar Sunkara

Affordable Care Act / Obamacare, agricultural Revolution, Bernie Sanders, British Empire, business climate, business cycle, capital controls, centre right, Charles Lindbergh, collective bargaining, Deng Xiaoping, deskilling, Donald Trump, equal pay for equal work, feminist movement, Ferguson, Missouri, Francis Fukuyama: the end of history, full employment, gig economy, Gunnar Myrdal, happiness index / gross national happiness, Honoré de Balzac, income inequality, inventory management, labor-force participation, land reform, land value tax, Mark Zuckerberg, means of production, Mikhail Gorbachev, Neil Kinnock, new economy, Occupy movement, postindustrial economy, precariat, race to the bottom, Ralph Waldo Emerson, self-driving car, Silicon Valley, single-payer health, telemarketer, The Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith, too big to fail, union organizing, Upton Sinclair, urban renewal, We are the 99%

It was split from the beginning between Marxists and Lassalleans, and much like in the Old World, their theoretical disputes had real-world implications. The Lassalleans wanted to form a socialist political party and win reforms through the ballot box. In particular, they advocated for state funding for a network of cooperatives. Since they believed in an “iron law of wages,” they didn’t think there was a point in trade union activity. The Marxists took the opposite tack, believing that years of trade union organizing were needed before the ground would be ready for a socialist party. The Lassalleans managed to wrestle control of the Workingmen’s Party, with its leaders denouncing the 1877 strikes as futile. Many party activists, however, were actively engaged in the Great Railroad Strike. One was Albert Parsons. Perceiving both the power of direct action and the class nature of a repressive state drew him to anarchism.

The Comintern forced the two organizations to merge together, but only a handful of the combined twelve thousand members were native English speakers—this despite much of the SP’s historic left coming from American-born Western radicals. The Communists were so far to the left that in 1919, amid the most important strike wave in US history, they denounced left-wing trade unionists like their future leader William Z. Foster. Without a base in the labor movement the Communists made pronouncements such as, “The revolution is the real issue in the steel strike,” and called for “the destruction of existing trade union organizations.”29 The Comintern fought against these isolating tendencies and tried to forge a multiracial movement that could win over non-Communist workers. It pushed radicals to work above ground, as well as within the AFL. At the Comintern’s Second Congress, international Communist leader Karl Radek noted that the massive postwar uptick in unionism had benefited reformist, not revolutionary, unions and that “there is no tactical advantage in our stubbornly refusing to join the A.F. of L.”

It proclaimed that “Communism Is 20th Century Americanism.” When a Daughters of the American Revolution chapter neglected to do its annual commemoration of Paul Revere’s famous ride, the Young Communist League hired a rider, dressed him up like a Minuteman, and had him gallop down Broadway with a sign reading “The DAR forgets, but the YCL remembers.”35 Less ridiculously, beyond its key role in trade union organizing, the party engaged with New Deal sentiments and shaped a broader left-liberal movement through its front groups such as the National Negro Congress and the American Student Union. The CPUSA amassed not just eighty-five thousand members but also a much larger network of fellow travelers. Communists came to play a prominent role in American cinema, music, and the arts. From the domestic fights against racism and for union rights to their support for the Spanish republican cause abroad, Communists were seen as defenders of democracy, even as news of Soviet purges trickled in.


pages: 489 words: 111,305

How the World Works by Noam Chomsky, Arthur Naiman, David Barsamian

affirmative action, anti-communist, Ayatollah Khomeini, Berlin Wall, Bernie Sanders, Bretton Woods, British Empire, business climate, capital controls, clean water, corporate governance, deindustrialization, Fall of the Berlin Wall, feminist movement, glass ceiling, Howard Zinn, income inequality, interchangeable parts, Isaac Newton, joint-stock company, land reform, liberation theology, Monroe Doctrine, offshore financial centre, plutocrats, Plutocrats, race to the bottom, Ralph Nader, Ronald Reagan, Rosa Parks, single-payer health, strikebreaker, Telecommunications Act of 1996, transfer pricing, union organizing, War on Poverty, working poor

You can debate what the effect will be, but nobody doubts that it’ll be significant. Quite likely the effect will be to accelerate just what you’ve been describing—a flow of productive labor to Mexico. There’s a brutal and repressive dictatorship there, so it’s guaranteed wages will be low. During what’s been called the “Mexican economic miracle” of the last decade, their wages have dropped 60%. Union organizers get killed. If the Ford Motor Company wants to toss out its work force and hire super cheap labor, they just do it. Nobody stops them. Pollution goes on unregulated. It’s a great place for investors. One might think that NAFTA, which includes sending pro - ductive labor down to Mexico, might improve their real wages, maybe level the two countries. But that’s most unlikely. One reason is that the repression there prevents organizing for higher wages.

Along with the increasing hours of work comes increasing harshness of work conditions, increasing insecurity and, because of the decline of unions, reduced ability to protect oneself. In the Reagan years, even the minimal government programs for protecting workers against workplace accidents and the like were reduced, in the interest of maximizing profits. The absence of constructive options, like union organizing, leads to violence. Labor [Harvard professor] Elaine Bernard and [union official] Tony Mazzocchi have been talking about creating a new labor-based party. What are your views on that? I think that’s an important initiative. The US is becoming very depoliticized and negative. About half the population thinks both political parties should be disbanded. There’s a real need for something that would articulate the concerns of that substantial majority of the population that’s being left out of social planning and the political process.

The leading financial journal in Mexico, which is very pro-NAFTA, estimated that Mexico would lose about 25% of its manufacturing capacity in the first few years and about 15% of its manufacturing labor force. In addition, cheap US agricultural exports are expected to drive several million people off the land. That’s going to mean a substantial increase in the unemployed workforce in Mexico, which of course will drive down wages. On top of that, union organizing is essentially impossible. Corporations can operate internationally, but unions can’t—so there’s no way for the work force to fight back against the internationalization of production. The net effect is expected to be a decline in wealth and income for most people in Mexico and for most people in the US. The strongest NAFTA advocates point that out in the small print. My colleague at MIT, Paul Krugman, is a specialist in international trade and, interestingly, one of the economists who’s done some of the theoretical work showing why free trade doesn’t work.


pages: 497 words: 123,718

A Game as Old as Empire: The Secret World of Economic Hit Men and the Web of Global Corruption by Steven Hiatt; John Perkins

addicted to oil, airline deregulation, Andrei Shleifer, Asian financial crisis, Berlin Wall, big-box store, Bob Geldof, Bretton Woods, British Empire, capital controls, centre right, clean water, colonial rule, corporate governance, corporate personhood, deglobalization, deindustrialization, Doha Development Round, energy security, European colonialism, financial deregulation, financial independence, full employment, global village, high net worth, land reform, large denomination, liberal capitalism, Long Term Capital Management, Mexican peso crisis / tequila crisis, Mikhail Gorbachev, moral hazard, Naomi Klein, new economy, North Sea oil, offshore financial centre, oil shock, Ponzi scheme, race to the bottom, reserve currency, Ronald Reagan, Scramble for Africa, statistical model, structural adjustment programs, too big to fail, trade liberalization, transatlantic slave trade, transfer pricing, union organizing, Washington Consensus, working-age population, Yom Kippur War

.: World Bank, October 29, 1979), vol. 2, chap. 7. 46. Report and Recommendations of the President of the IBRD to Executive Directors on a Proposed Structural Adjustment Loan to the Republic of the Philippines, Report no. P-2872-PH (Washington, D.C.: World Bank, August 21, 1980), p. 31. 47. Bello et al., Development Debacle, p. 170. 48. Elvira, Philippine trade union organizer, interviewed by Ellen Augustine, February 12, 2006. Hereafter cited as Elvira interview. 49. Marivic, Philippine trade union organizer, interviewed by Ellen Augustine, February 12, 2006. 50. Sta Ana interview. 51. Riza Bernabe, program coordinator of the Small Farms and Agricultural Trade Center of Centro Saka, interviewed by Ellen Augustine, February 5, 2006. Hereafter cited as Bernabe interview. 52. Walden Bello, executive director of Focus on the Global South, interviewed by Ellen Augustine, January 22, 2006.

Steve took it upon himself to find someone who could be an editor and also serve as a sleuth: he’d have to ferret out prospective writers and convince them that loyalty to country, family, and future generations on every continent demanded that they participate in this book. After an extensive selection process, he, his staff, and I settled on Steven Hiatt. Steve is a professional editor—but he also has a long history as an activist, first against the Vietnam War and then as a teachers’ union organizer. In addition, he worked for a number of years at Stanford Research Institute, a think tank and consultancy organization serving multinationals and government agencies around the world and closely linked to Bechtel, Bank of America, and other players in the EHM world. There he worked on research reports that he describes as essentially “the corporatocracy talking to itself.” Once the process of assembling this anthology began, I started speaking about it.

Nowhere is this more evident than in Bolivia, Argentina, and Venezuela, whose economies all have been decimated under previous neoliberal governments. . . . Even Costa Rica, Peru, and Mexico, traditionally neoliberal strongholds, have experienced presidential elections almost entirely dominated by debate over trade liberalization.9 The global justice movement has also matured. For example, under the influence of unions such as Unite! and the Service Employees International Union, organized labor in the U.S. changed from first supporting corporate globalization to then supporting only instances that helped U.S. workers and then to a broader opposition grounded in the reality of the shared sacrifice of workers everywhere. In the U.S., white activists and NGOs have become less dominant, as farmworker, immigrant, nonunionized labor, and youth movements increasingly take the lead.


pages: 772 words: 203,182

What Went Wrong: How the 1% Hijacked the American Middle Class . . . And What Other Countries Got Right by George R. Tyler

8-hour work day, active measures, activist fund / activist shareholder / activist investor, affirmative action, Affordable Care Act / Obamacare, bank run, banking crisis, Basel III, Black Swan, blood diamonds, blue-collar work, Bolshevik threat, bonus culture, British Empire, business cycle, business process, buy and hold, capital controls, Carmen Reinhart, carried interest, cognitive dissonance, collateralized debt obligation, collective bargaining, commoditize, corporate governance, corporate personhood, corporate raider, corporate social responsibility, creative destruction, credit crunch, crony capitalism, crowdsourcing, currency manipulation / currency intervention, David Brooks, David Graeber, David Ricardo: comparative advantage, declining real wages, deindustrialization, Diane Coyle, disruptive innovation, Double Irish / Dutch Sandwich, eurozone crisis, financial deregulation, financial innovation, fixed income, Francis Fukuyama: the end of history, full employment, George Akerlof, George Gilder, Gini coefficient, Gordon Gekko, hiring and firing, income inequality, invisible hand, job satisfaction, John Markoff, joint-stock company, Joseph Schumpeter, Kenneth Rogoff, labor-force participation, laissez-faire capitalism, lake wobegon effect, light touch regulation, Long Term Capital Management, manufacturing employment, market clearing, market fundamentalism, Martin Wolf, minimum wage unemployment, mittelstand, moral hazard, Myron Scholes, Naomi Klein, Northern Rock, obamacare, offshore financial centre, Paul Samuelson, pension reform, performance metric, pirate software, plutocrats, Plutocrats, Ponzi scheme, precariat, price stability, profit maximization, profit motive, purchasing power parity, race to the bottom, Ralph Nader, rent-seeking, reshoring, Richard Thaler, rising living standards, road to serfdom, Robert Gordon, Robert Shiller, Robert Shiller, Ronald Reagan, Sand Hill Road, shareholder value, Silicon Valley, Social Responsibility of Business Is to Increase Its Profits, South Sea Bubble, sovereign wealth fund, Steve Ballmer, Steve Jobs, The Chicago School, The Spirit Level, The Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith, Thorstein Veblen, too big to fail, transcontinental railway, transfer pricing, trickle-down economics, tulip mania, Tyler Cowen: Great Stagnation, union organizing, Upton Sinclair, upwardly mobile, women in the workforce, working poor, zero-sum game

One-quarter of almost 500 corporate executives who responded to a 1992 Wall Street Journal survey, for example, confessed to exploiting the threat of relocating abroad under the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) as a bargaining tool in wage talks.22 And, Scott’s report for EPI concluded that more than 50 percent of union organizing campaigns in the mid-1990s featured corporate spokesmen threatening to close some or all of the target plants.23 The use of such intimidation tactics doubled in elections monitored by the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) after NAFTA was enacted in 1993.24 Cornell economist Kate Bronfenbrenner examined the impact of NAFTA on union-organizing elections in 1998 and 1999. Threats of offshoring notably reduced the organizers’ election success to 38 percent compared to 51 percent in elections where such threats were absent.25 The Reagan era has delivered precisely what many voted against in 1980.

And that support has remained steadfast in the modern era, as indicated by this 1986 pastoral letter from the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops: “No one may deny the right to organize without attacking human dignity itself.”48 The success of wage compression tactics targeting unions in the Reagan era is indicated not only by wage stagnation, but also by the union share of the private sector workforce, which has dwindled to below 7 percent from 35 percent in the 1950s; including the public sector, that share has dropped to about 11 percent. A major reason has been the barriers erected during the Reagan era to union organizing. A comparison with Canadian law and practice is instructive. While the share of employees interested in joining unions is similar to the US, membership is nearly three times higher in Canada because labor organizers face fewer roadblocks. Indeed, the Canadian membership rate is close to the US rate during the golden age, when organizing rights were better enforced.49 As Kris Warner with the Washington-based Center for Economic and Policy Research noted, a Canadian union is generally recognized once a majority of employees indicate intent to join over employer objections.

“Employers found out they could just ignore the Wagner Act and fire pro-union workers right before so-called ‘secret-ballot’ elections; they found out there was no real limit on what they could use as a threat.”52 These public relations campaigns were conducted in conjunction with niche law firms specializing in union busting. Lawyers taught executive suites where enforcement was weak, how to bend the rules, and how to greatly muddy the simplicity of union-organizing elections. New York Times journalist David Leonhardt explained: “Companies pay minimal penalties for illegally trying to bar unions and have become expert at doing so, legally and otherwise.”53 The ultimate goal was to slow-walk the union election process, in order to buy time for executive suites to ferret out and fire union sympathizers. Fired union advocates frequently complained, but pleas fell on deaf ears at a US Department of Labor behaving like the Interstate Commerce Commission in the nineteenth century.


pages: 239 words: 62,311

The Next Factory of the World: How Chinese Investment Is Reshaping Africa by Irene Yuan Sun

barriers to entry, Bretton Woods, capital controls, clean water, Computer Numeric Control, deindustrialization, demographic dividend, Deng Xiaoping, Donald Trump, European colonialism, floating exchange rates, full employment, global supply chain, invisible hand, job automation, low skilled workers, M-Pesa, manufacturing employment, means of production, mobile money, post-industrial society, profit motive, purchasing power parity, race to the bottom, RAND corporation, Ronald Reagan, Shenzhen was a fishing village, Silicon Valley, Skype, special economic zone, structural adjustment programs, Triangle Shirtwaist Factory, union organizing, Washington Consensus, working-age population

It eventually led me to spend years studying Chinese investment in Africa, knocking on countless factory doors, sweet-talking reticent Chinese owners into letting me onto the premises, and cajoling them into trusting me with their stories. I’ve visited more than fifty Chinese factories in Africa and talked to numerous Chinese businesspeople involved in other African sectors, along with a hundred-odd African workers, entrepreneurs, government officials, journalists, and union organizers who are partnering with and responding to Chinese interest in their countries in a variety of ways. It was on one of these research trips in eastern Nigeria that I had my aha! moment. At the end of a long, hot day of visiting factories, I showed up at the address of my last appointment and found myself in a courtyard ringed by buildings painted blue and white. The blue of the walls matched the blue of the heavy industrial trucks parked in the courtyard, and something about that blue tugged at a half-buried memory.

She had become a shop steward, the union representative on the factory floor—that linchpin figure responsible for signing up workers, collecting dues, and channeling grievances. She had spent nearly eight years working in a clothing factory while also being active in the union, so when the factory she worked in closed, the union asked her to join as a full-time organizer. I met two other female union organizers that day: Mampoi and Mopa. Mampoi had become active in the movement after experiencing discrimination at the factory where she worked. Mopa had worked at a denim factory for years before being fired, but still organized workers there to demand improved conditions. Her highest-priority demand? Heaters in the winter. She worked hard on strikingly practical issues: getting certain doors opened for more ventilation, instituting health and safety training, providing hot water during the winter.

There are no guarantees that this will occur smoothly or well—in fact, the lessons of history suggest the opposite. And yet, there is hope mixed in with the worry. People adapt, learn new skills, provide for their families, invent new futures, perhaps find voices they didn’t know they had. I’m reminded of Mopa’s description of her fight to get heaters in her factory—a long struggle that spanned her employment there, her being fired by that factory, and her becoming a full-time union organizer negotiating repeatedly with her former employer. She remembers being called into a meeting with the factory’s management and being told that after so much uncertainty over so many years, it had happened. It was only heaters, but it was real change, and it was finally here. “You cry for so many years,” she said. “Now it happens—now.” Her laughter rang out with joy and relief. CHAPTER 6 Two Steps Forward, One Step Back Stephen Sigei is a young Kenyan who recently graduated from a local vocational training school as a certified mechanic.


pages: 385 words: 133,839

The Coke Machine: The Dirty Truth Behind the World's Favorite Soft Drink by Michael Blanding

carbon footprint, clean water, collective bargaining, corporate social responsibility, Exxon Valdez, Gordon Gekko, Internet Archive, laissez-faire capitalism, market design, MITM: man-in-the-middle, Naomi Klein, Nelson Mandela, New Journalism, Ponzi scheme, profit motive, Ralph Nader, rolodex, Ronald Reagan, shareholder value, The Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith, Thorstein Veblen, union organizing, Upton Sinclair

Unconvinced, the Guatemalans appealed to the International Union of Food and Allied Workers (IUF), a Geneva-based super-union, which issued a call to boycott Coke in Novem­ ber 1979 and instigated work stoppages at Coke plants in Finland, Swe­ den, and New Zealand. As the situation quickly grew out of hand, the company assured critics that it would not be renewing Trotter’s contract when it expired in 1981. Meanwhile, the rampage continued, with four more union organizers killed. Street protests against Coke in Guatemala led to a dramatic fall in the company’s market share. Finally, the pressure was too much for Coke to stall any longer. Even though it had repeatedly claimed it could do 1 54 THE COKE MACHINE nothing until the contract expired, company execs flew to Houston in July 1980 to present Trotter with an offer he couldn’t refuse—a generous buy­ out by two handpicked bottling executives, with most of the financing provided by Coke Atlanta, and no questions asked.

Prosecutors with the Human Rights Office didn’t buy it. In September 1999, they issued an arrest warrant not only for Cepillo, but for Marín and Milan as well, declaring them under investigation for mur­ “SYRUP IN THE VEINS” 183 der, terrorism, and kidnapping. The evidence “leaves not the slightest doubt that [Milan] and [Marín] were behind inducing and encouraging the paramilitary group to finish off the union organization at the com­ pany,” prosecutors wrote, saying their behaviors “demonstrate there was a preconceived plan . . . leading to the dissolution of the union.” Both Milan and Marín declared their innocence, claiming that they’d never met with paramilitaries or threatened the union—in fact, they said, they’d been threatened by paramilitaries themselves. Milan said he had even agreed to pay money to the army post up the road in Apartadó, led by General Alejo del Río, for protection.

To Kovalik, the aid was never about eradicating drugs as much as it was protecting U.S. oil and mining interests. With that view in mind, he traveled to Barrancabermeja that first trip to gather stories of union officials, including the local president of SINAL­ TRAINAL, William Mendoza. On his second trip, in March 2001, he heard about the case of Isidro Gil, which immediately struck him as a flagrant use of paramilitaries to rub out union organizing. “Here you have a guy killed within the walls of the plant by paramilitaries,” he says. “He was killed after the manager threatened to wipe out the union. The para­ militaries returned, gathered all the workers within the plant, told them to resign from the union or they would be killed.” In his mind, the finger pointed all the way up to the top. “I don’t think necessarily someone from Atlanta said do this,” he says, “but it seemed like a combination of complicity and turning the other way and allowing things to happen.”


pages: 934 words: 135,736

The Divided Nation: A History of Germany, 1918-1990 by Mary Fulbrook

Albert Einstein, banking crisis, Berlin Wall, centre right, coherent worldview, collective bargaining, deindustrialization, Fall of the Berlin Wall, feminist movement, first-past-the-post, fixed income, full employment, joint-stock company, land reform, means of production, Mikhail Gorbachev, open borders, Peace of Westphalia, Sinatra Doctrine, union organizing, unorthodox policies

With the Page 22 continued expansion of industrial capitalism, the 'old' middle classes the small producers, shopkeepers and traders found their already declining position ever more threatened. New sections of the population were increasingly politicized: with many men away at the front, and with the large numbers of war casualties, women and young people were drawn into sectors of the economy in which they had not previously worked, and gained first-hand experience of union organization, confrontation with employers, and notions of 'class war'. Even those women who were not part of the paid labour market may have become somewhat politicized through the sheer struggle for survival, and the realization that the government rather than the individual might be held responsible for the difficulties they found in feeding their families. This awareness of the responsibilities of the state continued after the war, heightened by more widespread dependence on state benefits and pensions.

Again, these tendencies predated the onset of economic recession, and weakened the internal structure of Weimar democracy even before it was subjected to the sustained battering of the depression years. As early as 1923, employers had mounted an effective attack on the eight-hour-day agreed in the Stinnes Legien agreement of 1918; and the failure of the Zentral-Arbeits-Gemeinschaft (ZAG) to resolve industrial disputes led to the official resignation Page 48 of the trade union organization, the Allgemeiner Deutscher Gewerkschaftsbund (ADGB), in January 1924. After 1923, trade unions began losing members, funds, and credibility. They had increasingly to rely on the state as the effective guarantor of their position. Yet employers, despite their relatively strong position, remained on the defensive. Although it is difficult to generalize about employers' attitudes, the Ruhr lock-out of 1928 is a significant illustration of one important strand.

Gradually, significant sectors of industry came to feel that it was the democratic parliamentary system itself, which guaranteed the position of workers and unions, that needed to be revised. As they lost faith in a system for which they had never, in any event, had much love, so also they began to withdraw support and funds from the liberal parties of the bourgeois middle. More broadly, the Weimar Republic was identified with the institutionalized power of workers and their political and union organizations which employers, who had formed their attitudes in what were now seen as the golden days of Imperial Germany, tended to regard as essentially illegitimate, by definition little more than 'enemies of the Empire' (Reichsfeinde), in Bismarck's phrase. Labour relations constituted but one element in undermining support for the Republic among certain economic elites. Far more widespread was the rejection of the Versailles Treaty and all it implied for Germany's geographical boundaries, and for her political and military status.


pages: 357 words: 99,684

Why It's Still Kicking Off Everywhere: The New Global Revolutions by Paul Mason

anti-globalists, back-to-the-land, balance sheet recession, bank run, banking crisis, Berlin Wall, business cycle, capital controls, centre right, citizen journalism, collapse of Lehman Brothers, collective bargaining, creative destruction, credit crunch, Credit Default Swap, currency manipulation / currency intervention, currency peg, do-ocracy, eurozone crisis, Fall of the Berlin Wall, floating exchange rates, Francis Fukuyama: the end of history, full employment, ghettoisation, illegal immigration, informal economy, land tenure, low skilled workers, mass immigration, means of production, megacity, Mohammed Bouazizi, Naomi Klein, Network effects, New Journalism, Occupy movement, price stability, quantitative easing, race to the bottom, rising living standards, short selling, Slavoj Žižek, Stewart Brand, strikebreaker, union organizing, We are the 99%, Whole Earth Catalog, WikiLeaks, Winter of Discontent, women in the workforce, working poor, working-age population, young professional

But it also showed how, in developed societies, organized labour is still capable of channelling and overwhelming the more chaotic, spontaneous protests. And it was an advance preview of the problem which youthful, socially networked, horizontalist movements would have everywhere once things got serious: the absence of strategy, the absence of a line of communication through which to speak to the union-organized workers. The limits, in short, of ‘propaganda of the deed’. Despite all this, what was obvious by late 2010 is that we were dealing with something new: something produced by bigger changes in society. But what? 4 So, Why Did It Kick Off? The Social Roots of the New Unrest If the Arab Spring had happened in isolation, it might have been categorized as a belated aftershock of 1989; if the student unrest had been part of the normal cycle of youth revolt, it could have been quickly forgotten.

His only beef with the majority in the House is whether it should go to $2.5 trillion. ‘I don’t trust him,’ López says, pointing out that Obama also promised a law to offer illegal migrants ‘earned amnesty’. But that did not happen. In fact, by the summer of 2011 Obama was in trouble: healthcare reform got whittled down to a minimum and was now gridlocked at state level; a law to lift obstacles to trade union organization never got to first base; the promised pullout from Afghanistan turned into a surge of troops; and the Dodd–Frank Act, aimed at curtailing the power of Wall Street, had become a toothless object of derision on Wall Street. But Obama was so determined to stick at two trillion dollars’ worth of cuts for the needy—instead of $2.5 trillion—that, at one point, he walked out of negotiations with the Republicans.

I saw people who had slept on cold marble for weeks gladly share or give away camping mats and pillows … And when the pizza supply was cut off, I saw people who hadn’t eaten all day gladly share their only slice.11 If these had been just the usual consumers of organic burritos, the students or the radical left, the occupation could have been easily cleared, or coerced into clearing itself. But trade unions organized 100-strong delegations to sleep in the Capitol in shifts: plumbers, electricians, firefighters. Though it was to be defeated, the #wiunion protest was one of the clearest examples in 2011 of explicit ‘role-allocation’ and division of labour between workers and students. The workers understood that their role was to provide the protection of respectability to the youth activists who’d initiated the sleep-in.


pages: 227 words: 71,675

Rules for Revolutionaries: How Big Organizing Can Change Everything by Becky Bond, Zack Exley

battle of ideas, Bernie Sanders, call centre, centre right, cognitive dissonance, crowdsourcing, declining real wages, Donald Trump, family office, fixed income, full employment, hiring and firing, hydraulic fracturing, immigration reform, income inequality, Kickstarter, mass incarceration, Naomi Klein, Occupy movement, oil shale / tar sands, plutocrats, Plutocrats, randomized controlled trial, Skype, telemarketer, union organizing

I spent all day, every day on the phone, and by the time I got to Vermont, I had the beginnings of a solid core volunteer team. The only way I could have possibly gotten to know Corbin and the dozen other future leaders I recruited on that trip was by talking to them on the phone. Sure, face to face would have been better, but the Bernie campaign was and the revolution is national in scale—we have to make do with the phone. When I started out as a union organizer, we spent hours every day doing “call time”—following up with members of our organizing committees. We had to do call time from whatever dingy hotel we were working out of, hunched over our notes on the bed because the phone cord didn’t reach to the desk. I remember thinking ahead to a cell phone future and thinking how great it was going to be to do call time from the car on the way home from house visits, or from a café or park!

Corbin was already driving around Tennessee buying voter files from counties and having his own one-on-ones with leaders who were already at work organizing their own communities before I had even joined the campaign. What I was doing with Corbin was just the normal, natural process of getting to know one of my colleagues in the movement, a peer who I would need to work alongside in order to succeed. My free-ranging conversations did not follow a set format—such as the “five steps of a one-on-one” that I had learned as a union organizer—but instead sought to simply get to know him, learn all that I could from him, and develop a truly mutual relationship that would hopefully become the basis of a productive partnership. In big organizing, we get back to building organizations by empowering thousands of people on our lists to become builders. (The central volunteer Slack for the Bernie campaign was actually called “Bernie Builders.”)

Becky is a cofounder of CREDO SuperPAC, which was named by Mother Jones as one “2012’s Least Horrible Super-PACs” for helping to defeat five sitting Tea Party Republican Congressmen. She lives in San Francisco, California, with writer, designer, and book artist Emily McVarish. Zack Exley served as a senior advisor on the Bernie Sanders presidential campaign and was an architect of the campaign’s national, volunteer-driven grassroots campaign. Zack was a union organizer before becoming MoveOn.org’s first organizing director in its campaign to prevent the war in Iraq in 2003. As an early advisor to the Howard Dean campaign, he helped transfer MoveOn.org’s early fundraising and organizing discoveries into presidential politics, and he then served as John Kerry’s director of online fundraising and communications in the general election where his team raised more than $100 million online for the nominee.


pages: 335 words: 104,850

Conscious Capitalism, With a New Preface by the Authors: Liberating the Heroic Spirit of Business by John Mackey, Rajendra Sisodia, Bill George

Berlin Wall, Buckminster Fuller, business process, carbon footprint, collective bargaining, corporate governance, corporate social responsibility, creative destruction, crony capitalism, cross-subsidies, en.wikipedia.org, Everything should be made as simple as possible, Fall of the Berlin Wall, fear of failure, Flynn Effect, income per capita, invisible hand, Jeff Bezos, job satisfaction, lone genius, Mahatma Gandhi, microcredit, Nelson Mandela, Occupy movement, profit maximization, Ralph Waldo Emerson, shareholder value, six sigma, social intelligence, Social Responsibility of Business Is to Increase Its Profits, Steve Jobs, Steven Pinker, The Fortune at the Bottom of the Pyramid, The Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith, too big to fail, union organizing, wealth creators, women in the workforce, zero-sum game

Years ago, unions maintained long-term picketers (none of whom were team members) for up to eighteen months in front of several stores to try to discourage customers from shopping with us. They also have funded many organized attacks against our company and have tried to smear our reputation and brand numerous times. In 2002, a narrow majority of team members at the Whole Foods Market store in Madison, Wisconsin, voted to unionize, in what we later discovered was a setup. Several union organizers gained employment at the store for the purpose of organizing it; most of them quit soon after the union was elected. The union organizers made many promises to our team members about what they would do for them if the store was successfully unionized: raise their pay, increase vacation time, increase their store discounts, improve their health coverage, liberalize the dress code, and so on. Unrealistic promises by unions are common when an organization campaign is under way, and the many restrictions that now exist due to strict National Labor Relations Board regulations make these promises almost impossible for companies to counter effectively.

Unrealistic promises by unions are common when an organization campaign is under way, and the many restrictions that now exist due to strict National Labor Relations Board regulations make these promises almost impossible for companies to counter effectively. Ironically, companies are prohibited from making any promises concerning either compensation or working conditions once a union-organizing campaign has begun and the National Labor Relations Board has been notified. The union-organizing campaign was a huge wake-up call for me personally. My reaction was “Wow—how is this possible?” Clearly, we were not doing a good-enough job of ensuring team member happiness. If we were, the union would not have been able to get a foothold. So I took it upon myself personally to find out where we had gone wrong and how we could improve. I traveled the country and visited every single store over the next twelve months, having one-on-one discussions and group meetings with team members.


pages: 667 words: 149,811

Economic Dignity by Gene Sperling

active measures, Affordable Care Act / Obamacare, autonomous vehicles, basic income, Bernie Sanders, Cass Sunstein, collective bargaining, corporate governance, David Brooks, desegregation, Detroit bankruptcy, Donald Trump, Double Irish / Dutch Sandwich, Elon Musk, employer provided health coverage, Erik Brynjolfsson, Ferguson, Missouri, full employment, gender pay gap, ghettoisation, gig economy, Gini coefficient, guest worker program, Gunnar Myrdal, housing crisis, income inequality, invisible hand, job automation, job satisfaction, labor-force participation, late fees, liberal world order, longitudinal study, low skilled workers, Lyft, Mark Zuckerberg, market fundamentalism, mass incarceration, mental accounting, meta analysis, meta-analysis, minimum wage unemployment, obamacare, offshore financial centre, payday loans, price discrimination, profit motive, race to the bottom, RAND corporation, randomized controlled trial, Richard Thaler, ride hailing / ride sharing, Ronald Reagan, Rosa Parks, Second Machine Age, secular stagnation, shareholder value, Silicon Valley, single-payer health, speech recognition, The Chicago School, The Future of Employment, The Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith, Toyota Production System, traffic fines, Triangle Shirtwaist Factory, Uber and Lyft, uber lyft, union organizing, universal basic income, War on Poverty, working poor, young professional, zero-sum game

The goal of this restriction is to avoid employers taking advantage of workers by exerting undue influence over the union. However, this restriction also means collaborative efforts such as works councils would need to be part of a collective-bargaining agreement between an employer and a union. 35. Lydia DePillis, “Why Volkswagen Is Helping a Union Organize Its Own Plant,” Washington Post, February 10, 2014, https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/wonk/wp/2014/02/10/why-volkswagen-is-helping-a-union-organize-its-own-plant/; and Mica Rosenberg, “UAW Wants Works Council with ‘Tennessee Flavor’ at VW Plant,” Reuters, December 9, 2014, https://www.reuters.com/article/us-autos-volkswagen-uaw/uaw-wants-works-council-with-tennessee-flavor-at-vw-plant-idUSKBN0JN29H20141209. 36. Justin King, “King: Having a Voice—VW Worker Supports UAW,” Chattanooga Times Free Press, February 11, 2014, https://www.timesfreepress.com/news/opinion/columns/story/2014/feb/11/king-having-voice-vw-worker-supports-uaw/131415. 37.

The median minimum age was fourteen years old.18 By 1920, 9 percent of children still worked, down from 18 percent in 1910.19 In 1938, Congress passed a child labor law as part of the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) that limited legal child labor to children sixteen and older, with lower ages allowed for work on farms. For hazardous occupations, the minimum age was eighteen.20 MOTHER JONES AND THE FIGHT AGAINST VIRTUAL INVOLUNTARY SERVITUDE When the Thirteenth Amendment’s prohibition against slavery and involuntary servitude was passed on January 31, 1865, Mary Harris Jones was a teacher, dressmaker, and mother of four. Few could have imagined that she would become a take-no-prisoners union organizer who took on the virtual involuntary servitude of mine workers employed by the big coal companies. Not long after, however, Jones lost all four of her children to yellow fever. And then she lost her home and dressmaking shop to the Great Chicago Fire of 1871. From there, she found a new purpose: organizing for the Knights of Labor and the United Mine Workers union, adopting the title “Mother” along the way.

On that day, Perkins heard commotion and cries for help coming from the Triangle Shirtwaist Factory and ran to the scene, where she witnessed the “horrifying spectacle”31 of more than fifty young female workers forced to jump to their deaths from the burning building.32 The women, Perkins recalled watching, “had been holding on until that time, standing in the windowsills, being crowded by others behind them, the fire pressing closer and closer, the smoke closer and closer.”33 The ninth-floor exits had been closed by management seeking to prevent theft, keep out union organizers, and prevent walkouts. The city’s fire brigade ladders were too short to reach the floors where the factory was contained, and many of those who reached the fire escape died as it collapsed under the heat and the weight of workers trying to flee.34 It was one of the deadliest industrial disasters in New York City’s history. The Triangle Shirtwaist disaster could in no way be described as an unforeseeable accident or misfortune.


pages: 275 words: 77,955

Capitalism and Freedom by Milton Friedman

affirmative action, Berlin Wall, central bank independence, Corn Laws, Deng Xiaoping, floating exchange rates, Fractional reserve banking, full employment, invisible hand, Joseph Schumpeter, liquidity trap, market friction, minimum wage unemployment, price discrimination, rent control, road to serfdom, Ronald Reagan, secular stagnation, Simon Kuznets, the market place, The Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith, union organizing

If in fact some employees would prefer to work in firms that have a closed shop and others in firms that have an open shop, there would develop different forms of employment contracts, some having the one provision, others the other provision. As a practical matter, of course, there are some important differences between FEPC and right to work. The differences are the presence of monopoly in the form of union organizations on the employee side and the presence of federal legislation in respect of labor unions. It is doubtful that in a competitive labor market, it would in fact ever be profitable for employers to offer a closed shop as a condition of employment. Whereas unions may frequently be found without any strong monopoly power on the side of labor, a closed shop almost never is. It is almost always a symbol of monopoly power.

Another special feature that is important in practice is the conflict between federal and state law and the existence at the moment of a federal law which applies to all the states and which leaves a loophole for the individual state only through the passage of a right-to-work law. The optimum solution would be to have the federal law revised. The difficulty is that no individual state is in a position to bring this about and yet people within an individual state might wish to have a change in the legislation governing union organization within their state. The right-to-work law may be the only effective way in which this can be done and therefore the lesser of evils. Partly, I suppose, because I am inclined to believe that a right-to-work law will not in and of itself have any great effect on the monopoly power of the unions, I do not accept this justification for it. The practical arguments seem to me much too weak to outweigh the objection of principle.

Labor unions include roughly a quarter of the working population and this greatly overestimates the importance of unions on the structure of wages. Many unions are utterly ineffective. Even the strong and powerful unions have only a limited effect on the wage structure. It is even clearer for labor than for industry why there is a strong tendency to overestimate the importance of monopoly. Given a labor union, any wage increase will come through the union, even though it may not be a consequence of the union organization. The wages of domestic servants have risen very greatly in recent years. Had there been a union of domestic servants, the increase would have come through the union and would have been attributed to it. This is not to say that unions are unimportant. Like enterprise monopoly, they play a significant and meaningful role making many wage rates different from what the market alone would establish.


pages: 242 words: 245

The New Ruthless Economy: Work & Power in the Digital Age by Simon Head

Asian financial crisis, business cycle, business process, call centre, conceptual framework, deskilling, Erik Brynjolfsson, Ford paid five dollars a day, Frederick Winslow Taylor, informal economy, information retrieval, medical malpractice, new economy, Panopticon Jeremy Bentham, shareholder value, Shoshana Zuboff, Silicon Valley, single-payer health, supply-chain management, telemarketer, Thomas Davenport, Toyota Production System, union organizing

For 2000, the most recent year for which statistics are available, the figure was 30,590. By the late 1990s, one out of every eighteen workers involved in an organizing campaign was a victim of workplace discrimination at the hands of THE ECONOMICS OF UNFAIRNESS an employer.4 A compiler of these statistics, Professor Charles Morris, concludes that "a substantial number of employers involved in union [organizing] campaigns deliberately use employment discrimination against employees as a device to remove union activists and thereby inject an element of fear in the process of selecting or rejecting union representation.*'5 The NLRA provides an elaborate process of litigation to deal with such cases, but a determined employer can exploit the immense inertia of the system to draw out litigation for years.

Ernest Duval, a Haitian immigrant unfairly dismissed in 1994 by the King David Nursing Home in West Palm Beach, Florida, in 1999 received $1,793 in back pay for the five years it took to litigate his case.6 Few workers have the stamina for these legal marathons, and even those vindicated by the NLRB or the federal courts often do not seek reinstatement with their original employer. The illegal firing of pro-union workers is one among a battery of lawless acts that companies use to defeat union-organizing campaigns. Others include the use of threats and intimidation during the run up to an election; the manipulation of wages and benefits to penalize union supporters and favor opponents; the refusal to bargain with a newly established union committee, even if the validity of a union election has been upheld by the NLRB; and a refusal to bargain in good faith once 175 176 THE NEW RUTHLESS ECONOMY negotiations do get under way.

See also Managed care organizations (MCOs); Medical reengineering Physicians for a National Health Program (PNHP), 178 Piore, Michael, 37 Populism as Democratic message, 180,181 Poverty and lower-income families, 2-3,182 Preferred provider organizations (PPOs), 118 The Principles of Scientific Management (Taylor), 24, 45, 46, 51, 76 Privacy issues, 100, 185 Process Innovation: Reengineering Work through Information Technology (Davenport), 68, 81 Procops, Tony, 96, 97 Progressivism, 185 Protectionist policies, 183-84 Proxy Remote Control Gateway, 97, 98 Radclyffe Group survey of call center industry, 107-09 Randomized clinical trials (RCTs), 146^8 Raskin, Josh, 121 Real-time monitoring, 12,15, 67, 70, 75-76; customer call centers, 93-98; effect on manager-employee relationship, 101-02,107-08; ERP monitoring as, 156-57,164; "informate," 75; Internetmonitoring system, 98; live listening, 94; patient care systems, 126; privacy issues, 100,185; quality monitoring, 96, 97; stealth monitoring, 98; types of, 93-96 Reengineering, 4-5, 60-79; and customer relations management, 80-99; and ERP, 155,157-59,160; IT as tool of, 71-76; Japanese influence on, 58-59, 67; managerial vs. operational processes, 70-71; methods of, 7-8; of relationship between manager and employee, 74-75, 84; relationship to scientific management, 68-70, 76, 170; resistance to, 77-79; separation of decision making tasks, 71-73; software to support, 171; of structure of work, 73-74, 84. See also Medical reengineering; Real-time monitoring Reengineering the Corporation (Hammer & Champy), 68, 71, 81-82 221 INDEX Reengineering Management (Champy), 76 The Reengineering Revolution (Hammer), 77-79 Reichheld, Frederick, 112-13, 187 Retaliation against union organizing, 102-03,174-75 A Revolution in Manufacturing, the SMED System (Shingo), 50-53, 55 Rockefeller, John D., 18 Rogers, Joel, 179,181-82,183 Roos, Daniel, 50, 51 Sabel, Charles, 37 Sales and marketing. See Call centers; Customer relations management (CRM) SAP (German software maker), 5, 153-54,157,159,171; manual on ERP software, 156; monitoring potential of, 168. See also Enterprise resource planning (ERP) Schumacher, William D., 133 Scientific management, 7-8,17, 159; and automobile industry, 29-33,43-44,45^6, 52; and customer relations management, 98; and ERP, 162; history of, 20; inculcated in U.S. manufacturing, 172; and mail-order industry, 62-66; modern restatement of, 5, 6, 51, 54-57, 69,170-71; relationship to reengineering, 68-70, 76,170; resistance to, 27,172; and service industries, 16,18,60-66,170,171; and standardization of routines, 62, 76.


pages: 497 words: 161,742

The Enemy Within by Seumas Milne

active measures, anti-communist, Berlin Wall, Boris Johnson, collective bargaining, corporate governance, Edward Snowden, Etonian, Fall of the Berlin Wall, invisible hand, Kickstarter, market fundamentalism, Mikhail Gorbachev, Naomi Klein, Neil Kinnock, Nelson Mandela, New Journalism, Ronald Reagan, strikebreaker, union organizing, Washington Consensus, Winter of Discontent, éminence grise

The ousting of Cheddi Jagan is one of the last known covert operations overseas involving MI5, which had a powerful ‘counterintelligence’ role in the British colonial system. MI5’s cooperation with the CIA in British Guiana was carried out on the direct orders of the then Prime Minister, Harold Macmillan. After the Cold War, Jagan returned to office in Guyana, this time as president.5 In common with other Western international trade-union organizations, PSI officials insist their outfit was ‘cleaned up’ long ago. It is certainly true that, in later years, more left-led British unions joined PSI and helped steer it away from its traditional Cold War role. Windsor himself claims that by the early 1970s the CIA agents working at the PSI headquarters had all been cleared out and that the international was a thoroughly respectable outfit. ‘By the time I got to PSI, there was no question of CIA subversion, but you just had to accept that was part of its history,’ he says.

It was Charles Clarke, the Labour leader’s chef de cabinet, who handed Dalyell the request to call the NUM’s former chief executive – jotted down on the leader of the Opposition’s office notepaper. A year earlier, in an interview with Channel Four television, Windsor had taken a more relaxed, but similar, line when asked if he had had any contact with the intelligence services. I’ve never had anything to do with intelligence. I worked for ten years for an international trade-union organization. I’ve been a member of the Labour Party for many years. I’ve served as a Labour councillor. Yes, of course, I could be a place by the CIA, perhaps even I don’t know about it, but it’s ridiculous. My telephone’s been tapped, my family and my wife have been subjected to a tremendous amount of adverse publicity and pressure as a result of this … I rebut it as absolute sheer nonsense. Two days after Dalyell’s statement, Windsor adopted a more whimsical tone: ‘Scargill gave me the NUM job.

This was the main hardship fund for striking miners and their families and was never touched or even threatened by the sequestrators or receiver. Money was raised for it both in Britain and all over the world, though nothing was contributed from the Soviet Union. But as the dispute wore on, the NUM leaders became increasingly anxious for financial backing for the running of the strike itself. In particular, they wanted cash to pay for the essential day-to-day expenses of the union organization, which, with the loss of all contributions income, had become a major headache. This was what they lobbied the Russians for – among others – from the summer onwards. Soviet officials accepted relatively quickly that they had ‘an obligation to help’ and promised to transfer a substantial sum. Scargill, Heathfield and Mick McGahey, the ‘troika’ who led the strike, all met Soviet trade-unionists during 1984 to press the point, and there were regular contacts with Yuri Mazur, the Soviet labour attaché in London – who resurfaced in Dublin after the collapse of the Soviet state as a diplomat for Boris Yeltsin’s Russian Federation.


Profit Over People: Neoliberalism and Global Order by Noam Chomsky

Bernie Sanders, Bretton Woods, declining real wages, deindustrialization, full employment, invisible hand, joint-stock company, land reform, liberal capitalism, manufacturing employment, means of production, Monroe Doctrine, Ronald Reagan, strikebreaker, structural adjustment programs, Telecommunications Act of 1996, The Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith, Thomas Malthus, union organizing, Washington Consensus

The study was carried out under NAFTA rules in response to a complaint by telecommunications workers on illegal labor practices by Sprint. The complaint was upheld by the US National Labor Relations Board, which ordered trivial penalties after years of delay, standard procedure. The NAFTA study, by Cornell University Labor economist Kate Bronfenbrenner, was authorized for release by Canada and Mexico, but delayed by the Clinton administration. It reveals a significant impact of NAFTA on strike-breaking. About half of union organizing efforts are disrupted by employer threats to transfer production abroad; for example, by placing signs reading “Mexico Transfer Job” in front of a plant where there is an organizing drive. The threats are not idle: when such organizing drives nevertheless succeed, employers close the plant in whole or in part at triple the pre-NAFTA rate (about 15 percent of the time). Plant-closing threats are almost twice as high in more mobile industries (e.g., manufacturing vs. construction).

McNamara had particular praise for the training of Indonesian military officers in US universities, “very significant factors” in setting the “new Indonesian political elite” (the military) on the proper course. In crafting its human rights policies for China, the administration might have also recalled the constructive advice of a Kennedy military mission to Colombia: “As necessary execute paramilitary, sabotage, and/or terrorist activities against known communist proponents” (a term that covers peasants, union organizers, human rights activists, etc.). The pupils learned the lessons well, compiling the worst human rights record of the 1990s in the hemisphere with increasing US military aid and training. Reasonable people can easily understand, then, that it would be counterproductive to press China too hard on such matters as torture of dissidents or atrocities in Tibet. That might even cause China to suffer the “harmful effects of a society isolated from American influence,” the reason adduced by a group of corporate executives for removing US trade barriers that keep them from Cuban markets, where they could labor to restore the “helpful effects of American influence” that prevailed from the “liberation” 100 years ago through the Batista years, the same influences that have proven so benign in Haiti, El Salvador, and other contemporary paradises—by accident, yielding profits as well.3 Such subtle discriminations must be part of the armory of those who aspire to respectability and prestige.


Year 501 by Noam Chomsky

"Robert Solow", anti-communist, Bartolomé de las Casas, Berlin Wall, Bolshevik threat, Bretton Woods, British Empire, business cycle, capital controls, colonial rule, corporate governance, cuban missile crisis, declining real wages, Deng Xiaoping, deskilling, Dissolution of the Soviet Union, European colonialism, experimental subject, Fall of the Berlin Wall, Howard Zinn, invisible hand, land reform, land tenure, long peace, mass incarceration, means of production, Monroe Doctrine, non-tariff barriers, offshore financial centre, plutocrats, Plutocrats, price stability, Ralph Nader, Ralph Waldo Emerson, RAND corporation, Ronald Reagan, Simon Kuznets, strikebreaker, structural adjustment programs, the scientific method, The Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith, trade liberalization, trickle-down economics, union organizing, War on Poverty, working poor

Moves to end the Cold War, in contrast, would serve neither of these goals, and hence were never a serious option. A third reason for opposing unification, Leffler observes, was concern over the “appeal of the left,” reinforced by “the more vigorous recovery and political activism in the Soviet zone,” including the space allowed for works councils with some managerial authority in denazified enterprises, and trade union organization. Washington feared that a unified labor movement and other popular organizations might interfere with US plans to restore traditional business rule. The British Foreign Office also feared “economic and ideological infiltration” from the East, which it perceived as “something very like aggression”; political successes by the wrong people are commonly described as “aggression” in the internal record.

We need not linger on the record of mass slaughter, genocide in the highlands, disappearance, torture, mutilation, and other standard accompaniments of Free World victories; admittedly, a display of imperial benevolence that has been somewhat excessive in the case of Guatemala. The contours, at least, should be recalled. The terror began as soon as the US-run military coup succeeded in overthrowing the reformist capitalist democracy. Some 8000 peasants were murdered in two months in a terror campaign that targeted particularly United Fruit Company union organizers and Indian village leaders. The US Embassy participated with considerable fervor, providing lists of “Communists” to be eliminated or imprisoned and tortured while Washington dedicated itself to making Guatemala “a showcase for democracy.” At a comparable stage, the Khmer Rouge were condemned for genocide. Terror mounted again in the 1960s, with active US participation. The process resumed in the late 1970s, soon reaching new levels of barbarism.

The first warning was sounded in 1932, when the Norris-LaGuardia Act exempted unions from antitrust prosecution, granting labor rights that it had received in England sixty years earlier. The Wagner Act was entirely unacceptable, and has by now been effectively reversed by the business-state-media complex. In the late 19th century, American workers made progress despite the extremely hostile climate. In the steel industry, the heart of the developing economy, union organization reached roughly the level of Britain in the 1880s. That was soon to change. A state-business offensive destroyed the unions with considerable violence, in other industries as well. In the business euphoria of the 1920s, it was assumed that the beast had been slain. American labor history is unusually violent, considerably more so than in other industrial societies. Noting that there is no serious study, Patricia Sexton reports an estimate of 700 strikers killed and thousands injured from 1877 to 1968, a figure that may “grossly understate the total casualties”; in comparison, one British striker was killed since 1911.15 A major blow against working people was struck in 1892, when Andrew Carnegie destroyed the 60,000 member Amalgamated Association of Iron and Steel Workers (AAISW) by hiring scabs—yet another anniversary that might have been commemorated in 1992, when the UAW was laid low by the very same methods, revived after a sixty-year lapse.


pages: 309 words: 91,581

The Great Divergence: America's Growing Inequality Crisis and What We Can Do About It by Timothy Noah

assortative mating, autonomous vehicles, blue-collar work, Bonfire of the Vanities, Branko Milanovic, business cycle, call centre, collective bargaining, computer age, corporate governance, Credit Default Swap, David Ricardo: comparative advantage, Deng Xiaoping, easy for humans, difficult for computers, Erik Brynjolfsson, Everybody Ought to Be Rich, feminist movement, Frank Levy and Richard Murnane: The New Division of Labor, Gini coefficient, Gunnar Myrdal, income inequality, industrial robot, invisible hand, job automation, Joseph Schumpeter, longitudinal study, low skilled workers, lump of labour, manufacturing employment, moral hazard, oil shock, pattern recognition, Paul Samuelson, performance metric, positional goods, post-industrial society, postindustrial economy, purchasing power parity, refrigerator car, rent control, Richard Feynman, Ronald Reagan, shareholder value, Silicon Valley, Simon Kuznets, Stephen Hawking, Steve Jobs, The Spirit Level, too big to fail, trickle-down economics, Tyler Cowen: Great Stagnation, union organizing, upwardly mobile, very high income, Vilfredo Pareto, War on Poverty, We are the 99%, women in the workforce, Works Progress Administration, Yom Kippur War

Taft-Hartley also eliminated so-called card check certification, an alternative to secret-ballot elections that involved the quiet collection of authorization cards from a majority of employees. The disadvantage to unionizing via card check (a method that labor tried and failed to get Congress to revive after President Barack Obama’s election in 2008) is that it risks subjecting wavering rank-and-file members to unseemly and perhaps thuggish pressure from union organizers. But the absence of card check (as an alternative to an NLRB-supervised election; the method remains legal as a step to initiate a union election, as we saw with Josh Noble’s organizing effort) has allowed employers to engage in fear-mongering campaigns (and some thuggery of their own against employees who campaign visibly for unionization) prior to union elections.17 The formal union elections required under Taft-Hartley can also drown organizing drives in procedure.

Repealing Taft-Hartley, the 1947 law that imposed severe restrictions on labor’s ability to organize, is a necessary step. As we saw in chapter 8, Taft-Hartley played a major role in labor’s gradual postwar decline. But even before Republicans regained the House of Representatives in the 2010 election, labor unions were unable to persuade Congress to repeal just one part of Taft-Hartley by restoring “card check,” an informal method of union certification wherein union organizers quietly collect authorization cards from employees as an alternative to secret-ballot elections (which are easily manipulated by management). “The Democrats wouldn’t support it,” Stern explained. “In the end, many of the Democrats don’t believe in unions. It’s not their funding base. In terms of their hard-dollar contributions, particularly for senators, they all come from a class of people who are not particularly pro-union.

But Stern noted that there are some profitable employee stock ownership plans, among them the Publix supermarket chain, one of the ten largest-volume supermarket chains in the country. Wage levels, Stern told me, should be negotiated industry-wide (as they were under the Treaty of Detroit), thereby removing wages from price competition. In exchange, Stern said, perhaps business and government could be persuaded to support easing existing restrictions on union organizing. The obvious difficulty here is that, as we saw in chapter 8, management had little inclination to let unions participate in non-labor decisions even back in the 1940s and 1950s, when unions were much more powerful. But Stern argued that heightened global competition of a sort undreamed of in the mid-twentieth century has increased pressure on government and business to work together as a team—as occurs in many countries that the United States competes with—and that labor is a logical member of that team.


The Man Behind the Microchip: Robert Noyce and the Invention of Silicon Valley by Leslie Berlin

Apple II, Bob Noyce, business cycle, collective bargaining, computer age, George Gilder, informal economy, John Markoff, Kickstarter, laissez-faire capitalism, low skilled workers, means of production, Menlo Park, Murray Gell-Mann, open economy, Richard Feynman, Ronald Reagan, Sand Hill Road, Silicon Valley, Silicon Valley startup, Steve Jobs, Steve Wozniak, union organizing, War on Poverty, women in the workforce, Yom Kippur War

In 1973, WEMA, an industry association to which Intel belonged and in which Noyce actively participated, offered a two-day seminar for “companies that are non-union and wish to remain so.” Led by an attorney who specialized in labor law, the seminar featured a simulated union organizing drive, so participants could practice making decisions in realistic scenarios. WEMA (which changed its name to the American Electronics Association [AEA] in 1977) also provided legal aid to companies facing union drives and furthermore served as a highly efficient clearinghouse for information about union activity throughout the electronics industry. As one union organizer explained, “Whenever organizers passed [out] leaflets in one plant, a copy of the leaflet would be on the desk of every human resources director in the Valley within two or three days.”7 Conventional wisdom within the semiconductor industry held that no matter how rich a company’s wages and benefits package, it would cost 25 percent more to operate the business with a union in house.

Everything was under yellow lights, and we were petrified.”11 Intel found that a number of its new employees were quitting after only a few days on the job because, as Flath put it, “they were just so nervous they’d go home and shake at night because they [hadn’t known] what they were going to get into.” The strangeness of the clean room that terrified workers gave union organizers hope. Indeed, the most significant unionizing effort Intel faced was at Fab 3 the late 1970s.12 But that effort failed, too, as did every other attempt to unionize the semiconductor industry in the late 1970s and early 1980s. Union organizers in these years were swimming against the tide. Between 1970 and 1988, the percentage of California workers represented by a union dropped from 36 percent to 22 percent. By the end of the 1970s, nearly three-quarters of semiconductor production workers were women and almost half were members of minority ethnic groups (mostly Hispanic or Asian).

The company said this policy rewarded individual effort; the labor movement claimed its primary effect was to discourage collective thinking of any sort among workers. In any case, Intel’s failure to follow its own policies led someone at the company either to contact the Teamsters or to listen carefully when approached by them. “I felt we brought the unionization problem on ourselves,” Bowers explains. “If we had followed our own policies, it never would have happened.” The timing of Intel’s misstep coincided with a spike in union-organizing activity throughout Silicon Valley. In 1974, the United Electrical Workers (UE) created an organizing committee specifically to target the Silicon Valley labor force. Many in the labor movement thought that workers might be more open to collective bargaining after the massive 1974 layoffs, especially if someone pointed out to them that with every passing year, more semiconductor production jobs moved offshore.


Power Systems: Conversations on Global Democratic Uprisings and the New Challenges to U.S. Empire by Noam Chomsky, David Barsamian

affirmative action, Affordable Care Act / Obamacare, Albert Einstein, American ideology, Chelsea Manning, collective bargaining, colonial rule, corporate personhood, David Brooks, discovery of DNA, double helix, drone strike, failed state, Howard Zinn, hydraulic fracturing, income inequality, inflation targeting, Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), Julian Assange, land reform, Martin Wolf, Mohammed Bouazizi, Naomi Klein, Nelson Mandela, new economy, obamacare, Occupy movement, oil shale / tar sands, pattern recognition, Powell Memorandum, quantitative easing, Ralph Nader, Ralph Waldo Emerson, single-payer health, sovereign wealth fund, The Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith, theory of mind, Tobin tax, union organizing, Upton Sinclair, uranium enrichment, WikiLeaks

Over time, this campaign had some success, but a majority of the workforce would still prefer to be unionized if they could be.7 Barriers have been set up by state policy which make it very hard to join a union.8 The consequence of all this is that private-sector unionization is down to about 7 percent.9 Public-sector unions still haven’t been destroyed, but that’s why there is a bitter attack against them right now. The attack in Wisconsin on the right of workers to organize and collectively bargain is a clear example.10 The issues in Wisconsin have nothing to do with the state budget deficit. That’s a fraud that’s simply used as a pretext. The issue is the right of collective bargaining, one of the basic principles of union organization. The business world wants to destroy that. Rhetoric aside, has the Democratic Party really been a friend of organized labor and the working class? Compared with the Republicans, yes, but that’s not saying much. The studies of Larry Bartels and other political scientists show that working people and the poor tend to do somewhat better under Democratic than Republican administrations.11 But that just means that the Republicans are deeper in the pockets of the corporate system than the Democrats are.

Actually, it turned out it didn’t, but it really could have meant something. That’s an example of a spark that didn’t lead to a conflagration. In order to mount resistance and challenge power, it’s necessary to overcome the barrier of fear. It seems that the Occupy movement has done that. It has. It’s costly to oppose power. No matter if you’re a graduate student, a child in school questioning something that’s happening, a union organizer, or a political dissident, whatever you may be, it’s going to carry a personal cost. Power systems, whatever they are, very rarely abdicate their power cheerfully. They usually resist. In a society like ours, they have many means at their disposal. We have a very class-conscious business class in the United States. They’re always fighting a bitter one-sided class war and if they meet any opposition they will react.


pages: 1,106 words: 335,322

Titan: The Life of John D. Rockefeller, Sr. by Ron Chernow

business cycle, California gold rush, collective bargaining, death of newspapers, delayed gratification, double entry bookkeeping, endowment effect, family office, financial independence, Frederick Winslow Taylor, George Santayana, God and Mammon, income inequality, invisible hand, Joseph Schumpeter, Louis Pasteur, Mahatma Gandhi, Menlo Park, New Journalism, oil rush, oil shale / tar sands, passive investing, plutocrats, Plutocrats, price discrimination, profit motive, Ralph Waldo Emerson, refrigerator car, The Chicago School, Thorstein Veblen, transcontinental railway, traveling salesman, union organizing, Upton Sinclair, white picket fence, yellow journalism

One biographer has gone so far as to say of Rockefeller, “He was the best employer of his time, instituting hospitalization and retirement pensions.”19 He was a fine boss if workers abided by his rules, but if they did something foolish, like show interest in a union, they promptly forfeited his sympathy. Rockefeller never acknowledged the legitimacy of organized labor, nor did he tolerate union organizers on the premises. He also reserved the right to pass judgment on the private lives of employees. Imposing his own prudish standards on his staff, he penalized any executive implicated in an adulterous affair and frowned on divorce. Sabbath observance was de rigueur, and if colleagues wrote to him when they should have been in church, they tended not to put the real dates on their letters. The most remarkable instance of Rockefeller participating in an associate’s moral reformation occurred with John D.

Because of Bowers’s demonstrated proficiency in running the Great Lakes ore fleet, the Rockefellers reposed extraordinary— and ultimately misplaced—trust in the abilities of this former wholesale grocer from upstate New York who became vice president of the Colorado company and the Rockefellers’ chief liaison with it. Despite this fresh leadership, the Colorado investment seemed as misbegotten as the Mesabi investment had been charmed, and for years CFI did not pay a penny on its stocks or bonds. Hobbled with a money loser, the Rockefellers took an intransigent tone with union organizers. As early as October 1903, Junior sent fighting words to CFI’s president on the subject: “We are prepared to stand by in this fight and see the thing out, not yielding an inch. Recognition of any kind of either the labor leaders or union, much more a conference such as they request, would be a sign of evident weakness on our part.”2 In his decades in business, Senior had learned never to budge on the prerogatives of capital, especially when it came to unions.

Right on the eve of the Colorado disaster, Gates urged Rockefeller to slim down his investment, but he would not hear of it. William Lyon Mackenzie King (left) and John D. Rockefeller, Jr., don denim overalls at the Colorado Fuel and Iron Company, September 1915, after the Ludlow Massacre. (Courtesy of the Rockefeller Archive Center) Under Rockefeller rule, it was heretical for anyone in CFI management to concede any legitimacy to unions. To scare off union organizers, Bowers and CFI president Jesse Welborn resorted to terror, fielding spies and detectives and firing union sympathizers. At the same time, they tried to inoculate workers against unions through paternalistic measures, raising their wages 10 percent and introducing an eight-hour day. As a chastened Junior later said of Bowers, “He had the kindness-of-heart theory, i.e. that he was glad to treat the men well, not that they had any necessary claim to it, but because it was the proper attitude of a Christian gentleman.


pages: 291 words: 95,468

Sam Walton: Made in America by Sam Walton, John Huey

inventory management, profit motive, union organizing

Today, some of our company's critics would like everybody to believe we started our profit-sharing program and other benefits merely as a way to stave off union organizing. The traditional version of what happened is that the Retail Clerks Union organized a strike against us when we opened store number 20 in Clinton, Missouri, and another one when we opened store number 25 in Mexico, Missouri, and that in response to those troubles we started all these programs to keep the unions out. That story is only partly true. We did have labor trouble in those two stores, and we did fight the unions —legally and aboveboard—and we won. In fact, we've never lost a union organizing election. But the idea for sharing profits and benefits had come up even before we went public, not from me, but from Helen. HELEN WALTON: "We were on a trip, driving someplace, and we were talking about the high salary that Sam was earning, and about all the money and benefits that he was paying the officers of the company in order to keep his top people.


pages: 405 words: 103,723

The Government of No One: The Theory and Practice of Anarchism by Ruth Kinna

Berlin Wall, British Empire, complexity theory, creative destruction, David Graeber, en.wikipedia.org, Fall of the Berlin Wall, feminist movement, friendly fire, ghettoisation, Kickstarter, late capitalism, means of production, moral panic, New Journalism, Occupy movement, post scarcity, Steven Pinker, Ted Kaczynski, union organizing, wage slave

Anarchist debates about class and intersectionality bring out some of the tensions in this conception and help show how anarchists have addressed the issue of inequalities between groups of oppressed peoples. CLASS The critique of domination gives anarchists a wide lens to identify instances of oppression. Their integral analysis of state oppression and capitalist exploitation has also provided a fertile ground for building alliances with non-anarchist socialists. Anarchists have often been energetic union organizers and have pursued sometimes aggressive anti-bourgeois agendas to mobilize class actions: it is not difficult to find the language of class struggle in anarchist writing. In that sense, Ricardo Flores Magón’s 1911 Manifesto of the Mexican Liberal Party often sounds virtually indistinguishable from Marx and Engels’s 1848 Communist Manifesto: [H]umanity remains divided into two classes whose interests are diametrically opposed – the capitalist class and the working class; the class that has possession of the land, the machinery of production and the means of transporting wealth, and the class that must rely on its muscle and intelligence to support itself.

He served a year of the four-year sentence.5 MURRAY BOOKCHIN (1921-2006) Bookchin was a left-libertarian autodidact, advocate of decentralized federalism and communalist democracy. Born in New York, he joined the youth organization of the American Communist Party, the Young Communist League aged nine. Alienated by the adoption of the Popular Front policy, he broke with Stalinism in 1935 and was expelled in 1937 during the Spanish Revolution for anarchist-Trotskyist tendencies. He worked in New Jersey as a foundryman and union organizer for the Congress of Industrial Unions. After being demobbed from the US Army he became a car worker and participant in the General Motors strike of 1946. Writing under the pen-name Lewis Herber, he published Our Synthetic Environment in 1962 to promote social ecology. In the latter part of the decade he developed the concept of post-scarcity, finding a foothold in the countercultural movements that blossomed in the 60s.

In the 1960s and 70s Bookchin lectured across the US and Canada and was active in number of anti-nuclear, civil rights and anti-Vietnam War campaigns. He wrote nearly thirty books, including the collection Post-Scarcity Anarchism (1971), The Ecology of Freedom (1982), Urbanization without Cities (1992) and Social Anarchism or Lifestyle Anarchism: An Unbridgeable Chasm (1995).6 TOM BROWN (1900–1974) Brown was an anarchist syndicalist born in Newcastle-on-Tyne in the north-east of England. Apprenticed as an engineer, he became a union organizer and shop steward. He joined the Communist Party after the Bolshevik takeover and served as its industrial organizer in the north-east. Disillusioned with Bolshevism, he subsequently quit the party. In 1934 Brown was involved in foundation of the Anti-Fascist League, a direct-action organization established to counter the rise of the British Union of Fascists in the north-east. Moving from the West Midlands to London in the mid-1930s he joined the editorial board of Revolt!


pages: 346 words: 97,330

Ghost Work: How to Stop Silicon Valley From Building a New Global Underclass by Mary L. Gray, Siddharth Suri

Affordable Care Act / Obamacare, Amazon Mechanical Turk, augmented reality, autonomous vehicles, barriers to entry, basic income, big-box store, bitcoin, blue-collar work, business process, business process outsourcing, call centre, Capital in the Twenty-First Century by Thomas Piketty, cloud computing, collaborative consumption, collective bargaining, computer vision, corporate social responsibility, crowdsourcing, data is the new oil, deindustrialization, deskilling, don't be evil, Donald Trump, Elon Musk, employer provided health coverage, en.wikipedia.org, equal pay for equal work, Erik Brynjolfsson, financial independence, Frank Levy and Richard Murnane: The New Division of Labor, future of work, gig economy, glass ceiling, global supply chain, hiring and firing, ImageNet competition, industrial robot, informal economy, information asymmetry, Jeff Bezos, job automation, knowledge economy, low skilled workers, low-wage service sector, market friction, Mars Rover, natural language processing, new economy, passive income, pattern recognition, post-materialism, post-work, race to the bottom, Rana Plaza, recommendation engine, ride hailing / ride sharing, Ronald Coase, Second Machine Age, sentiment analysis, sharing economy, Shoshana Zuboff, side project, Silicon Valley, Silicon Valley startup, Skype, software as a service, speech recognition, spinning jenny, Stephen Hawking, The Future of Employment, The Nature of the Firm, transaction costs, two-sided market, union organizing, universal basic income, Vilfredo Pareto, women in the workforce, Works Progress Administration, Y Combinator

But these communities can also create barriers to entry and keep people out. As noted in chapter 2, organized labor movements and unions historically depended on two factors to rally workers. They made use of the coherence of a professional identity—machinists, steelworkers, teachers—to lay the groundwork for a common cause. Union organizers also relied on the solidarity of face-to-face interactions at the work site and, when striking, the power of collective action as a force for change. Social solidarity, as seen from the earliest days of union organizing, could also include xenophobia and insularities. Ironically, the homogeneity of a full-time workforce and the tacit, unexamined discrimination that can make workplaces hostile to difference led some people to try on-demand work. Yet these real and imagined divisions are not hard-and-fast.

We would have to rent another floor to make room for their machines; we would have to buy the machines, and we would have to have gas and heat, and then have to pay them more, may be, into the bargain.”13 Unions proved themselves no more motivated than the factory owners to recognize the value of women’s contingent labor, either on-site or working from home. The largest, most progressive union, the United Garment Workers, organized in 1891, tried to root out what it saw as the “menace of the outworkers” and make them “a coherent part of its growth,” but to no avail.14 Union organizers focused on getting young women to fill vacancies on the factory floor. But these approaches did not contend with or even recognize how often women worked on contract through piecework, because factory work was still considered morally suspect for a young, unmarried woman and, practically speaking, took her away from her other full-time job of cooking, cleaning, and caring for children and elders at home.


pages: 161 words: 52,058

The Art of Corporate Success: The Story of Schlumberger by Ken Auletta

Albert Einstein, Bretton Woods, George Gilder, job satisfaction, offshore financial centre, oil shale / tar sands, oil shock, Ronald Reagan, the scientific method, union organizing

Through Cartier-Bresson, Riboud met members of the art and literary worlds, including Charles Olson, who was then living in Washington, D.C. Olson and his wife, Constance, became special friends of Riboud’s. Every two or three months, Riboud took the train to Washington to spend a weekend with them. The three would stay up talking until dawn, sleep until midafternoon, talk until dawn. Unlike Riboud, Olson came from a working-class background; his father was a mailman and a union organizer in Massachusetts. Riboud read Mao Zedong’s writings aloud in French to Olson, who used several of Mao’s lines in his 1949 poem “The Kingfishers,” and who wrote enthusiastically of Central America’s “Communist future.” Olson, who was something of a mystic, taught English at Black Mountain College, in North Carolina, and was considered a leading avant-garde figure of his day. His devoted students included John Cage, Robert Rauschenberg, and Merce Cunningham.

During the same period, an exactly opposite trend took place in the Far East, particularly in Japan … If I look now at Schlumberger, obviously we are riding on top of the wave, everything looks bright … How can we lose? Simply by letting the motivation of the Schlumberger people fade away. America fell asleep. Is Schlumberger going to fall asleep, too?… I am now asking you to add a new and more important parameter to your job: you are responsible for the fundamental motivation of the Schlumberger people. This is a totally new dimension to your job.” Riboud added, sounding like a union organizer, “You must have and ask for a higher position in the corporate totem pole, in the salary scale.” What Riboud has called “the will to win” hints at a final reason for Schlumberger’s success—what employees refer to as “the Schlumberger spirit,” or what Peters and Waterman label “corporate culture.” Because it cannot be measured, photographed, tasted, smelled, reduced to paper, PERT chart, or Harvard Business School formulas, analysts often overlook the role that commonly accepted attitudes, values, spirit—“the way we do business here”—plays in determining a company’s success or failure.


pages: 475 words: 149,310

Multitude: War and Democracy in the Age of Empire by Michael Hardt, Antonio Negri

affirmative action, Berlin Wall, Bretton Woods, British Empire, business cycle, conceptual framework, continuation of politics by other means, David Graeber, Defenestration of Prague, deskilling, Fall of the Berlin Wall, feminist movement, Francis Fukuyama: the end of history, friendly fire, global village, Howard Rheingold, Howard Zinn, illegal immigration, Joseph Schumpeter, land reform, land tenure, late capitalism, liberation theology, means of production, Naomi Klein, new economy, Paul Samuelson, post-work, private military company, race to the bottom, RAND corporation, reserve currency, Richard Stallman, Slavoj Žižek, The Chicago School, The Structural Transformation of the Public Sphere, Thomas Malthus, Thorstein Veblen, Tobin tax, transaction costs, union organizing, War on Poverty, Washington Consensus

One of the most fascinating contemporary examples is the Justice for Janitors movement, one of the most successful and creative union organizing efforts in the United States. The organizers face challenges that traditional unions have not been able to address: a mobile population, predominantly very recent immigrants, many of whom do no speak English, possessing few marketable skills. One of the secrets of the success may be that, at least in the Los Angeles region, where the movement won its first victories, many of the leading figures are veterans of the FMLN who fought in the civil war against the government of El Salvador. They carried their revolutionary desire with them from the mountains of Morazán to the skyscrapers of Los Angeles and infected others with it, transposing the struggle from guerrilla warfare to union organizing. This is a real and powerful extension of the common.133 A new international cycle finally emerged around the issues of globalization in the late 1990s.134 The coming-out party of the new cycle of struggles were the protests at the WTO summit in Seattle in 1999.

One index of the democratic nature of guerrilla military organizations is the participation of women. It was not uncommon for women to compose more than 30 percent of the combatants in Latin American guerrilla organizations in the late twentieth century, for example, with an equal percentage in leadership positions.90 This was a much higher percentage of female participation and leadership than in other sectors of these same societies, such as political or trade union organizations, and much higher than in state military regimes elsewhere. In the Nicaraguan case, after the Sandinista victory many women combatants complained that they were not able to maintain leadership positions in the postrevolutionary power structure. An impressive number of women did hold important positions in the victorious Sandinista government, but not nearly as many as in the Sandinista guerrilla forces.91 This is one symptom of the process of de-democratization of the guerrilla movements.

The demands for “guaranteed income,” for example, an income due to all citizens regardless of employment, which have circulated in Europe, Brazil, and North America for several years, is such a constituent project aimed against poverty.62 If extended beyond the national realm to become a global demand of guaranteed income for all, this could become an element of a project for the democratic management of globalization. Such a common scheme for the distribution of wealth would correspond to the common productivity of the poor. Our claims of the wealth, productivity, and commonality of the poor have immediate implications for trade union organizing. The old form of trade union, which was born in the nineteenth century and aimed primarily at negotiating wages for a specific trade, is no longer sufficient. First of all, as we have been arguing, the old trade unions are not able to represent the unemployed, the poor, or even the mobile and flexible post-Fordist workers with short-term contracts, all of whom participate actively in social production and increase social wealth.


pages: 518 words: 147,036

The Fissured Workplace by David Weil

accounting loophole / creative accounting, affirmative action, Affordable Care Act / Obamacare, banking crisis, barriers to entry, business cycle, business process, buy and hold, call centre, Carmen Reinhart, Cass Sunstein, Clayton Christensen, clean water, collective bargaining, commoditize, corporate governance, corporate raider, Corrections Corporation of America, Daniel Kahneman / Amos Tversky, David Ricardo: comparative advantage, declining real wages, employer provided health coverage, Frank Levy and Richard Murnane: The New Division of Labor, George Akerlof, global supply chain, global value chain, hiring and firing, income inequality, information asymmetry, intermodal, inventory management, Jane Jacobs, Kenneth Rogoff, law of one price, loss aversion, low skilled workers, minimum wage unemployment, moral hazard, Network effects, new economy, occupational segregation, Paul Samuelson, performance metric, pre–internet, price discrimination, principal–agent problem, Rana Plaza, Richard Florida, Richard Thaler, Ronald Coase, shareholder value, Silicon Valley, statistical model, Steve Jobs, supply-chain management, The Death and Life of Great American Cities, The Nature of the Firm, transaction costs, ultimatum game, union organizing, women in the workforce, yield management

The Fair Labor Standards Act, which sets minimum wage and overtime standards and regulates child labor, defines an employee as “any individual who is employed by an employer” and states that “employ includes to suffer or permit to work.” To help clarify this vague definition, courts apply an economic realities test to evaluate the particular employment situation surrounding a worker and an employer. This potentially gives the agency responsible for enforcement the latitude to adjust to changing employment conditions on the ground.13 The National Labor Relations Act, the federal statute governing union organizing and collective bargaining, also uses an economic reality test for defining employment. However, a Supreme Court decision in 1944 holding that boys who sold newspapers on the street on commission were in fact Hearst employees despite the company’s contention that they were independent contractors led enraged conservatives in Congress to amend the National Labor Relations Act in 1947 to specifically exempt independent contractors.14 This has led historically to very narrow readings of coverage and application of the act.

These contracts reflect both conditions in the external labor markets and relative bargaining power within the firm.10 None of these explanations, however, recognizes a basic aspect of the workplace: it brings together large groups of people, and people by nature are deeply social beings. Workers operating under one roof communicate and quickly discover a lot about their co-workers. This includes whether the person sitting in the next cubicle is being paid more for doing the same job. Paying individuals who do similar jobs different wages could have deleterious consequences on productivity, increase turnover, or even inspire a union-organizing drive. Unified personnel policies and simplified compensation structures for workers with varying levels of productivity play a fundamental role in reducing frictions among workers. Fairness and Wage Determination Fairness matters. In contrast to assumptions of traditional economics that individuals maximize gains solely for themselves, a large empirical literature from psychology, decision science, and more recently behavioral economics reveals that people care not only about their own gains but also about those of others.

For example, AT&T does not directly employ cell tower maintenance workers, but its use of turfers has clear impacts on hazards (and fatalities) on the tower sites it operates. As we shall see, OSHA has been wrestling with this issue for decades in establishing citation policies for construction and other multiemployer work sites. At the other end of the spectrum, the NLRA, the federal statute governing union organizing and collective bargaining, uses a restrictive definition and a narrow economic reality test for defining employment, more closely adhering to common law notions. Originally, the Supreme Court in ruling on the NLRA’s employer-employee definitions deferred to the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB). In NLRB v. Hearst Publications Inc., the Court explicitly stated that the board’s employment definition need not be confined to common law definitions, but could legitimately look, “as a matter of economic fact, to the evils the Act was designed to eradicate.”


pages: 207 words: 59,298

The Gig Economy: A Critical Introduction by Jamie Woodcock, Mark Graham

Airbnb, Amazon Mechanical Turk, autonomous vehicles, barriers to entry, British Empire, business process, business process outsourcing, call centre, collective bargaining, commoditize, corporate social responsibility, crowdsourcing, David Graeber, deindustrialization, disintermediation, en.wikipedia.org, full employment, future of work, gender pay gap, gig economy, global value chain, informal economy, information asymmetry, inventory management, Jaron Lanier, Jeff Bezos, job automation, knowledge economy, Lyft, mass immigration, means of production, Network effects, new economy, Panopticon Jeremy Bentham, planetary scale, precariat, rent-seeking, RFID, ride hailing / ride sharing, Ronald Reagan, self-driving car, sentiment analysis, sharing economy, Silicon Valley, Silicon Valley ideology, TaskRabbit, The Future of Employment, transaction costs, Travis Kalanick, two-sided market, Uber and Lyft, Uber for X, uber lyft, union organizing, women in the workforce, working poor, young professional

This was due to the strict timetables ships had to follow as they were caught up in a wider network of trade. Even before platforms, workers’ schedules were shaped by global economic forces. Each day, prospective workers from London’s deprived East End would queue up outside the gates of the docks, waiting to see if they would be ‘called on’ by a foreman. As Ben Tillett (1910: 8), a dock worker who later became a union organizer, explained: We are driven into a shed, iron-barred from end to end, outside of which a foreman or contractor walks up and down with the air of a dealer in a cattle market, picking and choosing from a crowd of men, who, in their eagerness to obtain employment, trample each other under foot, and where like beasts they fight for the chances of a day’s work. This is obviously a difficult environment for workers, who will be selling their time at a huge disadvantage.

While this kind of opposition has been incredibly widespread, there are emerging patterns of strikes by Uber drivers in different countries, including strikes in Bangladesh, India, Kenya, South Africa and the UK. In India, there have been large strikes of Uber drivers, including drivers for Ola – the Indian-based competitor. For example, in October 2018 there was a combined strike of Uber and Ola drivers in Mumbai and Delhi, with demands for higher fares to meet rising fuel costs. These were coordinated by existing union organizations like the Mumbai Taxi Drivers’ Union.4 In Bangalore, we met with Tanveer Pasha, the President of Ola, Taxiforsure and Uber drivers and Owners Association, to discuss organizing at these companies. While there was little participation in Bangalore in the previous strike, the union represents around 55,000–60,000 drivers.5 While they are yet to win concessions from Uber, it shows that sustained organization is possible.


pages: 219 words: 62,816

"They Take Our Jobs!": And 20 Other Myths About Immigration by Aviva Chomsky

affirmative action, Bernie Sanders, British Empire, call centre, colonial exploitation, colonial rule, deindustrialization, Donald Trump, European colonialism, full employment, guest worker program, illegal immigration, immigration reform, informal economy, invisible hand, longitudinal study, low skilled workers, mass immigration, mass incarceration, new economy, out of africa, postindustrial economy, race to the bottom, Ronald Reagan, Rosa Parks, structural adjustment programs, The Chicago School, thinkpad, trickle-down economics, union organizing, War on Poverty, Washington Consensus, women in the workforce

New England’s oldest textile towns, like Lowell, Massachusetts, and Central Falls, Rhode Island, turned into new immigrant centers in the 1960s, ’70s, and ’80s, as textile employers recruited workers in Puerto Rico and Colombia.12 Meatpacking followed a somewhat different trajectory. While the textile industry was able to use the threat of plant relocation to successfully undermine union organizing attempts or to keep unions weak, the meatpacking industry became one of the bastions of industrial union organizing in the 1930s, which succeeded in significantly improving the conditions of workers. “From the 1930s to the 1970s,” explains Lance Compa, “meatpacking workers’ pay and conditions improved. Master contracts covering the industry raised wages and safety standards. In the 1960s and 1970s, meatpacking workers’ pay and conditions approximated those of auto, steel, and other industrial laborers who worked hard in their plants and through their unions to attain steady jobs with good wages and benefits.


pages: 349 words: 114,038

Culture & Empire: Digital Revolution by Pieter Hintjens

4chan, airport security, AltaVista, anti-communist, anti-pattern, barriers to entry, Bill Duvall, bitcoin, blockchain, business climate, business intelligence, business process, Chelsea Manning, clean water, commoditize, congestion charging, Corn Laws, correlation does not imply causation, cryptocurrency, Debian, Edward Snowden, failed state, financial independence, Firefox, full text search, German hyperinflation, global village, GnuPG, Google Chrome, greed is good, Hernando de Soto, hiring and firing, informal economy, intangible asset, invisible hand, James Watt: steam engine, Jeff Rulifson, Julian Assange, Kickstarter, M-Pesa, mass immigration, mass incarceration, mega-rich, MITM: man-in-the-middle, mutually assured destruction, Naomi Klein, national security letter, Nelson Mandela, new economy, New Urbanism, Occupy movement, offshore financial centre, packet switching, patent troll, peak oil, pre–internet, private military company, race to the bottom, rent-seeking, reserve currency, RFC: Request For Comment, Richard Feynman, Richard Stallman, Ross Ulbricht, Satoshi Nakamoto, security theater, selection bias, Skype, slashdot, software patent, spectrum auction, Steve Crocker, Steve Jobs, Steven Pinker, Stuxnet, The Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith, The Wisdom of Crowds, trade route, transaction costs, twin studies, union organizing, wealth creators, web application, WikiLeaks, Y2K, zero day, Zipf's Law

Branding teenagers who send nude pictures of themselves as sex offenders, with life-long consequences, does not protect anyone. We are often so afraid of losing our bread and circuses and so quick to fear and hate others that we're ready to give up our neighbors without a struggle. We often clap as authorities drag away the wretched lawbreakers. And the labeling continues: "extremist," "communist," "liberal," "union organizer," "intellectual," "atheist" -- and the midnight knock on the door is for our parents, brothers, children, ourselves. Torturers and brutes know no limits except those we place on them. That is, we cannot as society expect authority to behave itself and then act surprised when it does not. The secret services will spy on us illegally. The police will detain and abuse vulnerable individuals illegally.

This is a stunning development with deep social, economic, and political impact. We can break it into two periods. The First Wave was roughly from 2000 to 2010 and brought a half-billion Africans the freedom to speak to each other across any distance. The Second Wave covers roughly 2010 to 2020, and will bring a billion Africans on line and into the global Internet. I was talking to a trade union organizer in Lomé, Togo during the crest of the First Wave. She explained how now, if there was a strike at one mine, say in Namibia, news would spread to all mines owned by the firm, across the continent, and workers could shut down operations in fifty mines the next day. The question is how that First Wave ever started. It certainly wasn't planned. In 2000 or so, I was working in Lagos, Nigeria. We had European mobile phones, which did not work in Lagos.

Such acts would not make the market, regulators, or taxman happy if they found out about them. To hide unethical behavior. Manipulating nicotine levels in cigarettes, lending money to dictators to conduct genocides, conducting dangerous product trials on uninformed test subjects, using child labor, buying black-market materials, polluting rivers, stealing pension funds, bribing politicians, muffling union organizers, and so on. As with financial delinquency, profits can suffer when such acts become public knowledge. To hide internal corruption. Directors, with the right to set their own salaries and benefits, regularly stretch the limits of what is appropriate. When confronted by unhappy shareholders, the response is usually, "Those are standard market practices," meaning "Everyone else is cheating their shareholders, so why shouldn't we?"


pages: 393 words: 115,178

The Jakarta Method: Washington's Anticommunist Crusade and the Mass Murder Program That Shaped Our World by Vincent Bevins

Albert Einstein, American ideology, anti-communist, Berlin Wall, Branko Milanovic, British Empire, centre right, colonial rule, crony capitalism, cuban missile crisis, Deng Xiaoping, European colonialism, Fall of the Berlin Wall, feminist movement, Gini coefficient, income inequality, land reform, market fundamentalism, megacity, Nelson Mandela, RAND corporation, Ronald Reagan, sexual politics, South China Sea, structural adjustment programs, union organizing

In addition to the crime of extermination, an International People’s Tribunal assembled later in the Netherlands found the Indonesian military guilty of a number of crimes against humanity, including torture, unjustified and long-term detainment in cruel conditions, forced labor amounting to enslavement, and systematic sexual violence. The judges found that all this was carried out for political purposes—to destroy the Communist Party and then “prop up a violent, dictatorial regime”—with the assistance of the United States, the UK, and Australia.49 It wasn’t only US government officials who handed over kill lists to the Army. Managers of US-owned plantations furnished them with the names of “troublesome” communists and union organizers, who were then murdered.50 The prime responsibility for the massacres and concentration camps lies with the Indonesian military. We still do not know if the method employed—disappearance and mass extermination—was planned well before October 1965, perhaps inspired by other cases around the world, or planned under foreign direction, or if it emerged as a solution as events unfolded. But Washington shares guilt for every death.

It claimed that the right wing had adopted something called “Plan Djakarta,” and said it had gotten the plan from David Rockefeller or Agustín Edwards (the owner of El Mercurio). “The Chilean extreme right wants to repeat that massacre,” the article explained. “What does that mean concretely? The terrorists have a plan which consists of killing the entire Central Committee of the Communist Party, the top of the Socialist Party, the national directors of CUT, the Central Unitaria de Trabajadores de Chile union organization, leaders of social movements, and all prominent figures on the Left.” The article was published on February 22, signed by Carlos Berger, the Communist Party member who had argued with Carmen Hertz about left-wing tactics and the meaning of the Indonesian massacre when she was back at the University of Chile.37 Carlos and Carmen Hertz were now married. Wall painting was a popular political device in Santiago in the early 1970s.

As tension periodically rose around you, friends disappeared forever; you escalated evasive tactics, then settled back into your “normal” life of low-level terror—if you survived this time. Life was a permanent cat-and-mouse game, and Guatemala City became a deadly, sprawling obstacle course, sometimes for the entire life span of its victims. Miguel Ángel Albizures, the same little schoolboy who never forgot the trauma of the sulfatos bombs dropped near his school during the US-backed coup in 1954, grew into a union organizer. The unions were not uniformly left-wing. As a teen, not long after the overthrow of Árbenz, he joined the Catholic Christian Workers’ Movement, and by the 1970s he was a bit of a small-time leader. The union movement had moderate communists, and Christian Democrats, as well as some who supported the more radical guerrillas. The government did not care much for these distinctions. In 1977 they busted open the door of a union meeting Miguel was attending, firing their guns.


pages: 255 words: 68,829

How PowerPoint Makes You Stupid by Franck Frommer

Albert Einstein, business continuity plan, cuban missile crisis, dematerialisation, hypertext link, invention of writing, inventory management, invisible hand, Just-in-time delivery, knowledge worker, Marshall McLuhan, means of production, new economy, oil shock, Ronald Reagan, Silicon Valley, Steve Jobs, Steve Wozniak, union organizing

Traditionally, organizational reforms of the state and of public services have followed a carefully managed process: inspectors general from all branches of the civil service are dispatched to the field to conduct investigations, to question agents, and so on. Reports are drafted to set out paths to improvement. The ones that seem least dangerous are then negotiated with union organizations. This very administrative process implicates agents, intermediate supervisors, and at the end of the chain, the top officials, as well as union organizations with which negotiations have been held to determine the measures, the personnel, and the costs involved. It is a long process simply because it involves negotiations, because if this slow mechanism is short-circuited, there is a strike, and the reform is not adopted. The problem was how to secure acceptance of a policy of reduction when the parties involved knew that that would be possible only to the detriment of the quality of service.


pages: 246 words: 68,392

Gigged: The End of the Job and the Future of Work by Sarah Kessler

Affordable Care Act / Obamacare, Airbnb, Amazon Mechanical Turk, basic income, bitcoin, blockchain, business cycle, call centre, cognitive dissonance, collective bargaining, crowdsourcing, David Attenborough, Donald Trump, East Village, Elon Musk, financial independence, future of work, game design, gig economy, income inequality, information asymmetry, Jeff Bezos, job automation, law of one price, Lyft, Mark Zuckerberg, market clearing, minimum wage unemployment, new economy, payday loans, post-work, profit maximization, QR code, race to the bottom, ride hailing / ride sharing, Second Machine Age, self-driving car, shareholder value, sharing economy, Silicon Valley, Snapchat, TaskRabbit, Travis Kalanick, Uber and Lyft, Uber for X, uber lyft, union organizing, universal basic income, working-age population, Works Progress Administration, Y Combinator

But by this point I had observed Managed by Q for more than a year, interviewing both executives and workers, and I had seen how it consistently made decisions that improved jobs, even when under no requirement to do so. It had gone so far as to offer workers fully paid healthcare benefits and equity, both uncommon in janitorial work (and professional work, for that matter). Its workers spoke highly of the opportunity to advance along a career path. Wasn’t this, too, a valid model for creating good jobs? Even if Dan were worried about the union organizers that were hovering near the office building door, as he started speaking into a microphone, he looked more comfortable than he had at the formal press conference. “I know it’s Saturday,” he started, “but personally there’s nowhere I’d rather be.” He ran through the highlights of the past few days, how the secretary of labor had come to speak at Q, and showed photos of “these beautiful operators” whose well-lit portraits had appeared in the New York Times Magazine.

August 23, 2017. https://www.wired.com/story/amazons-turker-crowd-has-had-enough/. 26   The traditional unions that once helped create the American middle class have nowhere near as much influence today as they once did. Only about 11% of the workforce (and just 6.6% of the non-government workforce) belonged to a union in 2016, compared to about 20% in 1983 (US Bureau of Labor Statistics. Union membership as a percentage of employed wage and salary workers), and the growing group of independent workers like Kristy, Curtis, Abe, and Terrence’s students fall outside of union organizing rights altogether. Dynamo was not the only idea for how to organize these workers outside of the traditional union system. A website called Coworker attempted to create online groups of workers and help them petition their employers. Starbucks employees used it to campaign for a policy change that allowed for visible tattoos and went on to win wage increases, scheduling improvements, and changes to parental leave policies.


pages: 230 words: 71,320

Outliers: The Story of Success by Malcolm Gladwell

affirmative action, Bill Gates: Altair 8800, computer age, corporate raider, crew resource management, medical residency, old-boy network, Pearl River Delta, popular electronics, Silicon Valley, Steve Ballmer, Steve Jobs, union organizing, upwardly mobile, why are manhole covers round?

He is slender now, but during his heyday, Flom was extremely overweight. He waddles when he walks. He doodles when he thinks. He mumbles when he talks, and when he makes his way down the halls of Skadden, Arps, conversations drop to a hush. Flom grew up in the Depression in Brooklyn's Borough Park neighborhood. His parents were Jewish immigrants from Eastern Europe. His father, Isadore, was a union organizer in the garment industry who later went to work sewing shoulder pads for ladies' dresses. His mother worked at what was called pieceworkdoing applique at home. They were desperately poor. His family moved nearly every year when he was growing up because the custom in those days was for landlords to give new tenants a month's free rent, and without that, his family could not get by. In junior high school, Flom took the entrance exam for the elite Townsend Harris public high school on Lexington Avenue in Manhattan, a school that in just forty years of existence produced three Nobel Prize winners, six Pulitzer Prize winners, and one Supreme Court Justice, not to mention George Gershwin and Jonas Salk, the inventor of the polio vaccine.

“There was a Mary who was a ticket taker, and if you gave Mary a quarter, she would let you stand in the second balcony, without a ticket. Carnegie Hall didn't know about it. It was just between you and Mary. It was a bit of a journey, but we would go back once or twice a month.”“” Friedman's mother was a Russian immigrant. She barely spoke English. But she had gone to work as a seamstress at the age of fifteen and had become a prominent garment union organizer, and what you learn in that world is that through your own powers of persuasion and initiative, you can take your kids to Carnegie Hall. There is no better lesson for a budding lawyer than that. The garment industry was boot camp for the professions. * The conventional explanation for Jewish success, of course, is that Jews come from a literate, intellectual culture. They are famously “the people of the book.”


pages: 602 words: 120,848

Winner-Take-All Politics: How Washington Made the Rich Richer-And Turned Its Back on the Middle Class by Paul Pierson, Jacob S. Hacker

accounting loophole / creative accounting, active measures, affirmative action, asset allocation, barriers to entry, Bonfire of the Vanities, business climate, business cycle, carried interest, Cass Sunstein, clean water, collective bargaining, corporate governance, Credit Default Swap, David Brooks, desegregation, employer provided health coverage, financial deregulation, financial innovation, financial intermediation, fixed income, full employment, Home mortgage interest deduction, Howard Zinn, income inequality, invisible hand, knowledge economy, laissez-faire capitalism, Martin Wolf, medical bankruptcy, moral hazard, Nate Silver, new economy, night-watchman state, offshore financial centre, oil shock, Powell Memorandum, Ralph Nader, Ronald Reagan, shareholder value, Silicon Valley, The Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith, too big to fail, trickle-down economics, union organizing, very high income, War on Poverty, winner-take-all economy, women in the workforce

Seeing a rare opportunity, it made an all-out push to enlist government support in its struggle to reverse its slowly but steadily declining place in the American economy. As we saw in chapter 2, U.S. laws governing industrial relations were becoming dramatically less effective in supporting union organization due to two linked challenges faced by organized labor. The first was a rise in capital mobility, which enhanced the capacity of businesses to use the famous 14(b) provision of the Taft-Hartley Act to shift their operations to right-to-work states, where unions were barred from making union membership a condition of employment in a firm or industry. The second threat, as also discussed in chapter 2, was the rise of much more aggressive employer tactics to block union organizing. Between 1960 and 1980, there was a fourfold increase in charges of unfair labor practices, a threefold rise in charges of unlawful termination, and a fivefold increase in workers awarded back pay or granted reinstatement orders.19 These stunning figures suggest that employers increasingly saw such practices as simply a cost of doing business, and far preferable to successful unionization.

Levy and Peter Temin, “Inequality and Institutions in 20th Century America,” NBER Working Paper No. 13106 (May 2007), 33. 29 John Logan, “The Union Avoidance Industry in the United States,” British Journal of Industrial Relations 44, no. 4 (December 2006): 654. 30 Robert J. Flanagan, “Has Management Strangled U.S. Unions?” Journal of Labor Research 26, no. 1 (December 2005): 48–49. 31 Henry S. Farber and Bruce Western, “Ronald Reagan and the Politics of Declining Union Organization,” British Journal of Industrial Relations 40 (2002): 385–401. 32 See Kate Bronfenbrenner, “No Holds Barred: The Intensification of Employer Opposition to Organizing,” Economic Policy Institute Briefing Paper No. 235 (May 30, 2009), 13. 33 Ibid., 9. 34 Jacob S. Hacker, The Divided Welfare State: The Battle over Public and Private Social Benefits in the United States (New York: Cambridge University Press, 2002); Jacob S.


pages: 550 words: 124,073

Democracy and Prosperity: Reinventing Capitalism Through a Turbulent Century by Torben Iversen, David Soskice

Andrei Shleifer, assortative mating, augmented reality, barriers to entry, Bretton Woods, business cycle, capital controls, Capital in the Twenty-First Century by Thomas Piketty, central bank independence, centre right, cleantech, cloud computing, collateralized debt obligation, collective bargaining, colonial rule, corporate governance, Credit Default Swap, credit default swaps / collateralized debt obligations, deindustrialization, deskilling, Donald Trump, first-past-the-post, full employment, Gini coefficient, hiring and firing, implied volatility, income inequality, industrial cluster, inflation targeting, invisible hand, knowledge economy, labor-force participation, liberal capitalism, low skilled workers, low-wage service sector, means of production, mittelstand, Network effects, New Economic Geography, new economy, New Urbanism, non-tariff barriers, Occupy movement, offshore financial centre, open borders, open economy, passive investing, precariat, race to the bottom, rent-seeking, RFID, road to serfdom, Robert Bork, Robert Gordon, Silicon Valley, smart cities, speech recognition, The Future of Employment, The Great Moderation, The Rise and Fall of American Growth, too big to fail, trade liberalization, union organizing, urban decay, Washington Consensus, winner-take-all economy, working-age population, World Values Survey, young professional, zero-sum game

With a few differences over the interpretation of Switzerland and France, Crouch (1993), Katznelson and Zolberg (1986), Luebbert (1991), Slomp (1990), and Thelen (2004), among others, have argued that the working class grosso modo developed in a unified way in the protocorporatist countries but not in the liberal. Ebbinghaus makes a similar distinction between, on the one hand, solidaristic unionism (the Scandinavian cases) with encompassing unions organized by social democratic parties and segmented unionism (Germany, Austria, the Netherlands, Switzerland, and Belgium) with strong interlinking between the social democratic party and unions but also with religious cleavages, and, on the other hand, laborist unionism with sectional unions creating a party as in the UK and Ireland, the French case being one of polarized unionism (Ebbinghaus 1995).

Hence, in the late nineteenth century, uncoordinated businesses chose one of two strategies: where it was difficult for individual companies to exclude unions, they accepted unionization for skilled workers while tending to move away from product markets which required substantial craft-skilled labor in order to compete. Or, as in the United States or France, where the political system allowed it, large companies excluded unions in part by violence and in part by developing technologies which minimized the need for blue-collar skills, and craft unions organized in small companies and in the artisan sector (Katznelson and Zolberg 1986). For skilled workers—including laborers with basic literacy and math skills, as well as higher-educated engineers, accountants, mid-level managers, and so on—employers turned to the general educational system, which went through a major expansion in the first half of the ninteenth century, fueled by government spending at both the local and central levels.

These differences help explain persistent variance in government policies and outcomes, which will be analyzed in later chapters, so we sketch their causes in this section.16 Once the shift to democracy was seen as inevitable, there were no deep partisan struggles over the fundamental economic and political institutions of modern capitalism. In the protocorporatist countries where guilds and agricultural cooperatives were strong, employers coordinated, and unions organized along industry lines, both right and left parties ended up supporting proportional representation (PR) as a political mechanism to protect their mutual investments in cospecific assets. Where guilds and agricultural cooperatives were weak, employers poorly organized and poorly coordinated, and unions divided by crafts, the center and the right opposed PR in order to prevent risk of radical redistribution.


pages: 255 words: 75,172

Sleeping Giant: How the New Working Class Will Transform America by Tamara Draut

affirmative action, Affordable Care Act / Obamacare, always be closing, American ideology, battle of ideas, big-box store, blue-collar work, collective bargaining, creative destruction, David Brooks, declining real wages, deindustrialization, desegregation, Detroit bankruptcy, Donald Trump, Edward Glaeser, ending welfare as we know it, Ferguson, Missouri, financial deregulation, full employment, immigration reform, income inequality, invisible hand, job satisfaction, knowledge economy, knowledge worker, low skilled workers, mass incarceration, minimum wage unemployment, mortgage tax deduction, new economy, obamacare, occupational segregation, payday loans, pink-collar, plutocrats, Plutocrats, Powell Memorandum, profit motive, race to the bottom, Ralph Nader, rent-seeking, rising living standards, Ronald Reagan, shared worldview, The Bell Curve by Richard Herrnstein and Charles Murray, The Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith, trickle-down economics, union organizing, upwardly mobile, War on Poverty, white flight, women in the workforce, young professional

Circuit in August 2015.38 The proposed changes were favored by some states (Connecticut, Illinois, Iowa, Maryland, Massachusetts, Minnesota, New Mexico, and New York), all of which submitted briefs in support of the new rule, while other states (Arizona, Georgia, Kansas, Michigan, Nevada, North Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, and Wisconsin) submitted briefs opposing the new rule.39 The win both delivers material gains for the workers and, as important, finally recognizes their occupations as “real work”—a major victory for a workforce that is expected to grow from 2 million workers to over 3 million by 2022.40 SEIU represents about 600,000 home care workers, a scale that lends itself to comparisons with the great industrial union organizing of the last century.41 This is substantial progress, but unlike the contracts negotiated for the mostly white and mostly male blue-collar manufacturing workers, these jobs don’t remotely provide the wages and benefits that allowed the previous working class to live a middle-class lifestyle. And thanks to another Supreme Court ruling, the ability of unions to organize home care workers took a big hit.

The Day Without an Immigrant mobilization underscored the latent power of the new working class to disrupt business as usual. Unions in the Most Unexpected Places Ben Speight is exceedingly good at a difficult job. He’s an organizer for the statewide Teamsters Local 728 based in Atlanta, Georgia. A thirty-three-year-old white man, he’s been organizing since he was eighteen, spending eleven of the past fifteen years as a union organizer with the Teamsters. He doesn’t see his work as being in the service of others but as organizing with others. As he explained, “In my fifteen years of organizing, I have never been a part of a campaign where the core of our support and the majority of our support did not come from black workers. Every campaign that I’ve been a part of, dozens of campaigns in the South, have all got the initial interest and the majority of their support from black workers.


Chomsky on Mis-Education by Noam Chomsky

American ideology, deindustrialization, deskilling, Howard Zinn, invisible hand, means of production, Ronald Reagan, strikebreaker, union organizing, Washington Consensus

While there have been “cases of kidnappings, tortures and extrajudicial killings in Honduras, Panama and Nicaragua, these actions have not been established as systematic government mechanisms.”145 A month later, the New York Times published a front-page story by Lindsey Gruson on atrocities in Guatemala.146 In the past, Gruson observes, Guatemala City had been “a free-fire zone for political extremists” who carried out extensive terror; unmentioned is the fact that the “political extremists” responsible for the overwhelming majority of the atrocities were—and are—the agents of the U.S.-backed government. In fact, the U.S. role in Guatemala is unmentioned in this story. Gruson describes the increase in kidnappings, torture, and murder; the worsening situation in the cities; and the “de facto military dictatorship” in the countryside (quoting Americas Watch Observer Anne Manuel). The main targets in the cities are “labor leaders, union organizers and leftists.” A spokesman for an independent human rights organization says that “there’s a democratic façade now, nothing more. The façade hides that all the power is held by the army and that the situation is getting worse.” An Americas Watch report released two weeks later accused the government of prime responsibility for the serious increase in human rights abuses, now reaching a level of about two a day, presumably a considerable underestimate, Americas Watch concludes.147 As 1988 came to a close, government atrocities mounted in the client states.

The study was carried out under NAFTA rules in response to a complaint by telecommunications workers on illegal labor practices by Sprint. The complaint was upheld by the U.S. National Labor Relations Board, which ordered trivial penalties after years of delay, the standard procedure. The NAFTA study, by Cornell University labor economist Kate Bronfenbrenner, has been authorized for release by Canada and Mexico but not by the Clinton administration. It reveals a significant impact of NAFTA on strikebreaking. About half of union organizing efforts are disrupted by employer threats to transfer production abroad, for example, by placing signs reading “Mexico Transfer Job” in front of a plant where there is an organizing drive. The threats are not idle: when such organizing drives nevertheless succeed, employers close the plant in whole or in part at triple the pre-NAFTA rate (about 15 percent of the time). Plant-closing threats are almost twice as high in more mobile industries (e.g., manufacturing versus construction).


pages: 491 words: 77,650

Humans as a Service: The Promise and Perils of Work in the Gig Economy by Jeremias Prassl

3D printing, Affordable Care Act / Obamacare, Airbnb, Amazon Mechanical Turk, Andrei Shleifer, autonomous vehicles, barriers to entry, call centre, cashless society, Clayton Christensen, collaborative consumption, collaborative economy, collective bargaining, creative destruction, crowdsourcing, disruptive innovation, Donald Trump, Erik Brynjolfsson, full employment, future of work, George Akerlof, gig economy, global supply chain, hiring and firing, income inequality, information asymmetry, invisible hand, Jeff Bezos, job automation, John Maynard Keynes: Economic Possibilities for our Grandchildren, John Maynard Keynes: technological unemployment, Kickstarter, low skilled workers, Lyft, Mahatma Gandhi, Mark Zuckerberg, market friction, means of production, moral hazard, Network effects, new economy, obamacare, pattern recognition, platform as a service, Productivity paradox, race to the bottom, regulatory arbitrage, remote working, ride hailing / ride sharing, Robert Gordon, Ronald Coase, Rosa Parks, Second Machine Age, secular stagnation, self-driving car, shareholder value, sharing economy, Silicon Valley, Silicon Valley ideology, Simon Singh, software as a service, Steve Jobs, TaskRabbit, The Future of Employment, The Market for Lemons, The Nature of the Firm, The Rise and Fall of American Growth, transaction costs, transportation-network company, Travis Kalanick, two tier labour market, two-sided market, Uber and Lyft, Uber for X, uber lyft, union organizing, working-age population

At the moment, unionization efforts can be logistically difficult and legally fraught: the fragmentation of work in the gig economy is a serious challenge for union organizers. Gone are the regular shifts before and after which groups of workers would congregate to voice their grievances, the geographic proximity of workers with shared interests, and the sense of being a united workforce. Whereas London cab drivers can congregate in their famous lit- tle tea huts dotted across the streets of the city, ride-sharing drivers are forced to hide out in increasingly rare open parking lots, often struggling to find a place to rest or even to go to the toilet.61 Most countries grant union organizers paid time off for their work and protect them against employer reprisals, as employers and legislators recognize the value of having a clear voice to represent workers’ concerns.


pages: 318 words: 85,824

A Brief History of Neoliberalism by David Harvey

affirmative action, Asian financial crisis, Berlin Wall, Bretton Woods, business climate, business cycle, capital controls, centre right, collective bargaining, creative destruction, crony capitalism, debt deflation, declining real wages, deglobalization, deindustrialization, Deng Xiaoping, Fall of the Berlin Wall, financial deregulation, financial intermediation, financial repression, full employment, George Gilder, Gini coefficient, global reserve currency, illegal immigration, income inequality, informal economy, labour market flexibility, land tenure, late capitalism, Long Term Capital Management, low-wage service sector, manufacturing employment, market fundamentalism, mass immigration, means of production, Mexican peso crisis / tequila crisis, Mont Pelerin Society, mortgage tax deduction, neoliberal agenda, new economy, Pearl River Delta, phenotype, Ponzi scheme, price mechanism, race to the bottom, rent-seeking, reserve currency, Ronald Reagan, Silicon Valley, special economic zone, structural adjustment programs, the built environment, The Chicago School, transaction costs, union organizing, urban renewal, urban sprawl, Washington Consensus, Winter of Discontent

The rates of remuneration of US CEOs, for example, were becoming the envy of Europeans in comparable positions. In Britain, a new wave of entrepreneurial financiers began to consolidate large fortunes. If the project was to restore class power to the top elites, then neoliberalism was clearly the answer. Whether or not a country could be pushed towards neoliberalization then depended upon the balance of class forces (powerful union organization in West Germany and Sweden held neoliberalization in check) as well as upon the degree of dependency of the capitalist class on the state (very strong in Taiwan and South Korea). The means whereby class power could be transformed and restored were gradually but unevenly put into place during the 1980s and consolidated in the 1990s. Four components were critical in this. First, the turn to more open financialization that began in the 1970s accelerated during the 1990s.

The chaebols resorted to borrowing, increasingly from foreign banks. Korean businesses acquired a very high debt-to-equity ratio and therefore became vulnerable to any rapid rise in interest rates.29 Internally, South Korea also had to deal with the rising power of organized labour. Massive industrialization entailed equally massive proletarianization and urbanization, which favoured labour organization. In the early years, independent union organizations were fiercely repressed. But Park’s assassination (by his own director of intelligence) in 1979, followed by a brutal massacre of civilian protesters in Kwangju in 1980, sparked a popular movement of students, citizens, and workers for democratization. This was formally achieved in 1987. Wages then rose as unions consolidated their power in the face of continuing governmental repression. Employers wanted more flexible labour markets, but successive governments found this hard to deliver.


pages: 353 words: 81,436

Buying Time: The Delayed Crisis of Democratic Capitalism by Wolfgang Streeck

activist fund / activist shareholder / activist investor, banking crisis, basic income, Bretton Woods, business cycle, capital controls, Carmen Reinhart, central bank independence, collective bargaining, corporate governance, creative destruction, David Graeber, deindustrialization, Deng Xiaoping, Eugene Fama: efficient market hypothesis, financial deregulation, financial repression, fixed income, full employment, Gini coefficient, Growth in a Time of Debt, income inequality, Joseph Schumpeter, Kenneth Rogoff, Kickstarter, knowledge economy, labour market flexibility, labour mobility, late capitalism, liberal capitalism, means of production, moral hazard, Myron Scholes, Occupy movement, open borders, open economy, Plutonomy: Buying Luxury, Explaining Global Imbalances, profit maximization, risk tolerance, shareholder value, too big to fail, union organizing, winner-take-all economy, Wolfgang Streeck

The monetary stabilization of the world economy in the early 1980s was a tour de force that came with a high political risk; it could be undertaken only by governments, such as those of Reagan and Thatcher, that were willing to trade mass unemployment for the restoration of ‘sound money’ and to crush the expected social resistance at whatever cost.62 In fact, the deflation of capitalist national economies, backed up with lasting unemployment and neoliberal labour-market reforms, brought about a worldwide decline in union organization (Fig. 1.6) that made the strike weapon virtually unusable in distributional conflicts; the incidence of strikes fell towards zero nearly everywhere and has remained there ever since (Fig. 1.7).63 At the same time, the gap separating the promises of capitalism and the expectations of its clientele from what ever more powerful markets were willing to deliver not only persisted but tended to grow wider; once again, under changed conditions and with new instruments, it had to be politically bridged, however provisionally.

By market justice, I mean distribution of the output of production according to the market evaluation of individual performance, expressed in relative prices; the yardstick for remuneration according to market justice is marginal productivity, the market value of the last unit of output under competitive conditions.21 Social justice, on the other hand, is determined by cultural norms and is based on status rather than contract. It follows collective ideas of fairness, correctness and reciprocity, concedes demands for a minimum livelihood irrespective of economic performance or productivity, and recognizes civil and human rights to such things as health, social security, participation in the life of the community, employment protection and trade union organization. Neither market nor social justice is uncontroversial. Émile Durkheim already considered the question of what was required for competition to be fair and its outcome to count as just.22 In practice, standard economics assumes that most markets are sufficiently ‘perfect’ that what emerges from them can be considered both just and efficient. Things are more complicated with social justice, whose substance is ‘socially constructed’ and therefore subject to cultural – political discourse as well as historical change.


pages: 523 words: 159,884

The Great Railroad Revolution by Christian Wolmar

1919 Motor Transport Corps convoy, accounting loophole / creative accounting, banking crisis, Bay Area Rapid Transit, big-box store, Charles Lindbergh, collective bargaining, cross-subsidies, intermodal, James Watt: steam engine, Kickstarter, Ponzi scheme, quantitative easing, railway mania, Ralph Waldo Emerson, refrigerator car, Silicon Valley, strikebreaker, too big to fail, trade route, transcontinental railway, traveling salesman, union organizing, urban sprawl

Attempts to hire unskilled “scabs” inevitably led to failure, since most railroad jobs required skills and experience. The managers were faced with uniquely powerful opponents who were further strengthened by their sheer numbers. It is hardly surprising that the railroads were fertile territory for union organization and, indeed, would become “the seedbed of the American labour movement.”21 The brotherhoods’ industrial and political strength meant that they could pioneer methods of collective bargaining, union organization, and grievance procedures that later would become universal across the labor movement. Railroad workers were able to exploit their skills by moving to rival railroads, often in the expectation of bettering themselves, even if by only a few cents an hour. This practice became so prevalent that those who drifted from job to job in this way became known as “boomers.”

Increasingly aware of their industrial muscle, railroad workers were among the first to form local unions and then, crucially, to expand these into national federations that “quickly became the most powerful and effective unions developed in the United States before the twentieth century.”20 The first stirrings of labor organization occurred before the Civil War, but they were very local in scope and generally involved only a small number of skilled workers. In 1863, a Brotherhood of the Footboard, later becoming the Brotherhood of Locomotive Engineers, was formed in Michigan, and this was soon followed by similar brotherhoods representing railroad conductors and “locomotive firemen and enginemen.” These were still, however, not modern-style unions organized to put pressure on management to improve wages and conditions, but rather fraternal organizations providing mutual support and holding social events. Throughout the 1870s and 1880s, larger brotherhoods and craft unions began to emerge. Not surprisingly, the railroad companies were reluctant to recognize organized labor. However, the size of the railroad companies meant that it was not the owners who would make decisions about union recognition, but rather the new breed of professional managers who were employed to run these big corporations.


pages: 331 words: 60,536

The Sovereign Individual: How to Survive and Thrive During the Collapse of the Welfare State by James Dale Davidson, Rees Mogg

affirmative action, agricultural Revolution, bank run, barriers to entry, Berlin Wall, borderless world, British Empire, California gold rush, clean water, colonial rule, Columbine, compound rate of return, creative destruction, Danny Hillis, debt deflation, ending welfare as we know it, epigenetics, Fall of the Berlin Wall, falling living standards, feminist movement, financial independence, Francis Fukuyama: the end of history, full employment, George Gilder, Hernando de Soto, illegal immigration, income inequality, informal economy, information retrieval, Isaac Newton, Kevin Kelly, market clearing, Martin Wolf, Menlo Park, money: store of value / unit of account / medium of exchange, new economy, New Urbanism, Norman Macrae, offshore financial centre, Parkinson's law, pattern recognition, phenotype, price mechanism, profit maximization, rent-seeking, reserve currency, road to serfdom, Ronald Coase, Sam Peltzman, school vouchers, seigniorage, Silicon Valley, spice trade, statistical model, telepresence, The Nature of the Firm, the scientific method, The Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith, Thomas L Friedman, Thomas Malthus, trade route, transaction costs, Turing machine, union organizing, very high income, Vilfredo Pareto

[T]hey have always recourse to the loudest clamour, and sometimes to the most shocking violence and outrage." '4 Nonetheless, the workmen "very seldom derive any advantage of those tumultuous combinations," except "the punishment or ruin of the ringleaders." ' 118 Scale economies in industry and firm size grew during the nineteenth century. Yet most individuals continued to work for themselves as farmers or small proprietors, and union organizing efforts, like those described by Adam Smith, continued to "generally end in nothing." 17 The legal and political standing of unions changed only as the scale of enterprise rose. The first unions that succeeded in organizing were craft unions of highly skilled workers, who normally organized without extensive violence. They tended to settle for wage increases that matched the marginal costs of replacing them.

Such attacks became commonplace during attempts to organize effective unions. These efforts were generally most intense during periods when real wages were rising due to deflation. When owners attempted to adjust nominal wages, this often triggered protests leading to violence. Such incidents were widespread in the depression that followed the Panic of 1873. In December 1874, open warfare erupted in the anthracite coalfields of eastern Pennsylvania. The unions organized a violent strike force in the guise of a secret society named the Ancient Order of Hibernians. Also known as the "Molly Maguires," after an Irish revolutionary, this group was known for terrorizing the coal fields and preventing those miners who wished to work from doing so. Sabotage and destruction of property, 119 outright murder and assassination, were all charged against its members." There was also recurring violence among railroad employees.

Where the power is small or insecurely possessed, it must be exercised overtly and extensively; large and unchallenged, it becomes like the power of government, confidently held, respectfully regarded, and rarely displayed conspicuously." 2 As precise as Simons's analysis is, however, he was wrong about a crucial point. He presumed that unions "always will have" what he described as "large powers of coercion and intimidation." In fact, unions are fading away, not merely in the United States and Great Britain, but in other mature industrial societies. The reason they are fading, what Simons missed and what even many union organizers fail to understand, is that the shift to an Information Society has altered megapolitical conditions in crucial ways that sharply increase the security of property. Microtechnology has already begun to prove subversive of the extortion that supports the welfare state because even in the commercial realm it creates very different incentives from those of the industrial period. 1. Information technology has negligible natural-resource content.


pages: 538 words: 145,243

Behemoth: A History of the Factory and the Making of the Modern World by Joshua B. Freeman

anti-communist, British Empire, Capital in the Twenty-First Century by Thomas Piketty, clean water, collective bargaining, Corn Laws, corporate raider, deindustrialization, Deng Xiaoping, disruptive innovation, en.wikipedia.org, factory automation, Ford paid five dollars a day, Frederick Winslow Taylor, global supply chain, indoor plumbing, interchangeable parts, invisible hand, James Hargreaves, joint-stock company, knowledge worker, mass immigration, means of production, mittelstand, Naomi Klein, new economy, On the Economy of Machinery and Manufactures, Panopticon Jeremy Bentham, Pearl River Delta, post-industrial society, Ralph Waldo Emerson, rising living standards, Ronald Reagan, Silicon Valley, special economic zone, spinning jenny, Steve Jobs, strikebreaker, technoutopianism, the built environment, The Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith, Thorstein Veblen, Tim Cook: Apple, transaction costs, union organizing, Upton Sinclair, urban planning, Vanguard fund, women in the workforce, working poor, Works Progress Administration, zero-sum game

The agreement that ended the strike, in itself, constituted but a modest union gain, a written company pledge that for six months it would recognize the UAW as the representative of its members in the struck plants. But as huge crowds cheered the haggard, bearded, smiling men who marched out of the occupied Flint plants, everyone knew that the world had changed; workers had shown that they could bring one of the most powerful corporations in the world to its knees by shutting down the giant factories in which they labored.69 The UAW victory set off a wave of strikes and union organization everywhere from giant factories to local retail stores. Nearly five million workers took part in walkouts during 1937, including four hundred thousand sit-downers. For its part, General Motors gave its workers a 5 percent pay hike and agreed with the UAW to a shop-steward system and the use of seniority in layoffs. Meanwhile, the auto union won agreements with smaller car companies, with parts makers, and, after a month-long sit-down in Dodge Main and six other factories, with Chrysler.

To support his operations, Kaiser built the first integrated steel mill on the West Coast, in Fontana, east of Los Angeles; constructed new cities for his workers, like Vanport in Portland, Oregon, with homes for nearly ten thousand families; and expanded his prepaid comprehensive medical program, which he renamed Kaiser Permanente—altogether an American Kombinat. After the war, Kaiser leased the Willow Run plant from the federal government to produce automobiles for the newly established Kaiser-Frazer Corporation, which remained in the car business until 1955.7 Defense production—especially in huge factory complexes—elevated the social prestige of the blue-collar worker, already raised by the substance and imagery of the New Deal and the great union organizing drives. Political, military, and labor leaders repeatedly stressed the importance of the industrial home front to victory, overlaying patriotism on the Promethean heroism already associated with the giant factory and the workers within it. Flags, bond sale rallies, blood drives, and collection points for British, Soviet, Greek, and Chinese relief made factories, mills, and shipyards into arenas of patriotic expression.

In an October 1944 strike at the Goodyear factory, just four striking workers idled five thousand others. When siting new factories, companies looked for locations where labor costs were lower and unionism was less likely to succeed, or at least be of a less militant sort. Repeated prewar efforts by the United Rubber Workers to unionize Goodyear’s Gadsden plant and Firestone’s Memphis plant failed, with a reign of terror in Alabama that included severe beatings of union organizers by company thugs and antiunion workers in cahoots with local law enforcement.11 The Radio Corporation of America (RCA) also reacted quickly to labor militancy. In 1936, a month-long strike, overcoming imported strikebreakers and police violence, led to the unionization of the company’s two-million-square-foot complex in Camden, New Jersey, just across the Delaware River from Philadelphia, where 9,700 workers (75 percent female) produced nearly all of its products.


Class Acts: Service and Inequality in Luxury Hotels by Rachel Sherman

deskilling, income inequality, indoor plumbing, invisible hand, knowledge worker, means of production, new economy, pink-collar, Thorstein Veblen, union organizing, upwardly mobile, yield management

When my family was staying in the hotel, my father and I picked up cookies as a parting gift for my coworkers (this was common practice for workers’ family members, who stayed at reduced rates). As we walked into the hotel, I said to Joel, “Look, we got cookies for the workers.” He responded sarcastically, “Yeah, the proletariat,” speaking, as I wrote in my notes, “in this way that was like the proletariat had nothing to do with him.” I was unaware of any discussion of union organizing in either hotel, with the exception of a rumor that Royal Court restaurant workers were thinking about trying to unionize, which I heard only once. One might assume that workers admired guests’ wealth because they identified with guests or aspired to be rich themselves.5 In my twelve months in both hotels, however, I spoke with only two workers who explicitly dreamed of consuming at the same level as guests.6 Few workers seemed to believe or even wonder whether they could reach these heights of consumption, and often they criticized guests for their extravagance.

Ironically, though, these conditions probably act as a disincentive to unionize, since workers already enjoy many of the advantages of the union contract. UC_Sherman (O).qxd 10/3/2006 2:01 PM Page 267 Conclusion 267 I suspect, however, that their lack of interest in unionization is also related to the stability of manager-worker and guest-worker relations, which reinforce each other. As union organizers know, it is often harder to organize front of house workers because of their relationships with clients.26 At the Luxury Garden, managers tended not to transgress worker prerogatives related to autonomy and games, and they generated resources for powerful self-conceptions, such as discourses of prestige and a division of labor that allowed workers to make distinctions between themselves and their colleagues.

First, I wondered if I should disclose my political position—both my experience with the union and the reason for my interest in luxury service, which was that I found its availability unbelievable and basically unconscionable. I was fairly sure that if I had been forthright about either of these issues I would not have gained access.4 However, given that I had no interest in muckraking or in union organizing in these hotels, I decided that I did not have an obligation to disclose my political views unless managers asked me directly, which they did not. Indeed, I was shocked by the extent to which they assumed I shared their interests. I believe they made these assumptions for several reasons. It appeared to me that managers in both hotels, and many workers, thought I was studying hospitality management even when they had been told otherwise.


The Cigarette: A Political History by Sarah Milov

activist lawyer, affirmative action, airline deregulation, American Legislative Exchange Council, barriers to entry, British Empire, collective bargaining, corporate personhood, deindustrialization, fixed income, Frederick Winslow Taylor, G4S, global supply chain, imperial preference, Indoor air pollution, information asymmetry, invisible hand, Kitchen Debate, land tenure, new economy, New Journalism, Philip Mirowski, pink-collar, Potemkin village, precariat, price stability, profit maximization, race to the bottom, Ralph Nader, rent-seeking, Silicon Valley, structural adjustment programs, The Chicago School, Torches of Freedom, trade route, union organizing, Unsafe at Any Speed, Upton Sinclair, War on Poverty, women in the workforce

The best place to start is Robert Korstad, Civil Rights Unionism: Tobacco Workers and the Struggle for Democracy in the Mid-Twentieth-Century South (Chapel Hill: UNC Press, 2003). Korstad argues that tobacco workers waged a multipronged attack on “economic exploitation, political disfranchisement, and racial discrimination,” illustrating deep linkages between union organizing and civil rights organizing. For an overview of the union organizing drive at Winston-Salem that is sympathetic to R. J. Reynolds, see, Nannie Mae Tilley, The R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Company (Chapel Hill: UNC Press, 1985), 373–414. For an oral history conducted with black tobacco workers in Durham, see Beverly W. Jones, “Race, Sex, and Class: Black Female Tobacco Workers in Durham, North Carolina, 1920–1940, and the Development of Female Consciousness,” Feminist Studies 10, No. 3 (Autumn, 1984), 441–451.

Shimp confessed concern that “there are not more women represented on the council.”47 It is striking that Shimp would be so straightforward in articulating her concerns about gender equity to a group of well-credentialed near-strangers, nearly all of whom were men. But Shimp’s vision for representation was rooted in her experience as part of a labor union—at the very heart, in fact, of what Ruth Milkman has described as the “fourth wave” of union organizing in the pink- and white-collar telecommunications, secretarial, and airline sectors.48 “The majority of employees trapped in the ‘ghettoes’ of the workforce (secretarial pools, clerical areas, etc.) are women,” Shimp wrote.49 “Ghetto” was a revealing choice of words. During the 1970s, feminist observers of the American workplace spoke increasingly of the “secretarial ghetto” or the “pink-collar ghetto”—the poorly paid, low-status, dead-end service and clerical jobs that were feminizing the labor force.50 The right to breathe smoke-free air was, for Shimp, a question of workplace rights.


pages: 75 words: 22,220

Occupy by Noam Chomsky

corporate governance, corporate personhood, deindustrialization, Howard Zinn, income inequality, invisible hand, Martin Wolf, Nate Silver, Occupy movement, Plutonomy: Buying Luxury, Explaining Global Imbalances, precariat, Ralph Nader, Ronald Reagan, too big to fail, union organizing

I’m just old enough to remember the Great Depression. After the first few years, by the mid-1930s—although the situation was objectively much harsher than it is today—nevertheless, the spirit was quite different. There was a sense that “we’re gonna get out of it,” even among unemployed people, including a lot of my relatives, a sense that “it will get better.” There was militant labor union organizing, especially CIO (Congress of Industrial Organizations), organizing going on. It was getting to the point of sit-down strikes, which are really very frightening to the business world—you could see it in the business press at the time—because a sit-down strike is just a step before taking over the factory and running it yourself. The idea of worker takeovers is something which is, incidentally, very much on the agenda today, and we should keep it in mind—I’ll come back to it.


Saving America's Cities: Ed Logue and the Struggle to Renew Urban America in the Suburban Age by Lizabeth Cohen

activist lawyer, affirmative action, Albert Einstein, anti-communist, British Empire, Buckminster Fuller, car-free, charter city, deindustrialization, desegregation, Edward Glaeser, garden city movement, ghettoisation, Henry Ford's grandson gave labor union leader Walter Reuther a tour of the company’s new, automated factory…, hiring and firing, housing crisis, income inequality, indoor plumbing, Jane Jacobs, land reform, megastructure, new economy, New Urbanism, Peter Eisenman, postindustrial economy, race to the bottom, rent control, Robert Gordon, rolodex, Ronald Reagan, the built environment, The Death and Life of Great American Cities, union organizing, upwardly mobile, urban decay, urban planning, urban renewal, Victor Gruen, Vilfredo Pareto, walkable city, War on Poverty, white flight, white picket fence, young professional

His social position and political sympathies made him more at home in their urban world outside the campus gates than most other Yale students were. When as a senior he showed a date around New Haven and “she was totally uninterested,” he took that as grounds enough to end the relationship.12 Logue’s bond with Yale’s low-level employees, so appalling to his dining-services supervisor from freshman year, only grew over his college career and drew him into helping with a full-scale union-organizing drive mounted during his senior year, 1941–42. The 1930s and early 1940s were a dynamic period for labor in New Haven, as elsewhere in the United States. Garment workers, clock workers, metalworkers, and other local laborers succeeded in organizing unions for the first time. Even the drivers for the Chieppo Bus Company, hired by the university to drive students to the Yale Bowl and other sports fields, struck for union recognition.

Experimenting with job training and placement, prekindergarten education, legal assistance, community schools and health centers, tutoring, adult literacy, juvenile delinquency prevention, and other programs, CPI was widely recognized as the incubator for many of the community action programs—such as the Job Corps, Head Start, and Neighborhood Legal Services—that would become signatures of President Lyndon Baines Johnson’s (LBJ) national War on Poverty by the mid-1960s. From its inception in 1962 until 1966, CPI was headed by Mitchell “Mike” Sviridoff, a pal of Logue’s going back to his union-organizing days at Yale.4 Born in the same working-class neighborhood of New Haven as Dick Lee, Sviridoff, like Lee, could not afford college upon graduating high school and so headed into the labor force, where he became a sheet metal worker on the assembly line of United Aircraft in Stratford, Connecticut. In no time, his reputation for being shrewd, pragmatic, and fair propelled him to head the United Auto Workers local.

With Ed leading the way, all four boys attended Yale College on scholarship. Ed, Frank, and Gordon also went to Yale Law School on the GI Bill. (COURTESY OF FAMILY OF EDWARD J. LOGUE) A UNION ACTIVIST ON CAMPUS, 1942. Logue (with union button) expressed his liberal Democratic politics at conservative Yale by supporting unionization of the university’s hourly workers during his senior year and becoming a full-time union organizer upon graduation. Agitating against the Yale administration launched a pattern in Logue’s life of enjoying being a rebel in the belly of the establishment beast. (COURTESY OF FAMILY OF EDWARD J. LOGUE) STUDYING EUROPEAN CITIES FROM THE AIR IN WORLD WAR II. Logue entered military service in early 1943 hoping to be a pilot but ended up a bombardier instead. He credited those cockpit hours with educating him in urban planning.


pages: 323 words: 95,188

The Year That Changed the World: The Untold Story Behind the Fall of the Berlin Wall by Michael Meyer

Ayatollah Khomeini, bank run, Berlin Wall, Bonfire of the Vanities, Bretton Woods, BRICs, call centre, Fall of the Berlin Wall, falling living standards, Francis Fukuyama: the end of history, haute couture, mass immigration, Mikhail Gorbachev, mutually assured destruction, Ronald Reagan, Ronald Reagan: Tear down this wall, union organizing

As the talks between Solidarity and the government dragged on inconclusively, he would break the impasse. The Round Table had been his idea. He brought the two sides together. He faced down communist hard-liners threatening to bolt the party at that stormy January meeting of the Central Committee. Ultimately, he would push them to success. Those who led Solidarity would later admit that they “owed” Jaruzelski. Jacek Kuron, a union organizer who spent seven years in jail and would go on to become minister of labor, put it bluntly: “Jaruzelski was the one who saw it just wasn’t working anymore, not just communism but the whole system. He was big enough to see it.” That Jaruzelski should reach out to the hated Solidarity, at a moment when he saw Poland threatened every bit as much as in 1981, was as much an act of courage as it was pragmatism or expedience.

He might as well have said, “Throw the godless commies out.” Solidarity’s campaign was full of zest. In Warsaw, snappy jingles introduced the candidates on radio and TV. Buses, billboards and shop windows were papered with posters and jaunty red-and-white Solidarity banners. All the candidates had their photos taken with Lech Walesa. They smiled forth from every kiosk, billboard, wall and flat surface in the city. Union organizers passed out Solidarity lapel pins, organized fund-raising concerts and canvassed for support outside churches and on street corners. Walesa himself was ubiquitous. “Ride the Solidarity tank to freedom,” he exhorted voters. The communist party, by contrast, was invisible. In all of Warsaw, it seemed, only a couple of government candidates had bothered to put up campaign posters. In Kraków, Poland’s second-largest city, the party’s electioneering went little further than publishing the candidates’ résumés in the newspapers.


Pirates and Emperors, Old and New by Noam Chomsky

American ideology, anti-communist, Berlin Wall, collective bargaining, conceptual framework, cuban missile crisis, drone strike, Fall of the Berlin Wall, land reform, liberation theology, Mikhail Gorbachev, Nelson Mandela, RAND corporation, Ronald Reagan, union organizing, urban planning

The Israeli coordinator of operations in the territories explained that the goal of his work is to “integrate the economy of the territories into the Israeli economy.”49 A Bantustan-style statelet would allow Israeli firms to place assembly plants on the Palestinian side of the border, providing cheap labor with no need for concern about environmental or other constraints on profit making, also relieving concerns that some of those derided as “beautiful souls” might see the way workers are treated and call for minimally decent conditions and wages. Again on the NAFTA model, a separate state would provide a useful weapon against the Israeli working class, offering ways to limit their wages and benefits, and to undermine unions; much as in the U.S., where manufacturers develop excess capacity abroad that can be used to break strikes, and threaten “transfer” to Mexico to disrupt union organizing, a significant consequence of NAFTA that has probably impressed Israeli manufacturers.50 Poor Israeli workers in “development towns” and the Arab sector would be particularly affected, as has already happened. During the neoliberal onslaught of the 1990s, Israeli port workers struggled against privatization of the ports and dismantling of collective-bargaining agreements endorsing rights they had won.

Agence France Presse, “UN Human Rights Commission Condemns Israel on Three Counts,” April 18, 2001. The vote was 50-1; Costa Rica abstained and one country was absent. There were a few scattered mentions in the U.S. press (April 19), none in the national press. 49. Asher Davidi, Davar, February 17, 1993; translated by Zachary Lockman in Middle East Report (MERIP), September–October 1993. 50. See Kate Bronfenbrenner, Uneasy Terrain: The Impact of Capital Mobility on Workers, Wages, and Union Organizing (Cornell, September 6, 2000), under contract with the U.S. Trade Deficit Review Commission, updating a 1997 study, also undertaken under NAFTA rules. Such studies are routinely ignored in public commentary, but not by workers (or, presumably, employers). 51. See economic correspondent Efraim Davidi, “Globalization and Economy in the Middle East,” Palestine-Israel Journal VII.1 and 2, 2000. 52.


pages: 422 words: 89,770

Death of the Liberal Class by Chris Hedges

1960s counterculture, Albert Einstein, Berlin Wall, call centre, clean water, collective bargaining, Columbine, corporate governance, deindustrialization, desegregation, Donald Trump, Fall of the Berlin Wall, Henry Ford's grandson gave labor union leader Walter Reuther a tour of the company’s new, automated factory…, hive mind, housing crisis, Howard Zinn, illegal immigration, Jane Jacobs, Jaron Lanier, Lao Tzu, Pearl River Delta, post scarcity, profit motive, Ralph Nader, Ronald Reagan, strikebreaker, the scientific method, The Wisdom of Crowds, Tobin tax, union organizing, Unsafe at Any Speed, Upton Sinclair, WikiLeaks, working poor, Works Progress Administration

College presidents, paid enormous salaries as if they were the heads of corporations, are judged almost solely on their ability to raise money. In return, these universities, like the media and religious institutions, not only remain silent about corporate power but also condemn as “political” all within their walls who question corporate malfeasance and the excesses of unfettered capitalism. Unions, organizations formerly steeped in the doctrine of class struggle and filled with members who sought broad social and political rights for the working class, have been transformed into domesticated negotiators with the capitalist class. Cars rolling off the Ford plants in Michigan were said to be made by UAW Ford. But where unions still exist, they have been reduced to simple bartering tools, if that. The social demands of unions in the early twentieth century that gave the working class weekends off, the right to strike, the eight-hour workday, and Social Security, have been abandoned.

The Taft-Hartley Act was devised as a revision of the National Labor Relations Act (NLRB) of 1935, known as the Wagner Act. It was one of the first new pieces of postwar legislation to roll back the gains made by workers under the New Deal. The Wagner Act, known as “the labor bill of rights,” had created the NLRB, and it forbade employers from engaging in unfair labor practices. Although the gains by workers were made primarily in the North, since southern whites sought to block union organizing among blacks, the NLRB represented a major achievement for working men and women. To get it in place, Roosevelt had permitted the NLRB to exclude agricultural and domestic workers, a coded way to exclude blacks and keep southern politicians, who were mostly Democrats, behind him. The Taft-Hartley Act, which is still law, prohibited jurisdictional strikes, wildcat strikes, solidarity or political strikes, and secondary boycotts—union strikes against employers who continue to do business with a firm that is undergoing a strike.


pages: 334 words: 93,162

This Is Your Country on Drugs: The Secret History of Getting High in America by Ryan Grim

airport security, Alexander Shulgin, anti-communist, back-to-the-land, Burning Man, crack epidemic, double helix, Douglas Engelbart, Douglas Engelbart, East Village, failed state, global supply chain, Haight Ashbury, illegal immigration, John Markoff, Kickstarter, longitudinal study, mandatory minimum, new economy, New Urbanism, PIHKAL and TIHKAL, RAND corporation, Ronald Reagan, Saturday Night Live, Steve Jobs, trade route, transatlantic slave trade, union organizing, Upton Sinclair, upwardly mobile, urban decay, women in the workforce

Inflation was indeed halted, but thousands lost their jobs in the process. As the unemployed flooded into the Chapare in search of land to grow coca—for many, the only moneymaking option available—the United States launched its Bolivian drug war, funding the military unit Unidad Móvil de Patrullaje Rural (“Mobile Rural Patrol Unit”), or UMOPAR, which was tasked with the destruction of illegal coca crops. Morales and the cocalero unions organized to defend themselves against the onslaught. At the time, both left-wing insurgents and right-wing paramilitaries were involved in the Latin American drug trade. Given that the latter were protected by the CIA, that agency’s mission tended to collide with that of the DEA. In 1982, the Reagan White House issued an order that the CIA was not required to disclose to the DEA when it was working with a suspected drug-smuggling operation.

The government was deeply concerned about infiltration and sabotage at American ports, which Mafia-connected unions controlled, and it was equally worried about a strike that could shut the docks down. Communist organizers had been making inroads against the corrupt mob unions, so Luciano had good reason to cooperate with the feds. The mob gave U.S. Naval Intelligence operatives access to its docks and instructed its people to ferret out any German spies. In return, the government allowed the mob to battle the radical union organizers threatening to shut the ports with impunity. Between 1942 and 1946, more than two dozen dockworkers and organizers were killed, their murders left unsolved. Luciano also opened up channels of communication between exiled Sicilian mobsters and those still at home, yielding intelligence that would be used during the U.S. invasion and occupation of Sicily. The United States expressed its gratitude by installing mobsters as the leaders of occupied Italy, where they went about murdering Communist opponents and restarting the heroin trade.


pages: 90 words: 27,452

No More Work: Why Full Employment Is a Bad Idea by James Livingston

Affordable Care Act / Obamacare, business cycle, collective bargaining, delayed gratification, full employment, future of work, Internet of things, John Maynard Keynes: Economic Possibilities for our Grandchildren, labor-force participation, late capitalism, liberal capitalism, obamacare, post-work, Project for a New American Century, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Robert Gordon, Ronald Reagan, Silicon Valley, surplus humans, The Future of Employment, union organizing, working poor

In the past forty years, trade unions have almost disappeared, to the point where only 10 percent of workers bargain collectively according to negotiated contracts; manufacturing jobs in steel and autos, the heart and soul of the new labor movement invented in the 1930s, have been exported to low-wage, non-union regions, including the American South; employment increases have been concentrated in white-collar occupations, which are notoriously inhospitable to union organizing (at least as abetted by the courts); temporary and contingent labor have become the norm in the design and allocation of office space as corporations themselves come and go in a quickening spiral of mergers, bankruptcies, relocations, or rebrandings; and technological change now threatens to erase most of the job classifications the Labor Department has used for a half century to calculate employment patterns and trends.


The Rise and Fall of the British Nation: A Twentieth-Century History by David Edgerton

active measures, Berlin Wall, Big bang: deregulation of the City of London, blue-collar work, British Empire, business cycle, call centre, centre right, collective bargaining, colonial exploitation, Corn Laws, corporate governance, deglobalization, deindustrialization, dematerialisation, deskilling, Donald Davies, double helix, endogenous growth, Etonian, European colonialism, feminist movement, first-past-the-post, full employment, imperial preference, James Dyson, knowledge economy, labour mobility, land reform, land value tax, manufacturing employment, means of production, Mikhail Gorbachev, Neil Kinnock, new economy, non-tariff barriers, North Sea oil, offshore financial centre, old-boy network, packet switching, Philip Mirowski, Piper Alpha, plutocrats, Plutocrats, post-industrial society, rising living standards, road to serfdom, Ronald Reagan, The inhabitant of London could order by telephone, sipping his morning tea in bed, the various products of the whole earth, trade liberalization, union organizing, very high income, wages for housework, wealth creators, Winter of Discontent, women in the workforce, working poor

It shows a future where an international air police bring peace to a world descended into nationalism, war and backwardness. The international air police would in some future extirpate militarism and nationalism from the world. One of the advocates, of many, was the coal owner and endower of the study of international relations David Davies, who financed the New Commonwealth Society to promote the idea. The League of Nations Union organized a Peace Ballot in 1935, which was once cited by historians as evidence of pacifist sentiment, but is now more likely to be used to show how powerful was the view that international peace should be secured by sanctions and by the use of force, especially international force. The liberal internationalists gained new strength in the Second World War. In 1941, before the US entered the war, the National Labour MP Commander Stephen King-Hall (from February 1942 an independent) wanted an Anglo-American naval fleet and air force, a ‘Peace Force’ as he called it.

The Miners’ Federation of Great Britain, which loosely organized the regional miners’ federations, was greatly strengthened by the adherence of the Durham Miners in 1908. In 1910 a Federation of Transport Workers, made up of two general dockers’ unions (one southern, one northern) and the sailors’ union (its leader was a Liberal MP), was formed. A National Union of Railwaymen emerged in 1913 by merger (though the drivers’ union, ASLEF, remained aloof). By 1914 these three groupings created a ‘triple alliance’ which was threatening a general strike. Union organization was mirrored by employer organization, at the top level by the Trades Union Congress and the National Confederation of Employers’ Organizations (founded 1919), at lower levels by the likes of the Engineering and Shipbuilding Employers’ Federation and the Federation of Engineering and Shipbuilding Trades, which were already national before 1914. Indeed, one important aim of trade unionism was to get the same wages and conditions across the nation through national agreements, which involved getting government to recognize and deal with trade unions at national level.

It was implied in many such arguments that unions lived embedded in a society of equals where other than trade unionism there were no sectional interests. Of course, the rationale of trade unions was precisely that workers were weak in the face of the private interests of particular employers and the sectional interests of all employers. Yet the very limited power of workers and unions could be presented as much greater than it actually was because this could only express itself in visible ways – in trade union organization, in trade union elections, in strikes. There is no doubt about the relative strength of organized labour in the 1970s compared to earlier periods. Through the 1970s the number of trade unionists rose, peaking in 1979. The proportion of unionized workers was higher than ever before, reaching to more than half the workforce. Trade unionism expanded into new areas – into white-collar work and the public sector.


Who Rules the World? by Noam Chomsky

"Robert Solow", Albert Einstein, anti-communist, Ayatollah Khomeini, Berlin Wall, Bretton Woods, British Empire, capital controls, corporate governance, corporate personhood, cuban missile crisis, deindustrialization, Donald Trump, Doomsday Clock, Edward Snowden, en.wikipedia.org, facts on the ground, failed state, Fall of the Berlin Wall, Howard Zinn, illegal immigration, Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), invisible hand, liberation theology, Malacca Straits, Martin Wolf, Mikhail Gorbachev, Monroe Doctrine, Nelson Mandela, nuclear winter, Occupy movement, oil shale / tar sands, one-state solution, Plutonomy: Buying Luxury, Explaining Global Imbalances, precariat, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Ronald Reagan, South China Sea, Stanislav Petrov, structural adjustment programs, The Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith, Thorstein Veblen, too big to fail, trade route, union organizing, uranium enrichment, wage slave, WikiLeaks, working-age population

It was necessary to devise more subtle means to ensure corporate rule, primarily a flood of sophisticated propaganda and “scientific methods of strike breaking,” developed into a high art by the enterprises that specialize in the task.5 We should not forget Adam Smith’s perspicuous observation that the “masters of mankind”—in his day, the merchants and manufacturers of England—never cease to pursue their “vile maxim”: “All for ourselves, and nothing for other people.”6 The business counterattack was put on hold during World War II, but quickly revived afterward, with harsh legislation passed restricting workers’ rights and an extraordinary propaganda campaign aimed at factories, schools, churches, and every other form of association. Every available means of communication was employed. By the 1980s, with the bitterly antilabor Reagan administration, the attack was again underway in full force. President Reagan made it clear to the business world that the laws protecting labor rights, never very strong, would not be enforced. The illegal firing of union organizers skyrocketed, and the United States returned to the use of scabs, outlawed almost everywhere in developed countries except South Africa. The liberal Clinton administration undermined labor in different ways. One highly effective means was the creation of the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) linking Canada, Mexico, and the United States. For propaganda purposes, NAFTA was labeled a “free-trade agreement.”

Daedalus 26, no. 2 (Spring 1997), 183–209.   4. Montgomery, The Fall of the House of Labor.   5. Alex Carey, Taking the Risk out of Democracy: Corporate Propaganda Versus Freedom and Liberty (Champaign: University of Illinois Press, 1997), 26.   6. Adam Smith, The Wealth of Nations (New York: Bantam Classics, 2003).   7. Kate Bronfenbrenner, “We’ll Close! Plant Closings, Plant-Closing Threats, Union Organizing and NAFTA,” Multinational Monitor 18, no. 3 (March 1997): 8–14.   8. Richard B. Freeman, “Do Workers Still Want Unions? More than Ever,” Economic Policy Institute, 22 February 2007, http://www.sharedprosperity.org/bp182.html; Gallup Poll, “In U.S. Majority Approves of Unions, but Say They’ll Weaken,” 30 August 2013, http://www.gallup.com/poll/164186/majority-approves-unions-say-weaken.aspx.   9.


Rogue States by Noam Chomsky

anti-communist, Asian financial crisis, Berlin Wall, Branko Milanovic, Bretton Woods, business cycle, capital controls, collective bargaining, colonial rule, creative destruction, cuban missile crisis, declining real wages, deskilling, Edward Snowden, experimental subject, Fall of the Berlin Wall, floating exchange rates, land reform, liberation theology, Mikhail Gorbachev, Monroe Doctrine, new economy, oil shock, RAND corporation, Silicon Valley, strikebreaker, structural adjustment programs, Tobin tax, union organizing, Washington Consensus

The study was carried out under NAFTA rules in response to a complaint by telecommunications workers on illegal labor practices by Sprint. The complaint was upheld by the US National Labor Relations Board, which ordered trivial penalties after years of delay, the standard procedure. The NAFTA study, by Cornell University Labor economist Kate Bronfenbrenner, was authorized for release by Canada and Mexico, but delayed by the Clinton administration. It reveals a significant impact of NAFTA on strikebreaking. About half of union organizing efforts are disrupted by employer threats to transfer production abroad, for example, by placing signs reading “Mexico Transfer Job” in front of a plant where there is an organizing drive. The threats are not idle. When such organizing drives nevertheless succeed, employers close the plant in whole or in part at triple the pre-NAFTA rate (about 15 percent of the time). Plant-closing threats are almost twice as high in more mobile industries (e.g., manufacturing vs. construction).57 These and other practices reported in the NAFTA study are illegal, but that is a technicality, as the Reagan administration had made clear, outweighed by the contribution to undermining the right to organize that is formally guaranteed by Article 23—or, in more polite words, bringing about “changes in labor market institutions and practices” that contribute to “significant wage restraint” thanks to “greater worker insecurity,” within an economic model offered with great pride to a backward world, and greatly admired among privileged sectors.

Working hours have gone way up—Americans apparently work about a month a year more than they did 25 years ago, wages have stagnated, support systems have gone down, working conditions have deteriorated. The decline of US labor costs to the lowest, second to England, in the industrial world was hailed by the Wall Street Journal as “a welcome development of transcendent importance,” and that’s part of the United States being happy and satisfied. Illegal firing of union organizers tripled in the 1980s, along with other violations of law, which continue under Clinton. The Reagan administration essentially informed the business world it wasn’t going to apply the laws, and this was reported rather accurately in the business press.8 That’s a big factor in the increase in inequality, the attack on wages and incomes. If you turn to the business pages of the New York Times, they tell the story pretty straight: for example, in a story headlined “America’s Treadmill Economy,” in which most people are “Going Nowhere Fast,” with poor prospects.9 Let’s go back to the headline, “America is Prosperous and Smug,” and so on.


pages: 364 words: 104,697

Were You Born on the Wrong Continent? by Thomas Geoghegan

Albert Einstein, American Society of Civil Engineers: Report Card, banking crisis, Berlin Wall, Bob Geldof, collective bargaining, corporate governance, cross-subsidies, dark matter, David Brooks, declining real wages, deindustrialization, ending welfare as we know it, facts on the ground, Gini coefficient, haute cuisine, income inequality, John Maynard Keynes: Economic Possibilities for our Grandchildren, knowledge economy, knowledge worker, laissez-faire capitalism, low skilled workers, Martin Wolf, McJob, minimum wage unemployment, mittelstand, offshore financial centre, Paul Samuelson, payday loans, pensions crisis, plutocrats, Plutocrats, purchasing power parity, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Robert Gordon, Ronald Reagan: Tear down this wall, Saturday Night Live, Silicon Valley, The Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith, Thorstein Veblen, union organizing, Wolfgang Streeck, women in the workforce

Anyway, on this last trip, I phoned up a press person at that oddly named union, IG Metall, and asked her to set up an interview, just so I could go over it all again. After telling me I’m too late, the whole system has collapsed, and it’s just awful in Germany now, she then said, “I have just the person. He advised our works councils in IT.” She said he used to be a CEO of a high-tech company. Now he works as a full-time organizer for IG Metall. “What?” I said. “You’re saying this guy was a CEO like Bill Gates and now he’s a union organizer?” But it turned out to be true. His name was Wigand, and he had white hair, and he looked like the drummer for the Rolling Stones. He also looked like a U-boat commander, except he was in jeans and smoked more than they’d let you on (or “aboard”) a submarine. Right after we shook hands, I had to ask: “Were you really a CEO of a high-tech company?” He gave me a kind of wolf smile, the smile of a commander of a U-boat: “Yes, but of course this was only for a few years.”

(Streeck) German model of social democracy and capitalism child care benefits children in poverty civic trust college attendance rates college tuitions in contrast to France education system elderly poor English-speaking GDP per capita and German character and Germans who resemble Americans Germany as “Green” Germany’s darkness and historical trauma government-provided benefits/entitlements green technology holiday weekends and leisure time hours worked and standard-of-living income equality/inequality law students and bar exam middle class military draft nursing-home benefits and parent care pensions and retirement political conversations political identity and political educations quality control reading and print culture retirement age savings rates size and history in Europe small houses and unification U.S. elites’ opinions of weak state and socialist-friendly private corporations welfare women’s benefits and birthrates See also Berlin, Germany; financial meltdown of 2008 (the Krise) and German model; German model of social democracy (future of); German model of social democracy (German socialism); German model of social democracy (jobs/employment); German model of social democracy (labor and industry); German model of social democracy (unions and labor movement) German model of social democracy (future of) ascension of CDU changes to the European model decline of labor unions/union organizing financial meltdown of 2008 (the Krise) Germans’ despair about pension crisis rumors of collapse SDP-Green government and Agenda 2010 German model of social democracy (German socialism) and Catholicism co-determination contrast to older state socialism and German capitalism labor unions and wage-setting and postwar U.S. Army occupation and reading works councils German model of social democracy (jobs/employment) high-skill jobs and high-end precision goods manufacturing workforce percent of adults holding an associate degree percent of adults self-employed public-sector civil service jobs skilled-labor shortage subsidies for artists unemployment German model of social democracy (labor and industry) export sales “globalization” thesis high-skill jobs and high-end precision goods industry and social democracy labor costs labor markets market flexibility postwar economic recovery (the “German miracle”) public spending/consumer spending levels services and “virtuous growth” voices of the left on the labor crisis voices of the right on the labor crisis wage moderation and “wage costs” wage-setting by unions worker control German model of social democracy (unions and labor movement) decline of labor and organizing after the Krise foreign-born union membership and postwar U.S.


pages: 350 words: 112,234

Korea by Simon Winchester

Albert Einstein, Berlin Wall, life extension, Nelson Mandela, placebo effect, union organizing

Chi-Woo, who had driven down from Seoul the night before with his wife and two children, is a celebrated poet, a former aesthetics student at Seoul National University. ‘Korea’s Oxford,’ he said proudly. ‘I have to tell you we are not a very popular family with the government,’ he explained. ‘One of us has become a monk because of the Kwangju massacre. Another is a schoolteacher. Here am I, well known as an anti-government poet. And the fourth is a trade union organizer in Inchon, and he is in hiding. He has been on the run from the police for most of the last two years. So you have picked yourself dangerous company.’ By the time the last couple had arrived—a woman and child whose role in the family was never explained—mother emerged from wherever she had been hiding these past hours, and a lacquer table was brought in with scores of steel and china dishes balanced precariously on it.

Kim Woo Choong had seven employees back in 1968, and a total capital of £7,000. Now he employs more than a hundred thousand men and women, and his empire is worth billions. Brilliant organization, Confucian dedication, an innate sense of duty, carefully applied company paternalism, and an unforgiving regime of discipline—all this, coupled with low wages and precious little interference from union organizations—all helped to bring Kim and his colleagues at Hyundai and Gold Star and Samsung and the other chaebols, who started, as he had, from nothing in those ruined days following the war, the immense power and industrial might they enjoy today. The Japanese industrial giants are often much older and more venerable institutions or were founded by men with great fortunes or by the members of ancient aristocracies—Sony, for instance, was created by a man whose family firm had made a fortune out of sake more than a century ago.


pages: 823 words: 206,070

The Making of Global Capitalism by Leo Panitch, Sam Gindin

accounting loophole / creative accounting, active measures, airline deregulation, anti-communist, Asian financial crisis, asset-backed security, bank run, banking crisis, barriers to entry, Basel III, Big bang: deregulation of the City of London, bilateral investment treaty, Branko Milanovic, Bretton Woods, BRICs, British Empire, business cycle, call centre, capital controls, Capital in the Twenty-First Century by Thomas Piketty, Carmen Reinhart, central bank independence, collective bargaining, continuous integration, corporate governance, creative destruction, Credit Default Swap, crony capitalism, currency manipulation / currency intervention, currency peg, dark matter, Deng Xiaoping, disintermediation, ending welfare as we know it, eurozone crisis, facts on the ground, financial deregulation, financial innovation, Financial Instability Hypothesis, financial intermediation, floating exchange rates, full employment, Gini coefficient, global value chain, guest worker program, Hyman Minsky, imperial preference, income inequality, inflation targeting, interchangeable parts, interest rate swap, Kenneth Rogoff, Kickstarter, land reform, late capitalism, liberal capitalism, liquidity trap, London Interbank Offered Rate, Long Term Capital Management, manufacturing employment, market bubble, market fundamentalism, Martin Wolf, means of production, money market fund, money: store of value / unit of account / medium of exchange, Monroe Doctrine, moral hazard, mortgage debt, mortgage tax deduction, Myron Scholes, new economy, non-tariff barriers, Northern Rock, oil shock, precariat, price stability, quantitative easing, Ralph Nader, RAND corporation, regulatory arbitrage, reserve currency, risk tolerance, Ronald Reagan, seigniorage, shareholder value, short selling, Silicon Valley, sovereign wealth fund, special drawing rights, special economic zone, structural adjustment programs, The Chicago School, The Great Moderation, the payments system, The Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith, too big to fail, trade liberalization, transcontinental railway, trickle-down economics, union organizing, very high income, Washington Consensus, Works Progress Administration, zero-coupon bond, zero-sum game

These struggles by American workers reached their peak in the early 1890s, when the dramatic strikes that marked the first attempts at industrial unionization in steel, rail, and metal mining briefly threatened to coalesce with farmer radicalism, before the strikes were broken through severe state repression.42 The capitalist class regrouped through the formation of a wide variety of local civic, social, and cultural organizations, as well as through powerful new national institutions like the National Association of Manufacturers (formed to stimulate US exports, as well as being an active anti-union organization). The most important expression of this regrouping was a new alliance between business and the Republican Party that was forged in the run-up to the 1896 election. It was an alliance founded on an explicit recognition that “a system based on private property needs class-conscious leadership just as much as a revolutionary movement.”43 The Republicans’ historic victory over Bryanite populism in the 1896 election ushered in two key developments in the American state.

The appeal of Ronald Reagan’s tax cuts to the Democrats’ working-class constituency, followed by the explicit class war from above undertaken by his administration after the 1980 election (through cutbacks to welfare, food stamps, Medicare, public pensions, and unemployment insurance), was a major factor in turning this initial defeat of labor in the iconic auto sector into an historic shift in the broader balance of class forces. With workers desperate to hold on to their jobs, by the end of 1982 “major concessions had been negotiated in airlines, meatpacking, agricultural implements, trucking, grocery, rubber, among smaller steel firms, and in public employment.”47 Anti-union appointments to the Department of Labor and the National Labor Relations Board had immediate effects in checking union organizing drives and sustaining employers’ bad-faith bargaining tactics. But, as Alan Greenspan subsequently reflected, in discussing Reagan’s legacy, “perhaps the most important, and then highly controversial, domestic initiative was the firing of the air traffic controllers in August 1981 . . . his action gave weight to the legal right of private employers, previously not fully exercised, to use their own discretion to both hire and discharge workers.”48 The strike by PATCO (the Professional Air Traffic Controllers Organization), which had actually endorsed Reagan in the 1980 election campaign) was broken not only by the permanent dismissal of 12,000 controllers, but by military personnel being brought in to run the airports, while many of the strike leaders were arrested and led away in chains.49 Notably, Volcker himself thought that the breaking of PATCO did “even more to break the morale of labor” than had the earlier “breaking of the pattern of wage push in the auto industry.”50 The “contradictions of success” that had erupted with worker and social-movement militancy in the mid 1960s were thus finally resolved in the early 1980s.

Mortgage borrowers are the beneficiaries of what amounts to a global competition to lend to American home buyers.104 Indeed, by the mid 1990s household consumer and mortgage debt surpassed the total debt of nonfinancial corporations, and it also exceeded the debt of federal, state, and municipal governments combined. The global competition to lend to American workers combined with the global competition that free trade represented to integrate as well as weaken American labor. The main goal of the reform leadership slate elected to the AFL-CIO in 1995, committed to increasing the density of union organization, was to try to get “progressive competitiveness” back on the agenda: “We want to increase productivity,” the AFL-CIO’s new president declared in 1996. “We want to help American business compete in the world.”105 Yet US labor’s accommodation to the making of global capitalism by the end of the twentieth century was accompanied by the emergence of the new anti-globalization protest movement.


pages: 716 words: 192,143

The Enlightened Capitalists by James O'Toole

activist fund / activist shareholder / activist investor, anti-communist, Ayatollah Khomeini, Bernie Madoff, British Empire, business cycle, business process, California gold rush, carbon footprint, City Beautiful movement, collective bargaining, corporate governance, corporate social responsibility, Credit Default Swap, crowdsourcing, cryptocurrency, desegregation, Donald Trump, double entry bookkeeping, end world poverty, equal pay for equal work, Frederick Winslow Taylor, full employment, garden city movement, germ theory of disease, glass ceiling, God and Mammon, greed is good, hiring and firing, income inequality, indoor plumbing, inventory management, invisible hand, James Hargreaves, job satisfaction, joint-stock company, Kickstarter, knowledge worker, Lao Tzu, longitudinal study, Louis Pasteur, Lyft, means of production, Menlo Park, North Sea oil, passive investing, Ponzi scheme, profit maximization, profit motive, Ralph Waldo Emerson, rolodex, Ronald Reagan, shareholder value, Silicon Valley, Social Responsibility of Business Is to Increase Its Profits, Socratic dialogue, sovereign wealth fund, spinning jenny, Steve Jobs, Steve Wozniak, stocks for the long run, stocks for the long term, The Fortune at the Bottom of the Pyramid, The Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith, Tim Cook: Apple, traveling salesman, Uber and Lyft, uber lyft, union organizing, Vanguard fund, white flight, women in the workforce, young professional

Tellingly, that residual power has never been exercised, because workers and management have come to share the same interests. Although the company has enjoyed unusually harmonious industrial relations, it would be a mistake to overidealize that aspect of its culture. As in any organization, there have been conflicts, disagreements, and disgruntled groups and individuals. In the mid-1990s, dissident Lincoln Electric employees took part in a union-organizing campaign to “force management back to better lines of communication” with regard to decisions that had reduced the company’s commitment to promoting from within, and altered the way its pension plan was funded. When management subsequently reversed those decisions, the employees promptly called off the organizing drive. The worker who had led the effort explained to journalist Frank Koller that his peers’ intent had been simply to get management back in the habit of listening to them, and that in fact they never wanted a union: “Why would we want to hurt our livelihood?”

Instead, they were put on a three-day workweek—painting the factory, refinishing its floors, anything to enable them to earn a paycheck large enough to feed their families. The Depression was so devastating for American workers that many began to form trade unions. By the mid-1930s, almost every business in San Francisco had been organized. The one major exception, Levi Strauss & Co., then found itself targeted for organization by the United Garment Workers of America (UGWA). But when union organizers approached the Levi plant’s employee entrance, they were largely ignored by the company’s workers, who apparently were grateful to have been spared the curse of unemployment. Resolved to win the right to represent the workers, the UGWA began to picket the facility. The union had a significant point of leverage: it demanded that its members buy only products affixed with a “union-made” label.

14 In the 1970s, Cummins appointed an ethics officer long before ethics and compliance officers became de rigueur in American corporations. At Cummins, ethical practices began with the way the company treated its employees. To create a sense of community among its workers, no Cummins facility had more than five thousand employees (a large number, but small for diesel factories). In 1936, when CIO union organizers attempted to enlist the workers in Columbus’s largest companies, Miller rejected his fellow industrialists’ concerted efforts to prevent unionization; he even refused to join the Indiana Chamber of Commerce because it backed so-called right-to-work legislation. His reason: “We don’t feel right fighting our own people.”15 Years later, after Cummins workers had rejected the CIO bid and formed their own Diesel Workers Union, Miller remarked, “I wouldn’t know how to run a big business without a strong union.


pages: 138 words: 40,525

This Is Not a Drill: An Extinction Rebellion Handbook by Extinction Rebellion

3D printing, autonomous vehicles, banks create money, bitcoin, blockchain, Buckminster Fuller, car-free, carbon footprint, clean water, Colonization of Mars, crowdsourcing, David Attenborough, David Graeber, decarbonisation, deindustrialization, Donald Trump, Elon Musk, Ethereum, ethereum blockchain, feminist movement, full employment, gig economy, global pandemic, ice-free Arctic, Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), job automation, mass immigration, Peter Thiel, place-making, quantitative easing, Ray Kurzweil, Sam Altman, smart grid, supply-chain management, the scientific method, union organizing, urban sprawl, wealth creators

If you haven’t taken action before and you fear arrest, then first of all you need to feel you are among people who are organized and know what they are doing. The more successful the movement, the greater the backlash from the state and the more important such solidarity will be. A tangible example of how solidarity was built at scale can be seen in the work of the Bristol-based Easton Anti-Poll Tax Union. We concluded that people would only refuse to pay if they felt others around them would also do so. Once it had grown sufficiently, the Union organized a representative for every street in Easton. That person took responsibility for knocking on every door in that street with a survey. One of the key questions ran along the lines of ‘If 75 per cent of people in your street say that they won’t pay the Poll Tax, will you also not pay?’ We collated the responses and then went back to every household with the results, at the same time inviting people to group meetings.


pages: 482 words: 122,497

The Wrecking Crew: How Conservatives Rule by Thomas Frank

affirmative action, anti-communist, barriers to entry, Berlin Wall, Bernie Madoff, British Empire, business cycle, collective bargaining, corporate governance, Credit Default Swap, David Brooks, edge city, financial deregulation, full employment, George Gilder, guest worker program, income inequality, invisible hand, job satisfaction, Mikhail Gorbachev, Mont Pelerin Society, mortgage debt, Naomi Klein, Nelson Mandela, new economy, P = NP, plutocrats, Plutocrats, Ponzi scheme, Ralph Nader, rent control, Richard Florida, road to serfdom, rolodex, Ronald Reagan, school vouchers, shareholder value, Silicon Valley, stem cell, Telecommunications Act of 1996, the scientific method, too big to fail, union organizing, War on Poverty

They were seen more as the property of the employers,” a former attorney general of the CNMI explained to me. The local Department of Labor did little to keep them from “being locked up in barracks with fences around them, . . . and didn’t even think there was any reason to investigate it.”34 In 1994 and ’95, the islands’ raw material—the imported guest workers themselves—started refusing to play their assigned role. A wave of union organizing swept across Saipan, and the government was put to the ultimate test. Workers at grocery stores, restaurants, and several of Saipan’s hotels decided to take matters into their own hands, with the assistance of an organizer sent by a hotel workers’ union in Hawaii, one Elwood Mott. But this kind of liberty—well, let’s just say it might have blown up the laboratory altogether. CNMI officialdom reacted to the organizing drive with horror.

Torres on the profits unions make: “One More Time Against Unions,” Letter to the Editor, Marianas Variety, date not visible on my copy (probably 1995). Torres on bigwigs in limousines: “Torres Shuns Unions for Aliens,” Marianas Variety, August 4, 1995. Persona Non Grata: Ninth Northern Marianas Commonwealth Legislature, HR No. 9-141, December 18, 1995: “A House Resolution to declare Elwood Mott, a resident of the State of Hawaii and a union organizer, a persona non grata in the Commonwealth.” One reason cited by the CNMI legislature for its bizarre move was that “the formulation of unions here effectively promotes a division between resident and non-resident employees.” 39. Torres’s two-year proposal would obviously have been in violation of the nation’s labor laws, which prohibit discriminating against union members in such a fashion.


pages: 913 words: 299,770

A People's History of the United States by Howard Zinn

active measures, affirmative action, agricultural Revolution, Albert Einstein, American ideology, anti-communist, Bartolomé de las Casas, Bernie Sanders, British Empire, clean water, colonial rule, death of newspapers, desegregation, equal pay for equal work, feminist movement, friendly fire, full employment, God and Mammon, Howard Zinn, illegal immigration, jobless men, land reform, Mercator projection, Mikhail Gorbachev, minimum wage unemployment, Monroe Doctrine, new economy, New Urbanism, Norman Mailer, offshore financial centre, plutocrats, Plutocrats, profit motive, Ralph Nader, Ralph Waldo Emerson, RAND corporation, Ronald Reagan, Rosa Parks, Silicon Valley, strikebreaker, Telecommunications Act of 1996, The Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith, transcontinental railway, union organizing, Upton Sinclair, very high income, War on Poverty, Works Progress Administration

George Berke, a veteran life guard, found the ring, whereupon Mitchell peeled a hundred dollar bill from a roll he carried in his pocket and handed it to the captain as a reward for his find. The well-paid leaders of the AFL were protected from criticism by tightly controlled meetings and by “goon” squads—hired toughs originally used against strikebreakers but after a while used to intimidate and beat up opponents inside the union. In this situation—terrible conditions of labor, exclusivity in union organization—working people wanting radical change, seeing the root of misery in the capitalist system, moved toward a new kind of labor union. One morning in June 1905, there met in a hall in Chicago a convention of two hundred socialists, anarchists, and radical trade unionists from all over the United States. They were forming the I. W. W.—the Industrial Workers of the World. Big Bill Haywood, a leader of the Western Federation of Miners, recalled in his autobiography that he picked up a piece of board that lay on the platform and used it for a gavel to open the convention: Fellow workers. . . .

A textile strike in Rhode Island in 1922 among Italian and Portuguese workers failed, but class feelings were awakened and some of the strikers joined radical movements. Luigi Nardella recalled: . . . my oldest brother, Guido, he started the strike. Guido pulled the handles on the looms in the Royal Mills, going from one section to the next shouting, “Strike! Strike!” . . . When the strike started we didn’t have any union organizers. . . . We got together a group of girls and went from mill to mill, and that morning we got five mills out. We’d motion to the girls in the mills, “Come out! Come out!” Then we’d go on to the next. . . . Somebody from the Young Workers’ League came out to bring a check, and invited me to a meeting, and I went. Then I joined, and in a few years I was in the Risorgimento Club in Providence.

But Republic Steel was organized, and so was Ford Motor Company, and the other huge plants in steel, auto, rubber, meatpacking, the electrical industry. The Wagner Act was challenged by a steel corporation in the courts, but the Supreme Court found it constitutional—that the government could regulate interstate commerce, and that strikes hurt interstate commerce. From the trade unions’ point of view, the new law was an aid to union organizing. From the government’s point of view it was an aid to the stability of commerce. Unions were not wanted by employers, but they were more controllable—more stabilizing for the system than the wildcat strikes, the factory occupations of the rank and file. In the spring of 1937, a New York Times article carried the headline “Unauthorized Sit-Downs Fought by CIO Unions.” The story read: “Strict orders have been issued to all organizers and representatives that they will be dismissed if they authorize any stoppages of work without the consent of the international officers. . . .”


Hollow City by Rebecca Solnit, Susan Schwartzenberg

blue-collar work, Brownian motion, dematerialisation, Golden Gate Park, Haight Ashbury, housing crisis, informal economy, Jane Jacobs, Loma Prieta earthquake, low skilled workers, new economy, New Urbanism, pets.com, rent control, Silicon Valley, South of Market, San Francisco, The Death and Life of Great American Cities, union organizing, upwardly mobile, urban planning, urban renewal, wage slave

"They had their HOLLOW 32 faults," the CITY San Francisco poet Kenneth Rexroth once remarked of San Francisco's original inhabitants, 'T3ut they Mather." For many were not influenced by Cotton decades afterwards, the city was celebrated as a cosmopolitan version of the Wild West town, with malleable social mores, eccentrics and adventurers a big part of the social mix. tieth century, it was becoming By a center for the twen- immigrant Wobblies and union organizers Italian anarchists, not only the most tightly organized city in America but . . . States, the stronghold of trade unionism in the United " asserted Carey McWilliams.^'^ Conscientious objectors flocked here after poets who would later be World War II. and the celebrated as beat and as the San Francisco Renaissance started coming in the 1940s and 1950s; .\frican-.-\merican emigration to the war- time jobs of San Francisco produced another postwar cultural flourishing of jazz the Black Cat, earlv on.


pages: 154 words: 47,880

The System: Who Rigged It, How We Fix It by Robert B. Reich

affirmative action, Affordable Care Act / Obamacare, Bernie Madoff, Bernie Sanders, business cycle, clean water, collective bargaining, corporate governance, corporate raider, corporate social responsibility, Credit Default Swap, crony capitalism, cryptocurrency, Donald Trump, ending welfare as we know it, financial deregulation, Gordon Gekko, immigration reform, income inequality, Jeff Bezos, job automation, London Whale, Long Term Capital Management, market fundamentalism, mass incarceration, mortgage debt, Occupy movement, Ponzi scheme, race to the bottom, Robert Bork, Ronald Reagan, shareholder value, too big to fail, trickle-down economics, union organizing, women in the workforce, working poor, zero-sum game

CHAPTER 11 The Triumph of the Oligarchy DIG UNDER THE SURFACE of the system and you see individuals making deals that generated billions for themselves—such as Carl Icahn’s corporate raids, Jack Welch’s attacks on GE’s workers and unions, Warren Buffet’s investments in corporations with moats, and Sandy Weill’s and Jamie Dimon’s unfettered financial supermarkets and betting parlors. Dig deeper and you see how these deals depended on seemingly small changes in laws and regulations, such as preventing companies from defending themselves from raiders, neutering antitrust enforcement, imposing small fines on corporations for firing union organizers, refusing to regulate derivatives, and dismantling Glass-Steagall. Bore still deeper and you see a vicious cycle in which, starting around 1980, wealth and power began concentrating among a relatively small group at the top, giving them increasing political clout to get changes in laws and regulations that concentrated their wealth and power even more. Look at the shifting tectonic plates under all this and you view the profound shifts in the allocation of power that brought us the system we have today.


pages: 497 words: 143,175

Pivotal Decade: How the United States Traded Factories for Finance in the Seventies by Judith Stein

"Robert Solow", 1960s counterculture, activist lawyer, affirmative action, airline deregulation, anti-communist, Ayatollah Khomeini, barriers to entry, Berlin Wall, blue-collar work, Bretton Woods, business cycle, capital controls, centre right, collective bargaining, Credit Default Swap, crony capitalism, David Ricardo: comparative advantage, deindustrialization, desegregation, energy security, Fall of the Berlin Wall, falling living standards, feminist movement, financial deregulation, floating exchange rates, full employment, Gunnar Myrdal, income inequality, income per capita, intermodal, invisible hand, knowledge worker, laissez-faire capitalism, liberal capitalism, Long Term Capital Management, manufacturing employment, market bubble, Martin Wolf, new economy, oil shale / tar sands, oil shock, open economy, Paul Samuelson, payday loans, post-industrial society, post-oil, price mechanism, price stability, Ralph Nader, RAND corporation, reserve currency, Robert Gordon, Ronald Reagan, Simon Kuznets, strikebreaker, trade liberalization, union organizing, urban planning, urban renewal, War on Poverty, Washington Consensus, working poor, Yom Kippur War

For those who worried that the bill would promote strikes, the law also established a national committee—composed of labor, industry, and public officials—that could assert jurisdiction in local construction disputes. Believing that a law passed in 1975 would have no trouble in 1977, labor leaders did not ask for Carter’s support and it was not volunteered, although Carter promised to sign the legislation.18 But labor underestimated anti-union organizing, led by Associated General Contractors, which assembled a grassroots movement and a united business lobby. On March 23 the House of Representatives killed the bill, 205–217. Neither the labor movement nor the Carter administration had been fully aware of the increasing militancy of business. The National Association of Manufactures had moved its headquarters to Washington in 1972 and came close to merging in 1976 with the Chamber of Commerce.19 For the previous ten years, business had been on the defensive.

(The Roundtable opposed the three.) The AFL-CIO had wanted the three clauses to remain so that a strong bill could weather the inevitable congressional compromises. But, having lost the picketing bill and requiring presidential support, labor acquiesced. The bill still contained numerous changes that would speed up elections, stiffen penalties for labor law violators, and make certain that union organizers had access to workers. In early July, Carter publicly embraced the principles of labor reform but not the reform bill itself. He advocated sped-up elections, expansion of the NLRB from five to seven members, and measures penalizing law-breaking companies with both double back pay for illegally discharged workers, and debarment from federal contracts. He was silent on a provision that gave unions equal access to employees if employers addressed workers on company time or property.


pages: 450 words: 134,152

The Deal of the Century: The Breakup of AT&T by Steve Coll

Ayatollah Khomeini, cross-subsidies, George Santayana, Marshall McLuhan, Ralph Nader, Ronald Reagan, union organizing

Once, vacationing on a Caribbean island and finding himself stranded by a local airline strike, McGowan had chartered a jet to the States and paid for it by selling tickets to frustrated tourists at the airport, rescuing his fellow travelers and clearing a handsome profit at the same time. He had grown up in Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania, a bleak Appalachian coal town colored gray by smoke and soot from dozens of nearby anthracite coal plants. His father was a union organizer who worked with the men at Wilkes-Barre’s bustling railyards, where tons of coal moved in and out of the city on five different railroad lines. McGowan knew early and profoundly the ethic of relentless hard work that drove Wilkes-Barre’s smokestack industries, and if he was ever inclined to forget that ethic in adolescence, the corporal discipline meted out by the nuns in the Catholic schools he attended provided a painful reminder of his obligations.

Perhaps McGowan should put the heat on AT&T himself, eyeball to eyeball with John deButts. By the time Bill McGowan pushed through a revolving glass door into the lobby of 195 Broadway at about 9:30 A.M. on Friday, March 2, 1973, the MCI chairman had worked himself into a lather. He was ready to play hardball with his AT&T counterpart, and he was not going to be overmatched—as the son of a union organizer, McGowan had learned early in life about the use of threats and intimidation in business negotiations. John deButts, AT&T’s patrician southern gentleman, was about to be introduced to a style of negotiation prevalent thirty years earlier in the smoky railroad union halls of Wilkes-Barre. McGowan was now on AT&T’s turf, however, and the headquarters building at 195 Broadway conjured up a culture far removed from the Dickensian milieu of an Appalachian coal town.


Stacy Mitchell by Big-Box Swindle The True Cost of Mega-Retailers, the Fight for America's Independent Businesses (2006)

big-box store, business climate, business cycle, clean water, collective bargaining, corporate personhood, European colonialism, Haight Ashbury, income inequality, inventory management, invisible hand, Jane Jacobs, low skilled workers, Maui Hawaii, Menlo Park, new economy, New Urbanism, price discrimination, race to the bottom, Ray Oldenburg, RFID, Ronald Reagan, The Chicago School, The Death and Life of Great American Cities, The Great Good Place, union organizing, urban planning, women in the workforce, zero-sum game

It was puzzling at first: wouldn’t a company want to encourage those who were striving to do well and who took pride in how competently they carried out their work? But after a while it became clear: the megastores want the work done, but they do not want employees to have any degree of self-confidence or sense of their own worth, which only leads to costly problems, like demands for wage increases, independent thinking, and union-organizing drives. “They like to put people down,” Turner explained. One wonders how many of his coworkers, especially those he described as the store manager’s favorites, had also had entire days deleted from their paychecks, but, rather than stand up for themselves, had opted to just let it go. Trying to support a family on less than nineteen thousand dollars a year became virtually impossible—an endless series of hard choices between food and health care, electricity and rent.

Those who find some way, licit or otherwise, to meet the budget, earn substantial bonuses that can double or triple their base pay; those who do not are either demoted or fired. Moreover, annual increases in a store’s sales are expected to exceed the rate of growth in payroll costs—so every year, the screws tighten. Above all, it is the store manager’s responsibility to snuƒ out any attempts by workers to form a union. Organizing a retail store is already extremely di‰cult, due to the high rate of employee turnover and the vulnerability of a workforce that is easily replaced. Sporadic organizing drives at stores operated by Home Depot, Target, and other chains have collapsed, often amid allegations that union supporters were illegally intimidated or even fired by store managers. Federal law does little to deter such unionbusting tactics.


Masters of Mankind by Noam Chomsky

affirmative action, American Legislative Exchange Council, Berlin Wall, failed state, God and Mammon, income inequality, Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), land reform, Martin Wolf, means of production, Nelson Mandela, nuremberg principles, offshore financial centre, oil shale / tar sands, Paul Samuelson, plutocrats, Plutocrats, profit maximization, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Silicon Valley, the scientific method, The Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith, too big to fail, union organizing, urban renewal, War on Poverty, Washington Consensus, Westphalian system

In short, there is a conflict between the government, which is the enemy, and the people, who are living the American dream together: the sober working man, his loyal wife (now maybe with a job herself), the hardworking executive toiling for the benefit of all, the friendly banker eager to lend money when needed, all a model of harmony, their happy lives disrupted only by “outsiders” and “un-Americans” of various sorts—union organizers and other riffraff. That is the picture that has been diligently crafted by the Public Relations industry, vastly expanded after the shock of popular organizing in the 1930s shattered the belief that the end of history had been reached in a kind of utopia of the masters. With some variants, the picture has endured in business propaganda, the entertainment industry, and much of the popular and intellectual culture.


What We Say Goes: Conversations on U.S. Power in a Changing World by Noam Chomsky, David Barsamian

banking crisis, British Empire, Doomsday Clock, failed state, feminist movement, Howard Zinn, informal economy, liberation theology, mass immigration, microcredit, Mikhail Gorbachev, Monroe Doctrine, oil shale / tar sands, peak oil, RAND corporation, Ronald Reagan, Thomas L Friedman, union organizing, Upton Sinclair, uranium enrichment, Washington Consensus

Actually, public sector unionization has stayed pretty steady, which illustrates the fact, as we know from other sources, that workers would join unions if they could.6 In the public sector, there are rules that make it difficult to employ illegal measures to block unionization. In the private sector, since Ronald Reagan, the government has made it explicit that employers can use illegal measures to undermine union organizing, and it’s done constantly.7 There have been other changes in the international economy that affect unionization. Can this be reversed? It certainly can. But it’s going to mean overcoming a lot of pressures. There are no new secrets about this. The methods of organizing are known. They just have to be pursued. And it’s not something that can be done only by working people. It means making changes in the cultural background and other kinds of organization—support and solidarity and so on.


pages: 218 words: 44,364

The Starfish and the Spider: The Unstoppable Power of Leaderless Organizations by Ori Brafman, Rod A. Beckstrom

Atahualpa, barriers to entry, Burning Man, creative destruction, disintermediation, experimental economics, Firefox, Francisco Pizarro, jimmy wales, Kibera, Lao Tzu, Network effects, peer-to-peer, pez dispenser, shareholder value, Silicon Valley, Skype, The Wisdom of Crowds, union organizing

As for Sky, who never gave anyone his last name, he was used to these kinds of situations when he came into a new town. Some people fit naturally into the role of hunt saboteur; others didn't. But Sky never said anything negative or discouraging. His job, as he saw it, was to get a group on its feet. The members could eventually figure out who fit in, who didn't, and what actions to take together as a group. In many ways, Sky was like a union organizer. He was also a TAKING ON DECENTRALIZATION perfect example of a catalyst. He'd come into a progressive town like Berkeley and connect with the local animal rights activists. They usually weren't very difficult to find—every college town has at least one animal rights group, and the animal rights community is small and intimate enough that the major activists across different cities all know each other.


The New Class War: Saving Democracy From the Metropolitan Elite by Michael Lind

affirmative action, anti-communist, basic income, Bernie Sanders, Boris Johnson, Bretton Woods, business cycle, capital controls, Cass Sunstein, central bank independence, centre right, collective bargaining, commoditize, corporate governance, crony capitalism, deindustrialization, Doha Development Round, Donald Trump, Edward Snowden, future of work, global supply chain, guest worker program, Haight Ashbury, illegal immigration, immigration reform, invisible hand, knowledge economy, liberal world order, low skilled workers, low-wage service sector, manufacturing employment, Mark Zuckerberg, mass immigration, means of production, moral panic, Nate Silver, new economy, offshore financial centre, oil shock, open borders, plutocrats, Plutocrats, Ponzi scheme, purchasing power parity, Ralph Nader, regulatory arbitrage, rent-seeking, Richard Florida, Ronald Reagan, Silicon Valley, The Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith, Thorstein Veblen, trade liberalization, union organizing, universal basic income, upwardly mobile, WikiLeaks, Wolfgang Streeck, working poor

Not only American firms but also German, Japanese, and South Korean car companies have avoided dealing with unionized workforces in the American “rust belt” by moving jobs to nonunion workforces in the American South and Mexico.13 The use by employers of immigrants, both legal and illegal, to weaken or destroy unions in US sectors like agriculture and meatpacking and janitorial work has been well documented.14 The mere threat of replacement by foreign workers or immigrants can serve to intimidate a much larger group than those who are actually replaced. During the economic boom of the 1990s more than half of all employers in one study, to discourage union organizing, threatened to shut down all or part of a plant, even though employers acted on the threat in fewer than 3 percent of the cases.15 * * * — IN ADDITION TO weakening organized labor, high levels of immigration can reduce public support for welfare state services that bolster the bargaining power of workers by allowing them to “hold out” longer in negotiations with employers. In modern Western welfare states, lower-paid immigrant workers may compete with better-paid native workers for limited public resources such as schools, hospitals, welfare services, or, in some countries, public housing.


Killing Hope: Us Military and Cia Interventions Since World War 2 by William Blum

anti-communist, Berlin Wall, Bolshevik threat, centre right, collective bargaining, colonial rule, cuban missile crisis, currency manipulation / currency intervention, deindustrialization, kremlinology, land reform, liberation theology, Mikhail Gorbachev, Monroe Doctrine, nuremberg principles, Ronald Reagan, South China Sea, trickle-down economics, union organizing

To add to the concern of American leaders, Sukarno had made trips to the Soviet Union and China (though to the White House as well), he had purchased arms from Eastern European countries (but only after being turned down by the United States),7 he had nationalized many private holdings of the Dutch, and, perhaps most disturbing of all, the Indonesian Communist Party (PK1) had made impressive gains electorally and in union-organizing, thus earning an important role in the coalition government. It was a familiar Third World scenario, and the reaction of Washington policymakers was equally familiar. Once again, they were unable, or unwilling, to distinguish nationalism from pro-communism, neutralism from wickedness. By any definition of the word, Sukarno was no communist. He was an Indonesian nationalist and a "Sukarnoist" who had crushed the PKI forces in 1948 after the independence struggle had been won.8 He ran what was largely his own show by granting concessions to both the PKI and the Army, balancing one against the other.

Bosch, who had returned several months prior to the election, was himself so fearful for his personal safety that he never left his home during the campaign. Joaquin Balaguer remained in office for the next 12 years, ruling his people in the grand Latin American style: The rich became richer and the poor had babies, hungry babies; democracy remained an alien concept; the police and military regularly kidnapped, tortured and murdered opponents of the government and terrorized union organizers.46 But the man was not, personally, the monster that Trujillo was. There was relative calm and peace. No "communist threat" hovered over the land. The pot was sweetened for foreign investors, and American corporations moved in with big bucks. There was stability and order. And the men who ran the United States looked and were satisfied. Perhaps some of them had come to the realization that the anti-communist liberal government was an impossible ideal; for any movement seeking genuine democracy and social reform would invariably attract individuals whom the United States would invariably categorize as "communist"; the United States would then feel driven to discredit, subvert and eventually overturn the movement.


pages: 525 words: 153,356

The People: The Rise and Fall of the Working Class, 1910-2010 by Selina Todd

call centre, collective bargaining, conceptual framework, credit crunch, deindustrialization, deskilling, different worldview, Downton Abbey, financial independence, full employment, income inequality, longitudinal study, manufacturing employment, Neil Kinnock, New Urbanism, Red Clydeside, rent control, Right to Buy, rising living standards, sexual politics, strikebreaker, The Spirit Level, unemployed young men, union organizing, upwardly mobile, urban renewal, Winter of Discontent, women in the workforce, young professional

This made an impact on Alf, who disliked the existing system whereby a worker with a grievance had to approach the manager directly, and had no one to speak for him if a foreman complained about his work. ‘The fear was that if you had to speak to the manager, you might be dismissed,’ he said. ‘With the trade union, you would have someone who would put your case and that could make a very big difference.’ All the same, it took two years to unionize the workers at Alf’s Kingswood tram depot – just one of many, many battles being fought by union organizers across the country.23 Among the union’s pioneers were the workers of Ingrams Rubber Factory in Hackney Wick. Ingrams was one of the area’s largest employers and one of its oldest. In 1933 the firm had made more than £300,000, but paid low wages: just 9d per hour to men, and less than 25s per week to women. The workers had no overtime pay and no paid holidays. In April 1936 workers at a nearby wood factory helped establish a branch of the TGWU – union branch 1/149.

Hazel was worried when John began working at a Coventry car factory in the late 1960s because ‘we’d heard they walked out for nothing’. But Hazel quickly came to sympathize with the strikers when John joined the picket lines: ‘it was the only way they could get anything,’ she said. Unofficial strikes often erupted in protest at the inaction or indifference of senior trade union officials and managers. Thirty-year-old Ricky Tomlinson – later to become a famous actor – became union organizer of the motorway construction gang of which he was a member. He was surprised to discover that ‘some of the other union officials were lazy and corrupt. One in particular would never return my calls … One day I rang and said I was [a manager] calling from McAlpine’s [a large building firm]. He came to the phone straight away, sounding like a grovelling toad. I don’t know if he was in cahoots with the bosses, or just after a quiet life.’37 Twenty years after strikes had erupted on Britain’s docks, more workers than ever were frustrated by the ‘top-down’ negotiation process established in the 1940s, which in practice gave trade union officials a seat at the managers’ table, but offered ordinary workers little say.


pages: 519 words: 155,332

Tailspin: The People and Forces Behind America's Fifty-Year Fall--And Those Fighting to Reverse It by Steven Brill

2013 Report for America's Infrastructure - American Society of Civil Engineers - 19 March 2013, activist fund / activist shareholder / activist investor, affirmative action, Affordable Care Act / Obamacare, airport security, American Society of Civil Engineers: Report Card, asset allocation, Bernie Madoff, Bernie Sanders, Blythe Masters, Bretton Woods, business process, call centre, Capital in the Twenty-First Century by Thomas Piketty, carried interest, clean water, collapse of Lehman Brothers, collective bargaining, computerized trading, corporate governance, corporate raider, corporate social responsibility, Credit Default Swap, currency manipulation / currency intervention, Donald Trump, ending welfare as we know it, failed state, financial deregulation, financial innovation, future of work, ghettoisation, Gordon Gekko, hiring and firing, Home mortgage interest deduction, immigration reform, income inequality, invention of radio, job automation, knowledge economy, knowledge worker, labor-force participation, laissez-faire capitalism, Mahatma Gandhi, Mark Zuckerberg, mortgage tax deduction, new economy, obamacare, old-boy network, paper trading, performance metric, post-work, Potemkin village, Powell Memorandum, quantitative hedge fund, Ralph Nader, ride hailing / ride sharing, Robert Bork, Robert Gordon, Robert Mercer, Ronald Reagan, shareholder value, Silicon Valley, Social Responsibility of Business Is to Increase Its Profits, telemarketer, too big to fail, trade liberalization, union organizing, Unsafe at Any Speed, War on Poverty, women in the workforce, working poor

Manufacturers didn’t need a memo demonizing Ralph Nader or Charles Reich to tell them they had, from their perspective, a problem—albeit one that had resulted in unprecedented prosperity for people who did physical work. The end of World War II brought an end to the promise many unions had made not to strike during wartime, accompanied by a post-war boom in demand for the products the workers made. Thanks to the New Deal’s National Labor Relations Act, which established a breakthrough menu of protections for union organizing and collective bargaining, this gave workers and their union leaders unprecedented power. They used it aggressively. In 1946, there were strikes involving more than five million workers, many of them prolonged standoffs. Taft-Hartley was passed to recalibrate the balance of power. It survived a veto by President Harry Truman, in part with the votes of Democrats, particularly those from the South.

But by 1980, the Stevens fight had attracted widespread news coverage, sparked by a union-led boycott of Stevens’s consumer products (which included towels and sheets under the Fieldcrest, Laura Ashley, Utica, and Ralph Lauren brands), and by the blatancy of Stevens’s defiance. In 1979, there was even a hit movie about the confrontation, Norma Rae, for which Sally Field won an Academy Award for her portrayal of a fired union organizer. That, and belated judicial threats to jail Stevens executives for contempt of multiple court orders, gradually tamed the company. Robert Stevens replaced Blakeney as his lead lawyer, and the company began to allow union elections. The contests were still resisted by the company, but they were fair enough so that 17 percent of the company was unionized by the mid-1980s. Yet that tense peace didn’t settle the worker-management standoff.


pages: 585 words: 151,239

Capitalism in America: A History by Adrian Wooldridge, Alan Greenspan

"Robert Solow", 2013 Report for America's Infrastructure - American Society of Civil Engineers - 19 March 2013, Affordable Care Act / Obamacare, agricultural Revolution, air freight, Airbnb, airline deregulation, American Society of Civil Engineers: Report Card, Asian financial crisis, bank run, barriers to entry, Berlin Wall, Bonfire of the Vanities, Bretton Woods, British Empire, business climate, business cycle, business process, California gold rush, Charles Lindbergh, cloud computing, collateralized debt obligation, collective bargaining, Corn Laws, corporate governance, corporate raider, creative destruction, credit crunch, debt deflation, Deng Xiaoping, disruptive innovation, Donald Trump, edge city, Elon Musk, equal pay for equal work, Everybody Ought to Be Rich, Fall of the Berlin Wall, fiat currency, financial deregulation, financial innovation, fixed income, full employment, George Gilder, germ theory of disease, global supply chain, hiring and firing, income per capita, indoor plumbing, informal economy, interchangeable parts, invention of the telegraph, invention of the telephone, Isaac Newton, Jeff Bezos, jimmy wales, John Maynard Keynes: technological unemployment, Joseph Schumpeter, Kenneth Rogoff, Kitchen Debate, knowledge economy, knowledge worker, labor-force participation, Louis Pasteur, low skilled workers, manufacturing employment, market bubble, Mason jar, mass immigration, means of production, Menlo Park, Mexican peso crisis / tequila crisis, minimum wage unemployment, mortgage debt, Myron Scholes, Network effects, new economy, New Urbanism, Northern Rock, oil rush, oil shale / tar sands, oil shock, Peter Thiel, plutocrats, Plutocrats, popular capitalism, post-industrial society, postindustrial economy, price stability, Productivity paradox, purchasing power parity, Ralph Nader, Ralph Waldo Emerson, RAND corporation, refrigerator car, reserve currency, rising living standards, road to serfdom, Robert Gordon, Ronald Reagan, Sand Hill Road, savings glut, secular stagnation, Silicon Valley, Silicon Valley startup, Simon Kuznets, Social Responsibility of Business Is to Increase Its Profits, South Sea Bubble, sovereign wealth fund, stem cell, Steve Jobs, Steve Wozniak, strikebreaker, supply-chain management, The Great Moderation, The Rise and Fall of American Growth, The Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith, Thomas Malthus, Thorstein Veblen, too big to fail, total factor productivity, trade route, transcontinental railway, tulip mania, Tyler Cowen: Great Stagnation, union organizing, Unsafe at Any Speed, Upton Sinclair, urban sprawl, Vannevar Bush, War on Poverty, washing machines reduced drudgery, Washington Consensus, white flight, wikimedia commons, William Shockley: the traitorous eight, women in the workforce, Works Progress Administration, Yom Kippur War, young professional

The most calamitous manifestation of this was the decision by Winston Churchill, who was then chancellor of the exchequer, to return Britain to the gold standard at $4.86 per pound sterling or £4.25 per troy ounce of gold, the level that it had been before the Great War shattered European civilization—indeed, the level that it had been when America declared independence. The result of the pound’s overvaluation was a triple disaster for Britain. The real economy suffered because Britain at its old exchange rate was uncompetitive, leading to unnecessary agonies as industry was squeezed, export industries such as coal mining contracted, unemployment soared, and the trade unions organized a general strike. In 1931, with 22 percent of the workforce unemployed, the British government, with its gold reserves rapidly depleting, took sterling off the gold standard for the first time in peacetime since Sir Isaac Newton established the gold parity in 1717. The pound fell by more than a third against the dollar (from $4.86 to $3.25), forcing other countries to follow suit, first the Scandinavian and Baltic states, with their close ties to the British market, then Japan, then much of Latin America.

Eisenhower filled his cabinet with businesspeople: as well as appointing Charles Wilson, the CEO of General Motors, as secretary of defense, he appointed a couple of former General Motors distributors to Cabinet posts, leading Adlai Stevenson to quip that “the New Dealers have all left Washington to make way for the car dealers.” Big labor was more of a problem. In the eighteen months after the war, unions organized 550 strikes, involving 1.4 million workers, in order to demonstrate their newfound power, conferred by the prolabor legal changes of the 1930s and the tight labor markets of the postwar years. The UAW launched a particularly determined strike against General Motors that was only settled when the management offered not just higher wages but company-sponsored pensions and health care. The “Treaty of Detroit” provided a template for all labor negotiations in the future: benefits that had hitherto been confined to managers were now spread to all workers.


pages: 486 words: 150,849

Evil Geniuses: The Unmaking of America: A Recent History by Kurt Andersen

affirmative action, Affordable Care Act / Obamacare, airline deregulation, airport security, always be closing, American ideology, American Legislative Exchange Council, anti-communist, Apple's 1984 Super Bowl advert, artificial general intelligence, autonomous vehicles, basic income, Bernie Sanders, blue-collar work, Bonfire of the Vanities, bonus culture, Burning Man, call centre, Capital in the Twenty-First Century by Thomas Piketty, Cass Sunstein, centre right, computer age, coronavirus, corporate governance, corporate raider, COVID-19, Covid-19, creative destruction, Credit Default Swap, cryptocurrency, deindustrialization, Donald Trump, Elon Musk, ending welfare as we know it, Erik Brynjolfsson, feminist movement, financial deregulation, financial innovation, Francis Fukuyama: the end of history, future of work, game design, George Gilder, Gordon Gekko, greed is good, High speed trading, hive mind, income inequality, industrial robot, interchangeable parts, invisible hand, Isaac Newton, James Watt: steam engine, Jane Jacobs, Jaron Lanier, Jeff Bezos, jitney, Joan Didion, job automation, John Maynard Keynes: Economic Possibilities for our Grandchildren, John Maynard Keynes: technological unemployment, Joseph Schumpeter, knowledge worker, low skilled workers, Lyft, Mark Zuckerberg, market bubble, mass immigration, mass incarceration, Menlo Park, Naomi Klein, new economy, Norbert Wiener, Norman Mailer, obamacare, Peter Thiel, Picturephone, plutocrats, Plutocrats, post-industrial society, Powell Memorandum, pre–internet, Ralph Nader, Right to Buy, road to serfdom, Robert Bork, Robert Gordon, Robert Mercer, Ronald Reagan, Saturday Night Live, Seaside, Florida, Second Machine Age, shareholder value, Silicon Valley, Social Responsibility of Business Is to Increase Its Profits, Steve Jobs, Stewart Brand, strikebreaker, The Death and Life of Great American Cities, The Future of Employment, The Rise and Fall of American Growth, The Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith, Tim Cook: Apple, too big to fail, trickle-down economics, Tyler Cowen: Great Stagnation, Uber and Lyft, uber lyft, union organizing, universal basic income, Unsafe at Any Speed, urban planning, urban renewal, very high income, wage slave, Wall-E, War on Poverty, Whole Earth Catalog, winner-take-all economy, women in the workforce, working poor, young professional, éminence grise

Just thirty years earlier, in the 1920s, “the steel industry worked a twelve-hour day and seventy-two-hour week with an incredible twenty-four-hour stint every fortnight when the shift changed. No such power is exercised today,” by bosses in the 1950s, only because the overworked workers had risen up and “brought it to an end.” That is, during the 1930s, in addition to enacting a minimum wage and child labor laws, citizens through their government created a system that let workers’ unions organize and negotiate fairly, and instantly union membership more than tripled. By the 1950s, a third of all jobs at private companies had been unionized. But the new countervailing power wasn’t just about employees forcing businesses to share more of their profits. Citizens elected legislators and governors and presidents to enact new rules concerning how big business could and couldn’t conduct itself in other ways, and created new regulatory agencies to enforce those rules.

In addition, for the first time in their histories, the Los Angeles Times, the Chicago Tribune, The New Republic, New York, and The New Yorker are suddenly union shops. With only a few thousand workers in all, the economic impact is negligible. But the news media’s new generation deciding en masse to form and join unions, individual aspirations to become brands and stars notwithstanding, is a leading zeitgeist indicator and will surely have an outsize impact on coverage and public attitudes, as the media do. In addition to the long slog of union organizing, there are other political means to empower workers. A minimum wage and overtime pay and standard forty-hour workweeks, for instance, all came into being by passing federal laws eighty years ago. Over the last five or six years, as a result of popular protest (“Fight for $15”) and lobbying, most states have increased their minimum wages, most have set them higher than federal law—several now reaching fifteen dollars an hour—and many cities have set legal minimums higher than their states require.*2 In 2018 that shift in public opinion, as well as employees murmuring about organizing a union, persuaded Amazon to adopt a fifteen-dollar-an-hour minimum for its hundreds of thousands of workers.


pages: 394 words: 110,352

The Art of Community: Building the New Age of Participation by Jono Bacon

barriers to entry, Benevolent Dictator For Life (BDFL), collaborative editing, crowdsourcing, Debian, DevOps, do-ocracy, en.wikipedia.org, Firefox, game design, Guido van Rossum, Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, Jono Bacon, Kickstarter, Larry Wall, Mark Shuttleworth, Mark Zuckerberg, openstreetmap, Richard Stallman, side project, Silicon Valley, Skype, slashdot, social graph, software as a service, telemarketer, union organizing, VA Linux, web application

Horrible's Sing-Along Blog, Read-mostly communities Drupal community, Governance Does Not Suck, Dries Buytaert, Drupal and Acquia, Dries Buytaert, Drupal and Acquia DVCS (Distributed Version Control System), Source Control E East Bay and Tri-Valley SPCA, The Gates of Your Community, The Gates of Your Community Easterbrook, Gregg, Statistics and Automated Data eBay, Carolyn Mellor, X.commerce, PayPal, and eBay, Carolyn Mellor, X.commerce, PayPal, and eBay, Carolyn Mellor, X.commerce, PayPal, and eBay Ebron, Rafael, Mary Colvig, Mozilla economy, social, The Art of Community (see social economy) editing, collaborative, Collaborative Editing, Reporting, Reporting ego, Avoid Ego, or Others Will Avoid You, Avoid Ego, or Others Will Avoid You Ekiga (SIP client), Voice over IP (VoIP), Voice over IP (VoIP) electing council members, Nominating and Electing Council Members, Forming a new council electrical power, at events, Ilan Rabinovitch, Southern California Linux Expo, Ilan Rabinovitch, Southern California Linux Expo elevator pitch, Assessing Contributors, Assessing Contributors email, about private topics, Privacy entitlement, Avoid Ego, or Others Will Avoid You, Avoid Ego, or Others Will Avoid You environment, Community: The Bird’s-Eye View, Community: The Bird’s-Eye View, Units of Belonging, Units of Belonging familiarity of, effect on confidence, Units of Belonging, Units of Belonging positive, Community: The Bird’s-Eye View, Community: The Bird’s-Eye View equipment, for events, Equipment, Additional notes, Event-specific notes, Event-specific notes, Infrastructure, Infrastructure errata, If You Like (or Don’t Like) This Book escalation of issues, Escalation, Escalation, Escalation, Escalation clarifying when expanding governance, Escalation, Escalation in Ubuntu community, Escalation, Escalation Esguerra, Richard, Richard Esguerra, Humble Indie Bundle, Richard Esguerra, Humble Indie Bundle ethos, collaboration-driven, Collaboration-Driven Ethos, Collaboration-Driven Ethos Ettrich, Matthias, Enlightened Dictatorship Eucalyptus open source cloud infrastructure, Mårten Mickos, MySQL and Eucalyptus, Mårten Mickos, MySQL and Eucalyptus events, The Art of Community, Events, Events, Organizing a Community Event, At the event, Attracting Contributors, Events and Conferences, Events and Conferences, Choosing Events, Choosing Events, Choosing Events, Submitting your paper, Submitting your paper, Promoting your talk, Promoting your talk, Delivering Presentations, Long versus short presentations, Creating attractive slides, Long versus short presentations, Long versus short presentations, Long versus short presentations, Building Family Values, Building Family Values, Events, Events, Events, Step 2: Find Help, Step 2: Find Help, Step 2: Find Help, Step 2: Find Help, Step 3: Set Deadlines, Step 3: Set Deadlines, Step 4: Make Time, Step 4: Make Time, Step 4: Make Time, Step 4: Make Time, Step 4: Make Time, Organizing Physical Events, Organizing Physical Events, Organizing Physical Events, Organizing Physical Events, Organizing Physical Events, Location/venue, Location/venue, Accommodation, Accommodation, Equipment, Equipment, Date/time, Date/time, Cost, Cost, Registering attendance, Registering attendance, Catering, Catering, Insurance/unions, Insurance/unions, Insurance/unions, Insurance/unions, Organizing a Sprint, Additional notes, Additional notes, Additional notes, Additional notes, Additional notes, Additional notes, Organizing a Summit, Inside a session, Inside a session, Event-specific notes, Event-specific notes, Event-specific notes, Event-specific notes, Event-specific notes, Event-specific notes, Event-specific notes, Organizing an Unconference, Event-specific notes, Event-specific notes, Event-specific notes, Event-specific notes, Event-specific notes, Organizing Online Events, Organizing Online Events, Organizing Online Events, Medium, Virtual worlds, Date/time, Date/time, Online Discussion Meetings, Running the meeting, Organizing Online Tutorials, Event-specific notes, Ilan Rabinovitch, Southern California Linux Expo, Ilan Rabinovitch, Southern California Linux Expo, Ilan Rabinovitch, Southern California Linux Expo, Ilan Rabinovitch, Southern California Linux Expo, Ilan Rabinovitch, Southern California Linux Expo (see also Ubuntu Developer Summit) benefits of, Events, Events building buzz with, Attracting Contributors choosing, Choosing Events, Choosing Events, Choosing Events costs of, Events and Conferences, Events and Conferences family-building effects of, Building Family Values, Building Family Values, Events online events, Organizing Online Events, Organizing Online Events, Organizing Online Events, Medium, Virtual worlds, Date/time, Date/time, Online Discussion Meetings, Running the meeting, Organizing Online Tutorials, Event-specific notes date and time of, Date/time, Date/time discussion meetings, Online Discussion Meetings, Running the meeting medium for hosting, Medium, Virtual worlds overview of, Organizing Online Events, Organizing Online Events tutorials, Organizing Online Events, Organizing Online Tutorials, Event-specific notes organizing, Events, Events, Organizing a Community Event, At the event, Step 2: Find Help, Step 2: Find Help, Step 2: Find Help, Step 2: Find Help, Step 3: Set Deadlines, Step 3: Set Deadlines, Step 4: Make Time, Step 4: Make Time, Step 4: Make Time, Step 4: Make Time, Step 4: Make Time allocating time for event, Step 4: Make Time, Step 4: Make Time, Step 4: Make Time collaboration on, Events, Events deadlines for, Step 3: Set Deadlines, Step 3: Set Deadlines finding help, Step 2: Find Help, Step 2: Find Help Google's experience with, Step 4: Make Time, Step 4: Make Time meetings for, Step 2: Find Help, Step 2: Find Help use of social media for, Organizing a Community Event, At the event physical events, Organizing Physical Events, Organizing Physical Events, Organizing Physical Events, Organizing Physical Events, Organizing Physical Events, Location/venue, Location/venue, Accommodation, Accommodation, Equipment, Equipment, Date/time, Date/time, Cost, Cost, Registering attendance, Registering attendance, Catering, Catering, Insurance/unions, Insurance/unions, Insurance/unions, Insurance/unions, Organizing a Sprint, Additional notes, Additional notes, Additional notes, Additional notes, Additional notes, Additional notes, Organizing a Summit, Inside a session, Inside a session, Event-specific notes, Event-specific notes, Event-specific notes, Event-specific notes, Event-specific notes, Event-specific notes, Event-specific notes, Organizing an Unconference, Event-specific notes, Event-specific notes, Event-specific notes, Event-specific notes, Event-specific notes, Ilan Rabinovitch, Southern California Linux Expo, Ilan Rabinovitch, Southern California Linux Expo, Ilan Rabinovitch, Southern California Linux Expo accommodations, Accommodation, Accommodation catering for, Catering, Catering, Additional notes, Event-specific notes, Event-specific notes conferences, Organizing Physical Events cost of, Cost, Cost, Additional notes, Event-specific notes, Ilan Rabinovitch, Southern California Linux Expo, Ilan Rabinovitch, Southern California Linux Expo, Ilan Rabinovitch, Southern California Linux Expo date and time for, Date/time, Date/time, Additional notes, Event-specific notes, Event-specific notes equipment at, Equipment, Equipment, Additional notes, Event-specific notes, Event-specific notes insurance needs, Insurance/unions, Insurance/unions location of, Location/venue, Location/venue registering attendance, Registering attendance, Registering attendance, Additional notes, Event-specific notes, Event-specific notes remote participation in, Inside a session, Inside a session sprints, Organizing Physical Events, Organizing a Sprint, Additional notes summits, Organizing Physical Events, Organizing a Summit, Event-specific notes, Event-specific notes types of, Organizing Physical Events, Organizing Physical Events unconferences, Organizing an Unconference, Event-specific notes union requirements, Insurance/unions, Insurance/unions presentations at, Submitting your paper, Submitting your paper, Promoting your talk, Promoting your talk, Delivering Presentations, Long versus short presentations, Creating attractive slides, Long versus short presentations, Long versus short presentations, Long versus short presentations, Ilan Rabinovitch, Southern California Linux Expo, Ilan Rabinovitch, Southern California Linux Expo attracting presenters, Ilan Rabinovitch, Southern California Linux Expo, Ilan Rabinovitch, Southern California Linux Expo delivering, Delivering Presentations, Long versus short presentations long vs. short, Long versus short presentations, Long versus short presentations promoting, Promoting your talk, Promoting your talk slides in, Creating attractive slides, Long versus short presentations submitting proposal for, Submitting your paper, Submitting your paper excitement, The Art of Community (see buzz, creating) experience, vs. theory, Theory Versus Action: Action Wins, Theory Versus Action: Action Wins F fables, The Basis of Communication Facebook, Being Social, Being Social, Facebook, Facebook, Getting started with Facebook, Getting started with Facebook, Collaboration, Campaigns and awareness, Campaigns and awareness, Events, The buildup, The buildup collaboration via, Collaboration, Campaigns and awareness, Campaigns and awareness, Events, The buildup, The buildup for campaigns and awareness, Campaigns and awareness, Campaigns and awareness for event coordination, Collaboration, Events, The buildup, The buildup getting started with, Getting started with Facebook, Getting started with Facebook history of, Facebook, Facebook overview of, Being Social, Being Social facilitators, The Role of a Facilitator, Be clear, Inside a session, Inside a session of resolution conflict, The Role of a Facilitator, Be clear of summits, Inside a session, Inside a session family, vs. belonging, Building Family Values, Building Family Values FC (Ubuntu Forums Council), Codifying Your Council, Codifying Your Council, Escalation Fedora Board, Commercial sponsorship feedback, The Art of Community, Leading by Example, Leading by Example, Gathering feedback, Gathering feedback, Gathering feedback, Gathering Structured Feedback, Gathering Structured Feedback, Being Social, Feedback, Feedback, Feedback, Feedback, Debates, Debates, Asking for feedback, Asking for feedback, Perception of you, Perception of you, Perception of you, Sharing feedback about personality issues, Sharing feedback about personality issues, Part 2: Get the facts, Community feedback, Community feedback (see also measuring community) about personality issues, Sharing feedback about personality issues, Sharing feedback about personality issues about quality of communication, Leading by Example, Leading by Example criticism, Gathering feedback for conflict resolution, Part 2: Get the facts gathering, Gathering feedback, Gathering feedback, Gathering Structured Feedback, Gathering Structured Feedback about workflow, Gathering Structured Feedback, Gathering Structured Feedback process of, Gathering feedback, Gathering feedback messenger of, to company, Community feedback, Community feedback obtaining via social media, Being Social, Feedback, Feedback, Feedback, Feedback, Debates, Debates, Asking for feedback, Asking for feedback by asking for, Asking for feedback, Asking for feedback importance of, Feedback, Feedback overview, Being Social Ubuntu 11.04 release example, Feedback, Feedback via debates, Debates, Debates personal, Perception of you, Perception of you, Perception of you Field, Jason, Planning Your Community finances, The Art of Community, The Art of Community, Financially Supporting Your Community, Financially Supporting Your Community, Revenue Opportunities, Donations (see also costs) (see also money from sponsors) required resources, Financially Supporting Your Community, Financially Supporting Your Community revenue opportunities, Revenue Opportunities, Donations financial economy vs. social economy, Building Belonging into the Social Economy, Building Belonging into the Social Economy Firefox, Attracting Contributors, Attracting Contributors, Mary Colvig, Mozilla, Mary Colvig, Mozilla fixed release cycles, Building a Strategic Plan, Building a Strategic Plan Flash plug-in, Videos focus, increasing with events, Events FooCamp (Friends of O'Reilly camp), Organizing an Unconference Ford, Henry, Working Together Is Success, Working Together Is Success Fort Minor, Mike Shinoda, Linkin Park forums, Choices, Choices, Choices, Choices, Communication fetishism, Communication fetishism, Discussion forums, Discussion forums of LugRadio, Communication fetishism, Communication fetishism use by users vs. developers, Choices, Choices, Choices, Choices frankness, Setting tone Free Culture communities, Write-centered communities, Mike Linksvayer, Creative Commons, Mike Linksvayer, Creative Commons Free Software community, Unwrapping Opportunity, Dictatorial Charismatic Leadership Freenode network, IRC Freeware Summit, Tim O’Reilly, O’Reilly Media Freudenberger, Herbert, Dealing with Burnout Friends of O'Reilly camp (FooCamp), Organizing an Unconference Fry, Stephen, Read-mostly communities G gaming communities, Richard Esguerra, Humble Indie Bundle, James Spafford, Media Molecule, James Spafford, Media Molecule GEdit, An Example: Ubuntu Bug Workflow, An Example: Ubuntu Bug Workflow Geiser, Ian Reinhart, Enlightened Dictatorship GNOME project, An Example: Ubuntu Bug Workflow, An Example: Ubuntu Bug Workflow, Bug reporting, Tool Access GNU General Public License, Dictatorial Charismatic Leadership goals, Structuring the plan, Financially Supporting Your Community, Brainstorming Ideas, Donations, Defining Purpose, Defining Purpose for measuring community, Defining Purpose, Defining Purpose for obtaining donations, Donations for strategic plan, Structuring the plan, Financially Supporting Your Community, Brainstorming Ideas Gobby (text editor), Brainstorming Ideas, Reporting, Reporting Google AdSense, Online advertising, Online advertising, Handling Absence, Handling Absence Google+, Being Social, Being Social, Google+, Getting started with Google+, Getting started with Google+, Tim O’Reilly, O’Reilly Media challenges facing, Google+ getting started with, Getting started with Google+, Getting started with Google+ overview of, Being Social, Being Social use by Tim O'Reilly, Tim O’Reilly, O’Reilly Media Google, event organizing at, Step 4: Make Time, Step 4: Make Time governance, The Art of Community, The Art of Community, The Art of Community, Accountability, Accountability, Governance Does Not Suck, Governance Does Not Suck, The Case for Governance, The Case for Governance, Follow the Leader, Follow the Leader, Engage the People, Engage the People, Aspire to Inspire, Aspire to Inspire, To Bring Peace, To Bring Peace, Dictatorial Charismatic Leadership, Dictatorial Charismatic Leadership, Enlightened Dictatorship, Enlightened Dictatorship, Delegated Governance, Delegated Governance, Expanding Governance, Expanding Governance, Knowing When It Is Time, Knowing When It Is Time, Building the Subcouncil, Escalation, Escalation, Escalation, Communicating Between Councils, Communicating Between Councils (see also Community Council) (see also community managers) (see also councils) and accountability, Accountability, Accountability benefits of, Governance Does Not Suck, Governance Does Not Suck division of, Follow the Leader, Follow the Leader engagement with people, Engage the People, Engage the People expanding, Expanding Governance, Expanding Governance, Knowing When It Is Time, Knowing When It Is Time, Building the Subcouncil, Escalation, Escalation, Escalation, Communicating Between Councils, Communicating Between Councils clarifying issue escalation, Escalation, Escalation communication between councils, Communicating Between Councils, Communicating Between Councils forming subconcil, Building the Subcouncil, Escalation identifying when needed, Knowing When It Is Time, Knowing When It Is Time overview of, Expanding Governance, Expanding Governance indicators of need for, The Case for Governance, The Case for Governance inspiration from governing body, Aspire to Inspire, Aspire to Inspire peace as goal of, To Bring Peace, To Bring Peace types of, Dictatorial Charismatic Leadership, Dictatorial Charismatic Leadership, Enlightened Dictatorship, Enlightened Dictatorship, Delegated Governance, Delegated Governance delegated, Delegated Governance, Delegated Governance dictatorial charismatic leadership, Dictatorial Charismatic Leadership, Dictatorial Charismatic Leadership enlightened dictatorship, Enlightened Dictatorship, Enlightened Dictatorship Graen, George B., Diversity graphs, Plugging your stats into graphs, Plugging your stats into graphs Gwibber tool, Controlling the Fire Hose, Controlling the Fire Hose, Optimizing How You Post H hangouts, in Google+, Getting started with Google+ Hanifan, L.J., Building Belonging into the Social Economy hashtags, Getting more eyeballs, Where to look, Asking for feedback, The buildup, At the event Hawthorn, Leslie, Step 4: Make Time, Event-specific notes, Event-specific notes health of community, tracking, Tracking Health, Tracking Health, Promoting a Feedback Culture, Promoting a Feedback Culture, Building a Set of Generals, Building a Set of Generals, Reacting to Community Concerns, Reacting to Community Concerns by calls to team leaders, Building a Set of Generals, Building a Set of Generals overview, Tracking Health, Tracking Health promoting feedback culture, Promoting a Feedback Culture, Promoting a Feedback Culture responding to concerns, Reacting to Community Concerns, Reacting to Community Concerns hiring community manager, Risk, Risk Holbach, Daniel, Planning, Hooks ’n’ Data, Visibility Is Key, Visibility Is Key hooks and data, Hooks ’n’ Data, Hooks ’n’ Data, Statistics and Automated Data, Plugging your stats into graphs, Surveys and Structured Feedback, Showing off your survey reports, Observational Tests, Observational Tests, Measuring Mechanics, Measuring Mechanics, Gathering General Perceptions, Perception of you, Part 2: Get the facts, Part 2: Get the facts gathering general perceptions, Gathering General Perceptions, Perception of you in conflict resolution, Part 2: Get the facts, Part 2: Get the facts measuring mechanics, Measuring Mechanics, Measuring Mechanics observational tests, Observational Tests, Observational Tests overview, Hooks ’n’ Data, Hooks ’n’ Data statistics and automated data, Statistics and Automated Data, Plugging your stats into graphs surveys, Surveys and Structured Feedback, Showing off your survey reports hotels, for event accommodation, Accommodation, Accommodation Hudson, Paul, The Professional Press, The Professional Press Humble Indie Bundle, Richard Esguerra, Humble Indie Bundle, Richard Esguerra, Humble Indie Bundle humor, Setting tone Hybrid Theory (album), Mike Shinoda, Linkin Park I identi.ca, Reporting, Reporting, Getting started with Facebook reporting with, Reporting, Reporting users of, Getting started with Facebook implementation plan, Structuring the plan incentives, for donations, Donations Innovate Developer Conference, Carolyn Mellor, X.commerce, PayPal, and eBay inspiring others, Inspiring your community, Inspiring your community, Inspired Words, Inspired Words, Aspire to Inspire, Aspire to Inspire as goal of governing body, Aspire to Inspire, Aspire to Inspire through writing, Inspiring your community, Inspiring your community, Inspired Words, Inspired Words insurance, for physical events, Insurance/unions, Insurance/unions Internet Relay Chat, The Art of Community (see IRC) interviews, building buzz with, Attracting Contributors IRC (Internet Relay Chat), IRC, IRC, Communications, Observational Tests, Privacy, Internet Relay Chat (IRC), Preparing for a session, Running a session features and benefits of, IRC, IRC logging, Communications privacy issues, Privacy usability testing over, Observational Tests use with online events, Internet Relay Chat (IRC), Preparing for a session, Running a session issues, communication between teams about, The Art of Community, Ensure that teams can communicate clearly and effectively (see also conflict) J Johnson & Johnson conflict resolution approach, Part 1: Calm and reassure, The fantastical user group debacle, Part 2: Get the facts, The fantastical user group debacle, Part 3: Discuss, The fantastical user group debacle, Part 4: Document, The fantastical user group debacle, Part 5: Reflect and maintain, The fantastical user group debacle calm and reassure, Part 1: Calm and reassure, The fantastical user group debacle discuss, Part 3: Discuss, The fantastical user group debacle document, Part 4: Document, The fantastical user group debacle get the facts, Part 2: Get the facts, The fantastical user group debacle reflect and maintain, Part 5: Reflect and maintain, The fantastical user group debacle Jokosher project, Planning Your Community, Planning Your Community, Communication fetishism, Reviewing new developers: In depth, Reviewing new developers: In depth, Bug reporting, Regular Workflow Assessment, Regular Workflow Assessment bug tracking, Bug reporting communication channels used for, Communication fetishism contributions of Laszlo Pandy, Reviewing new developers: In depth, Reviewing new developers: In depth workflow assessment during, Regular Workflow Assessment, Regular Workflow Assessment justice, lack of, Lack of Justice, Lack of Justice K KDE project, Enlightened Dictatorship, Enlightened Dictatorship, Creating and Running Events, Creating and Running Events keynotes, at events, Opening keynotes, Opening keynotes KGRUBEditor, Observational Tests KHTML technology, Enlightened Dictatorship, Enlightened Dictatorship KickStarter, Donations Kiss, Tom, James Spafford, Media Molecule L Langridge, Stuart (Aq), Planning Your Community Laporte, Leo, Foreword from the First Edition Launchpad (software collaboration platform), An Example: Ubuntu Bug Workflow, Getting to know the problem, Hooks ’n’ Data, Hooks ’n’ Data leadership, The Art of Community, The Art of Community (see community managers) (see governance) Lessig, Lawrence, Untwisting the tail, Announcing Your Community licensing, Untwisting the tail, Untwisting the tail, Videos, Mike Linksvayer, Creative Commons, Mike Linksvayer, Creative Commons Liebling, Alison, Gathering General Perceptions lightning talks, Lightning talks, Lightning talks Linkin Park, Mike Shinoda, Linkin Park, Mike Shinoda, Linkin Park Linksvayer, Mike, Mike Linksvayer, Creative Commons, Mike Linksvayer, Creative Commons Linspire (formerly Lindows), Blog wars, Blog wars Linux community, The Art of Community, The Art of Community, Write-centered communities, Diversity, Diversity, Linus Torvalds, Linux, Linus Torvalds, Linux (see also Ubuntu community) (see also Xubuntu community) Linux Demo Day, Building Buzz, Building Buzz Linux Format magazine, The Professional Press, The Professional Press listening to others, The Value of Listening, The Value of Listening, Membership, Barriers to Input, Barriers to Input LittleBigPlanet community, James Spafford, Media Molecule, James Spafford, Media Molecule live streaming, Videos, Videos LoCo (Ubuntu Local Community), Observational Tests, Building a Set of Generals, Building a Set of Generals, Responsibilities, Team councils, Team councils LUGFests, Ilan Rabinovitch, Southern California Linux Expo, Ilan Rabinovitch, Southern California Linux Expo LugRadio community, The Essence of Community, The Essence of Community, The Basis of Communication, The Basis of Communication, Unwrapping Opportunity, Unwrapping Opportunity, Unwrapping Opportunity, Unwrapping Opportunity, Unwrapping Opportunity, Unwrapping Opportunity, Becoming Yourself, Becoming Yourself, Communication fetishism, Communication fetishism, Discussion forums, Podcasts, Podcasts, Location/venue, Cost, Setting expectations, Setting expectations belief in, Unwrapping Opportunity, Unwrapping Opportunity effect of unedited productions, Becoming Yourself, Becoming Yourself events of, Unwrapping Opportunity, Unwrapping Opportunity, Location/venue, Cost forums of, Communication fetishism, Communication fetishism, Discussion forums origin of, The Essence of Community, The Essence of Community podcast, Podcasts, Podcasts response to rail strike, Unwrapping Opportunity, Unwrapping Opportunity sponsorship of, Setting expectations, Setting expectations stories in, The Basis of Communication, The Basis of Communication M MacQueue bulletion board, Foreword from the First Edition Macromedia Flash plug-in, Videos mailing lists, The Mediums, Mailing lists, Mailing lists, Netiquette, Netiquette, Gathering feedback, Gathering feedback, Privacy, Communicating Between Councils effect on how people behave, The Mediums for communication between councils, Communicating Between Councils for gathering feedback, Gathering feedback, Gathering feedback overview of, Mailing lists, Mailing lists privacy concerns, Privacy top posting to, Netiquette, Netiquette Major, John, Uniting Together managers, The Art of Community, The Art of Community (see community managers) (see governance) marketing, The Art of Community (see buzz, creating) maturing of members, Profiling the polemical, Profiling the polemical McMillan, John, Building Belonging into the Social Economy measuring community, Measuring Community, Community Self-Reflection, The Foundations of Feedback, The Foundations of Feedback, Defining Purpose, Defining Purpose, Hooks ’n’ Data, Hooks ’n’ Data, Statistics and Automated Data, Plugging your stats into graphs, Surveys and Structured Feedback, Showing off your survey reports, Observational Tests, Observational Tests, Measuring Mechanics, Measuring Mechanics, Gathering General Perceptions, Perception of you, Anonymity, Anonymity, Privacy, Privacy anonymity and, Anonymity, Anonymity establishing goals of, Defining Purpose, Defining Purpose meaning in measurements, The Foundations of Feedback, The Foundations of Feedback overview of, Measuring Community, Community Self-Reflection privacy issues, Privacy, Privacy use of hooks and data, Hooks ’n’ Data, Hooks ’n’ Data, Statistics and Automated Data, Plugging your stats into graphs, Surveys and Structured Feedback, Showing off your survey reports, Observational Tests, Observational Tests, Measuring Mechanics, Measuring Mechanics, Gathering General Perceptions, Perception of you gathering general perceptions, Gathering General Perceptions, Perception of you measuring mechanics, Measuring Mechanics, Measuring Mechanics observational tests, Observational Tests, Observational Tests overview, Hooks ’n’ Data, Hooks ’n’ Data statistics and automated data, Statistics and Automated Data, Plugging your stats into graphs surveys, Surveys and Structured Feedback, Showing off your survey reports Measuring the Quality of Prison Life study, Gathering General Perceptions mechanics of collaboration, The Mechanics of Collaboration, The Mechanics of Collaboration, Measuring Mechanics, Measuring Mechanics Media Molecule, James Spafford, Media Molecule, James Spafford, Media Molecule mediator, of conflict resolution, The Role of a Facilitator, Be clear meetings, The Art of Community, Attracting Contributors, Step 2: Find Help, Step 2: Find Help, Online Discussion Meetings, Running the meeting, Management and Communications, Weekly engagements (see also events) between company and community manager, Management and Communications, Weekly engagements building buzz with, Attracting Contributors for organizing events, Step 2: Find Help, Step 2: Find Help online discussion meetings, Online Discussion Meetings, Running the meeting Mellor, Carolyn, Carolyn Mellor, X.commerce, PayPal, and eBay, Carolyn Mellor, X.commerce, PayPal, and eBay members, The Art of Community, Responsibilities, Membership, Nominating and Electing Council Members, Forming a new council (see also contributers) approval of, Responsibilities of Community Council, Membership, Nominating and Electing Council Members, Forming a new council meritocracy, Meritocracy, Meritocracy, Enlightened Dictatorship Messina, Chris, Attracting Contributors, Organizing an Unconference, Organizing an Unconference, Organizing an Unconference, Organizing an Unconference Mickos, Mårten, The Role of a Community Manager in the Corporation, Mårten Mickos, MySQL and Eucalyptus, Mårten Mickos, MySQL and Eucalyptus microphones, at events, Room Layout mindcasting, Tim O’Reilly, O’Reilly Media mindshare, Mindshare, The Mindshare Opportunity, Defining Purpose, Gathering General Perceptions mission statement, Designing Your Community, Building a Mission Statement, Building a Mission Statement, Define the scope of each team, and help team members understand that scope, Define the scope of each team, and help team members understand that scope, The Mission, The Mission and buzz, The Mission, The Mission for each team, Define the scope of each team, and help team members understand that scope, Define the scope of each team, and help team members understand that scope overview of, Designing Your Community writing, Building a Mission Statement, Building a Mission Statement money from sponsors, The Art of Community, The Art of Community, Handling the Money, Handling the Money (see also costs) (see also finances) Mozilla, Attracting Contributors, Attracting Contributors, Mary Colvig, Mozilla, Mary Colvig, Mozilla mrben (Ben Thorp), The Essence of Community, The Basis of Communication, The Basis of Communication multimedia, use when announcing community, Announcing Your Community music industry, and community, Mike Shinoda, Linkin Park, Mike Shinoda, Linkin Park N negative energy, Honesty, Honesty netiquette, Netiquette, Netiquette news, on website, Staying Current, Staying Current Nielsen, Jakob, Announce, Announce Nielsen, Michael, Tim O’Reilly, O’Reilly Media nominating council members, Nominating and Electing Council Members, Forming a new council North, Gail, Dealing with Burnout notetakers, at summits, Inside a session O O'Reilly Media, Tim O’Reilly, O’Reilly Media, Tim O’Reilly, O’Reilly Media O'Reilly's Radar site, Staying Current O'Reilly, Tim, Don’t Be That Guy/Girl, Staying Current, Privacy, Tim O’Reilly, O’Reilly Media, Tim O’Reilly, O’Reilly Media Obama, Barack, Unwrapping Opportunity, Unwrapping Opportunity, Aspire to Inspire, Aspire to Inspire as inspirational orator, Aspire to Inspire, Aspire to Inspire election of, Unwrapping Opportunity, Unwrapping Opportunity objectives, in strategic plan, Structuring the plan, Pulling Together the Threads, Financially Supporting Your Community objectivity, in conflict resolution, Be objective, Be objective, Be objective Ogg Theora, Videos Oliver, Jamie, The Mindshare Opportunity, The Mindshare Opportunity On Writing Well (Zinsser), Don’t write like an institution on-ramp, The On-Ramp: Creating Collaborative Processes, The On-Ramp: Creating Collaborative Processes, The On-Ramp: Creating Collaborative Processes, Identifying the On-Ramp, Identifying the On-Ramp, Developing Knowledge, Developing Knowledge, Determining Contributions, Determining Contributions, Growing Kudos, Growing Kudos defined, The On-Ramp: Creating Collaborative Processes determining contributions, Determining Contributions, Determining Contributions identifying, Identifying the On-Ramp, Identifying the On-Ramp showing appreciation, Growing Kudos, Growing Kudos skills acquisition, Developing Knowledge, Developing Knowledge steps in, The On-Ramp: Creating Collaborative Processes, The On-Ramp: Creating Collaborative Processes one-on-one discussion, for gathering feedback, Gathering feedback, Gathering feedback online events, Organizing Online Events, Organizing Online Events, Organizing Online Events, Medium, Virtual worlds, Date/time, Date/time, Online Discussion Meetings, Running the meeting, Organizing Online Tutorials, Event-specific notes date and time of, Date/time, Date/time discussion meetings, Online Discussion Meetings, Running the meeting medium for hosting, Medium, Virtual worlds overview of, Organizing Online Events, Organizing Online Events tutorials, Organizing Online Events, Organizing Online Tutorials, Event-specific notes open days, building buzz with, Attracting Contributors Open Source Conference (OSCON), Long versus short presentations, Long versus short presentations open source development, Building Belonging into the Social Economy, Building Belonging into the Social Economy, Planning Your Community, Planning Your Community, Building a Strategic Plan, Building a Strategic Plan, Tool Access, Tool Access, Observational Tests, Observational Tests, Observational Tests, Why Community Building Has Become a Big Business, Why Community Building Has Become a Big Business, Linus Torvalds, Linux, Linus Torvalds, Linux access to tools, Tool Access, Tool Access and community, Why Community Building Has Become a Big Business, Why Community Building Has Become a Big Business differing motives for contributing to, Linus Torvalds, Linux, Linus Torvalds, Linux fixed release cycles, Building a Strategic Plan, Building a Strategic Plan in business, Building Belonging into the Social Economy, Building Belonging into the Social Economy Jokosher audio editor example, Planning Your Community, Planning Your Community usability testing, Observational Tests, Observational Tests, Observational Tests OpenAdvantage, Becoming the Advocate, Becoming the Advocate openess, The Art of Community (see also transparency) openness, Barriers to Input, Be open, Be open OpenSuSE Board, Commercial sponsorship opportunities, Unwrapping Opportunity, Unwrapping Opportunity, Unwrapping Opportunity, Designing Your Community, Designing Your Community, Designing Your Community, Designing Your Community, Designing Your Community and early days of Linux, Unwrapping Opportunity, Unwrapping Opportunity and Obama election, Unwrapping Opportunity documenting, Designing Your Community, Designing Your Community, Designing Your Community, Designing Your Community, Designing Your Community Oram, Andy, Preface, Simplicity is key Organizational Vision, Values and Mission (Scott), Building a Mission Statement OSCON (Open Source Conference), Long versus short presentations, Long versus short presentations outside the box thinking, Technique 2: Think outside the box, Technique 2: Think outside the box owner of goals, Structuring the plan P Packard, Keith, Transparency Pages, in Google+, Getting started with Google+ Pandy, Laszlo, Reviewing new developers: In depth, Reviewing new developers: In depth patience, The Value of Listening patterns, in burndown charts, Observing burndown patterns, Observing burndown patterns Paul, Celeste Lyn, Observational Tests, Observational Tests PayPal, Donations, Carolyn Mellor, X.commerce, PayPal, and eBay, Carolyn Mellor, X.commerce, PayPal, and eBay, Carolyn Mellor, X.commerce, PayPal, and eBay peer review, Reviewing new developers: In depth, Reviewing new developers: In depth performance reviews, Technique 1: Question assumptions personality issues, The Art of Community, Profiling the polemical, Profiling the polemical, Profiling the polemical, Profiling the polemical, Sharing feedback about personality issues, Sharing feedback about personality issues, Poisonous people, Poisonous people (see also conflict) attributes causing conflict, Profiling the polemical, Profiling the polemical maturity, Profiling the polemical, Profiling the polemical poisonous people, Poisonous people, Poisonous people sharing feedback about, Sharing feedback about personality issues, Sharing feedback about personality issues Persse, James, Building Great Processes phone calls, privacy during, Privacy physical events, Organizing Physical Events, Organizing Physical Events, Organizing Physical Events, Organizing Physical Events, Organizing Physical Events, Location/venue, Location/venue, Location/venue, Location/venue, Accommodation, Accommodation, Equipment, Equipment, Date/time, Date/time, Cost, Cost, Registering attendance, Registering attendance, Catering, Catering, Insurance/unions, Insurance/unions, Insurance/unions, Insurance/unions, Organizing a Sprint, Additional notes, Additional notes, Additional notes, Additional notes, Additional notes, Additional notes, Organizing a Summit, Inside a session, Inside a session, Event-specific notes, Event-specific notes, Event-specific notes, Event-specific notes, Event-specific notes, Event-specific notes, Event-specific notes, Organizing an Unconference, Event-specific notes, Event-specific notes, Event-specific notes, Event-specific notes, Event-specific notes accommodations for, Accommodation, Accommodation catering for, Catering, Catering, Additional notes, Event-specific notes, Event-specific notes conferences, Organizing Physical Events cost of, Cost, Cost, Additional notes, Event-specific notes date and time for, Date/time, Date/time, Additional notes, Event-specific notes, Event-specific notes equipment at, Equipment, Equipment, Additional notes, Event-specific notes, Event-specific notes insurance needs, Insurance/unions, Insurance/unions location of, Location/venue, Location/venue registering attendance, Registering attendance, Registering attendance, Additional notes, Event-specific notes, Event-specific notes remote participation in, Inside a session, Inside a session sprints, Organizing Physical Events, Organizing a Sprint, Additional notes summits, Organizing Physical Events, Organizing a Summit, Event-specific notes, Event-specific notes types of, Organizing Physical Events, Organizing Physical Events unconferences, Organizing an Unconference, Event-specific notes union requirements, Insurance/unions, Insurance/unions venue, Location/venue, Location/venue piracy, Foreword, Foreword planets, Syndication planning phase, of buzz cycle, Planning, Planning, Planning, Applying the buzz cycle, Applying the buzz cycle plenaries, at events, Plenaries, Plenaries podcasts, Podcasts, Podcasts politics, creating buzz compared to, Uniting Together, Uniting Together Pope, Alan, Social Media, Social Media positiveness, in conflict resolution, Be positive, Be positive postmortems, Review, Review presentations at events, Submitting your paper, Submitting your paper, Promoting your talk, Promoting your talk, Delivering Presentations, Long versus short presentations, Creating attractive slides, Long versus short presentations, Long versus short presentations, Long versus short presentations, Ilan Rabinovitch, Southern California Linux Expo, Ilan Rabinovitch, Southern California Linux Expo attracting presenters, Ilan Rabinovitch, Southern California Linux Expo, Ilan Rabinovitch, Southern California Linux Expo delivering, Delivering Presentations, Long versus short presentations long vs. short, Long versus short presentations, Long versus short presentations promoting, Promoting your talk, Promoting your talk slides in, Creating attractive slides, Long versus short presentations submitting proposal for, Submitting your paper, Submitting your paper press, as target of buzz campaign, The Professional Press, The Professional Press, The Amateur Press, The Amateur Press amateur, The Amateur Press, The Amateur Press professional, The Professional Press, The Professional Press pride, Avoid Ego, or Others Will Avoid You, Avoid Ego, or Others Will Avoid You privacy, Privacy, Privacy, Privacy, Part 2: Get the facts, Tim O’Reilly, O’Reilly Media, Tim O’Reilly, O’Reilly Media balancing with visibility, Tim O’Reilly, O’Reilly Media, Tim O’Reilly, O’Reilly Media during conflict resolution, Part 2: Get the facts during phone calls, Privacy when gathering feedback, Privacy, Privacy Process Improvement Essentials (Persse), Building Great Processes processes, Building Great Processes, Building Great Processes, Breaking Up the Puzzle, Building a process, Building a process, Simplicity is key, Simplicity is key, Avoiding bureaucracy, Avoiding bureaucracy, Transparency, Transparency, Assessing Needs, Assessing Needs, Community Cycles, Leading by example: Ubuntu, The Gates of Your Community, The Gates of Your Community, Assessing Contributors, Reviewing new developers: In depth, Managing Feedback, Gathering feedback, Document Them, Make Them Easy to Find, Make Them Easy to Find, Make Them Easy to Find, Make Them Easy to Find, Using Your Processes, Using Your Processes, The On-Ramp: Creating Collaborative Processes, Growing Kudos, The On-Ramp: Creating Collaborative Processes, The On-Ramp: Creating Collaborative Processes, The On-Ramp: Creating Collaborative Processes, Identifying the On-Ramp, Identifying the On-Ramp, Developing Knowledge, Developing Knowledge, Determining Contributions, Determining Contributions, Growing Kudos, Growing Kudos, Process Reassessment, Building Regularity, Responsibilities and community cycles, Community Cycles, Leading by example: Ubuntu announcing, Make Them Easy to Find, Make Them Easy to Find avoiding bureaucracy, Avoiding bureaucracy, Avoiding bureaucracy building, Building a process, Building a process categories of, Assessing Needs, Assessing Needs changes in, Responsibilities documentation of, Document Them, Make Them Easy to Find, Make Them Easy to Find encouraging use of, Using Your Processes, Using Your Processes for assessing contributors, Assessing Contributors, Reviewing new developers: In depth for attracting contributors, The Gates of Your Community, The Gates of Your Community for managing feedback, Managing Feedback, Gathering feedback good vs. bad, Building Great Processes, Building Great Processes in getting participation (the on-ramp), The On-Ramp: Creating Collaborative Processes, Growing Kudos, The On-Ramp: Creating Collaborative Processes, The On-Ramp: Creating Collaborative Processes, The On-Ramp: Creating Collaborative Processes, Identifying the On-Ramp, Identifying the On-Ramp, Developing Knowledge, Developing Knowledge, Determining Contributions, Determining Contributions, Growing Kudos, Growing Kudos defined, The On-Ramp: Creating Collaborative Processes determining contributions, Determining Contributions, Determining Contributions identifying, Identifying the On-Ramp, Identifying the On-Ramp showing appreciation, Growing Kudos, Growing Kudos skills acquisition, Developing Knowledge, Developing Knowledge steps in, The On-Ramp: Creating Collaborative Processes, The On-Ramp: Creating Collaborative Processes reassessing, Process Reassessment, Building Regularity simplicity as foundation of, Breaking Up the Puzzle, Simplicity is key, Simplicity is key transparency in, Transparency, Transparency product recalls, Building Great Processes, Building Great Processes professional press, as target of buzz campaign, The Professional Press, The Professional Press Project level, of projects, Tracking Projects projectors, using at events, The Ethos of the UDS, Room Layout, Room Layout, Room Layout projects, tracking, Tracking Projects, Tracking Projects, Structuring Your Projects, Structuring Your Projects, Managing Work Items, Documenting work items, Visualizing Data with Burndown Charts, Visualizing Data with Burndown Charts, Using burndown charts, Using burndown charts, Using burndown charts, Generating additional information, Using burndown charts, Using burndown charts, Observing burndown patterns, Observing burndown patterns, Building burndown charts into your workflow, Building burndown charts into your workflow managing work items, Managing Work Items, Documenting work items providing different levels of visibility, Tracking Projects, Tracking Projects using blueprints, Structuring Your Projects, Structuring Your Projects using burndown charts, Visualizing Data with Burndown Charts, Visualizing Data with Burndown Charts, Using burndown charts, Using burndown charts, Using burndown charts, Generating additional information, Using burndown charts, Using burndown charts, Observing burndown patterns, Observing burndown patterns, Building burndown charts into your workflow, Building burndown charts into your workflow benefits of, Using burndown charts, Using burndown charts building into workflow, Building burndown charts into your workflow, Building burndown charts into your workflow generating charts, Using burndown charts, Generating additional information overview, Visualizing Data with Burndown Charts, Visualizing Data with Burndown Charts patterns in charts, Observing burndown patterns, Observing burndown patterns reading charts, Using burndown charts, Using burndown charts Putnam, Robert, Building Belonging into the Social Economy Q quantity vs. quality, The risks of interpretation R Rabinovitch, Ilan, Location/venue, Ilan Rabinovitch, Southern California Linux Expo, Ilan Rabinovitch, Southern California Linux Expo Raymond, Eric, Bug Tracking read-mostly communities, Read-mostly communities, Read-mostly communities Really Simple Syndication (RSS) feeds, Syndication, Syndication recordMyDesktop, Videos Regional Membership Boards, Ubuntu Member, Ubuntu Member Reinventing Discovery (Nielsen), Tim O’Reilly, O’Reilly Media Reinventing the Bazaar (McMillan), Building Belonging into the Social Economy release cycles, Ubuntu community, Leading by example: Ubuntu, Leading by example: Ubuntu release parties, Organizing Physical Events, Organizing Online Events defined, Organizing Physical Events online, Organizing Online Events remote participation, in Ubuntu Developer Summit, Infrastructure, Infrastructure, Room Layout reporting, Bug reporting, Bug reporting, Reporting, Reporting, Reporting, Reporting, Showing off your survey reports, Showing off your survey reports, Measuring Mechanics, Measuring Mechanics bugs, Bug reporting, Bug reporting, Measuring Mechanics, Measuring Mechanics examples of, Reporting, Reporting making easy, Reporting, Reporting survey data, Showing off your survey reports, Showing off your survey reports reputation of community manager, Internal reputation, Community reputation resources, and governance, The Case for Governance respect for others, in Ubuntu Code of Conduct, Diversity responsibility, problems with, Problems with Responsibility, Problems with Responsibility revenue opportunities, Revenue Opportunities, Donations ReverbNation, The preparation review phase, of buzz cycle, Review, Review, Applying the buzz cycle, Applying the buzz cycle roles, Roles, Roles room layout, at events, Room Layout, Room Layout Ross, Blake, Attracting Contributors, Mary Colvig, Mozilla routine, breaking, Events, Events, Events RSS (Really Simple Syndication) feeds, Syndication, Syndication S SaaS (Software as a Service), Software As a Service, Software As a Service Safari® Books Online, Safari® Books Online salary of community manager, Salary, Salary Saxena, Deepak, Building Buzz, Building Buzz SCALE (Southern California Linux Expo), Ilan Rabinovitch, Southern California Linux Expo, Ilan Rabinovitch, Southern California Linux Expo Schaller, Christian, The Structure of Strife, The Structure of Strife scope of teams, Units of Belonging, Define the scope of each team, and help team members understand that scope, Define the scope of each team, and help team members understand that scope Scott, Cynthia D., Building a Mission Statement screen-scraping, Plugging your stats into graphs Screencast-O-Matic, Videos search engine optimization (SEO), Syndication, Syndication Second Life, Virtual worlds, Virtual worlds selling items, to generate revenue, Selling, Selling SEO (search engine optimization), Syndication, Syndication seriousness, Setting tone sessions, at events, Sessions, Sessions Severed Fifth project, Donations, Donations Sheen, Martin, Inspiring your community Shigeru Miyamoto, Technique 2: Think outside the box Shinoda, Mike, A Community Manager: Becoming the Community, Mike Shinoda, Linkin Park, Mike Shinoda, Linkin Park Shuttleworth, Mark, Hooks ’n’ Data, Commercial sponsorship, In the Beginning..., In the Beginning..., Scheduling signs, using at events, Assets simplicity as foundation of processes, Breaking Up the Puzzle, Simplicity is key, Simplicity is key size of community, The Case for Governance skills, Designing Your Community, Designing Your Community, Designing Your Community, Designing Your Community, Identify how we can divide our community into teams, Identify how we can divide our community into teams, Developing Knowledge, Developing Knowledge, Knowing When It Is Time acquisition of, Developing Knowledge, Developing Knowledge and formation of additional councils, Knowing When It Is Time mapping to teams, Identify how we can divide our community into teams, Identify how we can divide our community into teams required, documenting, Designing Your Community, Designing Your Community, Designing Your Community, Designing Your Community Skype, Voice over IP (VoIP), Voice over IP (VoIP) slides in presentations, Creating attractive slides, Long versus short presentations Smanis, Konstantinos, Observational Tests social capital, Building Belonging into the Social Economy, Building Belonging into the Social Economy, Building Belonging into the Social Economy, The Basis of Communication, The Basis of Communication building through storytelling, The Basis of Communication, The Basis of Communication defined, Building Belonging into the Social Economy social economy, Building Belonging into the Social Economy, Building Belonging into the Social Economy, Building Belonging into the Social Economy, Building Belonging into the Social Economy, The Basis of Communication, The Basis of Communication building belonging into, Building Belonging into the Social Economy, Building Belonging into the Social Economy communication in, The Basis of Communication, The Basis of Communication comparison with financial economy, Building Belonging into the Social Economy, Building Belonging into the Social Economy social media, The Art of Community, The Art of Community, The Art of Community, Don’t Be That Guy/Girl, Don’t Be That Guy/Girl, Being Social, Being Social, Being Social, Being Social, Being Social, Harnessing Social Media, Broadcasting, Broadcasting, Broadcasting, Tuning up your messages, Avoiding social media overkill, Avoiding social media overkill, Feedback, Feedback, Where to look, Where to look, Where to look, Debates, Debates, Asking for feedback, Asking for feedback, Collaboration, Collaboration, Campaigns and awareness, Events, Events, Controlling the Fire Hose, Controlling the Fire Hose, Optimizing How You Post, Optimizing How You Post, Being Socially Responsible, Being Socially Responsible, Organizing a Community Event, At the event, Running a Campaign, The buildup, Providing Community Updates, Providing Community Updates, Mike Shinoda, Linkin Park, Mike Shinoda, Linkin Park, Tim O’Reilly, O’Reilly Media, Tim O’Reilly, O’Reilly Media (see also Facebook) (see also Google+) (see also Twitter) broadcasting with, Being Social, Broadcasting, Broadcasting, Broadcasting, Tuning up your messages, Avoiding social media overkill, Avoiding social media overkill balanced use of, Avoiding social media overkill, Avoiding social media overkill content of broadcasts, Broadcasting, Broadcasting overview, Being Social using Twitter, Broadcasting, Tuning up your messages collaboration using, Being Social, Collaboration, Collaboration, Campaigns and awareness, Events, Events, Running a Campaign, The buildup coordinating events, Events, Events for campaigns and awareness, Campaigns and awareness, Running a Campaign, The buildup overview of, Being Social party-planning example, Collaboration, Collaboration controlling time using, Harnessing Social Media, Controlling the Fire Hose, Controlling the Fire Hose getting feedback using, Being Social, Feedback, Feedback, Where to look, Where to look, Where to look, Debates, Debates, Asking for feedback, Asking for feedback by asking for, Asking for feedback, Asking for feedback overview, Being Social Ubuntu 11.04 release example, Feedback, Feedback using Twitter, Where to look, Where to look, Where to look via debates, Debates, Debates most common networks, Being Social, Being Social optimizing posts to, Optimizing How You Post, Optimizing How You Post organizing community event using, Organizing a Community Event, At the event providing community updates with, Providing Community Updates, Providing Community Updates realistic expectations of, Don’t Be That Guy/Girl, Don’t Be That Guy/Girl responsible use of, Being Socially Responsible, Being Socially Responsible use by community leaders, Mike Shinoda, Linkin Park, Mike Shinoda, Linkin Park, Tim O’Reilly, O’Reilly Media, Tim O’Reilly, O’Reilly Media Mike Shinoda (Linkin Park), Mike Shinoda, Linkin Park, Mike Shinoda, Linkin Park Tim O'Reilly, Tim O’Reilly, O’Reilly Media, Tim O’Reilly, O’Reilly Media Software as a Service (SaaS), Software As a Service, Software As a Service software cycles, fixed release, Building a Strategic Plan, Building a Strategic Plan Somerville, Cody, Baking in Openness Sorkin, Aaron, Inspiring your community source control, Source Control, Source Control Southern California Linux Expo (SCALE), Ilan Rabinovitch, Southern California Linux Expo, Ilan Rabinovitch, Southern California Linux Expo Spafford, James, The Second Edition, James Spafford, Media Molecule, James Spafford, Media Molecule spam, Getting It Right by Not Getting It Wrong, Getting It Right by Not Getting It Wrong speaking at events, The Art of Community (see presentations at events) Spencer, Rick, Visualizing Data with Burndown Charts, Visualizing Data with Burndown Charts sponsored communities, The Case for Governance, Commercial sponsorship, Commercial sponsorship, Barriers to Input, Barriers to Input and governance, The Case for Governance conflict within, Barriers to Input, Barriers to Input councils of, Commercial sponsorship, Commercial sponsorship sponsors, Understanding Your Needs, Understanding Your Needs, Finding and Handling Sponsors, Finding and Handling Sponsors, Setting expectations, Setting expectations, The pitch, The pitch, Handling the Money, Handling the Money, Scheduling, Scheduling determining, Finding and Handling Sponsors, Finding and Handling Sponsors examining needs before approaching, Understanding Your Needs, Understanding Your Needs giving back to, Setting expectations, Setting expectations managing money from, Handling the Money, Handling the Money of Ubuntu Developer Summit, Scheduling, Scheduling pitching to, The pitch, The pitch Spread Firefox campaign, Attracting Contributors, Attracting Contributors, Mary Colvig, Mozilla, Mary Colvig, Mozilla Spreadshirt, Selling sprints, Organizing Physical Events, Organizing a Sprint, Additional notes Stallman, Richard, Dictatorial Charismatic Leadership stories, The Basis of Communication, The Basis of Communication, The Basis of Communication, The Basis of Communication, Attracting Contributors, Attracting Contributors, Delivering Presentations as mechanism behind communication, The Basis of Communication, The Basis of Communication as viral marketing assets, Attracting Contributors, Attracting Contributors building social capital through, The Basis of Communication, The Basis of Communication in presentations, Delivering Presentations strategic planning, The Art of Community, Planning Your Community, Community: The Bird’s-Eye View, Community: The Bird’s-Eye View, Community: The Bird’s-Eye View, Community: The Bird’s-Eye View, Designing Your Community, Designing Your Community, Designing Your Community, Baking in Openness, Baking in Openness, Baking in Openness, Baking in Openness, Building a Mission Statement, Building a Mission Statement, Structuring the plan, Structuring the plan, Structuring the plan, Structuring the plan, Structuring the plan, Brainstorming Ideas, Technique 3: Let’s make it suck, Pulling Together the Threads, Financially Supporting Your Community, Documenting Your Strategy, Documenting Your Strategy, Financially Supporting Your Community, Financially Supporting Your Community, Revenue Opportunities, Sponsorship, Strategy, Strategy (see also teams) brainstorming, Brainstorming Ideas, Technique 3: Let’s make it suck building positive environment, Community: The Bird’s-Eye View, Community: The Bird’s-Eye View contribute growth, Community: The Bird’s-Eye View, Community: The Bird’s-Eye View difference from business strategic planning, Structuring the plan, Structuring the plan documenting, Designing Your Community, Designing Your Community, Designing Your Community, Baking in Openness, Baking in Openness, Building a Mission Statement, Building a Mission Statement, Structuring the plan, Structuring the plan, Structuring the plan, Pulling Together the Threads, Financially Supporting Your Community, Documenting Your Strategy, Documenting Your Strategy defining objectives, Structuring the plan, Pulling Together the Threads, Financially Supporting Your Community ingredients of, Designing Your Community, Designing Your Community mission statement, Designing Your Community, Building a Mission Statement, Building a Mission Statement structure of documentation, Structuring the plan, Structuring the plan transparency/openess when, Baking in Openness, Baking in Openness finances, Financially Supporting Your Community, Financially Supporting Your Community, Revenue Opportunities, Sponsorship required resources, Financially Supporting Your Community, Financially Supporting Your Community revenue opportunities, Revenue Opportunities, Sponsorship for openess/transparency, Baking in Openness, Baking in Openness need for, Planning Your Community of company, conveying to community managers, Strategy, Strategy streaming, live, Videos, Videos stress, The Art of Community (see burnout) subcouncils, Responsibilities success criteria, in strategic plan, Structuring the plan, Structuring the plan, Structuring the plan summits, Organizing Physical Events, Organizing a Summit, Event-specific notes, Event-specific notes surface-level diversity, Diversity, Diversity surveys, Gathering feedback, Gathering Structured Feedback, Gathering Structured Feedback, Surveys and Structured Feedback, Surveys and Structured Feedback, Choosing questions, Choosing questions, Showing off your survey reports, Showing off your survey reports, Ensuring Effective Processes, Ensuring Effective Processes, Reacting to Community Concerns, Reacting to Community Concerns choosing questions for, Choosing questions, Choosing questions for finding causes of bottlenecks, Ensuring Effective Processes, Ensuring Effective Processes for gathering feedback, Gathering feedback, Gathering Structured Feedback, Gathering Structured Feedback for learning about community concerns, Reacting to Community Concerns, Reacting to Community Concerns purpose of, Surveys and Structured Feedback, Surveys and Structured Feedback reports from, Showing off your survey reports, Showing off your survey reports Sweet, Adam, Finding Your Place, Finding Your Place syndication of content, Syndication, Syndication T T-shirts, for events, Assets, Assets tales, The Basis of Communication tasks, communication between teams about, Ensure that teams can communicate clearly and effectively teams, Community: The Bird’s-Eye View, Community: The Bird’s-Eye View, Community: The Bird’s-Eye View, Units of Belonging, Units of Belonging, Units of Belonging, Write-centered communities, Write-centered communities, Diversity, Diversity, Identify how we can divide our community into teams, Identify how we can divide our community into teams, Define the scope of each team, and help team members understand that scope, Define the scope of each team, and help team members understand that scope, Define the scope of each team, and help team members understand that scope, Define the scope of each team, and help team members understand that scope, Understand the extent and range of collaboration among our teams, Understand the extent and range of collaboration among our teams, Ensure that teams can communicate clearly and effectively, Ensure that teams can communicate clearly and effectively, Building a Set of Generals, Building a Set of Generals, Setting Up a Community Council, Setting Up a Community Council, Responsibilities and Community Council, Responsibilities as units of belonging, Units of Belonging, Units of Belonging building, Community: The Bird’s-Eye View, Community: The Bird’s-Eye View collaboration between, Understand the extent and range of collaboration among our teams, Understand the extent and range of collaboration among our teams communication between, Community: The Bird’s-Eye View, Ensure that teams can communicate clearly and effectively, Ensure that teams can communicate clearly and effectively diversity within, Diversity, Diversity dividing community into, Identify how we can divide our community into teams, Identify how we can divide our community into teams leaders of, tracking community health through, Building a Set of Generals, Building a Set of Generals mission statement for, Define the scope of each team, and help team members understand that scope, Define the scope of each team, and help team members understand that scope of Ubuntu community, Write-centered communities, Write-centered communities scope of, Units of Belonging, Define the scope of each team, and help team members understand that scope, Define the scope of each team, and help team members understand that scope vs. councils, Setting Up a Community Council, Setting Up a Community Council Technical Board, of Ubuntu community, Technical Board, Technical Board Technorati, The Amateur Press testing usability, Observational Tests, Observational Tests, Observational Tests Texas Linux Fest, Ilan Rabinovitch, Southern California Linux Expo, Ilan Rabinovitch, Southern California Linux Expo The Art of Community, community of, Social Media, Social Media The West Wing (TV program), Inspiring your community, Inspiring your community theory versus action, Theory Versus Action: Action Wins, Theory Versus Action: Action Wins Thorp, Ben (mrben), The Essence of Community, The Basis of Communication, The Basis of Communication threats on community, The Basis of Communication, The Basis of Communication, Unwrapping Opportunity, Unwrapping Opportunity effect on sense of belonging, The Basis of Communication, The Basis of Communication LugRadio response to rail strike, Unwrapping Opportunity, Unwrapping Opportunity time zones, and online events, Date/time, Date/time tone, of writing, Avoiding bikeshedding, Setting tone tools, Building Great Infrastructure, Building Great Infrastructure, Software As a Service, Software As a Service, Avoiding Resource Fetishism, Avoiding Resource Fetishism, Tool Access, Tool Access, Don’t Be That Guy/Girl, Don’t Be That Guy/Girl, Controlling the Fire Hose, Controlling the Fire Hose access to, Tool Access, Tool Access and workflow, Building Great Infrastructure, Building Great Infrastructure debates over, Avoiding Resource Fetishism, Avoiding Resource Fetishism for managing social media, Controlling the Fire Hose, Controlling the Fire Hose social media as tool, Don’t Be That Guy/Girl, Don’t Be That Guy/Girl Software as a Service (SaaS), Software As a Service, Software As a Service top posting, Netiquette, Netiquette Torvalds, Linus, Dictatorial Charismatic Leadership, Linus Torvalds, Linux, Linus Torvalds, Linux Trac (software), Building Great Infrastructure tracking, The Art of Community, Bug Tracking, Bug triage, Bug reporting, Measuring Mechanics, Measuring Mechanics, Credibility and the Need to Track Progress, Credibility and the Need to Track Progress, The Importance of Tracking Our Work, The Importance of Tracking Our Work, Tracking the Right Things, Tracking the Right Things, Within the Context of a Company, Communicating up and down, Tracking Growth and Decline, Using burndown charts, Tracking Growth and Decline, Tracking Growth and Decline, Visibility Is Key, Visibility Is Key, Ensuring Effective Processes, Ensuring Effective Processes, Tracking Health, Tracking Health, Promoting a Feedback Culture, Promoting a Feedback Culture, Building a Set of Generals, Building a Set of Generals, Reacting to Community Concerns, Reacting to Community Concerns (see also projects, tracking) bugs, Bug Tracking, Bug triage, Bug reporting, Measuring Mechanics, Measuring Mechanics determining what to track, Tracking the Right Things, Tracking the Right Things effect on building credibility, Credibility and the Need to Track Progress, Credibility and the Need to Track Progress growth and decline, Tracking Growth and Decline, Using burndown charts, Tracking Growth and Decline, Tracking Growth and Decline, Visibility Is Key, Visibility Is Key, Ensuring Effective Processes, Ensuring Effective Processes areas of, Tracking Growth and Decline, Tracking Growth and Decline data visibility, Visibility Is Key, Visibility Is Key finding causes of, Ensuring Effective Processes, Ensuring Effective Processes overview, Tracking Growth and Decline, Using burndown charts health of community, Tracking Health, Tracking Health, Promoting a Feedback Culture, Promoting a Feedback Culture, Building a Set of Generals, Building a Set of Generals, Reacting to Community Concerns, Reacting to Community Concerns by calls to team leaders, Building a Set of Generals, Building a Set of Generals overview, Tracking Health, Tracking Health promoting feedback culture, Promoting a Feedback Culture, Promoting a Feedback Culture responding to concerns, Reacting to Community Concerns, Reacting to Community Concerns importance of, The Importance of Tracking Our Work, The Importance of Tracking Our Work within a company, Within the Context of a Company, Communicating up and down transparency, Baking in Openness, Baking in Openness, Striving for Clarity, Striving for Clarity, Transparency, Transparency, Bug Tracking, Bug Tracking, Building and Maintaining Transparency, Building and Maintaining Transparency, Communications, Communications, Perception of you, Perception of you, Dictatorial Charismatic Leadership and dictatorial communities, Dictatorial Charismatic Leadership in bug tracking, Bug Tracking, Bug Tracking in communication, Striving for Clarity, Striving for Clarity, Communications, Communications in personal feedback, Perception of you, Perception of you in processes, Transparency, Transparency in strategic plan, Baking in Openness, Baking in Openness in workflow, Building and Maintaining Transparency, Building and Maintaining Transparency trend line, Using burndown charts trending topics, Getting more eyeballs triaging, Bug triage, Bug triage, Measuring Mechanics, Measuring Mechanics Troy, Ryan, Codifying Your Council trust, Trust Is Everything, Trust Is Everything tutorials, online, Organizing Online Events, Organizing Online Tutorials, Event-specific notes Twitter, Reporting, Reporting, Being Social, Being Social, Twitter, Twitter, Getting started with Twitter, Getting started with Twitter, Broadcasting, Tuning up your messages, Tuning up your messages, Tuning up your messages, Where to look, Where to look, Where to look, Where to look, Where to look, The buildup, At the event, At the event, Tim O’Reilly, O’Reilly Media, Tim O’Reilly, O’Reilly Media, Tim O’Reilly, O’Reilly Media broadcasting with, Broadcasting, Tuning up your messages, The buildup, At the event, At the event, Tim O’Reilly, O’Reilly Media about events, The buildup, At the event, At the event mindcasting, Tim O’Reilly, O’Reilly Media getting feedback using, Where to look, Where to look, Where to look getting started with, Getting started with Twitter, Getting started with Twitter history of, Twitter, Twitter overview of, Being Social, Being Social reporting with, Reporting, Reporting searching tweets, Where to look, Where to look use by Tim O'Reilly, Tim O’Reilly, O’Reilly Media, Tim O’Reilly, O’Reilly Media writing messages, Tuning up your messages, Tuning up your messages U Ubuntu Code of Conduct, Diversity, Diversity Ubuntu community, Write-centered communities, Baking in Openness, Baking in Openness, Understand the extent and range of collaboration among our teams, Striving for Clarity, Inspiring your community, Leading by example: Ubuntu, Leading by example: Ubuntu, Reviewing new developers: In depth, Reviewing new developers: In depth, Developing Knowledge, Developing Knowledge, Process Reassessment, Process Reassessment, An Example: Ubuntu Bug Workflow, Lessons learned, Feedback, Feedback, Providing Community Updates, Providing Community Updates, Videos, Videos, Hooks ’n’ Data, Hooks ’n’ Data, Plugging your stats into graphs, Visibility Is Key, Ensuring Effective Processes, Ensuring Effective Processes, In the Beginning..., In the Beginning..., Mark Shuttleworth, Mark Shuttleworth, Community Council, Community Council, Technical Board, Technical Board, Team councils, Team councils, Membership, Membership, Ubuntu Member, Ubuntu Member, Ubuntu Member, Ubuntu Member, Ubuntu Member, Ubuntu Member, Ubuntu Member, Ubuntu Member, Developer, Developer, Council or Board Member, Council or Board Member, Escalation, Escalation bug workflow example, An Example: Ubuntu Bug Workflow, Lessons learned bug-squashing parties, Plugging your stats into graphs contributor access to repositories, Reviewing new developers: In depth, Reviewing new developers: In depth developer mentoring campaign, Visibility Is Key history of, In the Beginning..., In the Beginning...

Horrible's Sing-Along Blog, Read-mostly communities Drupal community, Governance Does Not Suck, Dries Buytaert, Drupal and Acquia, Dries Buytaert, Drupal and Acquia DVCS (Distributed Version Control System), Source Control E East Bay and Tri-Valley SPCA, The Gates of Your Community, The Gates of Your Community Easterbrook, Gregg, Statistics and Automated Data eBay, Carolyn Mellor, X.commerce, PayPal, and eBay, Carolyn Mellor, X.commerce, PayPal, and eBay, Carolyn Mellor, X.commerce, PayPal, and eBay Ebron, Rafael, Mary Colvig, Mozilla economy, social, The Art of Community (see social economy) editing, collaborative, Collaborative Editing, Reporting, Reporting ego, Avoid Ego, or Others Will Avoid You, Avoid Ego, or Others Will Avoid You Ekiga (SIP client), Voice over IP (VoIP), Voice over IP (VoIP) electing council members, Nominating and Electing Council Members, Forming a new council electrical power, at events, Ilan Rabinovitch, Southern California Linux Expo, Ilan Rabinovitch, Southern California Linux Expo elevator pitch, Assessing Contributors, Assessing Contributors email, about private topics, Privacy entitlement, Avoid Ego, or Others Will Avoid You, Avoid Ego, or Others Will Avoid You environment, Community: The Bird’s-Eye View, Community: The Bird’s-Eye View, Units of Belonging, Units of Belonging familiarity of, effect on confidence, Units of Belonging, Units of Belonging positive, Community: The Bird’s-Eye View, Community: The Bird’s-Eye View equipment, for events, Equipment, Additional notes, Event-specific notes, Event-specific notes, Infrastructure, Infrastructure errata, If You Like (or Don’t Like) This Book escalation of issues, Escalation, Escalation, Escalation, Escalation clarifying when expanding governance, Escalation, Escalation in Ubuntu community, Escalation, Escalation Esguerra, Richard, Richard Esguerra, Humble Indie Bundle, Richard Esguerra, Humble Indie Bundle ethos, collaboration-driven, Collaboration-Driven Ethos, Collaboration-Driven Ethos Ettrich, Matthias, Enlightened Dictatorship Eucalyptus open source cloud infrastructure, Mårten Mickos, MySQL and Eucalyptus, Mårten Mickos, MySQL and Eucalyptus events, The Art of Community, Events, Events, Organizing a Community Event, At the event, Attracting Contributors, Events and Conferences, Events and Conferences, Choosing Events, Choosing Events, Choosing Events, Submitting your paper, Submitting your paper, Promoting your talk, Promoting your talk, Delivering Presentations, Long versus short presentations, Creating attractive slides, Long versus short presentations, Long versus short presentations, Long versus short presentations, Building Family Values, Building Family Values, Events, Events, Events, Step 2: Find Help, Step 2: Find Help, Step 2: Find Help, Step 2: Find Help, Step 3: Set Deadlines, Step 3: Set Deadlines, Step 4: Make Time, Step 4: Make Time, Step 4: Make Time, Step 4: Make Time, Step 4: Make Time, Organizing Physical Events, Organizing Physical Events, Organizing Physical Events, Organizing Physical Events, Organizing Physical Events, Location/venue, Location/venue, Accommodation, Accommodation, Equipment, Equipment, Date/time, Date/time, Cost, Cost, Registering attendance, Registering attendance, Catering, Catering, Insurance/unions, Insurance/unions, Insurance/unions, Insurance/unions, Organizing a Sprint, Additional notes, Additional notes, Additional notes, Additional notes, Additional notes, Additional notes, Organizing a Summit, Inside a session, Inside a session, Event-specific notes, Event-specific notes, Event-specific notes, Event-specific notes, Event-specific notes, Event-specific notes, Event-specific notes, Organizing an Unconference, Event-specific notes, Event-specific notes, Event-specific notes, Event-specific notes, Event-specific notes, Organizing Online Events, Organizing Online Events, Organizing Online Events, Medium, Virtual worlds, Date/time, Date/time, Online Discussion Meetings, Running the meeting, Organizing Online Tutorials, Event-specific notes, Ilan Rabinovitch, Southern California Linux Expo, Ilan Rabinovitch, Southern California Linux Expo, Ilan Rabinovitch, Southern California Linux Expo, Ilan Rabinovitch, Southern California Linux Expo, Ilan Rabinovitch, Southern California Linux Expo (see also Ubuntu Developer Summit) benefits of, Events, Events building buzz with, Attracting Contributors choosing, Choosing Events, Choosing Events, Choosing Events costs of, Events and Conferences, Events and Conferences family-building effects of, Building Family Values, Building Family Values, Events online events, Organizing Online Events, Organizing Online Events, Organizing Online Events, Medium, Virtual worlds, Date/time, Date/time, Online Discussion Meetings, Running the meeting, Organizing Online Tutorials, Event-specific notes date and time of, Date/time, Date/time discussion meetings, Online Discussion Meetings, Running the meeting medium for hosting, Medium, Virtual worlds overview of, Organizing Online Events, Organizing Online Events tutorials, Organizing Online Events, Organizing Online Tutorials, Event-specific notes organizing, Events, Events, Organizing a Community Event, At the event, Step 2: Find Help, Step 2: Find Help, Step 2: Find Help, Step 2: Find Help, Step 3: Set Deadlines, Step 3: Set Deadlines, Step 4: Make Time, Step 4: Make Time, Step 4: Make Time, Step 4: Make Time, Step 4: Make Time allocating time for event, Step 4: Make Time, Step 4: Make Time, Step 4: Make Time collaboration on, Events, Events deadlines for, Step 3: Set Deadlines, Step 3: Set Deadlines finding help, Step 2: Find Help, Step 2: Find Help Google's experience with, Step 4: Make Time, Step 4: Make Time meetings for, Step 2: Find Help, Step 2: Find Help use of social media for, Organizing a Community Event, At the event physical events, Organizing Physical Events, Organizing Physical Events, Organizing Physical Events, Organizing Physical Events, Organizing Physical Events, Location/venue, Location/venue, Accommodation, Accommodation, Equipment, Equipment, Date/time, Date/time, Cost, Cost, Registering attendance, Registering attendance, Catering, Catering, Insurance/unions, Insurance/unions, Insurance/unions, Insurance/unions, Organizing a Sprint, Additional notes, Additional notes, Additional notes, Additional notes, Additional notes, Additional notes, Organizing a Summit, Inside a session, Inside a session, Event-specific notes, Event-specific notes, Event-specific notes, Event-specific notes, Event-specific notes, Event-specific notes, Event-specific notes, Organizing an Unconference, Event-specific notes, Event-specific notes, Event-specific notes, Event-specific notes, Event-specific notes, Ilan Rabinovitch, Southern California Linux Expo, Ilan Rabinovitch, Southern California Linux Expo, Ilan Rabinovitch, Southern California Linux Expo accommodations, Accommodation, Accommodation catering for, Catering, Catering, Additional notes, Event-specific notes, Event-specific notes conferences, Organizing Physical Events cost of, Cost, Cost, Additional notes, Event-specific notes, Ilan Rabinovitch, Southern California Linux Expo, Ilan Rabinovitch, Southern California Linux Expo, Ilan Rabinovitch, Southern California Linux Expo date and time for, Date/time, Date/time, Additional notes, Event-specific notes, Event-specific notes equipment at, Equipment, Equipment, Additional notes, Event-specific notes, Event-specific notes insurance needs, Insurance/unions, Insurance/unions location of, Location/venue, Location/venue registering attendance, Registering attendance, Registering attendance, Additional notes, Event-specific notes, Event-specific notes remote participation in, Inside a session, Inside a session sprints, Organizing Physical Events, Organizing a Sprint, Additional notes summits, Organizing Physical Events, Organizing a Summit, Event-specific notes, Event-specific notes types of, Organizing Physical Events, Organizing Physical Events unconferences, Organizing an Unconference, Event-specific notes union requirements, Insurance/unions, Insurance/unions presentations at, Submitting your paper, Submitting your paper, Promoting your talk, Promoting your talk, Delivering Presentations, Long versus short presentations, Creating attractive slides, Long versus short presentations, Long versus short presentations, Long versus short presentations, Ilan Rabinovitch, Southern California Linux Expo, Ilan Rabinovitch, Southern California Linux Expo attracting presenters, Ilan Rabinovitch, Southern California Linux Expo, Ilan Rabinovitch, Southern California Linux Expo delivering, Delivering Presentations, Long versus short presentations long vs. short, Long versus short presentations, Long versus short presentations promoting, Promoting your talk, Promoting your talk slides in, Creating attractive slides, Long versus short presentations submitting proposal for, Submitting your paper, Submitting your paper excitement, The Art of Community (see buzz, creating) experience, vs. theory, Theory Versus Action: Action Wins, Theory Versus Action: Action Wins F fables, The Basis of Communication Facebook, Being Social, Being Social, Facebook, Facebook, Getting started with Facebook, Getting started with Facebook, Collaboration, Campaigns and awareness, Campaigns and awareness, Events, The buildup, The buildup collaboration via, Collaboration, Campaigns and awareness, Campaigns and awareness, Events, The buildup, The buildup for campaigns and awareness, Campaigns and awareness, Campaigns and awareness for event coordination, Collaboration, Events, The buildup, The buildup getting started with, Getting started with Facebook, Getting started with Facebook history of, Facebook, Facebook overview of, Being Social, Being Social facilitators, The Role of a Facilitator, Be clear, Inside a session, Inside a session of resolution conflict, The Role of a Facilitator, Be clear of summits, Inside a session, Inside a session family, vs. belonging, Building Family Values, Building Family Values FC (Ubuntu Forums Council), Codifying Your Council, Codifying Your Council, Escalation Fedora Board, Commercial sponsorship feedback, The Art of Community, Leading by Example, Leading by Example, Gathering feedback, Gathering feedback, Gathering feedback, Gathering Structured Feedback, Gathering Structured Feedback, Being Social, Feedback, Feedback, Feedback, Feedback, Debates, Debates, Asking for feedback, Asking for feedback, Perception of you, Perception of you, Perception of you, Sharing feedback about personality issues, Sharing feedback about personality issues, Part 2: Get the facts, Community feedback, Community feedback (see also measuring community) about personality issues, Sharing feedback about personality issues, Sharing feedback about personality issues about quality of communication, Leading by Example, Leading by Example criticism, Gathering feedback for conflict resolution, Part 2: Get the facts gathering, Gathering feedback, Gathering feedback, Gathering Structured Feedback, Gathering Structured Feedback about workflow, Gathering Structured Feedback, Gathering Structured Feedback process of, Gathering feedback, Gathering feedback messenger of, to company, Community feedback, Community feedback obtaining via social media, Being Social, Feedback, Feedback, Feedback, Feedback, Debates, Debates, Asking for feedback, Asking for feedback by asking for, Asking for feedback, Asking for feedback importance of, Feedback, Feedback overview, Being Social Ubuntu 11.04 release example, Feedback, Feedback via debates, Debates, Debates personal, Perception of you, Perception of you, Perception of you Field, Jason, Planning Your Community finances, The Art of Community, The Art of Community, Financially Supporting Your Community, Financially Supporting Your Community, Revenue Opportunities, Donations (see also costs) (see also money from sponsors) required resources, Financially Supporting Your Community, Financially Supporting Your Community revenue opportunities, Revenue Opportunities, Donations financial economy vs. social economy, Building Belonging into the Social Economy, Building Belonging into the Social Economy Firefox, Attracting Contributors, Attracting Contributors, Mary Colvig, Mozilla, Mary Colvig, Mozilla fixed release cycles, Building a Strategic Plan, Building a Strategic Plan Flash plug-in, Videos focus, increasing with events, Events FooCamp (Friends of O'Reilly camp), Organizing an Unconference Ford, Henry, Working Together Is Success, Working Together Is Success Fort Minor, Mike Shinoda, Linkin Park forums, Choices, Choices, Choices, Choices, Communication fetishism, Communication fetishism, Discussion forums, Discussion forums of LugRadio, Communication fetishism, Communication fetishism use by users vs. developers, Choices, Choices, Choices, Choices frankness, Setting tone Free Culture communities, Write-centered communities, Mike Linksvayer, Creative Commons, Mike Linksvayer, Creative Commons Free Software community, Unwrapping Opportunity, Dictatorial Charismatic Leadership Freenode network, IRC Freeware Summit, Tim O’Reilly, O’Reilly Media Freudenberger, Herbert, Dealing with Burnout Friends of O'Reilly camp (FooCamp), Organizing an Unconference Fry, Stephen, Read-mostly communities G gaming communities, Richard Esguerra, Humble Indie Bundle, James Spafford, Media Molecule, James Spafford, Media Molecule GEdit, An Example: Ubuntu Bug Workflow, An Example: Ubuntu Bug Workflow Geiser, Ian Reinhart, Enlightened Dictatorship GNOME project, An Example: Ubuntu Bug Workflow, An Example: Ubuntu Bug Workflow, Bug reporting, Tool Access GNU General Public License, Dictatorial Charismatic Leadership goals, Structuring the plan, Financially Supporting Your Community, Brainstorming Ideas, Donations, Defining Purpose, Defining Purpose for measuring community, Defining Purpose, Defining Purpose for obtaining donations, Donations for strategic plan, Structuring the plan, Financially Supporting Your Community, Brainstorming Ideas Gobby (text editor), Brainstorming Ideas, Reporting, Reporting Google AdSense, Online advertising, Online advertising, Handling Absence, Handling Absence Google+, Being Social, Being Social, Google+, Getting started with Google+, Getting started with Google+, Tim O’Reilly, O’Reilly Media challenges facing, Google+ getting started with, Getting started with Google+, Getting started with Google+ overview of, Being Social, Being Social use by Tim O'Reilly, Tim O’Reilly, O’Reilly Media Google, event organizing at, Step 4: Make Time, Step 4: Make Time governance, The Art of Community, The Art of Community, The Art of Community, Accountability, Accountability, Governance Does Not Suck, Governance Does Not Suck, The Case for Governance, The Case for Governance, Follow the Leader, Follow the Leader, Engage the People, Engage the People, Aspire to Inspire, Aspire to Inspire, To Bring Peace, To Bring Peace, Dictatorial Charismatic Leadership, Dictatorial Charismatic Leadership, Enlightened Dictatorship, Enlightened Dictatorship, Delegated Governance, Delegated Governance, Expanding Governance, Expanding Governance, Knowing When It Is Time, Knowing When It Is Time, Building the Subcouncil, Escalation, Escalation, Escalation, Communicating Between Councils, Communicating Between Councils (see also Community Council) (see also community managers) (see also councils) and accountability, Accountability, Accountability benefits of, Governance Does Not Suck, Governance Does Not Suck division of, Follow the Leader, Follow the Leader engagement with people, Engage the People, Engage the People expanding, Expanding Governance, Expanding Governance, Knowing When It Is Time, Knowing When It Is Time, Building the Subcouncil, Escalation, Escalation, Escalation, Communicating Between Councils, Communicating Between Councils clarifying issue escalation, Escalation, Escalation communication between councils, Communicating Between Councils, Communicating Between Councils forming subconcil, Building the Subcouncil, Escalation identifying when needed, Knowing When It Is Time, Knowing When It Is Time overview of, Expanding Governance, Expanding Governance indicators of need for, The Case for Governance, The Case for Governance inspiration from governing body, Aspire to Inspire, Aspire to Inspire peace as goal of, To Bring Peace, To Bring Peace types of, Dictatorial Charismatic Leadership, Dictatorial Charismatic Leadership, Enlightened Dictatorship, Enlightened Dictatorship, Delegated Governance, Delegated Governance delegated, Delegated Governance, Delegated Governance dictatorial charismatic leadership, Dictatorial Charismatic Leadership, Dictatorial Charismatic Leadership enlightened dictatorship, Enlightened Dictatorship, Enlightened Dictatorship Graen, George B., Diversity graphs, Plugging your stats into graphs, Plugging your stats into graphs Gwibber tool, Controlling the Fire Hose, Controlling the Fire Hose, Optimizing How You Post H hangouts, in Google+, Getting started with Google+ Hanifan, L.J., Building Belonging into the Social Economy hashtags, Getting more eyeballs, Where to look, Asking for feedback, The buildup, At the event Hawthorn, Leslie, Step 4: Make Time, Event-specific notes, Event-specific notes health of community, tracking, Tracking Health, Tracking Health, Promoting a Feedback Culture, Promoting a Feedback Culture, Building a Set of Generals, Building a Set of Generals, Reacting to Community Concerns, Reacting to Community Concerns by calls to team leaders, Building a Set of Generals, Building a Set of Generals overview, Tracking Health, Tracking Health promoting feedback culture, Promoting a Feedback Culture, Promoting a Feedback Culture responding to concerns, Reacting to Community Concerns, Reacting to Community Concerns hiring community manager, Risk, Risk Holbach, Daniel, Planning, Hooks ’n’ Data, Visibility Is Key, Visibility Is Key hooks and data, Hooks ’n’ Data, Hooks ’n’ Data, Statistics and Automated Data, Plugging your stats into graphs, Surveys and Structured Feedback, Showing off your survey reports, Observational Tests, Observational Tests, Measuring Mechanics, Measuring Mechanics, Gathering General Perceptions, Perception of you, Part 2: Get the facts, Part 2: Get the facts gathering general perceptions, Gathering General Perceptions, Perception of you in conflict resolution, Part 2: Get the facts, Part 2: Get the facts measuring mechanics, Measuring Mechanics, Measuring Mechanics observational tests, Observational Tests, Observational Tests overview, Hooks ’n’ Data, Hooks ’n’ Data statistics and automated data, Statistics and Automated Data, Plugging your stats into graphs surveys, Surveys and Structured Feedback, Showing off your survey reports hotels, for event accommodation, Accommodation, Accommodation Hudson, Paul, The Professional Press, The Professional Press Humble Indie Bundle, Richard Esguerra, Humble Indie Bundle, Richard Esguerra, Humble Indie Bundle humor, Setting tone Hybrid Theory (album), Mike Shinoda, Linkin Park I identi.ca, Reporting, Reporting, Getting started with Facebook reporting with, Reporting, Reporting users of, Getting started with Facebook implementation plan, Structuring the plan incentives, for donations, Donations Innovate Developer Conference, Carolyn Mellor, X.commerce, PayPal, and eBay inspiring others, Inspiring your community, Inspiring your community, Inspired Words, Inspired Words, Aspire to Inspire, Aspire to Inspire as goal of governing body, Aspire to Inspire, Aspire to Inspire through writing, Inspiring your community, Inspiring your community, Inspired Words, Inspired Words insurance, for physical events, Insurance/unions, Insurance/unions Internet Relay Chat, The Art of Community (see IRC) interviews, building buzz with, Attracting Contributors IRC (Internet Relay Chat), IRC, IRC, Communications, Observational Tests, Privacy, Internet Relay Chat (IRC), Preparing for a session, Running a session features and benefits of, IRC, IRC logging, Communications privacy issues, Privacy usability testing over, Observational Tests use with online events, Internet Relay Chat (IRC), Preparing for a session, Running a session issues, communication between teams about, The Art of Community, Ensure that teams can communicate clearly and effectively (see also conflict) J Johnson & Johnson conflict resolution approach, Part 1: Calm and reassure, The fantastical user group debacle, Part 2: Get the facts, The fantastical user group debacle, Part 3: Discuss, The fantastical user group debacle, Part 4: Document, The fantastical user group debacle, Part 5: Reflect and maintain, The fantastical user group debacle calm and reassure, Part 1: Calm and reassure, The fantastical user group debacle discuss, Part 3: Discuss, The fantastical user group debacle document, Part 4: Document, The fantastical user group debacle get the facts, Part 2: Get the facts, The fantastical user group debacle reflect and maintain, Part 5: Reflect and maintain, The fantastical user group debacle Jokosher project, Planning Your Community, Planning Your Community, Communication fetishism, Reviewing new developers: In depth, Reviewing new developers: In depth, Bug reporting, Regular Workflow Assessment, Regular Workflow Assessment bug tracking, Bug reporting communication channels used for, Communication fetishism contributions of Laszlo Pandy, Reviewing new developers: In depth, Reviewing new developers: In depth workflow assessment during, Regular Workflow Assessment, Regular Workflow Assessment justice, lack of, Lack of Justice, Lack of Justice K KDE project, Enlightened Dictatorship, Enlightened Dictatorship, Creating and Running Events, Creating and Running Events keynotes, at events, Opening keynotes, Opening keynotes KGRUBEditor, Observational Tests KHTML technology, Enlightened Dictatorship, Enlightened Dictatorship KickStarter, Donations Kiss, Tom, James Spafford, Media Molecule L Langridge, Stuart (Aq), Planning Your Community Laporte, Leo, Foreword from the First Edition Launchpad (software collaboration platform), An Example: Ubuntu Bug Workflow, Getting to know the problem, Hooks ’n’ Data, Hooks ’n’ Data leadership, The Art of Community, The Art of Community (see community managers) (see governance) Lessig, Lawrence, Untwisting the tail, Announcing Your Community licensing, Untwisting the tail, Untwisting the tail, Videos, Mike Linksvayer, Creative Commons, Mike Linksvayer, Creative Commons Liebling, Alison, Gathering General Perceptions lightning talks, Lightning talks, Lightning talks Linkin Park, Mike Shinoda, Linkin Park, Mike Shinoda, Linkin Park Linksvayer, Mike, Mike Linksvayer, Creative Commons, Mike Linksvayer, Creative Commons Linspire (formerly Lindows), Blog wars, Blog wars Linux community, The Art of Community, The Art of Community, Write-centered communities, Diversity, Diversity, Linus Torvalds, Linux, Linus Torvalds, Linux (see also Ubuntu community) (see also Xubuntu community) Linux Demo Day, Building Buzz, Building Buzz Linux Format magazine, The Professional Press, The Professional Press listening to others, The Value of Listening, The Value of Listening, Membership, Barriers to Input, Barriers to Input LittleBigPlanet community, James Spafford, Media Molecule, James Spafford, Media Molecule live streaming, Videos, Videos LoCo (Ubuntu Local Community), Observational Tests, Building a Set of Generals, Building a Set of Generals, Responsibilities, Team councils, Team councils LUGFests, Ilan Rabinovitch, Southern California Linux Expo, Ilan Rabinovitch, Southern California Linux Expo LugRadio community, The Essence of Community, The Essence of Community, The Basis of Communication, The Basis of Communication, Unwrapping Opportunity, Unwrapping Opportunity, Unwrapping Opportunity, Unwrapping Opportunity, Unwrapping Opportunity, Unwrapping Opportunity, Becoming Yourself, Becoming Yourself, Communication fetishism, Communication fetishism, Discussion forums, Podcasts, Podcasts, Location/venue, Cost, Setting expectations, Setting expectations belief in, Unwrapping Opportunity, Unwrapping Opportunity effect of unedited productions, Becoming Yourself, Becoming Yourself events of, Unwrapping Opportunity, Unwrapping Opportunity, Location/venue, Cost forums of, Communication fetishism, Communication fetishism, Discussion forums origin of, The Essence of Community, The Essence of Community podcast, Podcasts, Podcasts response to rail strike, Unwrapping Opportunity, Unwrapping Opportunity sponsorship of, Setting expectations, Setting expectations stories in, The Basis of Communication, The Basis of Communication M MacQueue bulletion board, Foreword from the First Edition Macromedia Flash plug-in, Videos mailing lists, The Mediums, Mailing lists, Mailing lists, Netiquette, Netiquette, Gathering feedback, Gathering feedback, Privacy, Communicating Between Councils effect on how people behave, The Mediums for communication between councils, Communicating Between Councils for gathering feedback, Gathering feedback, Gathering feedback overview of, Mailing lists, Mailing lists privacy concerns, Privacy top posting to, Netiquette, Netiquette Major, John, Uniting Together managers, The Art of Community, The Art of Community (see community managers) (see governance) marketing, The Art of Community (see buzz, creating) maturing of members, Profiling the polemical, Profiling the polemical McMillan, John, Building Belonging into the Social Economy measuring community, Measuring Community, Community Self-Reflection, The Foundations of Feedback, The Foundations of Feedback, Defining Purpose, Defining Purpose, Hooks ’n’ Data, Hooks ’n’ Data, Statistics and Automated Data, Plugging your stats into graphs, Surveys and Structured Feedback, Showing off your survey reports, Observational Tests, Observational Tests, Measuring Mechanics, Measuring Mechanics, Gathering General Perceptions, Perception of you, Anonymity, Anonymity, Privacy, Privacy anonymity and, Anonymity, Anonymity establishing goals of, Defining Purpose, Defining Purpose meaning in measurements, The Foundations of Feedback, The Foundations of Feedback overview of, Measuring Community, Community Self-Reflection privacy issues, Privacy, Privacy use of hooks and data, Hooks ’n’ Data, Hooks ’n’ Data, Statistics and Automated Data, Plugging your stats into graphs, Surveys and Structured Feedback, Showing off your survey reports, Observational Tests, Observational Tests, Measuring Mechanics, Measuring Mechanics, Gathering General Perceptions, Perception of you gathering general perceptions, Gathering General Perceptions, Perception of you measuring mechanics, Measuring Mechanics, Measuring Mechanics observational tests, Observational Tests, Observational Tests overview, Hooks ’n’ Data, Hooks ’n’ Data statistics and automated data, Statistics and Automated Data, Plugging your stats into graphs surveys, Surveys and Structured Feedback, Showing off your survey reports Measuring the Quality of Prison Life study, Gathering General Perceptions mechanics of collaboration, The Mechanics of Collaboration, The Mechanics of Collaboration, Measuring Mechanics, Measuring Mechanics Media Molecule, James Spafford, Media Molecule, James Spafford, Media Molecule mediator, of conflict resolution, The Role of a Facilitator, Be clear meetings, The Art of Community, Attracting Contributors, Step 2: Find Help, Step 2: Find Help, Online Discussion Meetings, Running the meeting, Management and Communications, Weekly engagements (see also events) between company and community manager, Management and Communications, Weekly engagements building buzz with, Attracting Contributors for organizing events, Step 2: Find Help, Step 2: Find Help online discussion meetings, Online Discussion Meetings, Running the meeting Mellor, Carolyn, Carolyn Mellor, X.commerce, PayPal, and eBay, Carolyn Mellor, X.commerce, PayPal, and eBay members, The Art of Community, Responsibilities, Membership, Nominating and Electing Council Members, Forming a new council (see also contributers) approval of, Responsibilities of Community Council, Membership, Nominating and Electing Council Members, Forming a new council meritocracy, Meritocracy, Meritocracy, Enlightened Dictatorship Messina, Chris, Attracting Contributors, Organizing an Unconference, Organizing an Unconference, Organizing an Unconference, Organizing an Unconference Mickos, Mårten, The Role of a Community Manager in the Corporation, Mårten Mickos, MySQL and Eucalyptus, Mårten Mickos, MySQL and Eucalyptus microphones, at events, Room Layout mindcasting, Tim O’Reilly, O’Reilly Media mindshare, Mindshare, The Mindshare Opportunity, Defining Purpose, Gathering General Perceptions mission statement, Designing Your Community, Building a Mission Statement, Building a Mission Statement, Define the scope of each team, and help team members understand that scope, Define the scope of each team, and help team members understand that scope, The Mission, The Mission and buzz, The Mission, The Mission for each team, Define the scope of each team, and help team members understand that scope, Define the scope of each team, and help team members understand that scope overview of, Designing Your Community writing, Building a Mission Statement, Building a Mission Statement money from sponsors, The Art of Community, The Art of Community, Handling the Money, Handling the Money (see also costs) (see also finances) Mozilla, Attracting Contributors, Attracting Contributors, Mary Colvig, Mozilla, Mary Colvig, Mozilla mrben (Ben Thorp), The Essence of Community, The Basis of Communication, The Basis of Communication multimedia, use when announcing community, Announcing Your Community music industry, and community, Mike Shinoda, Linkin Park, Mike Shinoda, Linkin Park N negative energy, Honesty, Honesty netiquette, Netiquette, Netiquette news, on website, Staying Current, Staying Current Nielsen, Jakob, Announce, Announce Nielsen, Michael, Tim O’Reilly, O’Reilly Media nominating council members, Nominating and Electing Council Members, Forming a new council North, Gail, Dealing with Burnout notetakers, at summits, Inside a session O O'Reilly Media, Tim O’Reilly, O’Reilly Media, Tim O’Reilly, O’Reilly Media O'Reilly's Radar site, Staying Current O'Reilly, Tim, Don’t Be That Guy/Girl, Staying Current, Privacy, Tim O’Reilly, O’Reilly Media, Tim O’Reilly, O’Reilly Media Obama, Barack, Unwrapping Opportunity, Unwrapping Opportunity, Aspire to Inspire, Aspire to Inspire as inspirational orator, Aspire to Inspire, Aspire to Inspire election of, Unwrapping Opportunity, Unwrapping Opportunity objectives, in strategic plan, Structuring the plan, Pulling Together the Threads, Financially Supporting Your Community objectivity, in conflict resolution, Be objective, Be objective, Be objective Ogg Theora, Videos Oliver, Jamie, The Mindshare Opportunity, The Mindshare Opportunity On Writing Well (Zinsser), Don’t write like an institution on-ramp, The On-Ramp: Creating Collaborative Processes, The On-Ramp: Creating Collaborative Processes, The On-Ramp: Creating Collaborative Processes, Identifying the On-Ramp, Identifying the On-Ramp, Developing Knowledge, Developing Knowledge, Determining Contributions, Determining Contributions, Growing Kudos, Growing Kudos defined, The On-Ramp: Creating Collaborative Processes determining contributions, Determining Contributions, Determining Contributions identifying, Identifying the On-Ramp, Identifying the On-Ramp showing appreciation, Growing Kudos, Growing Kudos skills acquisition, Developing Knowledge, Developing Knowledge steps in, The On-Ramp: Creating Collaborative Processes, The On-Ramp: Creating Collaborative Processes one-on-one discussion, for gathering feedback, Gathering feedback, Gathering feedback online events, Organizing Online Events, Organizing Online Events, Organizing Online Events, Medium, Virtual worlds, Date/time, Date/time, Online Discussion Meetings, Running the meeting, Organizing Online Tutorials, Event-specific notes date and time of, Date/time, Date/time discussion meetings, Online Discussion Meetings, Running the meeting medium for hosting, Medium, Virtual worlds overview of, Organizing Online Events, Organizing Online Events tutorials, Organizing Online Events, Organizing Online Tutorials, Event-specific notes open days, building buzz with, Attracting Contributors Open Source Conference (OSCON), Long versus short presentations, Long versus short presentations open source development, Building Belonging into the Social Economy, Building Belonging into the Social Economy, Planning Your Community, Planning Your Community, Building a Strategic Plan, Building a Strategic Plan, Tool Access, Tool Access, Observational Tests, Observational Tests, Observational Tests, Why Community Building Has Become a Big Business, Why Community Building Has Become a Big Business, Linus Torvalds, Linux, Linus Torvalds, Linux access to tools, Tool Access, Tool Access and community, Why Community Building Has Become a Big Business, Why Community Building Has Become a Big Business differing motives for contributing to, Linus Torvalds, Linux, Linus Torvalds, Linux fixed release cycles, Building a Strategic Plan, Building a Strategic Plan in business, Building Belonging into the Social Economy, Building Belonging into the Social Economy Jokosher audio editor example, Planning Your Community, Planning Your Community usability testing, Observational Tests, Observational Tests, Observational Tests OpenAdvantage, Becoming the Advocate, Becoming the Advocate openess, The Art of Community (see also transparency) openness, Barriers to Input, Be open, Be open OpenSuSE Board, Commercial sponsorship opportunities, Unwrapping Opportunity, Unwrapping Opportunity, Unwrapping Opportunity, Designing Your Community, Designing Your Community, Designing Your Community, Designing Your Community, Designing Your Community and early days of Linux, Unwrapping Opportunity, Unwrapping Opportunity and Obama election, Unwrapping Opportunity documenting, Designing Your Community, Designing Your Community, Designing Your Community, Designing Your Community, Designing Your Community Oram, Andy, Preface, Simplicity is key Organizational Vision, Values and Mission (Scott), Building a Mission Statement OSCON (Open Source Conference), Long versus short presentations, Long versus short presentations outside the box thinking, Technique 2: Think outside the box, Technique 2: Think outside the box owner of goals, Structuring the plan P Packard, Keith, Transparency Pages, in Google+, Getting started with Google+ Pandy, Laszlo, Reviewing new developers: In depth, Reviewing new developers: In depth patience, The Value of Listening patterns, in burndown charts, Observing burndown patterns, Observing burndown patterns Paul, Celeste Lyn, Observational Tests, Observational Tests PayPal, Donations, Carolyn Mellor, X.commerce, PayPal, and eBay, Carolyn Mellor, X.commerce, PayPal, and eBay, Carolyn Mellor, X.commerce, PayPal, and eBay peer review, Reviewing new developers: In depth, Reviewing new developers: In depth performance reviews, Technique 1: Question assumptions personality issues, The Art of Community, Profiling the polemical, Profiling the polemical, Profiling the polemical, Profiling the polemical, Sharing feedback about personality issues, Sharing feedback about personality issues, Poisonous people, Poisonous people (see also conflict) attributes causing conflict, Profiling the polemical, Profiling the polemical maturity, Profiling the polemical, Profiling the polemical poisonous people, Poisonous people, Poisonous people sharing feedback about, Sharing feedback about personality issues, Sharing feedback about personality issues Persse, James, Building Great Processes phone calls, privacy during, Privacy physical events, Organizing Physical Events, Organizing Physical Events, Organizing Physical Events, Organizing Physical Events, Organizing Physical Events, Location/venue, Location/venue, Location/venue, Location/venue, Accommodation, Accommodation, Equipment, Equipment, Date/time, Date/time, Cost, Cost, Registering attendance, Registering attendance, Catering, Catering, Insurance/unions, Insurance/unions, Insurance/unions, Insurance/unions, Organizing a Sprint, Additional notes, Additional notes, Additional notes, Additional notes, Additional notes, Additional notes, Organizing a Summit, Inside a session, Inside a session, Event-specific notes, Event-specific notes, Event-specific notes, Event-specific notes, Event-specific notes, Event-specific notes, Event-specific notes, Organizing an Unconference, Event-specific notes, Event-specific notes, Event-specific notes, Event-specific notes, Event-specific notes accommodations for, Accommodation, Accommodation catering for, Catering, Catering, Additional notes, Event-specific notes, Event-specific notes conferences, Organizing Physical Events cost of, Cost, Cost, Additional notes, Event-specific notes date and time for, Date/time, Date/time, Additional notes, Event-specific notes, Event-specific notes equipment at, Equipment, Equipment, Additional notes, Event-specific notes, Event-specific notes insurance needs, Insurance/unions, Insurance/unions location of, Location/venue, Location/venue registering attendance, Registering attendance, Registering attendance, Additional notes, Event-specific notes, Event-specific notes remote participation in, Inside a session, Inside a session sprints, Organizing Physical Events, Organizing a Sprint, Additional notes summits, Organizing Physical Events, Organizing a Summit, Event-specific notes, Event-specific notes types of, Organizing Physical Events, Organizing Physical Events unconferences, Organizing an Unconference, Event-specific notes union requirements, Insurance/unions, Insurance/unions venue, Location/venue, Location/venue piracy, Foreword, Foreword planets, Syndication planning phase, of buzz cycle, Planning, Planning, Planning, Applying the buzz cycle, Applying the buzz cycle plenaries, at events, Plenaries, Plenaries podcasts, Podcasts, Podcasts politics, creating buzz compared to, Uniting Together, Uniting Together Pope, Alan, Social Media, Social Media positiveness, in conflict resolution, Be positive, Be positive postmortems, Review, Review presentations at events, Submitting your paper, Submitting your paper, Promoting your talk, Promoting your talk, Delivering Presentations, Long versus short presentations, Creating attractive slides, Long versus short presentations, Long versus short presentations, Long versus short presentations, Ilan Rabinovitch, Southern California Linux Expo, Ilan Rabinovitch, Southern California Linux Expo attracting presenters, Ilan Rabinovitch, Southern California Linux Expo, Ilan Rabinovitch, Southern California Linux Expo delivering, Delivering Presentations, Long versus short presentations long vs. short, Long versus short presentations, Long versus short presentations promoting, Promoting your talk, Promoting your talk slides in, Creating attractive slides, Long versus short presentations submitting proposal for, Submitting your paper, Submitting your paper press, as target of buzz campaign, The Professional Press, The Professional Press, The Amateur Press, The Amateur Press amateur, The Amateur Press, The Amateur Press professional, The Professional Press, The Professional Press pride, Avoid Ego, or Others Will Avoid You, Avoid Ego, or Others Will Avoid You privacy, Privacy, Privacy, Privacy, Part 2: Get the facts, Tim O’Reilly, O’Reilly Media, Tim O’Reilly, O’Reilly Media balancing with visibility, Tim O’Reilly, O’Reilly Media, Tim O’Reilly, O’Reilly Media during conflict resolution, Part 2: Get the facts during phone calls, Privacy when gathering feedback, Privacy, Privacy Process Improvement Essentials (Persse), Building Great Processes processes, Building Great Processes, Building Great Processes, Breaking Up the Puzzle, Building a process, Building a process, Simplicity is key, Simplicity is key, Avoiding bureaucracy, Avoiding bureaucracy, Transparency, Transparency, Assessing Needs, Assessing Needs, Community Cycles, Leading by example: Ubuntu, The Gates of Your Community, The Gates of Your Community, Assessing Contributors, Reviewing new developers: In depth, Managing Feedback, Gathering feedback, Document Them, Make Them Easy to Find, Make Them Easy to Find, Make Them Easy to Find, Make Them Easy to Find, Using Your Processes, Using Your Processes, The On-Ramp: Creating Collaborative Processes, Growing Kudos, The On-Ramp: Creating Collaborative Processes, The On-Ramp: Creating Collaborative Processes, The On-Ramp: Creating Collaborative Processes, Identifying the On-Ramp, Identifying the On-Ramp, Developing Knowledge, Developing Knowledge, Determining Contributions, Determining Contributions, Growing Kudos, Growing Kudos, Process Reassessment, Building Regularity, Responsibilities and community cycles, Community Cycles, Leading by example: Ubuntu announcing, Make Them Easy to Find, Make Them Easy to Find avoiding bureaucracy, Avoiding bureaucracy, Avoiding bureaucracy building, Building a process, Building a process categories of, Assessing Needs, Assessing Needs changes in, Responsibilities documentation of, Document Them, Make Them Easy to Find, Make Them Easy to Find encouraging use of, Using Your Processes, Using Your Processes for assessing contributors, Assessing Contributors, Reviewing new developers: In depth for attracting contributors, The Gates of Your Community, The Gates of Your Community for managing feedback, Managing Feedback, Gathering feedback good vs. bad, Building Great Processes, Building Great Processes in getting participation (the on-ramp), The On-Ramp: Creating Collaborative Processes, Growing Kudos, The On-Ramp: Creating Collaborative Processes, The On-Ramp: Creating Collaborative Processes, The On-Ramp: Creating Collaborative Processes, Identifying the On-Ramp, Identifying the On-Ramp, Developing Knowledge, Developing Knowledge, Determining Contributions, Determining Contributions, Growing Kudos, Growing Kudos defined, The On-Ramp: Creating Collaborative Processes determining contributions, Determining Contributions, Determining Contributions identifying, Identifying the On-Ramp, Identifying the On-Ramp showing appreciation, Growing Kudos, Growing Kudos skills acquisition, Developing Knowledge, Developing Knowledge steps in, The On-Ramp: Creating Collaborative Processes, The On-Ramp: Creating Collaborative Processes reassessing, Process Reassessment, Building Regularity simplicity as foundation of, Breaking Up the Puzzle, Simplicity is key, Simplicity is key transparency in, Transparency, Transparency product recalls, Building Great Processes, Building Great Processes professional press, as target of buzz campaign, The Professional Press, The Professional Press Project level, of projects, Tracking Projects projectors, using at events, The Ethos of the UDS, Room Layout, Room Layout, Room Layout projects, tracking, Tracking Projects, Tracking Projects, Structuring Your Projects, Structuring Your Projects, Managing Work Items, Documenting work items, Visualizing Data with Burndown Charts, Visualizing Data with Burndown Charts, Using burndown charts, Using burndown charts, Using burndown charts, Generating additional information, Using burndown charts, Using burndown charts, Observing burndown patterns, Observing burndown patterns, Building burndown charts into your workflow, Building burndown charts into your workflow managing work items, Managing Work Items, Documenting work items providing different levels of visibility, Tracking Projects, Tracking Projects using blueprints, Structuring Your Projects, Structuring Your Projects using burndown charts, Visualizing Data with Burndown Charts, Visualizing Data with Burndown Charts, Using burndown charts, Using burndown charts, Using burndown charts, Generating additional information, Using burndown charts, Using burndown charts, Observing burndown patterns, Observing burndown patterns, Building burndown charts into your workflow, Building burndown charts into your workflow benefits of, Using burndown charts, Using burndown charts building into workflow, Building burndown charts into your workflow, Building burndown charts into your workflow generating charts, Using burndown charts, Generating additional information overview, Visualizing Data with Burndown Charts, Visualizing Data with Burndown Charts patterns in charts, Observing burndown patterns, Observing burndown patterns reading charts, Using burndown charts, Using burndown charts Putnam, Robert, Building Belonging into the Social Economy Q quantity vs. quality, The risks of interpretation R Rabinovitch, Ilan, Location/venue, Ilan Rabinovitch, Southern California Linux Expo, Ilan Rabinovitch, Southern California Linux Expo Raymond, Eric, Bug Tracking read-mostly communities, Read-mostly communities, Read-mostly communities Really Simple Syndication (RSS) feeds, Syndication, Syndication recordMyDesktop, Videos Regional Membership Boards, Ubuntu Member, Ubuntu Member Reinventing Discovery (Nielsen), Tim O’Reilly, O’Reilly Media Reinventing the Bazaar (McMillan), Building Belonging into the Social Economy release cycles, Ubuntu community, Leading by example: Ubuntu, Leading by example: Ubuntu release parties, Organizing Physical Events, Organizing Online Events defined, Organizing Physical Events online, Organizing Online Events remote participation, in Ubuntu Developer Summit, Infrastructure, Infrastructure, Room Layout reporting, Bug reporting, Bug reporting, Reporting, Reporting, Reporting, Reporting, Showing off your survey reports, Showing off your survey reports, Measuring Mechanics, Measuring Mechanics bugs, Bug reporting, Bug reporting, Measuring Mechanics, Measuring Mechanics examples of, Reporting, Reporting making easy, Reporting, Reporting survey data, Showing off your survey reports, Showing off your survey reports reputation of community manager, Internal reputation, Community reputation resources, and governance, The Case for Governance respect for others, in Ubuntu Code of Conduct, Diversity responsibility, problems with, Problems with Responsibility, Problems with Responsibility revenue opportunities, Revenue Opportunities, Donations ReverbNation, The preparation review phase, of buzz cycle, Review, Review, Applying the buzz cycle, Applying the buzz cycle roles, Roles, Roles room layout, at events, Room Layout, Room Layout Ross, Blake, Attracting Contributors, Mary Colvig, Mozilla routine, breaking, Events, Events, Events RSS (Really Simple Syndication) feeds, Syndication, Syndication S SaaS (Software as a Service), Software As a Service, Software As a Service Safari® Books Online, Safari® Books Online salary of community manager, Salary, Salary Saxena, Deepak, Building Buzz, Building Buzz SCALE (Southern California Linux Expo), Ilan Rabinovitch, Southern California Linux Expo, Ilan Rabinovitch, Southern California Linux Expo Schaller, Christian, The Structure of Strife, The Structure of Strife scope of teams, Units of Belonging, Define the scope of each team, and help team members understand that scope, Define the scope of each team, and help team members understand that scope Scott, Cynthia D., Building a Mission Statement screen-scraping, Plugging your stats into graphs Screencast-O-Matic, Videos search engine optimization (SEO), Syndication, Syndication Second Life, Virtual worlds, Virtual worlds selling items, to generate revenue, Selling, Selling SEO (search engine optimization), Syndication, Syndication seriousness, Setting tone sessions, at events, Sessions, Sessions Severed Fifth project, Donations, Donations Sheen, Martin, Inspiring your community Shigeru Miyamoto, Technique 2: Think outside the box Shinoda, Mike, A Community Manager: Becoming the Community, Mike Shinoda, Linkin Park, Mike Shinoda, Linkin Park Shuttleworth, Mark, Hooks ’n’ Data, Commercial sponsorship, In the Beginning..., In the Beginning..., Scheduling signs, using at events, Assets simplicity as foundation of processes, Breaking Up the Puzzle, Simplicity is key, Simplicity is key size of community, The Case for Governance skills, Designing Your Community, Designing Your Community, Designing Your Community, Designing Your Community, Identify how we can divide our community into teams, Identify how we can divide our community into teams, Developing Knowledge, Developing Knowledge, Knowing When It Is Time acquisition of, Developing Knowledge, Developing Knowledge and formation of additional councils, Knowing When It Is Time mapping to teams, Identify how we can divide our community into teams, Identify how we can divide our community into teams required, documenting, Designing Your Community, Designing Your Community, Designing Your Community, Designing Your Community Skype, Voice over IP (VoIP), Voice over IP (VoIP) slides in presentations, Creating attractive slides, Long versus short presentations Smanis, Konstantinos, Observational Tests social capital, Building Belonging into the Social Economy, Building Belonging into the Social Economy, Building Belonging into the Social Economy, The Basis of Communication, The Basis of Communication building through storytelling, The Basis of Communication, The Basis of Communication defined, Building Belonging into the Social Economy social economy, Building Belonging into the Social Economy, Building Belonging into the Social Economy, Building Belonging into the Social Economy, Building Belonging into the Social Economy, The Basis of Communication, The Basis of Communication building belonging into, Building Belonging into the Social Economy, Building Belonging into the Social Economy communication in, The Basis of Communication, The Basis of Communication comparison with financial economy, Building Belonging into the Social Economy, Building Belonging into the Social Economy social media, The Art of Community, The Art of Community, The Art of Community, Don’t Be That Guy/Girl, Don’t Be That Guy/Girl, Being Social, Being Social, Being Social, Being Social, Being Social, Harnessing Social Media, Broadcasting, Broadcasting, Broadcasting, Tuning up your messages, Avoiding social media overkill, Avoiding social media overkill, Feedback, Feedback, Where to look, Where to look, Where to look, Debates, Debates, Asking for feedback, Asking for feedback, Collaboration, Collaboration, Campaigns and awareness, Events, Events, Controlling the Fire Hose, Controlling the Fire Hose, Optimizing How You Post, Optimizing How You Post, Being Socially Responsible, Being Socially Responsible, Organizing a Community Event, At the event, Running a Campaign, The buildup, Providing Community Updates, Providing Community Updates, Mike Shinoda, Linkin Park, Mike Shinoda, Linkin Park, Tim O’Reilly, O’Reilly Media, Tim O’Reilly, O’Reilly Media (see also Facebook) (see also Google+) (see also Twitter) broadcasting with, Being Social, Broadcasting, Broadcasting, Broadcasting, Tuning up your messages, Avoiding social media overkill, Avoiding social media overkill balanced use of, Avoiding social media overkill, Avoiding social media overkill content of broadcasts, Broadcasting, Broadcasting overview, Being Social using Twitter, Broadcasting, Tuning up your messages collaboration using, Being Social, Collaboration, Collaboration, Campaigns and awareness, Events, Events, Running a Campaign, The buildup coordinating events, Events, Events for campaigns and awareness, Campaigns and awareness, Running a Campaign, The buildup overview of, Being Social party-planning example, Collaboration, Collaboration controlling time using, Harnessing Social Media, Controlling the Fire Hose, Controlling the Fire Hose getting feedback using, Being Social, Feedback, Feedback, Where to look, Where to look, Where to look, Debates, Debates, Asking for feedback, Asking for feedback by asking for, Asking for feedback, Asking for feedback overview, Being Social Ubuntu 11.04 release example, Feedback, Feedback using Twitter, Where to look, Where to look, Where to look via debates, Debates, Debates most common networks, Being Social, Being Social optimizing posts to, Optimizing How You Post, Optimizing How You Post organizing community event using, Organizing a Community Event, At the event providing community updates with, Providing Community Updates, Providing Community Updates realistic expectations of, Don’t Be That Guy/Girl, Don’t Be That Guy/Girl responsible use of, Being Socially Responsible, Being Socially Responsible use by community leaders, Mike Shinoda, Linkin Park, Mike Shinoda, Linkin Park, Tim O’Reilly, O’Reilly Media, Tim O’Reilly, O’Reilly Media Mike Shinoda (Linkin Park), Mike Shinoda, Linkin Park, Mike Shinoda, Linkin Park Tim O'Reilly, Tim O’Reilly, O’Reilly Media, Tim O’Reilly, O’Reilly Media Software as a Service (SaaS), Software As a Service, Software As a Service software cycles, fixed release, Building a Strategic Plan, Building a Strategic Plan Somerville, Cody, Baking in Openness Sorkin, Aaron, Inspiring your community source control, Source Control, Source Control Southern California Linux Expo (SCALE), Ilan Rabinovitch, Southern California Linux Expo, Ilan Rabinovitch, Southern California Linux Expo Spafford, James, The Second Edition, James Spafford, Media Molecule, James Spafford, Media Molecule spam, Getting It Right by Not Getting It Wrong, Getting It Right by Not Getting It Wrong speaking at events, The Art of Community (see presentations at events) Spencer, Rick, Visualizing Data with Burndown Charts, Visualizing Data with Burndown Charts sponsored communities, The Case for Governance, Commercial sponsorship, Commercial sponsorship, Barriers to Input, Barriers to Input and governance, The Case for Governance conflict within, Barriers to Input, Barriers to Input councils of, Commercial sponsorship, Commercial sponsorship sponsors, Understanding Your Needs, Understanding Your Needs, Finding and Handling Sponsors, Finding and Handling Sponsors, Setting expectations, Setting expectations, The pitch, The pitch, Handling the Money, Handling the Money, Scheduling, Scheduling determining, Finding and Handling Sponsors, Finding and Handling Sponsors examining needs before approaching, Understanding Your Needs, Understanding Your Needs giving back to, Setting expectations, Setting expectations managing money from, Handling the Money, Handling the Money of Ubuntu Developer Summit, Scheduling, Scheduling pitching to, The pitch, The pitch Spread Firefox campaign, Attracting Contributors, Attracting Contributors, Mary Colvig, Mozilla, Mary Colvig, Mozilla Spreadshirt, Selling sprints, Organizing Physical Events, Organizing a Sprint, Additional notes Stallman, Richard, Dictatorial Charismatic Leadership stories, The Basis of Communication, The Basis of Communication, The Basis of Communication, The Basis of Communication, Attracting Contributors, Attracting Contributors, Delivering Presentations as mechanism behind communication, The Basis of Communication, The Basis of Communication as viral marketing assets, Attracting Contributors, Attracting Contributors building social capital through, The Basis of Communication, The Basis of Communication in presentations, Delivering Presentations strategic planning, The Art of Community, Planning Your Community, Community: The Bird’s-Eye View, Community: The Bird’s-Eye View, Community: The Bird’s-Eye View, Community: The Bird’s-Eye View, Designing Your Community, Designing Your Community, Designing Your Community, Baking in Openness, Baking in Openness, Baking in Openness, Baking in Openness, Building a Mission Statement, Building a Mission Statement, Structuring the plan, Structuring the plan, Structuring the plan, Structuring the plan, Structuring the plan, Brainstorming Ideas, Technique 3: Let’s make it suck, Pulling Together the Threads, Financially Supporting Your Community, Documenting Your Strategy, Documenting Your Strategy, Financially Supporting Your Community, Financially Supporting Your Community, Revenue Opportunities, Sponsorship, Strategy, Strategy (see also teams) brainstorming, Brainstorming Ideas, Technique 3: Let’s make it suck building positive environment, Community: The Bird’s-Eye View, Community: The Bird’s-Eye View contribute growth, Community: The Bird’s-Eye View, Community: The Bird’s-Eye View difference from business strategic planning, Structuring the plan, Structuring the plan documenting, Designing Your Community, Designing Your Community, Designing Your Community, Baking in Openness, Baking in Openness, Building a Mission Statement, Building a Mission Statement, Structuring the plan, Structuring the plan, Structuring the plan, Pulling Together the Threads, Financially Supporting Your Community, Documenting Your Strategy, Documenting Your Strategy defining objectives, Structuring the plan, Pulling Together the Threads, Financially Supporting Your Community ingredients of, Designing Your Community, Designing Your Community mission statement, Designing Your Community, Building a Mission Statement, Building a Mission Statement structure of documentation, Structuring the plan, Structuring the plan transparency/openess when, Baking in Openness, Baking in Openness finances, Financially Supporting Your Community, Financially Supporting Your Community, Revenue Opportunities, Sponsorship required resources, Financially Supporting Your Community, Financially Supporting Your Community revenue opportunities, Revenue Opportunities, Sponsorship for openess/transparency, Baking in Openness, Baking in Openness need for, Planning Your Community of company, conveying to community managers, Strategy, Strategy streaming, live, Videos, Videos stress, The Art of Community (see burnout) subcouncils, Responsibilities success criteria, in strategic plan, Structuring the plan, Structuring the plan, Structuring the plan summits, Organizing Physical Events, Organizing a Summit, Event-specific notes, Event-specific notes surface-level diversity, Diversity, Diversity surveys, Gathering feedback, Gathering Structured Feedback, Gathering Structured Feedback, Surveys and Structured Feedback, Surveys and Structured Feedback, Choosing questions, Choosing questions, Showing off your survey reports, Showing off your survey reports, Ensuring Effective Processes, Ensuring Effective Processes, Reacting to Community Concerns, Reacting to Community Concerns choosing questions for, Choosing questions, Choosing questions for finding causes of bottlenecks, Ensuring Effective Processes, Ensuring Effective Processes for gathering feedback, Gathering feedback, Gathering Structured Feedback, Gathering Structured Feedback for learning about community concerns, Reacting to Community Concerns, Reacting to Community Concerns purpose of, Surveys and Structured Feedback, Surveys and Structured Feedback reports from, Showing off your survey reports, Showing off your survey reports Sweet, Adam, Finding Your Place, Finding Your Place syndication of content, Syndication, Syndication T T-shirts, for events, Assets, Assets tales, The Basis of Communication tasks, communication between teams about, Ensure that teams can communicate clearly and effectively teams, Community: The Bird’s-Eye View, Community: The Bird’s-Eye View, Community: The Bird’s-Eye View, Units of Belonging, Units of Belonging, Units of Belonging, Write-centered communities, Write-centered communities, Diversity, Diversity, Identify how we can divide our community into teams, Identify how we can divide our community into teams, Define the scope of each team, and help team members understand that scope, Define the scope of each team, and help team members understand that scope, Define the scope of each team, and help team members understand that scope, Define the scope of each team, and help team members understand that scope, Understand the extent and range of collaboration among our teams, Understand the extent and range of collaboration among our teams, Ensure that teams can communicate clearly and effectively, Ensure that teams can communicate clearly and effectively, Building a Set of Generals, Building a Set of Generals, Setting Up a Community Council, Setting Up a Community Council, Responsibilities and Community Council, Responsibilities as units of belonging, Units of Belonging, Units of Belonging building, Community: The Bird’s-Eye View, Community: The Bird’s-Eye View collaboration between, Understand the extent and range of collaboration among our teams, Understand the extent and range of collaboration among our teams communication between, Community: The Bird’s-Eye View, Ensure that teams can communicate clearly and effectively, Ensure that teams can communicate clearly and effectively diversity within, Diversity, Diversity dividing community into, Identify how we can divide our community into teams, Identify how we can divide our community into teams leaders of, tracking community health through, Building a Set of Generals, Building a Set of Generals mission statement for, Define the scope of each team, and help team members understand that scope, Define the scope of each team, and help team members understand that scope of Ubuntu community, Write-centered communities, Write-centered communities scope of, Units of Belonging, Define the scope of each team, and help team members understand that scope, Define the scope of each team, and help team members understand that scope vs. councils, Setting Up a Community Council, Setting Up a Community Council Technical Board, of Ubuntu community, Technical Board, Technical Board Technorati, The Amateur Press testing usability, Observational Tests, Observational Tests, Observational Tests Texas Linux Fest, Ilan Rabinovitch, Southern California Linux Expo, Ilan Rabinovitch, Southern California Linux Expo The Art of Community, community of, Social Media, Social Media The West Wing (TV program), Inspiring your community, Inspiring your community theory versus action, Theory Versus Action: Action Wins, Theory Versus Action: Action Wins Thorp, Ben (mrben), The Essence of Community, The Basis of Communication, The Basis of Communication threats on community, The Basis of Communication, The Basis of Communication, Unwrapping Opportunity, Unwrapping Opportunity effect on sense of belonging, The Basis of Communication, The Basis of Communication LugRadio response to rail strike, Unwrapping Opportunity, Unwrapping Opportunity time zones, and online events, Date/time, Date/time tone, of writing, Avoiding bikeshedding, Setting tone tools, Building Great Infrastructure, Building Great Infrastructure, Software As a Service, Software As a Service, Avoiding Resource Fetishism, Avoiding Resource Fetishism, Tool Access, Tool Access, Don’t Be That Guy/Girl, Don’t Be That Guy/Girl, Controlling the Fire Hose, Controlling the Fire Hose access to, Tool Access, Tool Access and workflow, Building Great Infrastructure, Building Great Infrastructure debates over, Avoiding Resource Fetishism, Avoiding Resource Fetishism for managing social media, Controlling the Fire Hose, Controlling the Fire Hose social media as tool, Don’t Be That Guy/Girl, Don’t Be That Guy/Girl Software as a Service (SaaS), Software As a Service, Software As a Service top posting, Netiquette, Netiquette Torvalds, Linus, Dictatorial Charismatic Leadership, Linus Torvalds, Linux, Linus Torvalds, Linux Trac (software), Building Great Infrastructure tracking, The Art of Community, Bug Tracking, Bug triage, Bug reporting, Measuring Mechanics, Measuring Mechanics, Credibility and the Need to Track Progress, Credibility and the Need to Track Progress, The Importance of Tracking Our Work, The Importance of Tracking Our Work, Tracking the Right Things, Tracking the Right Things, Within the Context of a Company, Communicating up and down, Tracking Growth and Decline, Using burndown charts, Tracking Growth and Decline, Tracking Growth and Decline, Visibility Is Key, Visibility Is Key, Ensuring Effective Processes, Ensuring Effective Processes, Tracking Health, Tracking Health, Promoting a Feedback Culture, Promoting a Feedback Culture, Building a Set of Generals, Building a Set of Generals, Reacting to Community Concerns, Reacting to Community Concerns (see also projects, tracking) bugs, Bug Tracking, Bug triage, Bug reporting, Measuring Mechanics, Measuring Mechanics determining what to track, Tracking the Right Things, Tracking the Right Things effect on building credibility, Credibility and the Need to Track Progress, Credibility and the Need to Track Progress growth and decline, Tracking Growth and Decline, Using burndown charts, Tracking Growth and Decline, Tracking Growth and Decline, Visibility Is Key, Visibility Is Key, Ensuring Effective Processes, Ensuring Effective Processes areas of, Tracking Growth and Decline, Tracking Growth and Decline data visibility, Visibility Is Key, Visibility Is Key finding causes of, Ensuring Effective Processes, Ensuring Effective Processes overview, Tracking Growth and Decline, Using burndown charts health of community, Tracking Health, Tracking Health, Promoting a Feedback Culture, Promoting a Feedback Culture, Building a Set of Generals, Building a Set of Generals, Reacting to Community Concerns, Reacting to Community Concerns by calls to team leaders, Building a Set of Generals, Building a Set of Generals overview, Tracking Health, Tracking Health promoting feedback culture, Promoting a Feedback Culture, Promoting a Feedback Culture responding to concerns, Reacting to Community Concerns, Reacting to Community Concerns importance of, The Importance of Tracking Our Work, The Importance of Tracking Our Work within a company, Within the Context of a Company, Communicating up and down transparency, Baking in Openness, Baking in Openness, Striving for Clarity, Striving for Clarity, Transparency, Transparency, Bug Tracking, Bug Tracking, Building and Maintaining Transparency, Building and Maintaining Transparency, Communications, Communications, Perception of you, Perception of you, Dictatorial Charismatic Leadership and dictatorial communities, Dictatorial Charismatic Leadership in bug tracking, Bug Tracking, Bug Tracking in communication, Striving for Clarity, Striving for Clarity, Communications, Communications in personal feedback, Perception of you, Perception of you in processes, Transparency, Transparency in strategic plan, Baking in Openness, Baking in Openness in workflow, Building and Maintaining Transparency, Building and Maintaining Transparency trend line, Using burndown charts trending topics, Getting more eyeballs triaging, Bug triage, Bug triage, Measuring Mechanics, Measuring Mechanics Troy, Ryan, Codifying Your Council trust, Trust Is Everything, Trust Is Everything tutorials, online, Organizing Online Events, Organizing Online Tutorials, Event-specific notes Twitter, Reporting, Reporting, Being Social, Being Social, Twitter, Twitter, Getting started with Twitter, Getting started with Twitter, Broadcasting, Tuning up your messages, Tuning up your messages, Tuning up your messages, Where to look, Where to look, Where to look, Where to look, Where to look, The buildup, At the event, At the event, Tim O’Reilly, O’Reilly Media, Tim O’Reilly, O’Reilly Media, Tim O’Reilly, O’Reilly Media broadcasting with, Broadcasting, Tuning up your messages, The buildup, At the event, At the event, Tim O’Reilly, O’Reilly Media about events, The buildup, At the event, At the event mindcasting, Tim O’Reilly, O’Reilly Media getting feedback using, Where to look, Where to look, Where to look getting started with, Getting started with Twitter, Getting started with Twitter history of, Twitter, Twitter overview of, Being Social, Being Social reporting with, Reporting, Reporting searching tweets, Where to look, Where to look use by Tim O'Reilly, Tim O’Reilly, O’Reilly Media, Tim O’Reilly, O’Reilly Media writing messages, Tuning up your messages, Tuning up your messages U Ubuntu Code of Conduct, Diversity, Diversity Ubuntu community, Write-centered communities, Baking in Openness, Baking in Openness, Understand the extent and range of collaboration among our teams, Striving for Clarity, Inspiring your community, Leading by example: Ubuntu, Leading by example: Ubuntu, Reviewing new developers: In depth, Reviewing new developers: In depth, Developing Knowledge, Developing Knowledge, Process Reassessment, Process Reassessment, An Example: Ubuntu Bug Workflow, Lessons learned, Feedback, Feedback, Providing Community Updates, Providing Community Updates, Videos, Videos, Hooks ’n’ Data, Hooks ’n’ Data, Plugging your stats into graphs, Visibility Is Key, Ensuring Effective Processes, Ensuring Effective Processes, In the Beginning..., In the Beginning..., Mark Shuttleworth, Mark Shuttleworth, Community Council, Community Council, Technical Board, Technical Board, Team councils, Team councils, Membership, Membership, Ubuntu Member, Ubuntu Member, Ubuntu Member, Ubuntu Member, Ubuntu Member, Ubuntu Member, Ubuntu Member, Ubuntu Member, Developer, Developer, Council or Board Member, Council or Board Member, Escalation, Escalation bug workflow example, An Example: Ubuntu Bug Workflow, Lessons learned bug-squashing parties, Plugging your stats into graphs contributor access to repositories, Reviewing new developers: In depth, Reviewing new developers: In depth developer mentoring campaign, Visibility Is Key history of, In the Beginning..., In the Beginning...

., Building Belonging into the Social Economy hashtags, Getting more eyeballs, Where to look, Asking for feedback, The buildup, At the event Hawthorn, Leslie, Step 4: Make Time, Event-specific notes, Event-specific notes health of community, tracking, Tracking Health, Tracking Health, Promoting a Feedback Culture, Promoting a Feedback Culture, Building a Set of Generals, Building a Set of Generals, Reacting to Community Concerns, Reacting to Community Concerns by calls to team leaders, Building a Set of Generals, Building a Set of Generals overview, Tracking Health, Tracking Health promoting feedback culture, Promoting a Feedback Culture, Promoting a Feedback Culture responding to concerns, Reacting to Community Concerns, Reacting to Community Concerns hiring community manager, Risk, Risk Holbach, Daniel, Planning, Hooks ’n’ Data, Visibility Is Key, Visibility Is Key hooks and data, Hooks ’n’ Data, Hooks ’n’ Data, Statistics and Automated Data, Plugging your stats into graphs, Surveys and Structured Feedback, Showing off your survey reports, Observational Tests, Observational Tests, Measuring Mechanics, Measuring Mechanics, Gathering General Perceptions, Perception of you, Part 2: Get the facts, Part 2: Get the facts gathering general perceptions, Gathering General Perceptions, Perception of you in conflict resolution, Part 2: Get the facts, Part 2: Get the facts measuring mechanics, Measuring Mechanics, Measuring Mechanics observational tests, Observational Tests, Observational Tests overview, Hooks ’n’ Data, Hooks ’n’ Data statistics and automated data, Statistics and Automated Data, Plugging your stats into graphs surveys, Surveys and Structured Feedback, Showing off your survey reports hotels, for event accommodation, Accommodation, Accommodation Hudson, Paul, The Professional Press, The Professional Press Humble Indie Bundle, Richard Esguerra, Humble Indie Bundle, Richard Esguerra, Humble Indie Bundle humor, Setting tone Hybrid Theory (album), Mike Shinoda, Linkin Park I identi.ca, Reporting, Reporting, Getting started with Facebook reporting with, Reporting, Reporting users of, Getting started with Facebook implementation plan, Structuring the plan incentives, for donations, Donations Innovate Developer Conference, Carolyn Mellor, X.commerce, PayPal, and eBay inspiring others, Inspiring your community, Inspiring your community, Inspired Words, Inspired Words, Aspire to Inspire, Aspire to Inspire as goal of governing body, Aspire to Inspire, Aspire to Inspire through writing, Inspiring your community, Inspiring your community, Inspired Words, Inspired Words insurance, for physical events, Insurance/unions, Insurance/unions Internet Relay Chat, The Art of Community (see IRC) interviews, building buzz with, Attracting Contributors IRC (Internet Relay Chat), IRC, IRC, Communications, Observational Tests, Privacy, Internet Relay Chat (IRC), Preparing for a session, Running a session features and benefits of, IRC, IRC logging, Communications privacy issues, Privacy usability testing over, Observational Tests use with online events, Internet Relay Chat (IRC), Preparing for a session, Running a session issues, communication between teams about, The Art of Community, Ensure that teams can communicate clearly and effectively (see also conflict) J Johnson & Johnson conflict resolution approach, Part 1: Calm and reassure, The fantastical user group debacle, Part 2: Get the facts, The fantastical user group debacle, Part 3: Discuss, The fantastical user group debacle, Part 4: Document, The fantastical user group debacle, Part 5: Reflect and maintain, The fantastical user group debacle calm and reassure, Part 1: Calm and reassure, The fantastical user group debacle discuss, Part 3: Discuss, The fantastical user group debacle document, Part 4: Document, The fantastical user group debacle get the facts, Part 2: Get the facts, The fantastical user group debacle reflect and maintain, Part 5: Reflect and maintain, The fantastical user group debacle Jokosher project, Planning Your Community, Planning Your Community, Communication fetishism, Reviewing new developers: In depth, Reviewing new developers: In depth, Bug reporting, Regular Workflow Assessment, Regular Workflow Assessment bug tracking, Bug reporting communication channels used for, Communication fetishism contributions of Laszlo Pandy, Reviewing new developers: In depth, Reviewing new developers: In depth workflow assessment during, Regular Workflow Assessment, Regular Workflow Assessment justice, lack of, Lack of Justice, Lack of Justice K KDE project, Enlightened Dictatorship, Enlightened Dictatorship, Creating and Running Events, Creating and Running Events keynotes, at events, Opening keynotes, Opening keynotes KGRUBEditor, Observational Tests KHTML technology, Enlightened Dictatorship, Enlightened Dictatorship KickStarter, Donations Kiss, Tom, James Spafford, Media Molecule L Langridge, Stuart (Aq), Planning Your Community Laporte, Leo, Foreword from the First Edition Launchpad (software collaboration platform), An Example: Ubuntu Bug Workflow, Getting to know the problem, Hooks ’n’ Data, Hooks ’n’ Data leadership, The Art of Community, The Art of Community (see community managers) (see governance) Lessig, Lawrence, Untwisting the tail, Announcing Your Community licensing, Untwisting the tail, Untwisting the tail, Videos, Mike Linksvayer, Creative Commons, Mike Linksvayer, Creative Commons Liebling, Alison, Gathering General Perceptions lightning talks, Lightning talks, Lightning talks Linkin Park, Mike Shinoda, Linkin Park, Mike Shinoda, Linkin Park Linksvayer, Mike, Mike Linksvayer, Creative Commons, Mike Linksvayer, Creative Commons Linspire (formerly Lindows), Blog wars, Blog wars Linux community, The Art of Community, The Art of Community, Write-centered communities, Diversity, Diversity, Linus Torvalds, Linux, Linus Torvalds, Linux (see also Ubuntu community) (see also Xubuntu community) Linux Demo Day, Building Buzz, Building Buzz Linux Format magazine, The Professional Press, The Professional Press listening to others, The Value of Listening, The Value of Listening, Membership, Barriers to Input, Barriers to Input LittleBigPlanet community, James Spafford, Media Molecule, James Spafford, Media Molecule live streaming, Videos, Videos LoCo (Ubuntu Local Community), Observational Tests, Building a Set of Generals, Building a Set of Generals, Responsibilities, Team councils, Team councils LUGFests, Ilan Rabinovitch, Southern California Linux Expo, Ilan Rabinovitch, Southern California Linux Expo LugRadio community, The Essence of Community, The Essence of Community, The Basis of Communication, The Basis of Communication, Unwrapping Opportunity, Unwrapping Opportunity, Unwrapping Opportunity, Unwrapping Opportunity, Unwrapping Opportunity, Unwrapping Opportunity, Becoming Yourself, Becoming Yourself, Communication fetishism, Communication fetishism, Discussion forums, Podcasts, Podcasts, Location/venue, Cost, Setting expectations, Setting expectations belief in, Unwrapping Opportunity, Unwrapping Opportunity effect of unedited productions, Becoming Yourself, Becoming Yourself events of, Unwrapping Opportunity, Unwrapping Opportunity, Location/venue, Cost forums of, Communication fetishism, Communication fetishism, Discussion forums origin of, The Essence of Community, The Essence of Community podcast, Podcasts, Podcasts response to rail strike, Unwrapping Opportunity, Unwrapping Opportunity sponsorship of, Setting expectations, Setting expectations stories in, The Basis of Communication, The Basis of Communication M MacQueue bulletion board, Foreword from the First Edition Macromedia Flash plug-in, Videos mailing lists, The Mediums, Mailing lists, Mailing lists, Netiquette, Netiquette, Gathering feedback, Gathering feedback, Privacy, Communicating Between Councils effect on how people behave, The Mediums for communication between councils, Communicating Between Councils for gathering feedback, Gathering feedback, Gathering feedback overview of, Mailing lists, Mailing lists privacy concerns, Privacy top posting to, Netiquette, Netiquette Major, John, Uniting Together managers, The Art of Community, The Art of Community (see community managers) (see governance) marketing, The Art of Community (see buzz, creating) maturing of members, Profiling the polemical, Profiling the polemical McMillan, John, Building Belonging into the Social Economy measuring community, Measuring Community, Community Self-Reflection, The Foundations of Feedback, The Foundations of Feedback, Defining Purpose, Defining Purpose, Hooks ’n’ Data, Hooks ’n’ Data, Statistics and Automated Data, Plugging your stats into graphs, Surveys and Structured Feedback, Showing off your survey reports, Observational Tests, Observational Tests, Measuring Mechanics, Measuring Mechanics, Gathering General Perceptions, Perception of you, Anonymity, Anonymity, Privacy, Privacy anonymity and, Anonymity, Anonymity establishing goals of, Defining Purpose, Defining Purpose meaning in measurements, The Foundations of Feedback, The Foundations of Feedback overview of, Measuring Community, Community Self-Reflection privacy issues, Privacy, Privacy use of hooks and data, Hooks ’n’ Data, Hooks ’n’ Data, Statistics and Automated Data, Plugging your stats into graphs, Surveys and Structured Feedback, Showing off your survey reports, Observational Tests, Observational Tests, Measuring Mechanics, Measuring Mechanics, Gathering General Perceptions, Perception of you gathering general perceptions, Gathering General Perceptions, Perception of you measuring mechanics, Measuring Mechanics, Measuring Mechanics observational tests, Observational Tests, Observational Tests overview, Hooks ’n’ Data, Hooks ’n’ Data statistics and automated data, Statistics and Automated Data, Plugging your stats into graphs surveys, Surveys and Structured Feedback, Showing off your survey reports Measuring the Quality of Prison Life study, Gathering General Perceptions mechanics of collaboration, The Mechanics of Collaboration, The Mechanics of Collaboration, Measuring Mechanics, Measuring Mechanics Media Molecule, James Spafford, Media Molecule, James Spafford, Media Molecule mediator, of conflict resolution, The Role of a Facilitator, Be clear meetings, The Art of Community, Attracting Contributors, Step 2: Find Help, Step 2: Find Help, Online Discussion Meetings, Running the meeting, Management and Communications, Weekly engagements (see also events) between company and community manager, Management and Communications, Weekly engagements building buzz with, Attracting Contributors for organizing events, Step 2: Find Help, Step 2: Find Help online discussion meetings, Online Discussion Meetings, Running the meeting Mellor, Carolyn, Carolyn Mellor, X.commerce, PayPal, and eBay, Carolyn Mellor, X.commerce, PayPal, and eBay members, The Art of Community, Responsibilities, Membership, Nominating and Electing Council Members, Forming a new council (see also contributers) approval of, Responsibilities of Community Council, Membership, Nominating and Electing Council Members, Forming a new council meritocracy, Meritocracy, Meritocracy, Enlightened Dictatorship Messina, Chris, Attracting Contributors, Organizing an Unconference, Organizing an Unconference, Organizing an Unconference, Organizing an Unconference Mickos, Mårten, The Role of a Community Manager in the Corporation, Mårten Mickos, MySQL and Eucalyptus, Mårten Mickos, MySQL and Eucalyptus microphones, at events, Room Layout mindcasting, Tim O’Reilly, O’Reilly Media mindshare, Mindshare, The Mindshare Opportunity, Defining Purpose, Gathering General Perceptions mission statement, Designing Your Community, Building a Mission Statement, Building a Mission Statement, Define the scope of each team, and help team members understand that scope, Define the scope of each team, and help team members understand that scope, The Mission, The Mission and buzz, The Mission, The Mission for each team, Define the scope of each team, and help team members understand that scope, Define the scope of each team, and help team members understand that scope overview of, Designing Your Community writing, Building a Mission Statement, Building a Mission Statement money from sponsors, The Art of Community, The Art of Community, Handling the Money, Handling the Money (see also costs) (see also finances) Mozilla, Attracting Contributors, Attracting Contributors, Mary Colvig, Mozilla, Mary Colvig, Mozilla mrben (Ben Thorp), The Essence of Community, The Basis of Communication, The Basis of Communication multimedia, use when announcing community, Announcing Your Community music industry, and community, Mike Shinoda, Linkin Park, Mike Shinoda, Linkin Park N negative energy, Honesty, Honesty netiquette, Netiquette, Netiquette news, on website, Staying Current, Staying Current Nielsen, Jakob, Announce, Announce Nielsen, Michael, Tim O’Reilly, O’Reilly Media nominating council members, Nominating and Electing Council Members, Forming a new council North, Gail, Dealing with Burnout notetakers, at summits, Inside a session O O'Reilly Media, Tim O’Reilly, O’Reilly Media, Tim O’Reilly, O’Reilly Media O'Reilly's Radar site, Staying Current O'Reilly, Tim, Don’t Be That Guy/Girl, Staying Current, Privacy, Tim O’Reilly, O’Reilly Media, Tim O’Reilly, O’Reilly Media Obama, Barack, Unwrapping Opportunity, Unwrapping Opportunity, Aspire to Inspire, Aspire to Inspire as inspirational orator, Aspire to Inspire, Aspire to Inspire election of, Unwrapping Opportunity, Unwrapping Opportunity objectives, in strategic plan, Structuring the plan, Pulling Together the Threads, Financially Supporting Your Community objectivity, in conflict resolution, Be objective, Be objective, Be objective Ogg Theora, Videos Oliver, Jamie, The Mindshare Opportunity, The Mindshare Opportunity On Writing Well (Zinsser), Don’t write like an institution on-ramp, The On-Ramp: Creating Collaborative Processes, The On-Ramp: Creating Collaborative Processes, The On-Ramp: Creating Collaborative Processes, Identifying the On-Ramp, Identifying the On-Ramp, Developing Knowledge, Developing Knowledge, Determining Contributions, Determining Contributions, Growing Kudos, Growing Kudos defined, The On-Ramp: Creating Collaborative Processes determining contributions, Determining Contributions, Determining Contributions identifying, Identifying the On-Ramp, Identifying the On-Ramp showing appreciation, Growing Kudos, Growing Kudos skills acquisition, Developing Knowledge, Developing Knowledge steps in, The On-Ramp: Creating Collaborative Processes, The On-Ramp: Creating Collaborative Processes one-on-one discussion, for gathering feedback, Gathering feedback, Gathering feedback online events, Organizing Online Events, Organizing Online Events, Organizing Online Events, Medium, Virtual worlds, Date/time, Date/time, Online Discussion Meetings, Running the meeting, Organizing Online Tutorials, Event-specific notes date and time of, Date/time, Date/time discussion meetings, Online Discussion Meetings, Running the meeting medium for hosting, Medium, Virtual worlds overview of, Organizing Online Events, Organizing Online Events tutorials, Organizing Online Events, Organizing Online Tutorials, Event-specific notes open days, building buzz with, Attracting Contributors Open Source Conference (OSCON), Long versus short presentations, Long versus short presentations open source development, Building Belonging into the Social Economy, Building Belonging into the Social Economy, Planning Your Community, Planning Your Community, Building a Strategic Plan, Building a Strategic Plan, Tool Access, Tool Access, Observational Tests, Observational Tests, Observational Tests, Why Community Building Has Become a Big Business, Why Community Building Has Become a Big Business, Linus Torvalds, Linux, Linus Torvalds, Linux access to tools, Tool Access, Tool Access and community, Why Community Building Has Become a Big Business, Why Community Building Has Become a Big Business differing motives for contributing to, Linus Torvalds, Linux, Linus Torvalds, Linux fixed release cycles, Building a Strategic Plan, Building a Strategic Plan in business, Building Belonging into the Social Economy, Building Belonging into the Social Economy Jokosher audio editor example, Planning Your Community, Planning Your Community usability testing, Observational Tests, Observational Tests, Observational Tests OpenAdvantage, Becoming the Advocate, Becoming the Advocate openess, The Art of Community (see also transparency) openness, Barriers to Input, Be open, Be open OpenSuSE Board, Commercial sponsorship opportunities, Unwrapping Opportunity, Unwrapping Opportunity, Unwrapping Opportunity, Designing Your Community, Designing Your Community, Designing Your Community, Designing Your Community, Designing Your Community and early days of Linux, Unwrapping Opportunity, Unwrapping Opportunity and Obama election, Unwrapping Opportunity documenting, Designing Your Community, Designing Your Community, Designing Your Community, Designing Your Community, Designing Your Community Oram, Andy, Preface, Simplicity is key Organizational Vision, Values and Mission (Scott), Building a Mission Statement OSCON (Open Source Conference), Long versus short presentations, Long versus short presentations outside the box thinking, Technique 2: Think outside the box, Technique 2: Think outside the box owner of goals, Structuring the plan P Packard, Keith, Transparency Pages, in Google+, Getting started with Google+ Pandy, Laszlo, Reviewing new developers: In depth, Reviewing new developers: In depth patience, The Value of Listening patterns, in burndown charts, Observing burndown patterns, Observing burndown patterns Paul, Celeste Lyn, Observational Tests, Observational Tests PayPal, Donations, Carolyn Mellor, X.commerce, PayPal, and eBay, Carolyn Mellor, X.commerce, PayPal, and eBay, Carolyn Mellor, X.commerce, PayPal, and eBay peer review, Reviewing new developers: In depth, Reviewing new developers: In depth performance reviews, Technique 1: Question assumptions personality issues, The Art of Community, Profiling the polemical, Profiling the polemical, Profiling the polemical, Profiling the polemical, Sharing feedback about personality issues, Sharing feedback about personality issues, Poisonous people, Poisonous people (see also conflict) attributes causing conflict, Profiling the polemical, Profiling the polemical maturity, Profiling the polemical, Profiling the polemical poisonous people, Poisonous people, Poisonous people sharing feedback about, Sharing feedback about personality issues, Sharing feedback about personality issues Persse, James, Building Great Processes phone calls, privacy during, Privacy physical events, Organizing Physical Events, Organizing Physical Events, Organizing Physical Events, Organizing Physical Events, Organizing Physical Events, Location/venue, Location/venue, Location/venue, Location/venue, Accommodation, Accommodation, Equipment, Equipment, Date/time, Date/time, Cost, Cost, Registering attendance, Registering attendance, Catering, Catering, Insurance/unions, Insurance/unions, Insurance/unions, Insurance/unions, Organizing a Sprint, Additional notes, Additional notes, Additional notes, Additional notes, Additional notes, Additional notes, Organizing a Summit, Inside a session, Inside a session, Event-specific notes, Event-specific notes, Event-specific notes, Event-specific notes, Event-specific notes, Event-specific notes, Event-specific notes, Organizing an Unconference, Event-specific notes, Event-specific notes, Event-specific notes, Event-specific notes, Event-specific notes accommodations for, Accommodation, Accommodation catering for, Catering, Catering, Additional notes, Event-specific notes, Event-specific notes conferences, Organizing Physical Events cost of, Cost, Cost, Additional notes, Event-specific notes date and time for, Date/time, Date/time, Additional notes, Event-specific notes, Event-specific notes equipment at, Equipment, Equipment, Additional notes, Event-specific notes, Event-specific notes insurance needs, Insurance/unions, Insurance/unions location of, Location/venue, Location/venue registering attendance, Registering attendance, Registering attendance, Additional notes, Event-specific notes, Event-specific notes remote participation in, Inside a session, Inside a session sprints, Organizing Physical Events, Organizing a Sprint, Additional notes summits, Organizing Physical Events, Organizing a Summit, Event-specific notes, Event-specific notes types of, Organizing Physical Events, Organizing Physical Events unconferences, Organizing an Unconference, Event-specific notes union requirements, Insurance/unions, Insurance/unions venue, Location/venue, Location/venue piracy, Foreword, Foreword planets, Syndication planning phase, of buzz cycle, Planning, Planning, Planning, Applying the buzz cycle, Applying the buzz cycle plenaries, at events, Plenaries, Plenaries podcasts, Podcasts, Podcasts politics, creating buzz compared to, Uniting Together, Uniting Together Pope, Alan, Social Media, Social Media positiveness, in conflict resolution, Be positive, Be positive postmortems, Review, Review presentations at events, Submitting your paper, Submitting your paper, Promoting your talk, Promoting your talk, Delivering Presentations, Long versus short presentations, Creating attractive slides, Long versus short presentations, Long versus short presentations, Long versus short presentations, Ilan Rabinovitch, Southern California Linux Expo, Ilan Rabinovitch, Southern California Linux Expo attracting presenters, Ilan Rabinovitch, Southern California Linux Expo, Ilan Rabinovitch, Southern California Linux Expo delivering, Delivering Presentations, Long versus short presentations long vs. short, Long versus short presentations, Long versus short presentations promoting, Promoting your talk, Promoting your talk slides in, Creating attractive slides, Long versus short presentations submitting proposal for, Submitting your paper, Submitting your paper press, as target of buzz campaign, The Professional Press, The Professional Press, The Amateur Press, The Amateur Press amateur, The Amateur Press, The Amateur Press professional, The Professional Press, The Professional Press pride, Avoid Ego, or Others Will Avoid You, Avoid Ego, or Others Will Avoid You privacy, Privacy, Privacy, Privacy, Part 2: Get the facts, Tim O’Reilly, O’Reilly Media, Tim O’Reilly, O’Reilly Media balancing with visibility, Tim O’Reilly, O’Reilly Media, Tim O’Reilly, O’Reilly Media during conflict resolution, Part 2: Get the facts during phone calls, Privacy when gathering feedback, Privacy, Privacy Process Improvement Essentials (Persse), Building Great Processes processes, Building Great Processes, Building Great Processes, Breaking Up the Puzzle, Building a process, Building a process, Simplicity is key, Simplicity is key, Avoiding bureaucracy, Avoiding bureaucracy, Transparency, Transparency, Assessing Needs, Assessing Needs, Community Cycles, Leading by example: Ubuntu, The Gates of Your Community, The Gates of Your Community, Assessing Contributors, Reviewing new developers: In depth, Managing Feedback, Gathering feedback, Document Them, Make Them Easy to Find, Make Them Easy to Find, Make Them Easy to Find, Make Them Easy to Find, Using Your Processes, Using Your Processes, The On-Ramp: Creating Collaborative Processes, Growing Kudos, The On-Ramp: Creating Collaborative Processes, The On-Ramp: Creating Collaborative Processes, The On-Ramp: Creating Collaborative Processes, Identifying the On-Ramp, Identifying the On-Ramp, Developing Knowledge, Developing Knowledge, Determining Contributions, Determining Contributions, Growing Kudos, Growing Kudos, Process Reassessment, Building Regularity, Responsibilities and community cycles, Community Cycles, Leading by example: Ubuntu announcing, Make Them Easy to Find, Make Them Easy to Find avoiding bureaucracy, Avoiding bureaucracy, Avoiding bureaucracy building, Building a process, Building a process categories of, Assessing Needs, Assessing Needs changes in, Responsibilities documentation of, Document Them, Make Them Easy to Find, Make Them Easy to Find encouraging use of, Using Your Processes, Using Your Processes for assessing contributors, Assessing Contributors, Reviewing new developers: In depth for attracting contributors, The Gates of Your Community, The Gates of Your Community for managing feedback, Managing Feedback, Gathering feedback good vs. bad, Building Great Processes, Building Great Processes in getting participation (the on-ramp), The On-Ramp: Creating Collaborative Processes, Growing Kudos, The On-Ramp: Creating Collaborative Processes, The On-Ramp: Creating Collaborative Processes, The On-Ramp: Creating Collaborative Processes, Identifying the On-Ramp, Identifying the On-Ramp, Developing Knowledge, Developing Knowledge, Determining Contributions, Determining Contributions, Growing Kudos, Growing Kudos defined, The On-Ramp: Creating Collaborative Processes determining contributions, Determining Contributions, Determining Contributions identifying, Identifying the On-Ramp, Identifying the On-Ramp showing appreciation, Growing Kudos, Growing Kudos skills acquisition, Developing Knowledge, Developing Knowledge steps in, The On-Ramp: Creating Collaborative Processes, The On-Ramp: Creating Collaborative Processes reassessing, Process Reassessment, Building Regularity simplicity as foundation of, Breaking Up the Puzzle, Simplicity is key, Simplicity is key transparency in, Transparency, Transparency product recalls, Building Great Processes, Building Great Processes professional press, as target of buzz campaign, The Professional Press, The Professional Press Project level, of projects, Tracking Projects projectors, using at events, The Ethos of the UDS, Room Layout, Room Layout, Room Layout projects, tracking, Tracking Projects, Tracking Projects, Structuring Your Projects, Structuring Your Projects, Managing Work Items, Documenting work items, Visualizing Data with Burndown Charts, Visualizing Data with Burndown Charts, Using burndown charts, Using burndown charts, Using burndown charts, Generating additional information, Using burndown charts, Using burndown charts, Observing burndown patterns, Observing burndown patterns, Building burndown charts into your workflow, Building burndown charts into your workflow managing work items, Managing Work Items, Documenting work items providing different levels of visibility, Tracking Projects, Tracking Projects using blueprints, Structuring Your Projects, Structuring Your Projects using burndown charts, Visualizing Data with Burndown Charts, Visualizing Data with Burndown Charts, Using burndown charts, Using burndown charts, Using burndown charts, Generating additional information, Using burndown charts, Using burndown charts, Observing burndown patterns, Observing burndown patterns, Building burndown charts into your workflow, Building burndown charts into your workflow benefits of, Using burndown charts, Using burndown charts building into workflow, Building burndown charts into your workflow, Building burndown charts into your workflow generating charts, Using burndown charts, Generating additional information overview, Visualizing Data with Burndown Charts, Visualizing Data with Burndown Charts patterns in charts, Observing burndown patterns, Observing burndown patterns reading charts, Using burndown charts, Using burndown charts Putnam, Robert, Building Belonging into the Social Economy Q quantity vs. quality, The risks of interpretation R Rabinovitch, Ilan, Location/venue, Ilan Rabinovitch, Southern California Linux Expo, Ilan Rabinovitch, Southern California Linux Expo Raymond, Eric, Bug Tracking read-mostly communities, Read-mostly communities, Read-mostly communities Really Simple Syndication (RSS) feeds, Syndication, Syndication recordMyDesktop, Videos Regional Membership Boards, Ubuntu Member, Ubuntu Member Reinventing Discovery (Nielsen), Tim O’Reilly, O’Reilly Media Reinventing the Bazaar (McMillan), Building Belonging into the Social Economy release cycles, Ubuntu community, Leading by example: Ubuntu, Leading by example: Ubuntu release parties, Organizing Physical Events, Organizing Online Events defined, Organizing Physical Events online, Organizing Online Events remote participation, in Ubuntu Developer Summit, Infrastructure, Infrastructure, Room Layout reporting, Bug reporting, Bug reporting, Reporting, Reporting, Reporting, Reporting, Showing off your survey reports, Showing off your survey reports, Measuring Mechanics, Measuring Mechanics bugs, Bug reporting, Bug reporting, Measuring Mechanics, Measuring Mechanics examples of, Reporting, Reporting making easy, Reporting, Reporting survey data, Showing off your survey reports, Showing off your survey reports reputation of community manager, Internal reputation, Community reputation resources, and governance, The Case for Governance respect for others, in Ubuntu Code of Conduct, Diversity responsibility, problems with, Problems with Responsibility, Problems with Responsibility revenue opportunities, Revenue Opportunities, Donations ReverbNation, The preparation review phase, of buzz cycle, Review, Review, Applying the buzz cycle, Applying the buzz cycle roles, Roles, Roles room layout, at events, Room Layout, Room Layout Ross, Blake, Attracting Contributors, Mary Colvig, Mozilla routine, breaking, Events, Events, Events RSS (Really Simple Syndication) feeds, Syndication, Syndication S SaaS (Software as a Service), Software As a Service, Software As a Service Safari® Books Online, Safari® Books Online salary of community manager, Salary, Salary Saxena, Deepak, Building Buzz, Building Buzz SCALE (Southern California Linux Expo), Ilan Rabinovitch, Southern California Linux Expo, Ilan Rabinovitch, Southern California Linux Expo Schaller, Christian, The Structure of Strife, The Structure of Strife scope of teams, Units of Belonging, Define the scope of each team, and help team members understand that scope, Define the scope of each team, and help team members understand that scope Scott, Cynthia D., Building a Mission Statement screen-scraping, Plugging your stats into graphs Screencast-O-Matic, Videos search engine optimization (SEO), Syndication, Syndication Second Life, Virtual worlds, Virtual worlds selling items, to generate revenue, Selling, Selling SEO (search engine optimization), Syndication, Syndication seriousness, Setting tone sessions, at events, Sessions, Sessions Severed Fifth project, Donations, Donations Sheen, Martin, Inspiring your community Shigeru Miyamoto, Technique 2: Think outside the box Shinoda, Mike, A Community Manager: Becoming the Community, Mike Shinoda, Linkin Park, Mike Shinoda, Linkin Park Shuttleworth, Mark, Hooks ’n’ Data, Commercial sponsorship, In the Beginning..., In the Beginning..., Scheduling signs, using at events, Assets simplicity as foundation of processes, Breaking Up the Puzzle, Simplicity is key, Simplicity is key size of community, The Case for Governance skills, Designing Your Community, Designing Your Community, Designing Your Community, Designing Your Community, Identify how we can divide our community into teams, Identify how we can divide our community into teams, Developing Knowledge, Developing Knowledge, Knowing When It Is Time acquisition of, Developing Knowledge, Developing Knowledge and formation of additional councils, Knowing When It Is Time mapping to teams, Identify how we can divide our community into teams, Identify how we can divide our community into teams required, documenting, Designing Your Community, Designing Your Community, Designing Your Community, Designing Your Community Skype, Voice over IP (VoIP), Voice over IP (VoIP) slides in presentations, Creating attractive slides, Long versus short presentations Smanis, Konstantinos, Observational Tests social capital, Building Belonging into the Social Economy, Building Belonging into the Social Economy, Building Belonging into the Social Economy, The Basis of Communication, The Basis of Communication building through storytelling, The Basis of Communication, The Basis of Communication defined, Building Belonging into the Social Economy social economy, Building Belonging into the Social Economy, Building Belonging into the Social Economy, Building Belonging into the Social Economy, Building Belonging into the Social Economy, The Basis of Communication, The Basis of Communication building belonging into, Building Belonging into the Social Economy, Building Belonging into the Social Economy communication in, The Basis of Communication, The Basis of Communication comparison with financial economy, Building Belonging into the Social Economy, Building Belonging into the Social Economy social media, The Art of Community, The Art of Community, The Art of Community, Don’t Be That Guy/Girl, Don’t Be That Guy/Girl, Being Social, Being Social, Being Social, Being Social, Being Social, Harnessing Social Media, Broadcasting, Broadcasting, Broadcasting, Tuning up your messages, Avoiding social media overkill, Avoiding social media overkill, Feedback, Feedback, Where to look, Where to look, Where to look, Debates, Debates, Asking for feedback, Asking for feedback, Collaboration, Collaboration, Campaigns and awareness, Events, Events, Controlling the Fire Hose, Controlling the Fire Hose, Optimizing How You Post, Optimizing How You Post, Being Socially Responsible, Being Socially Responsible, Organizing a Community Event, At the event, Running a Campaign, The buildup, Providing Community Updates, Providing Community Updates, Mike Shinoda, Linkin Park, Mike Shinoda, Linkin Park, Tim O’Reilly, O’Reilly Media, Tim O’Reilly, O’Reilly Media (see also Facebook) (see also Google+) (see also Twitter) broadcasting with, Being Social, Broadcasting, Broadcasting, Broadcasting, Tuning up your messages, Avoiding social media overkill, Avoiding social media overkill balanced use of, Avoiding social media overkill, Avoiding social media overkill content of broadcasts, Broadcasting, Broadcasting overview, Being Social using Twitter, Broadcasting, Tuning up your messages collaboration using, Being Social, Collaboration, Collaboration, Campaigns and awareness, Events, Events, Running a Campaign, The buildup coordinating events, Events, Events for campaigns and awareness, Campaigns and awareness, Running a Campaign, The buildup overview of, Being Social party-planning example, Collaboration, Collaboration controlling time using, Harnessing Social Media, Controlling the Fire Hose, Controlling the Fire Hose getting feedback using, Being Social, Feedback, Feedback, Where to look, Where to look, Where to look, Debates, Debates, Asking for feedback, Asking for feedback by asking for, Asking for feedback, Asking for feedback overview, Being Social Ubuntu 11.04 release example, Feedback, Feedback using Twitter, Where to look, Where to look, Where to look via debates, Debates, Debates most common networks, Being Social, Being Social optimizing posts to, Optimizing How You Post, Optimizing How You Post organizing community event using, Organizing a Community Event, At the event providing community updates with, Providing Community Updates, Providing Community Updates realistic expectations of, Don’t Be That Guy/Girl, Don’t Be That Guy/Girl responsible use of, Being Socially Responsible, Being Socially Responsible use by community leaders, Mike Shinoda, Linkin Park, Mike Shinoda, Linkin Park, Tim O’Reilly, O’Reilly Media, Tim O’Reilly, O’Reilly Media Mike Shinoda (Linkin Park), Mike Shinoda, Linkin Park, Mike Shinoda, Linkin Park Tim O'Reilly, Tim O’Reilly, O’Reilly Media, Tim O’Reilly, O’Reilly Media Software as a Service (SaaS), Software As a Service, Software As a Service software cycles, fixed release, Building a Strategic Plan, Building a Strategic Plan Somerville, Cody, Baking in Openness Sorkin, Aaron, Inspiring your community source control, Source Control, Source Control Southern California Linux Expo (SCALE), Ilan Rabinovitch, Southern California Linux Expo, Ilan Rabinovitch, Southern California Linux Expo Spafford, James, The Second Edition, James Spafford, Media Molecule, James Spafford, Media Molecule spam, Getting It Right by Not Getting It Wrong, Getting It Right by Not Getting It Wrong speaking at events, The Art of Community (see presentations at events) Spencer, Rick, Visualizing Data with Burndown Charts, Visualizing Data with Burndown Charts sponsored communities, The Case for Governance, Commercial sponsorship, Commercial sponsorship, Barriers to Input, Barriers to Input and governance, The Case for Governance conflict within, Barriers to Input, Barriers to Input councils of, Commercial sponsorship, Commercial sponsorship sponsors, Understanding Your Needs, Understanding Your Needs, Finding and Handling Sponsors, Finding and Handling Sponsors, Setting expectations, Setting expectations, The pitch, The pitch, Handling the Money, Handling the Money, Scheduling, Scheduling determining, Finding and Handling Sponsors, Finding and Handling Sponsors examining needs before approaching, Understanding Your Needs, Understanding Your Needs giving back to, Setting expectations, Setting expectations managing money from, Handling the Money, Handling the Money of Ubuntu Developer Summit, Scheduling, Scheduling pitching to, The pitch, The pitch Spread Firefox campaign, Attracting Contributors, Attracting Contributors, Mary Colvig, Mozilla, Mary Colvig, Mozilla Spreadshirt, Selling sprints, Organizing Physical Events, Organizing a Sprint, Additional notes Stallman, Richard, Dictatorial Charismatic Leadership stories, The Basis of Communication, The Basis of Communication, The Basis of Communication, The Basis of Communication, Attracting Contributors, Attracting Contributors, Delivering Presentations as mechanism behind communication, The Basis of Communication, The Basis of Communication as viral marketing assets, Attracting Contributors, Attracting Contributors building social capital through, The Basis of Communication, The Basis of Communication in presentations, Delivering Presentations strategic planning, The Art of Community, Planning Your Community, Community: The Bird’s-Eye View, Community: The Bird’s-Eye View, Community: The Bird’s-Eye View, Community: The Bird’s-Eye View, Designing Your Community, Designing Your Community, Designing Your Community, Baking in Openness, Baking in Openness, Baking in Openness, Baking in Openness, Building a Mission Statement, Building a Mission Statement, Structuring the plan, Structuring the plan, Structuring the plan, Structuring the plan, Structuring the plan, Brainstorming Ideas, Technique 3: Let’s make it suck, Pulling Together the Threads, Financially Supporting Your Community, Documenting Your Strategy, Documenting Your Strategy, Financially Supporting Your Community, Financially Supporting Your Community, Revenue Opportunities, Sponsorship, Strategy, Strategy (see also teams) brainstorming, Brainstorming Ideas, Technique 3: Let’s make it suck building positive environment, Community: The Bird’s-Eye View, Community: The Bird’s-Eye View contribute growth, Community: The Bird’s-Eye View, Community: The Bird’s-Eye View difference from business strategic planning, Structuring the plan, Structuring the plan documenting, Designing Your Community, Designing Your Community, Designing Your Community, Baking in Openness, Baking in Openness, Building a Mission Statement, Building a Mission Statement, Structuring the plan, Structuring the plan, Structuring the plan, Pulling Together the Threads, Financially Supporting Your Community, Documenting Your Strategy, Documenting Your Strategy defining objectives, Structuring the plan, Pulling Together the Threads, Financially Supporting Your Community ingredients of, Designing Your Community, Designing Your Community mission statement, Designing Your Community, Building a Mission Statement, Building a Mission Statement structure of documentation, Structuring the plan, Structuring the plan transparency/openess when, Baking in Openness, Baking in Openness finances, Financially Supporting Your Community, Financially Supporting Your Community, Revenue Opportunities, Sponsorship required resources, Financially Supporting Your Community, Financially Supporting Your Community revenue opportunities, Revenue Opportunities, Sponsorship for openess/transparency, Baking in Openness, Baking in Openness need for, Planning Your Community of company, conveying to community managers, Strategy, Strategy streaming, live, Videos, Videos stress, The Art of Community (see burnout) subcouncils, Responsibilities success criteria, in strategic plan, Structuring the plan, Structuring the plan, Structuring the plan summits, Organizing Physical Events, Organizing a Summit, Event-specific notes, Event-specific notes surface-level diversity, Diversity, Diversity surveys, Gathering feedback, Gathering Structured Feedback, Gathering Structured Feedback, Surveys and Structured Feedback, Surveys and Structured Feedback, Choosing questions, Choosing questions, Showing off your survey reports, Showing off your survey reports, Ensuring Effective Processes, Ensuring Effective Processes, Reacting to Community Concerns, Reacting to Community Concerns choosing questions for, Choosing questions, Choosing questions for finding causes of bottlenecks, Ensuring Effective Processes, Ensuring Effective Processes for gathering feedback, Gathering feedback, Gathering Structured Feedback, Gathering Structured Feedback for learning about community concerns, Reacting to Community Concerns, Reacting to Community Concerns purpose of, Surveys and Structured Feedback, Surveys and Structured Feedback reports from, Showing off your survey reports, Showing off your survey reports Sweet, Adam, Finding Your Place, Finding Your Place syndication of content, Syndication, Syndication T T-shirts, for events, Assets, Assets tales, The Basis of Communication tasks, communication between teams about, Ensure that teams can communicate clearly and effectively teams, Community: The Bird’s-Eye View, Community: The Bird’s-Eye View, Community: The Bird’s-Eye View, Units of Belonging, Units of Belonging, Units of Belonging, Write-centered communities, Write-centered communities, Diversity, Diversity, Identify how we can divide our community into teams, Identify how we can divide our community into teams, Define the scope of each team, and help team members understand that scope, Define the scope of each team, and help team members understand that scope, Define the scope of each team, and help team members understand that scope, Define the scope of each team, and help team members understand that scope, Understand the extent and range of collaboration among our teams, Understand the extent and range of collaboration among our teams, Ensure that teams can communicate clearly and effectively, Ensure that teams can communicate clearly and effectively, Building a Set of Generals, Building a Set of Generals, Setting Up a Community Council, Setting Up a Community Council, Responsibilities and Community Council, Responsibilities as units of belonging, Units of Belonging, Units of Belonging building, Community: The Bird’s-Eye View, Community: The Bird’s-Eye View collaboration between, Understand the extent and range of collaboration among our teams, Understand the extent and range of collaboration among our teams communication between, Community: The Bird’s-Eye View, Ensure that teams can communicate clearly and effectively, Ensure that teams can communicate clearly and effectively diversity within, Diversity, Diversity dividing community into, Identify how we can divide our community into teams, Identify how we can divide our community into teams leaders of, tracking community health through, Building a Set of Generals, Building a Set of Generals mission statement for, Define the scope of each team, and help team members understand that scope, Define the scope of each team, and help team members understand that scope of Ubuntu community, Write-centered communities, Write-centered communities scope of, Units of Belonging, Define the scope of each team, and help team members understand that scope, Define the scope of each team, and help team members understand that scope vs. councils, Setting Up a Community Council, Setting Up a Community Council Technical Board, of Ubuntu community, Technical Board, Technical Board Technorati, The Amateur Press testing usability, Observational Tests, Observational Tests, Observational Tests Texas Linux Fest, Ilan Rabinovitch, Southern California Linux Expo, Ilan Rabinovitch, Southern California Linux Expo The Art of Community, community of, Social Media, Social Media The West Wing (TV program), Inspiring your community, Inspiring your community theory versus action, Theory Versus Action: Action Wins, Theory Versus Action: Action Wins Thorp, Ben (mrben), The Essence of Community, The Basis of Communication, The Basis of Communication threats on community, The Basis of Communication, The Basis of Communication, Unwrapping Opportunity, Unwrapping Opportunity effect on sense of belonging, The Basis of Communication, The Basis of Communication LugRadio response to rail strike, Unwrapping Opportunity, Unwrapping Opportunity time zones, and online events, Date/time, Date/time tone, of writing, Avoiding bikeshedding, Setting tone tools, Building Great Infrastructure, Building Great Infrastructure, Software As a Service, Software As a Service, Avoiding Resource Fetishism, Avoiding Resource Fetishism, Tool Access, Tool Access, Don’t Be That Guy/Girl, Don’t Be That Guy/Girl, Controlling the Fire Hose, Controlling the Fire Hose access to, Tool Access, Tool Access and workflow, Building Great Infrastructure, Building Great Infrastructure debates over, Avoiding Resource Fetishism, Avoiding Resource Fetishism for managing social media, Controlling the Fire Hose, Controlling the Fire Hose social media as tool, Don’t Be That Guy/Girl, Don’t Be That Guy/Girl Software as a Service (SaaS), Software As a Service, Software As a Service top posting, Netiquette, Netiquette Torvalds, Linus, Dictatorial Charismatic Leadership, Linus Torvalds, Linux, Linus Torvalds, Linux Trac (software), Building Great Infrastructure tracking, The Art of Community, Bug Tracking, Bug triage, Bug reporting, Measuring Mechanics, Measuring Mechanics, Credibility and the Need to Track Progress, Credibility and the Need to Track Progress, The Importance of Tracking Our Work, The Importance of Tracking Our Work, Tracking the Right Things, Tracking the Right Things, Within the Context of a Company, Communicating up and down, Tracking Growth and Decline, Using burndown charts, Tracking Growth and Decline, Tracking Growth and Decline, Visibility Is Key, Visibility Is Key, Ensuring Effective Processes, Ensuring Effective Processes, Tracking Health, Tracking Health, Promoting a Feedback Culture, Promoting a Feedback Culture, Building a Set of Generals, Building a Set of Generals, Reacting to Community Concerns, Reacting to Community Concerns (see also projects, tracking) bugs, Bug Tracking, Bug triage, Bug reporting, Measuring Mechanics, Measuring Mechanics determining what to track, Tracking the Right Things, Tracking the Right Things effect on building credibility, Credibility and the Need to Track Progress, Credibility and the Need to Track Progress growth and decline, Tracking Growth and Decline, Using burndown charts, Tracking Growth and Decline, Tracking Growth and Decline, Visibility Is Key, Visibility Is Key, Ensuring Effective Processes, Ensuring Effective Processes areas of, Tracking Growth and Decline, Tracking Growth and Decline data visibility, Visibility Is Key, Visibility Is Key finding causes of, Ensuring Effective Processes, Ensuring Effective Processes overview, Tracking Growth and Decline, Using burndown charts health of community, Tracking Health, Tracking Health, Promoting a Feedback Culture, Promoting a Feedback Culture, Building a Set of Generals, Building a Set of Generals, Reacting to Community Concerns, Reacting to Community Concerns by calls to team leaders, Building a Set of Generals, Building a Set of Generals overview, Tracking Health, Tracking Health promoting feedback culture, Promoting a Feedback Culture, Promoting a Feedback Culture responding to concerns, Reacting to Community Concerns, Reacting to Community Concerns importance of, The Importance of Tracking Our Work, The Importance of Tracking Our Work within a company, Within the Context of a Company, Communicating up and down transparency, Baking in Openness, Baking in Openness, Striving for Clarity, Striving for Clarity, Transparency, Transparency, Bug Tracking, Bug Tracking, Building and Maintaining Transparency, Building and Maintaining Transparency, Communications, Communications, Perception of you, Perception of you, Dictatorial Charismatic Leadership and dictatorial communities, Dictatorial Charismatic Leadership in bug tracking, Bug Tracking, Bug Tracking in communication, Striving for Clarity, Striving for Clarity, Communications, Communications in personal feedback, Perception of you, Perception of you in processes, Transparency, Transparency in strategic plan, Baking in Openness, Baking in Openness in workflow, Building and Maintaining Transparency, Building and Maintaining Transparency trend line, Using burndown charts trending topics, Getting more eyeballs triaging, Bug triage, Bug triage, Measuring Mechanics, Measuring Mechanics Troy, Ryan, Codifying Your Council trust, Trust Is Everything, Trust Is Everything tutorials, online, Organizing Online Events, Organizing Online Tutorials, Event-specific notes Twitter, Reporting, Reporting, Being Social, Being Social, Twitter, Twitter, Getting started with Twitter, Getting started with Twitter, Broadcasting, Tuning up your messages, Tuning up your messages, Tuning up your messages, Where to look, Where to look, Where to look, Where to look, Where to look, The buildup, At the event, At the event, Tim O’Reilly, O’Reilly Media, Tim O’Reilly, O’Reilly Media, Tim O’Reilly, O’Reilly Media broadcasting with, Broadcasting, Tuning up your messages, The buildup, At the event, At the event, Tim O’Reilly, O’Reilly Media about events, The buildup, At the event, At the event mindcasting, Tim O’Reilly, O’Reilly Media getting feedback using, Where to look, Where to look, Where to look getting started with, Getting started with Twitter, Getting started with Twitter history of, Twitter, Twitter overview of, Being Social, Being Social reporting with, Reporting, Reporting searching tweets, Where to look, Where to look use by Tim O'Reilly, Tim O’Reilly, O’Reilly Media, Tim O’Reilly, O’Reilly Media writing messages, Tuning up your messages, Tuning up your messages U Ubuntu Code of Conduct, Diversity, Diversity Ubuntu community, Write-centered communities, Baking in Openness, Baking in Openness, Understand the extent and range of collaboration among our teams, Striving for Clarity, Inspiring your community, Leading by example: Ubuntu, Leading by example: Ubuntu, Reviewing new developers: In depth, Reviewing new developers: In depth, Developing Knowledge, Developing Knowledge, Process Reassessment, Process Reassessment, An Example: Ubuntu Bug Workflow, Lessons learned, Feedback, Feedback, Providing Community Updates, Providing Community Updates, Videos, Videos, Hooks ’n’ Data, Hooks ’n’ Data, Plugging your stats into graphs, Visibility Is Key, Ensuring Effective Processes, Ensuring Effective Processes, In the Beginning..., In the Beginning..., Mark Shuttleworth, Mark Shuttleworth, Community Council, Community Council, Technical Board, Technical Board, Team councils, Team councils, Membership, Membership, Ubuntu Member, Ubuntu Member, Ubuntu Member, Ubuntu Member, Ubuntu Member, Ubuntu Member, Ubuntu Member, Ubuntu Member, Developer, Developer, Council or Board Member, Council or Board Member, Escalation, Escalation bug workflow example, An Example: Ubuntu Bug Workflow, Lessons learned bug-squashing parties, Plugging your stats into graphs contributor access to repositories, Reviewing new developers: In depth, Reviewing new developers: In depth developer mentoring campaign, Visibility Is Key history of, In the Beginning..., In the Beginning...


pages: 210 words: 56,667

The Misfit Economy: Lessons in Creativity From Pirates, Hackers, Gangsters and Other Informal Entrepreneurs by Alexa Clay, Kyra Maya Phillips

Airbnb, Alfred Russel Wallace, Berlin Wall, Burning Man, collaborative consumption, conceptual framework, creative destruction, different worldview, disruptive innovation, double helix, fear of failure, game design, Hacker Ethic, Howard Rheingold, informal economy, invention of the steam engine, James Watt: steam engine, Joseph Schumpeter, Kickstarter, lone genius, Mark Zuckerberg, mass incarceration, megacity, Occupy movement, peer-to-peer rental, Ronald Reagan, Rosa Parks, sharing economy, Silicon Valley, Steve Jobs, Steven Levy, Stewart Brand, supply-chain management, union organizing, Whole Earth Catalog, Whole Earth Review, Zipcar

If we listened to Joseph Schumpeter, the economist and political scientist, we’d allow the forces of “creative destruction”—the process of destroying an old economic order and the emergence of a new one—to have their way. DAVID BERDISH IS A DEVOUT Catholic and a third-generation autoworker at Ford Motor Company. He worked at the company for thirty-one years before recently retiring. His grandfather, a prominent labor organizer and founding member of UAW Local 600, a union that represented the largest Ford plants, was at the infamous Battle of the Overpass, where United Auto Worker union organizers were beaten by Ford henchmen. Like his grandfather, David Berdish is a misfit. “I get in trouble a lot [at Ford]. I push the boundaries of what I’m allowed to do,” he told us. Berdish was originally hired to work at Ford Aerospace but couldn’t get security clearance because of his grandfather’s labor history. So he went on to work at Ford, first in manufacturing, then as a financial analyst, a purchasing manager, a buyer, and a supply chain manager, before moving over to manage Ford’s sustainability practice in 2000.


pages: 190 words: 61,970

Life You Can Save: Acting Now to End World Poverty by Peter Singer

accounting loophole / creative accounting, Branko Milanovic, Cass Sunstein, clean water, end world poverty, experimental economics, illegal immigration, Martin Wolf, microcredit, Monkeys Reject Unequal Pay, Peter Singer: altruism, pre–internet, purchasing power parity, randomized controlled trial, Richard Thaler, Silicon Valley, Thomas Malthus, ultimatum game, union organizing

You may find it more rewarding than you imagined possible. I was lucky enough to know Henry Spira, a man who spent his life campaigning for the downtrodden, the poor, and the oppressed. Since he never had much money, his form of philanthropy was to give his time, energy, and intelligence to making a difference. In the 1950s, he marched in the civil rights movement in the South. Sailing around the world as a merchant seaman, he worked for a rebel union organization fighting corrupt union bosses. The 1960s saw him teaching in some of New York City’s toughest public high schools. In the 1970s, he became an extraordinarily effective advocate for animals; among his many achievements was persuading cosmetics companies to find alternatives to testing their products on animals.24 When he was around seventy, Spira developed cancer and knew he did not have long to live.


pages: 202 words: 62,901

The People's Republic of Walmart: How the World's Biggest Corporations Are Laying the Foundation for Socialism by Leigh Phillips, Michal Rozworski

Berlin Wall, Bernie Sanders, call centre, carbon footprint, central bank independence, Colonization of Mars, combinatorial explosion, complexity theory, computer age, corporate raider, decarbonisation, discovery of penicillin, Elon Musk, G4S, Georg Cantor, germ theory of disease, Gordon Gekko, greed is good, hiring and firing, index fund, Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), Internet of things, inventory management, invisible hand, Jeff Bezos, Joseph Schumpeter, linear programming, liquidity trap, mass immigration, Mont Pelerin Society, new economy, Norbert Wiener, oil shock, passive investing, Paul Samuelson, post scarcity, profit maximization, profit motive, purchasing power parity, recommendation engine, Ronald Coase, Ronald Reagan, sharing economy, Silicon Valley, Skype, sovereign wealth fund, strikebreaker, supply-chain management, technoutopianism, The Nature of the Firm, The Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith, theory of mind, transaction costs, Turing machine, union organizing

Take the US Federal Reserve. Its leadership has been very concerned with how quickly wages are growing, what unions are doing and how the balance of power is shifting within workplaces—what socialists would call “the state of class struggle.” Often in very explicit terms, the Federal Reserve has taken great interest in the relationship between workers and bosses, labor and capital, as much as any union organizer. The archives of meeting minutes dating back to the 1950s reveal central bankers talking frankly and knowledge-ably about which unions are currently in bargaining and their relative strength. The auto and steel sectors received particular attention; the governors of the Fed might have been even more interested in the strategy of the United Steelworkers (USW) or United Auto Workers (UAW) than would the average shop steward.


On Power and Ideology by Noam Chomsky

anti-communist, Ayatollah Khomeini, Berlin Wall, British Empire, cuban missile crisis, feminist movement, imperial preference, land reform, Mikhail Gorbachev, Monroe Doctrine, RAND corporation, Ronald Reagan, Stanislav Petrov, union organizing

He ended police repression and took steps to educate workers and peasants for democratic participation, thus instituting a “crisis of democracy,” from the U.S. perspective. He also initiated an economic revival, geared to domestic needs and concerns. Obviously, we had to “let him go,” in Ambassador Martin’s phrase. The inevitable military coup took place in 1963, recognized shortly after by the U.S. government, which offered it full support. CONATRAL, the union organized by the U.S. labor leadership which operates with funding provided by the U.S. government and in close coordination with private capital, praised the “patriotic gesture” of the armed forces in overthrowing Bosch. Earlier, CONATRAL had “called on the armed forces to defend the country against what it viewed as the communist menace,” Jan Knippers Black observes in her recent study of the Dominican Republic.


pages: 236 words: 62,158

Marx at the Arcade: Consoles, Controllers, and Class Struggle by Jamie Woodcock

4chan, Alexey Pajitnov wrote Tetris, anti-work, augmented reality, barriers to entry, battle of ideas, Boris Johnson, Build a better mousetrap, butterfly effect, call centre, collective bargaining, Columbine, conceptual framework, cuban missile crisis, David Graeber, deindustrialization, deskilling, Donald Trump, game design, gig economy, glass ceiling, global supply chain, global value chain, Hacker Ethic, Howard Zinn, John Conway, Kickstarter, Landlord’s Game, late capitalism, Marshall McLuhan, means of production, Minecraft, mutually assured destruction, Naomi Klein, Oculus Rift, pink-collar, sexual politics, Silicon Valley, union organizing, unpaid internship, V2 rocket

As Jason Prado, a software developer, wrote in an article published in Notes from Below: “Service workers on my company’s campuses have organized and won union contracts, and workers further up the hierarchy have actively supported these efforts.” Through circulating petitions, going to meetings, and taking part in actions, the groups are forming a reciprocal relationship. The “service workers and professional union organizers,” Prado said, “are happy to leverage support from high-prestige tech employees, and tech employees gain firsthand experience working on an organizing campaign.” This kind of connection has been rare in the past. But “workers from different roles quickly come to identify together when engaged in struggle. Said another way, no comrade in an actual struggle has stopped to ask, ‘Are tech workers really working-class?’


pages: 540 words: 168,921

The Relentless Revolution: A History of Capitalism by Joyce Appleby

1919 Motor Transport Corps convoy, agricultural Revolution, anti-communist, Asian financial crisis, asset-backed security, Bartolomé de las Casas, Bernie Madoff, Bretton Woods, BRICs, British Empire, call centre, Charles Lindbergh, collateralized debt obligation, collective bargaining, Columbian Exchange, commoditize, corporate governance, creative destruction, credit crunch, Credit Default Swap, credit default swaps / collateralized debt obligations, David Ricardo: comparative advantage, deindustrialization, Deng Xiaoping, deskilling, Doha Development Round, double entry bookkeeping, epigenetics, equal pay for equal work, European colonialism, facts on the ground, failed state, Firefox, fixed income, Ford paid five dollars a day, Francisco Pizarro, Frederick Winslow Taylor, full employment, Gordon Gekko, Henry Ford's grandson gave labor union leader Walter Reuther a tour of the company’s new, automated factory…, Hernando de Soto, hiring and firing, illegal immigration, informal economy, interchangeable parts, interest rate swap, invention of movable type, invention of the printing press, invention of the steam engine, invisible hand, Isaac Newton, James Hargreaves, James Watt: steam engine, Jeff Bezos, joint-stock company, Joseph Schumpeter, knowledge economy, land reform, Livingstone, I presume, Long Term Capital Management, Mahatma Gandhi, Martin Wolf, moral hazard, Parag Khanna, Ponzi scheme, profit maximization, profit motive, race to the bottom, Ralph Nader, refrigerator car, Ronald Reagan, Scramble for Africa, Silicon Valley, Silicon Valley startup, South China Sea, South Sea Bubble, special economic zone, spice trade, spinning jenny, strikebreaker, the built environment, The Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith, Thomas L Friedman, Thorstein Veblen, total factor productivity, trade route, transatlantic slave trade, transcontinental railway, union organizing, Unsafe at Any Speed, Upton Sinclair, urban renewal, War on Poverty, working poor, Works Progress Administration, Yogi Berra, Yom Kippur War

The public turned sharply against labor organizers, making it relatively easy to convict and execute four anarchists. The Knights of Labor plummeted from a membership of close to a million to just a hundred thousand in the last fifteen years of the century. In the wake of this decline, Samuel Gompers, an English immigrant cigar maker, formed the American Federation of Labor in 1886. The most successful union organization in the United States, the AFL recognized the autonomy of its participating craft unions. Gompers, who remained at the head of the AFL until his death in 1924, actually saw the potential benefit for workers in capitalism. Stressing “pure and simple unionism,” the AFL grew steadily as it worked for the immediate improvement of workers’ wages and conditions. Its initial openness to unskilled laborers, blacks, and women closed over time, in part because of the prejudices of the member unions, which forced segregation on black unions.

Although the rate of American productivity has risen since 2003, wages have not, and benefits have declined in value. Organized labor backs the Employee Free Choice Act, which Republicans blocked with a filibuster in the Senate in 2007. EFCA would protect workers’ right to organize their plant once a majority of them had signed cards expressing their intent to form a union. Statistics indicate that one-quarter of all employers have illegally fired at least one person for union organizing, so unions consider EFCA essential to organizing new plants. Reports of flat wages coupled with escalating incomes in the top tenth of the top 1 percent of American earners have brought much of the public back to the union side. The disgrace into which laissez-faire economic theory fell during the fancy-free years that opened the twenty-first century bodes well for organized labor too, but it will have to contend with the countervailing force of shuttered shops and the monolithic opposition of American business.11 Missing warning signs of disaster apparently is a human trait found in capitalist and noncapitalist countries alike.


pages: 598 words: 172,137

Who Stole the American Dream? by Hedrick Smith

Affordable Care Act / Obamacare, Airbus A320, airline deregulation, anti-communist, asset allocation, banking crisis, Bonfire of the Vanities, British Empire, business cycle, business process, clean water, cloud computing, collateralized debt obligation, collective bargaining, commoditize, corporate governance, Credit Default Swap, credit default swaps / collateralized debt obligations, currency manipulation / currency intervention, David Brooks, Deng Xiaoping, desegregation, Double Irish / Dutch Sandwich, family office, full employment, global supply chain, Gordon Gekko, guest worker program, hiring and firing, housing crisis, Howard Zinn, income inequality, index fund, industrial cluster, informal economy, invisible hand, Joseph Schumpeter, Kenneth Rogoff, Kitchen Debate, knowledge economy, knowledge worker, laissez-faire capitalism, late fees, Long Term Capital Management, low cost airline, low cost carrier, manufacturing employment, market fundamentalism, Maui Hawaii, mega-rich, MITM: man-in-the-middle, mortgage debt, negative equity, new economy, Occupy movement, Own Your Own Home, Paul Samuelson, Peter Thiel, Plutonomy: Buying Luxury, Explaining Global Imbalances, Ponzi scheme, Powell Memorandum, Ralph Nader, RAND corporation, Renaissance Technologies, reshoring, rising living standards, Robert Bork, Robert Shiller, Robert Shiller, rolodex, Ronald Reagan, shareholder value, Shenzhen was a fishing village, Silicon Valley, Silicon Valley startup, Steve Jobs, The Chicago School, The Spirit Level, too big to fail, transaction costs, transcontinental railway, union organizing, Unsafe at Any Speed, Vanguard fund, We are the 99%, women in the workforce, working poor, Y2K

Target #2—Organized Labor Having beaten President Carter and Ralph Nader on their first big showdown, the business forces were ready for a test of strength against a politically more organized and more formidable foe, organized labor. Since the early 1960s, the AFL-CIO labor federation had been itching to roll back the tough anti-union provisions of the Taft-Hartley Act of 1947 and the Landrum-Griffin Act of 1959, with little success, and to win more favorable conditions for union organizing. With a Democrat in the White House for the first time in eight years, the union movement saw a chance finally to achieve victory on three top union priorities—“labor law reform,” to make it easier for unions to organize and to curb the most aggressive anti-union activities of business; “common situs picketing,” to allow multiple unions to picket a construction site on a grievance from a single union; and legislation to generate automatic increases in the minimum wage, tied to inflation and rising wage scales generally.

The nation’s most powerful unions in the auto, steel, electrical, and rubber industries saw hundreds of thousands of their jobs exported overseas, massively shrinking their rolls. “Right to work” states in the Sun Belt lured industrial plants to move from the pro-union North and Midwest to the anti-union South, with the promise of laws, regulations, and regional attitudes that were often hostile to union organizing. Some corporate leaders became aggressive union busters, fighting to weaken and decertify unions, sometimes illegally harassing labor organizers. The number of illegally fired workers ordered reinstated by the National Labor Relations Board more than tripled from 1970 to 1980. Unions were hurt, too, by determined anti-union campaigns of big employers like Wal-Mart. Republican administrations, in power twenty of the past thirty-two years, have been unfriendly to unions, and over this same period, Supreme Court decisions have increasingly sided with business.


pages: 519 words: 160,846

One Day in December: Celia Sánchez and the Cuban Revolution by Nancy Stout

back-to-the-land, land reform, Mason jar, union organizing, urban planning

Elbia recalls, “I remember being on the porch of her house where the gifts were separated and wrapped, each with the name and address of the child. Many times we started this work at night and ended at dawn, tired and satisfied.” Once back in Pilón, she set her sights completely on January 6, when the toys were distributed. Truck drivers who worked for the mill would load all the gift-wrapped packages and distribute them to the various settlements that dotted the landscape and edged the sugar plantations. That year, due to the union-organized strike that had involved the cane-cutters, many families had no income, so Celia had purchased wholesale hundreds of pairs of shoes to give out as well—and because her census was so up to date, she could match recipients to sizes. Her colleagues grumbled. Berta Llópiz says she protested when Celia announced that they were going to be giving out shoes to the cane-cutters’ children in addition to the toys.

He may have felt the same about her; Juan León would have filled him in on her background: that she was the daughter of the doctor, of a man who had spoken out against Machado, and would have told him about her political background, her support of the Orthodox Party, of Eduardo Chibás and Emilio Ochoa. León might have described what he knew, or had heard, about the men in her life, her love affairs. Celia found out from Crescencio that Ignácio Pérez, his favorite son, was already eagerly conspiring with the union-organized cane-cutters in their strike against mill owners, and she could see that this worked to her advantage, that the old man was eager to be dealt in, handed a role. Several things jelled, and Crescencio needed little encouragement to act. Guillermo García and Crescencio Pérez, in a completely natural way, began traveling in their own regions, saving Celia from exposing herself unnecessarily. This was helpful, since the Rural Guard watched everyone’s movements, especially those named on the government’s lists—Cubans say “marked”—as Celia was for her previous Orthodox Party activities.


pages: 615 words: 168,775

Troublemakers: Silicon Valley's Coming of Age by Leslie Berlin

AltaVista, Apple II, Asilomar, Asilomar Conference on Recombinant DNA, beat the dealer, Bill Gates: Altair 8800, Bob Noyce, Byte Shop, Clayton Christensen, cloud computing, computer age, discovery of DNA, don't be evil, Donald Knuth, double helix, Douglas Engelbart, Douglas Engelbart, Dynabook, Edward Thorp, El Camino Real, fear of failure, Fellow of the Royal Society, financial independence, game design, Haight Ashbury, hiring and firing, industrial robot, informal economy, Internet of things, inventory management, John Markoff, Kickstarter, Kitchen Debate, Leonard Kleinrock, manufacturing employment, Mark Zuckerberg, Menlo Park, Minecraft, Mother of all demos, packet switching, Ralph Nader, Robert Metcalfe, rolodex, Ronald Reagan, Sand Hill Road, Silicon Valley, Silicon Valley startup, Snapchat, software as a service, Steve Jobs, Steve Wozniak, Steven Levy, Stewart Brand, Ted Nelson, union organizing, upwardly mobile, William Shockley: the traitorous eight, women in the workforce

“If you’re not treating your employees well enough so that they feel like they have to join the union and have somebody represent them to management, then management has failed.”11 There was never even a union organizing drive at ROLM. As Alvarez puts it, “We had good chairs, good lighting. We could go to the bathroom without raising our hands. We had dignity. What could we get from a union that we didn’t already have?”12 Even at Silicon Valley companies with less generous benefits or less comfortable working conditions, unions were rare. In 1974, the United Electrical Workers created an organizing committee specifically to target Silicon Valley production workers who performed highly repetitive tasks for relatively low wages, but the effort had little effect. Union organizers made significant inroads only at defense contractors, and even with those numbers factored in, fewer than 5 percent of electronics workers in the Valley were represented by a union in the 1970s.13 Union membership throughout the country dropped by 36 percent between 1972 and 1982, and organizing in Silicon Valley was further complicated by a number of local factors.


The Washington Connection and Third World Fascism by Noam Chomsky

anti-communist, business climate, colonial rule, declining real wages, deliberate practice, European colonialism, friendly fire, Gini coefficient, income inequality, income per capita, land reform, land tenure, new economy, RAND corporation, strikebreaker, union organizing

Balaguer sent in the army to help straighten things out. While the soldiers kept order, the contractors fired 32 allegedly leftist leaders...The strike was broken in eight days.” Matters had not changed much in the mid-70s. An ad hoc human rights group that visited the Dominican Republic in 1975 reported that “working people have been prevented by nearly every conceivable means from forming and joining trade union organizations.”169 A union organizing effort in the G&W free trade zone in the mid-1970s was broken with the help of the police in arresting, jailing, and deporting labor organizers, and with the use of “troops in full combat gear armed with submachine guns” to break up organizing meetings. Flannery states that Officials of the Dominican labor ministry told organizers that—contrary to the paper guarantees of the republic’s laws—workers would not be allowed to form a union in the industrial free zone.170 On the matter of labor unions, the 1977 State Department Human Rights Report has the following “information”: “Labor unions are permitted to function and numerous labor unions exist, including some associated with opposition parties, but under some government controls.”


pages: 586 words: 160,321

The Euro and the Battle of Ideas by Markus K. Brunnermeier, Harold James, Jean-Pierre Landau

Affordable Care Act / Obamacare, asset-backed security, bank run, banking crisis, battle of ideas, Ben Bernanke: helicopter money, Berlin Wall, Bretton Woods, business cycle, capital controls, Capital in the Twenty-First Century by Thomas Piketty, Celtic Tiger, central bank independence, centre right, collapse of Lehman Brothers, collective bargaining, credit crunch, Credit Default Swap, currency peg, debt deflation, Deng Xiaoping, different worldview, diversification, Donald Trump, Edward Snowden, en.wikipedia.org, Fall of the Berlin Wall, financial deregulation, financial repression, fixed income, Flash crash, floating exchange rates, full employment, German hyperinflation, global reserve currency, income inequality, inflation targeting, information asymmetry, Irish property bubble, Jean Tirole, Kenneth Rogoff, Martin Wolf, mittelstand, money market fund, Mont Pelerin Society, moral hazard, negative equity, Neil Kinnock, new economy, Northern Rock, obamacare, offshore financial centre, open economy, paradox of thrift, pension reform, price stability, principal–agent problem, quantitative easing, race to the bottom, random walk, regulatory arbitrage, rent-seeking, reserve currency, road to serfdom, secular stagnation, short selling, Silicon Valley, South China Sea, special drawing rights, the payments system, too big to fail, union organizing, unorthodox policies, Washington Consensus, WikiLeaks, yield curve

In 1976, the principle of half the representatives was applied to all German businesses employing more than 2,000. Competing French Labor Unions By contrast, in France, the labor movement was split both before and after World War II into communist and noncommunist unions. For most of the time, by far the strongest and most organized of the union federations was the CGT, which was close to the Communist Party. The different unions competed against each other: in particular, the noncommunist unions organized in the CFDT, and the Force Ouvrière needed to demonstrate that they were not just patsies of the bosses. They generally saw their interests as fundamentally opposed to those of the factory owners, not aligned with them. In the words of the famous French workers’ anthem, Eugène Pottier’s “The Internationale,” written in the aftermath of the Paris Commune of 1871, No saviour from on high delivers, No faith have we in prince or peer.

E’er the thieves will out with their booty, And to all give a happier lot. As a result, rhetoric escalated, and there is a substantially more antagonistic history of labor relations. It is filled with symbolic actions to demonstrate the principle of noncooperation: radicalized workers, for instance, liked to demolish statues of business pioneers (the result is that there are hardly any such monuments left in France). The way the unions organized and negotiated affected economic and monetary policy. The German government, especially after the 1960s, saw the setting of guidelines for pay settlements as part of its responsibility. From 1974, when the Bundesbank moved to monetary targeting, its representatives also insisted that a major part of setting the monetary target was to give employer and worker representatives a sense of how the economy was developing and, consequently, of what would be an appropriate wage settlement.


pages: 261 words: 64,977

Pity the Billionaire: The Unexpected Resurgence of the American Right by Thomas Frank

Affordable Care Act / Obamacare, bank run, big-box store, bonus culture, business cycle, collateralized debt obligation, collective bargaining, commoditize, Credit Default Swap, credit default swaps / collateralized debt obligations, crony capitalism, Deng Xiaoping, financial innovation, housing crisis, invisible hand, Kickstarter, money market fund, Naomi Klein, obamacare, payday loans, profit maximization, profit motive, road to serfdom, Robert Bork, Ronald Reagan, shareholder value, strikebreaker, The Chicago School, The Myth of the Rational Market, Thorstein Veblen, too big to fail, union organizing, Washington Consensus, white flight, Works Progress Administration

When the catastrophe comes, the thirties taught us, certain legislative deeds will follow swiftly. Unemployment insurance will be extended, and extended again. There will be massive investment in public works. Commissions will be named to investigate the causes of the crisis. Agencies will be set up to keep people from losing their houses to foreclosure. Those hurt by the downturn will start to take action themselves. Union organizing and a wave of strikes will sweep the country in response to the complete breakdown of capitalism’s promise. The people will protest, of course, voicing their discontent in public places and maybe descending on Washington like the “Bonus Army” of unemployed World War I vets who took to the road in 1932. In the larger culture, fundamental matters of subsistence will take precedence over noble principles.


pages: 237 words: 67,154

Ours to Hack and to Own: The Rise of Platform Cooperativism, a New Vision for the Future of Work and a Fairer Internet by Trebor Scholz, Nathan Schneider

1960s counterculture, activist fund / activist shareholder / activist investor, Airbnb, Amazon Mechanical Turk, barriers to entry, basic income, bitcoin, blockchain, Build a better mousetrap, Burning Man, capital controls, citizen journalism, collaborative economy, collaborative editing, collective bargaining, commoditize, conceptual framework, crowdsourcing, cryptocurrency, Debian, deskilling, disintermediation, distributed ledger, Ethereum, ethereum blockchain, future of work, gig economy, Google bus, hiring and firing, income inequality, information asymmetry, Internet of things, Jacob Appelbaum, Jeff Bezos, job automation, Julian Assange, Kickstarter, lake wobegon effect, low skilled workers, Lyft, Mark Zuckerberg, means of production, minimum viable product, moral hazard, Network effects, new economy, offshore financial centre, openstreetmap, peer-to-peer, post-work, profit maximization, race to the bottom, ride hailing / ride sharing, SETI@home, shareholder value, sharing economy, Shoshana Zuboff, Silicon Valley, smart cities, smart contracts, Snapchat, TaskRabbit, technoutopianism, transaction costs, Travis Kalanick, Uber for X, uber lyft, union organizing, universal basic income, Whole Earth Catalog, WikiLeaks, women in the workforce, Zipcar

But it could be useful to the latter; it can enable a sense of the individual’s worth to a network (“I matter to my community”), and thereby feed solidarity and mobilization around issues of concern to low-income neighborhoods, families, and workers. NEW CHALLENGES THAT CALL FOR NEIGHBORHOOD COLLECTIVE ACTION Neighborhoods are important spaces for low-wage workers. In the past they often enabled union organizing and the formation of mutual-assistance organizations. Much of this is lost today. There is work to be done to strengthen this neighborhood function. But this can only happen if the neighborhood is a space for connecting, collaborating, and mutually recognizing each other. Given the development of apps geared to low-wage workers, platform cooperativism could enable significant scale-ups in the deployment of such apps and in their spread.


pages: 306 words: 78,893

After the New Economy: The Binge . . . And the Hangover That Won't Go Away by Doug Henwood

"Robert Solow", accounting loophole / creative accounting, affirmative action, Asian financial crisis, barriers to entry, borderless world, Branko Milanovic, Bretton Woods, business cycle, capital controls, corporate governance, corporate raider, correlation coefficient, credit crunch, deindustrialization, dematerialisation, deskilling, ending welfare as we know it, feminist movement, full employment, gender pay gap, George Gilder, glass ceiling, Gordon Gekko, greed is good, half of the world's population has never made a phone call, income inequality, indoor plumbing, intangible asset, Internet Archive, job satisfaction, joint-stock company, Kevin Kelly, labor-force participation, liquidationism / Banker’s doctrine / the Treasury view, manufacturing employment, means of production, minimum wage unemployment, Naomi Klein, new economy, occupational segregation, pets.com, post-work, profit maximization, purchasing power parity, race to the bottom, Ralph Nader, Robert Gordon, Robert Shiller, Robert Shiller, Ronald Reagan, shareholder value, Silicon Valley, Simon Kuznets, statistical model, structural adjustment programs, Telecommunications Act of 1996, telemarketer, The Bell Curve by Richard Herrnstein and Charles Murray, The Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith, total factor productivity, union organizing, War on Poverty, women in the workforce, working poor, zero-sum game

So too in the office, cameras watch from the ceiling while last year's DoD software silendy tracks and analyzes employee output, work patterns and communications. Under such conditions a whole slew of working-class survival tactics are being smashed. The super-wired corporation will not permit: unauthorized break time, excessive fraternizing, fake invoices, on the job theft, pot smoking in the utiUty room, or for that matter union organizing. The net effect of all this has been to keep American workers on their toes.When the boss is nearly omniscient everyone is open to new types of discipUne. Likewise, transparency facilitates new forms ofTaylorism. As bugged computers, barcode-tracked packages and sateUite-tagged vehicles proUferate, redundant procedures and jobs can be eUminated and the extra work shifted to a core of intimidated and intensely supervised employees.


pages: 283 words: 73,093

Social Democratic America by Lane Kenworthy

affirmative action, Affordable Care Act / Obamacare, barriers to entry, basic income, business cycle, Celtic Tiger, centre right, clean water, collective bargaining, corporate governance, David Brooks, desegregation, Edward Glaeser, endogenous growth, full employment, Gini coefficient, hiring and firing, Home mortgage interest deduction, illegal immigration, income inequality, invisible hand, Kenneth Arrow, labor-force participation, manufacturing employment, market bubble, minimum wage unemployment, new economy, postindustrial economy, purchasing power parity, race to the bottom, rent-seeking, rising living standards, Robert Gordon, Robert Shiller, Robert Shiller, Ronald Reagan, school choice, shareholder value, sharing economy, Skype, Steve Jobs, too big to fail, Tyler Cowen: Great Stagnation, union organizing, universal basic income, War on Poverty, working poor, zero day

The pattern looks broadly supportive of the notion that high taxes reduce work hours. But knowledgeable comparativists will notice a familiar clustering of countries in figure 4.12.51 One group, in the lower-right corner, includes Belgium, France, Germany, Italy, and the Netherlands. These countries, along with Austria, have several features that might contribute to low employment hours. One is strong unions. Organized labor has been the principal force pushing for a shorter work week, more holiday and vacation time, and earlier retirement. These nations are also characterized by a preference for traditional family roles—breadwinner husband, homemaker wife. This preference, often associated with Catholicism and Christian Democratic political parties, is likely to influence women’s employment rates and work hours.


pages: 249 words: 77,027

Glock: The Rise of America's Gun by Paul M. Barrett

airport security, forensic accounting, hiring and firing, interchangeable parts, offshore financial centre, Pepto Bismol, Ralph Nader, Ronald Reagan, union organizing

One hard truth of civilized life, George Orwell noted, is that we rely on strong, bold people with weapons to protect us from those who might kill us for our possessions or politics or religious beliefs or real estate. Accepting this reality, we give the police and the military weapons to do the job of protection. The Glock, though not without imperfections, gets the job done. “It is the gun you want to have if you get in trouble,” Eamon Clifford, a former Washington, DC, cop told me. Clifford was in two shootouts in the early 1990s; in both cases, his conduct was deemed justified. Now a trade union organizer, he acknowledged that the Glock’s light trigger pull can lead to accidents: “You can fire a Glock pretty easy if you’re not real careful.” Then he added: “Being careful is what you should be with guns, you know what I mean?” In the law enforcement context, the issues of caliber and ease of concealment that so concern gun-control advocates seem, on close inspection, mostly theoretical. Uniformed cops wear their guns openly on a utility belt.


pages: 276 words: 71,950

Antisemitism: Here and Now by Deborah E. Lipstadt

anti-communist, Ayatollah Khomeini, Boycotts of Israel, Cass Sunstein, Donald Trump, en.wikipedia.org, epigenetics, fixed income, ghettoisation, Stephen Hawking, Steven Pinker, The Bell Curve by Richard Herrnstein and Charles Murray, union organizing, WikiLeaks, zero-sum game

In my next letter I will deal with Jeremy Corbyn, the British Member of Parliament and head of the Labour Party in the United Kingdom. Yours, DEL Dear Oxford Students: Jeremy Corbyn’s record in politics is not only far more extensive than Trump’s, it’s also more deeply rooted in firmly held ideological beliefs. As the Brits among you well know, Corbyn has been part of Britain’s labor and trade-union movement since the beginning of his political career. In the 1970s he worked as a trade-union organizer and was active in the antiapartheid movement in South Africa. During the years of the “troubles” in Northern Ireland, he showed great sympathy for the Irish Republican Army, which was waging active opposition—many called it terrorism—against the British presence in Northern Ireland. Consistently on the far-left end of the Labour Party, Corbyn became the unexpected head of the party, due in some measure to an internal political and electoral surprise, in 2015.


pages: 290 words: 73,000

Algorithms of Oppression: How Search Engines Reinforce Racism by Safiya Umoja Noble

A Declaration of the Independence of Cyberspace, affirmative action, Airbnb, borderless world, cloud computing, conceptual framework, crowdsourcing, desegregation, Donald Trump, Edward Snowden, Filter Bubble, Firefox, Google Earth, Google Glasses, housing crisis, illegal immigration, immigration reform, information retrieval, Internet Archive, Jaron Lanier, Mitch Kapor, Naomi Klein, new economy, PageRank, performance metric, phenotype, profit motive, Silicon Valley, Silicon Valley ideology, Snapchat, Tim Cook: Apple, union organizing, women in the workforce, yellow journalism

This is her story, which elucidates in a very personal way how algorithmic oppression works and is affecting her very quality of life as a small business owner who runs the only local African American hair salon within a predominantly White neighborhood, located near a prestigious college town in the United States: When I first came and opened up my shop here, there was a strong African American community. There were Black sororities and fraternities, and they had step shows, which no loner exist anymore! The Black Student Union organization was very strong; it was the ’80s. Everyone felt like family, and everyone knew each other. Even though I only worked in this part of town, it was almost like I went to school there too. We all knew each other, and everyone celebrated each other’s success. I often get invited to participate in the major events and celebrations—from marriages to their parents’ funerals. For instance, I have several clients from the ’80s who I still service to this day.


pages: 268 words: 75,490

The Knowledge Economy by Roberto Mangabeira Unger

additive manufacturing, balance sheet recession, business cycle, collective bargaining, commoditize, deindustrialization, disruptive innovation, first-past-the-post, full employment, global value chain, information asymmetry, knowledge economy, market fundamentalism, means of production, Paul Samuelson, savings glut, secular stagnation, side project, total factor productivity, transaction costs, union organizing, wealth creators

A critic of its work may object that such regularities—for example, those of the Phillips curve charting a supposedly law-like relation between unemployment and inflation—depend on a wide range of detailed institutional arrangements. It suffices to change any element of this background to alter the supposed regularities. For the Phillips curve, the formative institutional arrangements may include, for example, those that have to do with the labor-law regime and the type of union organization that it sustains, the nature and level of unemployment insurance, and the assignment and scope of the power to set monetary policy. To play a role in such explanations, the institutional regime of economic life must be defined with the detail that remains missing from abstractions like capitalism or the market economy. Because the details change, and are the object of persistent controversy and conflict, we will find it hard to mistake such formative structures for indivisible systems or for recurrent types of social and economic organization.


pages: 243 words: 76,686

How to Do Nothing by Jenny Odell

Airbnb, augmented reality, back-to-the-land, Burning Man, collective bargaining, Donald Trump, Filter Bubble, full employment, gig economy, Google Earth, Internet Archive, Jane Jacobs, Jaron Lanier, Kickstarter, late capitalism, Mark Zuckerberg, market fundamentalism, means of production, Minecraft, peer-to-peer, Peter Thiel, Port of Oakland, Results Only Work Environment, Rosa Parks, Sand Hill Road, Silicon Valley, Silicon Valley startup, Snapchat, source of truth, Steve Jobs, strikebreaker, technoutopianism, union organizing, white flight, Works Progress Administration

Discharging and loading vessels is subject to the variables of uncertain arrival of ships, diverse cargoes, good, bad, and ordinary equipment, regrouping of men and different employers; and is at the mercy of the elements of time, tide, and weather…Hiring is by the hour, not the day, and never steadily.47 Before the unions, the longshoremen’s experience of time was completely beholden to the ups and downs of capital. While the 1932 law enabled union organizing, the tides had already begun to turn against organized labor with the 1947 Taft–Hartley Act, which among other things prohibited the coordination of strike efforts among different unions. Today, subjection to a ruthless capitalist framework seems almost natural. In his 2006 book The Great Risk Shift: The New Economic Insecurity and the Decline of the American Dream, Jacob S. Hacker describes a “new contract” that formed between companies and employees in the absence of regulation from the government in the 1970s and ’80s: The essence of the new contract was the idea that workers should be constantly pitted against what economists call the “spot market” for labor—the amount that they could command at a particular moment given particular skills and the particular contours of the economy at that time.48 The contract is markedly different from the old one, in which companies and employees’ fates rose and fell together, like a marriage.


pages: 233 words: 75,712

In Defense of Global Capitalism by Johan Norberg

anti-globalists, Asian financial crisis, capital controls, clean water, correlation does not imply causation, creative destruction, Deng Xiaoping, Edward Glaeser, Gini coefficient, half of the world's population has never made a phone call, Hernando de Soto, illegal immigration, income inequality, income per capita, informal economy, Joseph Schumpeter, Kenneth Rogoff, land reform, Lao Tzu, liberal capitalism, market fundamentalism, Mexican peso crisis / tequila crisis, Naomi Klein, new economy, open economy, prediction markets, profit motive, race to the bottom, rising living standards, Silicon Valley, Simon Kuznets, structural adjustment programs, The Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith, Tobin tax, trade liberalization, trade route, transaction costs, trickle-down economics, union organizing, zero-sum game

At the same time, the Swedish ATTAC movement say that they are not at all opposed to globalization, they just want different rules for it. 2. Cit. Steven Greenhouse and Joseph Kahn, ‘‘Workers’ Rights: U.S. Effort to Add Labor Standards to Agenda Fails,’’ New York Times, December 3, 1999. Adherents eagerly point out that the International Confederation of Free Trade Unions favors social clauses, but it does so in spite of vociferous opposition from its members in the South. The other international union organization, the World Federation of Trade Unions, with 110 million members in 130 different countries, has argued against the inclusion of social clauses in WTO trade agreements. 3. Lukas, p. 11. 4. Carol Bellamy, The State of the World’s Children 1997 (New York: UNICEF, 1997), p. 23, http://www.unicef.org/sowc97. 5. Ra¨dda Barnen: ‘‘Faktablad om barnarbete,’’ http://www.rb.se, accessed May 1, 2001. 6.


pages: 237 words: 74,109

Uncanny Valley: A Memoir by Anna Wiener

autonomous vehicles, back-to-the-land, basic income, blockchain, Burning Man, call centre, charter city, cloud computing, cognitive bias, cognitive dissonance, commoditize, crowdsourcing, cryptocurrency, Extropian, future of work, Golden Gate Park, housing crisis, Jane Jacobs, job automation, knowledge worker, Lean Startup, means of production, medical residency, new economy, New Urbanism, passive income, pull request, rent control, ride hailing / ride sharing, Sand Hill Road, self-driving car, sharing economy, side project, Silicon Valley, Silicon Valley startup, social web, South of Market, San Francisco, special economic zone, technoutopianism, telepresence, telepresence robot, union organizing, universal basic income, unpaid internship, urban planning, urban renewal, women in the workforce, Y2K, young professional

Nobody cares about your tech job, the flyers read. Be courteous of others when in public and keep the feral careerism of your collegial banter on mute. Rents rose. Cafés went cashless. The roads were choked with ride-shares. Taquerias shuttered and reopened as upscale, organic taco shops. Tenement buildings burned, and were replaced with empty condominiums. On the side of San Francisco where streets were named after union organizers and Mexican anti-imperialists, speculators snapped up vinyl-sided starter homes and flipped them. Amid tidy rows of pastel Edwardians, the flipped houses looked like dead teeth, muted and ominous in freshly painted, staid shades of gray. Newly flush twentysomethings became meek, baby-faced landlords, apologetically invoking arcane housing law to evict inherited long-term tenants and clear the way for condo conversions.


pages: 263 words: 79,016

The Sport and Prey of Capitalists by Linda McQuaig

anti-communist, Bernie Sanders, carbon footprint, clean water, diversification, Donald Trump, energy transition, financial innovation, Kickstarter, Menlo Park, Naomi Klein, neoliberal agenda, new economy, offshore financial centre, oil shale / tar sands, payday loans, profit motive, risk/return, Ronald Reagan, Steve Jobs, strikebreaker, union organizing

Trying to recover from his very public fall from grace, Sir Henry and his wife embarked on several months of travels through the Maritimes and the southern United States before settling in New York. At sixty-two, after having achieved what D’Arcy Marsh calls “the most spectacular success in Canada’s commercial history,”12 Sir Henry was wasting away, increasingly weak, depressed, and in failing health. The following March, the CNR unions organized a dinner in his honour in New York, to be attended by prominent U.S. labour leaders. But Sir Henry didn’t make it to the dinner; he died that evening in a New York hospital. Although his name is not widely known in Canada today, his legacy has lived on in the highly successful railway he created and the foundation it laid for a national public broadcaster. With the Radio League enjoying robust public support in its crusade for such an entity, the Bennett government endorsed radio nationalization.


pages: 302 words: 74,350

I Hate the Internet: A Novel by Jarett Kobek

Anne Wojcicki, Burning Man, disruptive innovation, East Village, Edward Snowden, Golden Gate Park, Google bus, Google Glasses, Google X / Alphabet X, immigration reform, indoor plumbing, informal economy, Jeff Bezos, liberation theology, Mark Zuckerberg, MITM: man-in-the-middle, Norman Mailer, nuclear winter, packet switching, PageRank, Peter Thiel, quantitative easing, Ray Kurzweil, rent control, Ronald Reagan, Silicon Valley, Steve Jobs, technological singularity, Triangle Shirtwaist Factory, union organizing, V2 rocket, Vernor Vinge, wage slave, Whole Earth Catalog

Karacehennem met Adeline during the run up to the feature film adaptation of Trill. They were both in Los Angeles. He was asked by the editor of an ephemeral magazine to conduct an interview with the artist responsible for the original graphic novel. They met in a house that was once owned by Walt Disney’s Uncle. Walt Disney was America’s most beloved Anti-Semite and racist. He hated labor strikes, unions, organized labor and Communists. He named the names of troublesome employees before the House Un-American Activities Committee, saying that they were probably Communists. In 1938, Disney granted a private audience to Adolf Hitler’s favorite director, Leni Riefenstahl. After World War Two, Disney hired Werhner von Braun. Werhner von Braun was a Nazi rocket scientist and a Major in the Schutzstaffel.


pages: 840 words: 202,245

Age of Greed: The Triumph of Finance and the Decline of America, 1970 to the Present by Jeff Madrick

accounting loophole / creative accounting, Asian financial crisis, bank run, Bretton Woods, business cycle, capital controls, collapse of Lehman Brothers, collateralized debt obligation, credit crunch, Credit Default Swap, credit default swaps / collateralized debt obligations, desegregation, disintermediation, diversified portfolio, Donald Trump, financial deregulation, fixed income, floating exchange rates, Frederick Winslow Taylor, full employment, George Akerlof, Hyman Minsky, income inequality, index fund, inflation targeting, inventory management, invisible hand, John Meriwether, Kitchen Debate, laissez-faire capitalism, locking in a profit, Long Term Capital Management, market bubble, minimum wage unemployment, MITM: man-in-the-middle, money market fund, Mont Pelerin Society, moral hazard, mortgage debt, Myron Scholes, new economy, North Sea oil, Northern Rock, oil shock, Paul Samuelson, Philip Mirowski, price stability, quantitative easing, Ralph Nader, rent control, road to serfdom, Robert Bork, Robert Shiller, Robert Shiller, Ronald Coase, Ronald Reagan, Ronald Reagan: Tear down this wall, shareholder value, short selling, Silicon Valley, Simon Kuznets, technology bubble, Telecommunications Act of 1996, The Chicago School, The Great Moderation, too big to fail, union organizing, V2 rocket, value at risk, Vanguard fund, War on Poverty, Washington Consensus, Y2K, Yom Kippur War

His manner partly disguised his consuming ambition. By the early 1970s, Joe Flom had been plying his trade, hostile takeovers involving smaller companies, for twenty years. He eventually built the small law firm he joined after law school in the 1950s into the largest and one of the most respected in the world. Flom was born in 1923 and raised in Borough Park, Brooklyn, a son of Russian Jewish immigrants. “My father was a union organizer,” he said. “He couldn’t provide for the family.” His parents wanted him to be a “professional.” “To them being a professional was a great thing,” Flom said. “That meant either a doctor or lawyer.” Flom qualified for admission to Townsend Harris, one of New York City’s fast-track high schools. He knew he wanted to be a lawyer “right from the word go,” and in high school wrote a review of a book on cases in constitutional law.

Sirower further found that falling stock prices in the year after a merger are a good indication of poor performance over five years. Mark L. Sirower and Sumit Sahni, “Avoiding the Synergy Trap: Practical Guidance on M&A Decisions for CEOs and Boards,” Journal of Applied Corporate Finance 18, no. 3 (2006): 83–95. 5 “SUDDENLY, EVERY CEO”: Walter Kiechel III, The Lords of Strategy: The Secret Intellectual History of the New Corporate World (Boston: Harvard Business Press, 2010), pp. 207–8. 6 “MY FATHER WAS A UNION ORGANIZER”: Author interview, Joe Flom, September 2004. Also see Jeff Madrick, Taking America (New York: Bantam, 1987). 7 THE TRADITIONAL EQUITY BUSINESS WAS FOUNDERING: Barrie A. Wigmore, Securities Markets in the 1980s (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1997), p. 80. 8 THE AVERAGE P-E MULTIPLE: Companies issue shares to investors, which vary in quantity by company. Earnings per share are total earnings divided by the shares outstanding. 9 IN OTHER WORDS, ONE COULD OFTEN SELL OFF: This is known as the Q-ratio, an analytical concept developed by Nobel Prize–winning economist James Tobin. 10 IN 1974, THE AVERAGE PRICE OF A STOCK: Wigmore, Securities Markets in the 1980s, p. 93. 11 “I HAD THE FASTEST HANDS”: Madrick, Taking America, p. 25. 12 INCO APPROACHED MORGAN STANLEY: Based on author interviews with Charles Baird, Joe Flom, Robert Greenhill, Milton Friedman, Robert Rubin, and William Sword.


pages: 278 words: 82,069

Meltdown: How Greed and Corruption Shattered Our Financial System and How We Can Recover by Katrina Vanden Heuvel, William Greider

Asian financial crisis, banking crisis, Bretton Woods, business cycle, buy and hold, capital controls, carried interest, central bank independence, centre right, collateralized debt obligation, conceptual framework, corporate governance, creative destruction, credit crunch, Credit Default Swap, credit default swaps / collateralized debt obligations, declining real wages, deindustrialization, Exxon Valdez, falling living standards, financial deregulation, financial innovation, Financial Instability Hypothesis, fixed income, floating exchange rates, full employment, housing crisis, Howard Zinn, Hyman Minsky, income inequality, information asymmetry, John Meriwether, kremlinology, Long Term Capital Management, margin call, market bubble, market fundamentalism, McMansion, money market fund, mortgage debt, Naomi Klein, new economy, offshore financial centre, payday loans, pets.com, plutocrats, Plutocrats, Ponzi scheme, price stability, pushing on a string, race to the bottom, Ralph Nader, rent control, Robert Shiller, Robert Shiller, Ronald Reagan, savings glut, sovereign wealth fund, structural adjustment programs, The Great Moderation, too big to fail, trade liberalization, transcontinental railway, trickle-down economics, union organizing, wage slave, Washington Consensus, women in the workforce, working poor, Y2K

That debate needs restarting. We hope this list helps. We also need to recognize that blueprints for social change don’t go anywhere without social changers, without organized pressure from below. In America’s first great triumph over plutocracy, that pressure came mainly from a resurgent labor movement. To repeat that success, labor once again needs to be surging, one big reason initiatives that aim to help unions organize—like the Employee Free Choice Act campaign—have a key role to play in any plutocracy-busting offensive. Can such an offensive succeed? Why not? Our forebears faced a plutocracy more entrenched than ours. They beat that plutocracy back. Our turn. Trust but Verify J A M E S K . G A L B R A I T H A N D W I L L I A M K . B L A C K October 13, 2008 These are the days of miracles and wonders.”The market has collapsed!


pages: 250 words: 83,367

Methland: The Death and Life of an American Small Town by Nick Reding

Alfred Russel Wallace, call centre, crack epidemic, illegal immigration, invisible hand, Isaac Newton, Kickstarter, trade route, union organizing

There was no excess revenue for anything, never mind treatment. Murphy’s task was to raise the town from the ashes. He had to build a foundation of decent economic growth, and he had to do it ASAP. Businesses like the call center could afford to be choosy—every hard-luck town in the United States was courting them. In fact, Murphy believed that most companies were looking for a certain modicum of poverty as a fail-safe against union organizing. If people were desperate, they’d concede this essential ground to the company. Murphy understood the game. As he once put it to me in an e-mail, he was “enough of a student of economic trends in the last two decades to understand [he had to] play on the edges for wage and benefit rates.” The trick was to look like something in between a union town and a town that was downright criminally dangerous.


pages: 279 words: 87,910

How Much Is Enough?: Money and the Good Life by Robert Skidelsky, Edward Skidelsky

"Robert Solow", banking crisis, basic income, Bertrand Russell: In Praise of Idleness, Bonfire of the Vanities, call centre, creative destruction, David Ricardo: comparative advantage, death of newspapers, financial innovation, Francis Fukuyama: the end of history, full employment, happiness index / gross national happiness, income inequality, income per capita, informal economy, Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), invisible hand, John Maynard Keynes: Economic Possibilities for our Grandchildren, John Maynard Keynes: technological unemployment, Joseph Schumpeter, market clearing, market fundamentalism, Paul Samuelson, profit motive, purchasing power parity, Ralph Waldo Emerson, The Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith, Thomas Malthus, Thorstein Veblen, Tobin tax, union organizing, University of East Anglia, Veblen good, wage slave, wealth creators, World Values Survey, zero-sum game

Mao is said to have shrugged off the millions of deaths caused by his Great Leap Forward with the callous remark, “Death is indeed to be rejoiced over … We believe in dialectics, and so we can’t not be in favor of death.”42 The Failed Payoff: From Marx to Marcuse In the hundred years following the publication of Das Kapital in 1867, revolutionary socialism was vanquished in countries supposedly ripe for it, and victorious in countries that Marx did not think ready for it. By the late 1950s it was capitalism, not socialism, that seemed to have cracked the economic problem in the West: not, to be sure, the capitalism red in tooth and claw analyzed by Marx, but a capitalism so modified by state management, social security and trade-union organization that some doubted whether it was the same animal at all. If this was capitalism, there was no need for socialism.43 In 1956, John Kenneth Galbraith switched attention to the diseases of wealth. His best-selling work, The Affluent Society, argued that the citizens of Western countries were now so well off that the economic problem was no longer pressing. In short, Keynes’s era of plenty had arrived (ahead of schedule!).


pages: 252 words: 80,636

Bureaucracy by David Graeber

a long time ago in a galaxy far, far away, Affordable Care Act / Obamacare, airport security, Albert Einstein, banking crisis, barriers to entry, borderless world, Bretton Woods, British Empire, collateralized debt obligation, Columbine, conceptual framework, Corn Laws, David Graeber, George Gilder, High speed trading, hiring and firing, Kitchen Debate, late capitalism, means of production, music of the spheres, new economy, obamacare, Occupy movement, Parkinson's law, Peter Thiel, planetary scale, post-work, price mechanism, Ronald Reagan, self-driving car, Silicon Valley, South Sea Bubble, transcontinental railway, union organizing, urban planning, zero-sum game

For a while there was a lot of interest in German Marxism: Adorno, Benjamin, Marcuse, Lukacs, Fromm. But the focus eventually shifted to France, where the uprising of May 1968 had produced an efflorescence of extremely creative social theory—in France it was just called “ ’68 thought”—that was simultaneously radical in temperament, and hostile to almost every traditional manifestation of leftist politics, from union organizing to insurrection.47 Different theorists shifted in and out of fashion, but over the course of the eighties, Foucault managed to establish himself in a way no one—even, really, Weber—has before or since. Or, at least, he did so within those disciplines that considered themselves in any way oppositional. Ultimately, it might be better to speak here of the emergence of a kind of division of academic labor within the American higher education system, with the optimistic side of Weber reinvented (in even more simplified form) for the actual training of bureaucrats under the name of “rational choice theory,” while his pessimistic side was relegated to the Foucauldians.


pages: 316 words: 87,486

Listen, Liberal: Or, What Ever Happened to the Party of the People? by Thomas Frank

Affordable Care Act / Obamacare, Airbnb, Amazon Mechanical Turk, American ideology, barriers to entry, Berlin Wall, Bernie Sanders, blue-collar work, Burning Man, centre right, circulation of elites, Clayton Christensen, collective bargaining, Credit Default Swap, David Brooks, deindustrialization, disruptive innovation, Donald Trump, Edward Snowden, Fall of the Berlin Wall, financial innovation, Frank Gehry, full employment, George Gilder, gig economy, Gini coefficient, income inequality, Jaron Lanier, Jeff Bezos, knowledge economy, knowledge worker, Lean Startup, mandatory minimum, Marc Andreessen, Mark Zuckerberg, market bubble, mass immigration, mass incarceration, McMansion, microcredit, mobile money, moral panic, mortgage debt, Nelson Mandela, new economy, obamacare, payday loans, Peter Thiel, plutocrats, Plutocrats, Ponzi scheme, post-industrial society, postindustrial economy, pre–internet, profit maximization, profit motive, race to the bottom, Republic of Letters, Richard Florida, ride hailing / ride sharing, Ronald Reagan, sharing economy, Silicon Valley, Steve Jobs, Steven Levy, TaskRabbit, Thorstein Veblen, too big to fail, Travis Kalanick, Uber for X, union organizing, urban decay, women in the workforce, Works Progress Administration, young professional

Faux: This is the first anecdote in his 2006 book, The Global Class War: How America’s Bipartisan Elite Lost Our Future—and What It Will Take to Win It Back (Wiley), p. 1.   8. The letter was much discussed during the NAFTA debate. My quote from it is drawn from David Lauter, “283 Top Economists Back Trade Pact, Letter Shows,” the Los Angeles Times, September 4, 1993.   9. See the 1997 study by Kate Bronfenbrenner, “We’ll Close! Plant Closings, Plant-Closing Threats, Union Organizing and NAFTA,” posted online at http://digitalcommons.ilr.cornell.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1018&context=cbpubs. The 2010 study is summarized by Robert Scott in “Heading South: U.S.-Mexico trade and job displacement after NAFTA,” an Economic Policy Institute Briefing Paper dated May 3, 2011. 10. See the economist Mark Weisbrot’s article, “NAFTA: 20 Years of Regret for Mexico,” Guardian, January 4, 2014.


pages: 283 words: 81,163

How Capitalism Saved America: The Untold History of Our Country, From the Pilgrims to the Present by Thomas J. Dilorenzo

banking crisis, British Empire, business cycle, collective bargaining, corporate governance, corporate social responsibility, financial deregulation, Fractional reserve banking, Hernando de Soto, income inequality, invisible hand, Joseph Schumpeter, laissez-faire capitalism, means of production, medical malpractice, Menlo Park, minimum wage unemployment, Norman Mailer, plutocrats, Plutocrats, price stability, profit maximization, profit motive, Ralph Nader, rent control, rent-seeking, Robert Bork, Ronald Coase, Ronald Reagan, Silicon Valley, statistical model, The Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith, transcontinental railway, union organizing, Upton Sinclair, wealth creators, working poor, Works Progress Administration, zero-sum game

(Since half-baked ideas are easy for lay people to understand and require little intellectual effort, they tend to drive out truths that require more sophisticated reasoning and historical understanding.) Another of these best-selling anticapitalist tomes is Nickel and Dimed: On (Not) Getting By in America, by Ph.D. biologist Barbara Ehrenreich.32 The author, who informs readers that she “married a Teamster Union organizer,” claims to have written the book out of concern for the plight of people who were being phased out of welfare. Although she is an affluent author (she has written several books and is a contributor to Time, Harper’s, the New Republic, the Nation, and the New York Times Magazine), she pretended to be an entry-level restaurant and hotel worker so she could write a book about her experiences.


pages: 273 words: 85,195

Nomadland: Surviving America in the Twenty-First Century by Jessica Bruder

Affordable Care Act / Obamacare, back-to-the-land, big-box store, Burning Man, cognitive dissonance, crowdsourcing, full employment, game design, gender pay gap, Gini coefficient, income inequality, Jeff Bezos, job automation, Mars Rover, new economy, off grid, payday loans, Pepto Bismol, precariat, Ronald Reagan, Saturday Night Live, sharing economy, six sigma, supply-chain management, union organizing, urban sprawl, white picket fence, Y2K

Chuck was stationed near one of the conveyor belts when a cardboard box flew off, knocking him flat. His head hit the concrete floor. Soon medics from AmCare, the in-house medical service, were hovering over him. They said he didn’t have a concussion, so he could return to his job in the receiving department, walking fifteen miles a day. (Chuck, Barb, and I later reconnected at a Buffalo Wild Wings between shifts. They said that, before I arrived in Texas, union organizers had been campaigning in the warehouse parking lot. For about two weeks, managers gave twice-daily lectures warning workers to stay away from them and, above all, not to sign anything. Information about employees who engaged with organizers would end up in the union’s database and be used to “track” and contact them, Chuck remembered the managers saying.) During orientation, we also learned that our facility was one of ten distribution centers where Amazon was using robot “sherpas.”


pages: 327 words: 84,627

The Green New Deal: Why the Fossil Fuel Civilization Will Collapse by 2028, and the Bold Economic Plan to Save Life on Earth by Jeremy Rifkin

1919 Motor Transport Corps convoy, 2013 Report for America's Infrastructure - American Society of Civil Engineers - 19 March 2013, American Society of Civil Engineers: Report Card, autonomous vehicles, Bernie Sanders, blockchain, borderless world, business cycle, business process, carbon footprint, collective bargaining, corporate governance, corporate social responsibility, creative destruction, decarbonisation, en.wikipedia.org, energy transition, failed state, ghettoisation, hydrogen economy, information asymmetry, intangible asset, Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), Internet of things, invisible hand, Joseph Schumpeter, means of production, megacity, Network effects, new economy, off grid, oil shale / tar sands, peak oil, planetary scale, renewable energy credits, Ronald Reagan, shareholder value, sharing economy, Silicon Valley, Skype, smart cities, smart grid, sovereign wealth fund, Steven Levy, the built environment, The Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith, Tim Cook: Apple, trade route, union organizing, urban planning, women in the workforce, zero-sum game

Other industries and, particularly, the industries that made up the military-industrial complex, built their new plants across the southern states. When foreign auto companies—Honda, Toyota, Nissan, BMW—established their production facilities in the United States beginning in the 1980s, they, too, were virtually all located in southern states along interstate highway exits.14 The southern states had “right-to-work laws” designed to impede or prohibit union organizing. In the South, global companies found a more complacent white rural workforce ready to accept low wages and less than enthusiastic about organizing unions. The Interstate Highway System connecting the country meant that companies could locate in anti-union southern states and still have access to supply chains and distribution routes across the entire country, freeing their businesses from reliance on the hub-to-hub rail system connecting major metropolitan regions across the northern and midwestern sections of the country.


pages: 518 words: 170,126

City for Sale: The Transformation of San Francisco by Chester W. Hartman, Sarah Carnochan

affirmative action, Albert Einstein, Bay Area Rapid Transit, big-box store, business climate, Golden Gate Park, Haight Ashbury, housing crisis, illegal immigration, John Markoff, Loma Prieta earthquake, manufacturing employment, new economy, New Urbanism, profit motive, Ralph Nader, rent control, Ronald Reagan, Silicon Valley, South of Market, San Francisco, strikebreaker, union organizing, urban planning, urban renewal, very high income, young professional

Woolf was indignant—“I’m not a bum and I resent being discredited and discounted.” He responded by helping to create TOOR. Co-chair of TOOR was Peter Mendelsohn, for forty years a merchant seaman who lived on the same South of Market block when he returned from the sea. Although sixty-five years old, Mendelsohn had more energy than most people thirty years younger. Like George Woolf, Mendelsohn was a union organizer and also organized for the Communist Party in the 1930s.* When Mendelsohn returned from his final voyage in the summer of 1970, he discovered that the Redevelopment Agency had taken over his hotel. He briefly visited relatives and on his return found that his room had been broken into and robbed of all his valuables, which were quite substantial, as he had been a coin collector for years. Referring to the agency’s plans to move him to another neighborhood, Mendelsohn said: “I’ve lived on this block for 40 years.

But their architectural standards have been incomparably higher than those of the Marriott Corporation, builders of those giant theme parks paradoxically called ‘Great America,’ as well as some of the ugliest hotel architecture in the world.”10 The Marriott chain’s blatant anti-union record (only one of its 130 hotels at the time was unionized—and that only because it was unionized when Marriott purchased it)11 became an issue, particularly with Redevelopment Agency commissioner Leroy King from the International Longshoremen’s and Warehousemen’s Union. In this union-conscious town, Marriott prudently changed its stance and agreed not to oppose unionization in its new Central Blocks hotel. But once the hotel opened in 1989, Marriott went back on its word, putting roadblocks into the union organizing drive. (See below for the denouement of this issue.) An added bit of political juiciness was the revelation that Marriott’s chief financial officer, Gary L. Wilson, was a social and business associate of the mayor’s new husband, Richard Blum. Wilson, it turned out, was a 15 percent investor (a share worth sixty-five thousand dollars) in URS Corporation, an architecture/engineering firm of which Blum was vice president12 (the firm also had prepared the 1973 environmental impact report on YBC for the Redevelopment Agency).


pages: 726 words: 210,048

Hard Landing by Thomas Petzinger, Thomas Petzinger Jr.

airline deregulation, buy and hold, centralized clearinghouse, Charles Lindbergh, collective bargaining, cross-subsidies, desegregation, Donald Trump, feminist movement, index card, low cost airline, low cost carrier, low skilled workers, Marshall McLuhan, means of production, mutually assured destruction, Network effects, offshore financial centre, oil shock, Ponzi scheme, postindustrial economy, price stability, profit motive, Ralph Nader, Ronald Reagan, Silicon Valley, strikebreaker, the medium is the message, The Predators' Ball, Thomas L Friedman, union organizing, yield management, zero-sum game

He used a rubber stamp to brand documents with instructions to RUSH. His adversary, Charles E. Bryan of the International Association of Machinists and Aerospace Workers, would not be rushed. Bryan delighted in resisting authority. A short, square-shouldered man with a pug face not unlike Edward G. Robinson’s, Bryan in a way suffered from Frank Borman’s disease: he too had a need to be in charge. Bryan drew his power from a local union organization 13,000 strong, representing nearly everyone who touched an Eastern airplane without flying in it, from the lowliest cabin cleaners to the most skilled engine mechanics. At issue between the men was the control of the company that carried more passengers than any other airline in America. Like United, which began life as an affiliate of Boeing, Eastern came into the world as the progeny of an aircraft manufacturer.

Soon Burr was shocked to realize that Continental and New York Air between them were making severe inroads against him in New York. Burr couldn’t believe his complacency. He had allowed Frank Lorenzo to creep up on him. Worst of all, Burr was dying at the thought that the mystique shrouding People Express was now evaporating. The red ink forced him to withhold profit sharing. The stock price was plunging. Soon there were union organizers at his doorstep. Burr imagined his employees turning on him, the pilots in particular. He heard that they were referring to the Precepts as “Kool-Aid,” the poison-spiked beverage that the demonic cult leader Jim Jones had used to conduct a mass suicide a few years earlier in the jungles of Guyana. Burr imagined the pilots in their cockpits asking one another, “Have you had your Kool-Aid today?”


Understanding Power by Noam Chomsky

anti-communist, Ayatollah Khomeini, Berlin Wall, Bretton Woods, British Empire, Burning Man, business climate, business cycle, cognitive dissonance, continuous integration, Corn Laws, cuban missile crisis, dark matter, David Ricardo: comparative advantage, deindustrialization, Deng Xiaoping, deskilling, European colonialism, Fall of the Berlin Wall, feminist movement, global reserve currency, Howard Zinn, liberation theology, Mahatma Gandhi, Mikhail Gorbachev, Monroe Doctrine, mortgage tax deduction, Paul Samuelson, Ralph Nader, reserve currency, Ronald Reagan, Rosa Parks, school choice, strikebreaker, structural adjustment programs, the scientific method, The Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith, union organizing, wage slave, women in the workforce

I mean, I was a kid back then, so maybe my perspective was different. But I remember when I would go into the apartment of my cousins—you know, broken family, no job, twenty people living in a tiny apartment—somehow it was hopeful. It was intellectually alive, it was exciting, it was just very different from today somehow. WOMAN: Do you attribute that to the raised political consciousness of that era as compared to now? It’s possible: there was a lot of union organizing back then, and the struggles were very brutal. I remember it well. Like, one of my earliest childhood memories is of taking a trolley car with my mother and seeing the police wade into a strike of women pickets outside a Philadelphia textile mill, and beating them up—that’s a searing memory. And the poverty was extreme: I remember rag-pickers coming to the door begging for money, lots of things like that.

However, that party’s ability to enter the political system in Canada wasn’t a result of having proportional representation, it was due to the same thing that would be necessary to get any kind of change like proportional representation in the first place: a lot of serious popular organizing. Look, if you have a political movement that’s strong enough that the power structure has to accommodate it, it’ll get accommodated in some fashion—as in the case of union organizing rights here, the Wagner Act. But when that movement stops being active and challenging, those rights just aren’t going to matter very much anymore. So I think that pushing for something like proportional representation could be worth doing if it’s part of a wider organizing campaign. But if it’s just an effort to try to put some people into Congress and that’s it, then it’s pretty much a waste of your time.


pages: 273 words: 93,419

Let them eat junk: how capitalism creates hunger and obesity by Robert Albritton

Bretton Woods, California gold rush, clean water, collective bargaining, computer age, corporate personhood, creative destruction, deindustrialization, Food sovereignty, Haber-Bosch Process, illegal immigration, immigration reform, invisible hand, joint-stock company, joint-stock limited liability company, Kickstarter, land reform, late capitalism, means of production, offshore financial centre, oil shale / tar sands, peak oil, price stability, profit maximization, profit motive, South Sea Bubble, the built environment, union organizing, Unsafe at Any Speed, upwardly mobile

Marx (1976: chapters 26–33). Marx (1976: 254). At the time of writing this is all too real. For example, until they faced strong international competition that forced them to change, the American auto industry was criticized for “planned obsolescence”. The poor quality of some American cars was finally exposed by books like Nader’s Unsafe at Any Speed (1965). Marx (1976: 358). Read any good history of trade union organizing for many examples. Many of the welfare state gains and gains of trade unions in the 1950s and 1960s were later rolled back. For an interesting discussion of temporality and capitalism see Postone (1996). Marx (1976: Part V). The average sleep time in the United States went down 20 percent in the twentieth century, while work time is increasing, with Americans now working on average 350 hours more per year than Europeans (Worldwatch 2004: 168).


pages: 343 words: 91,080

Uberland: How Algorithms Are Rewriting the Rules of Work by Alex Rosenblat

"side hustle", Affordable Care Act / Obamacare, Airbnb, Amazon Mechanical Turk, autonomous vehicles, barriers to entry, basic income, big-box store, call centre, cashless society, Cass Sunstein, choice architecture, collaborative economy, collective bargaining, creative destruction, crowdsourcing, disruptive innovation, don't be evil, Donald Trump, en.wikipedia.org, future of work, gender pay gap, gig economy, Google Chrome, income inequality, information asymmetry, Jaron Lanier, job automation, job satisfaction, Lyft, marginal employment, Mark Zuckerberg, move fast and break things, Network effects, new economy, obamacare, performance metric, Peter Thiel, price discrimination, Ralph Waldo Emerson, regulatory arbitrage, ride hailing / ride sharing, self-driving car, sharing economy, Silicon Valley, Silicon Valley ideology, Skype, social software, stealth mode startup, Steve Jobs, strikebreaker, TaskRabbit, Tim Cook: Apple, transportation-network company, Travis Kalanick, Uber and Lyft, Uber for X, uber lyft, union organizing, universal basic income, urban planning, Wolfgang Streeck, Zipcar

There are many examples, even in very recent history, where a coalition of civil rights activists finds common ground. In March 2017, for example, faith and civil rights communities joined labor advocates to show support for workers at a Nissan plant in Canton, Mississippi, the majority of whom were African American.53 They carried signs with slogans like “Labor rights are civil rights” to demonstrate for safer working conditions, to protest intimidation tactics used against union organizers, and to push for a reduction in the use of permatemps (who qualify for inferior benefits compared to regular employees). The multiplying numbers who hold a stake in Uber’s future can create paradoxical clashes between civil rights and labor rights efforts when they might otherwise be aligned, because organization in favor of or in resistance to Uber is not uniform. The specter of managing labor’s economic relations along racial lines evokes other social struggles in American history.


pages: 408 words: 94,311

The Great Depression: A Diary by Benjamin Roth, James Ledbetter, Daniel B. Roth

bank run, banking crisis, business cycle, buy and hold, California gold rush, collective bargaining, currency manipulation / currency intervention, deindustrialization, financial independence, Joseph Schumpeter, market fundamentalism, moral hazard, short selling, statistical model, strikebreaker, union organizing, urban renewal, Works Progress Administration

The tendency of landlords everywhere is to boost rentals in anticipation of better business. The only cloud in the picture is the possibility of a nationwide strike in the automobile business. I also think we are beginning to see a reversal of trend against those policies of Roosevelt that smack of socialism. EDITOR’S NOTE Empowered by section 7(a) of the National Industry Recovery Act, union organizers signed up thousands of workers at plants and mills across the country. In 1934 alone more than eighteen hundred strikes ensued involving almost 1.5 million workers demanding better wages and an improved working environment. Their actions met with much violence at times, as the National Guard or local police were deployed to break up the strikes. From textile workers in Massachusetts and Georgia to autoworkers in Toledo and longshoremen in San Francisco, hundreds of union strikers were injured, some killed, in their fight for better working conditions.


pages: 320 words: 90,526

Squeezed: Why Our Families Can't Afford America by Alissa Quart

Affordable Care Act / Obamacare, Airbnb, Automated Insights, autonomous vehicles, barriers to entry, basic income, Bernie Sanders, business intelligence, Donald Trump, Downton Abbey, East Village, Elon Musk, full employment, future of work, gig economy, glass ceiling, haute couture, income inequality, Jaron Lanier, job automation, late capitalism, Lyft, minimum wage unemployment, moral panic, new economy, nuclear winter, obamacare, Ponzi scheme, post-work, precariat, price mechanism, rent control, ride hailing / ride sharing, school choice, sharing economy, Silicon Valley, Skype, Snapchat, surplus humans, TaskRabbit, Travis Kalanick, Uber and Lyft, Uber for X, uber lyft, union organizing, universal basic income, upwardly mobile, wages for housework, women in the workforce, working poor

She had started to train as a speech-language pathologist a few years earlier—her son had needed speech therapy since birth—but the further along she got in her studies the more despondent she became, she said, and she eventually dropped out: her experiences with her own son were traumatic enough without having to consider other kids with similar struggles. In 2015, she had been looking into work as a campus union organizer, to capitalize on her interest in improving adjuncts’ lot, but that hadn’t really panned out either. Bolin’s situation was not just the result of too few hours in the day. As social psychologists who study what’s known as “decision fatigue” have found, being poor takes a huge amount of mental work. There is a constant need to weigh the merits of spending even the smallest amounts of money: yes, maybe I should buy a few extra bars of that seriously marked-down soap (one of the experimental conditions tested by a Princeton economist in poor Indian villages), but then I can’t afford this week’s medicine or food.


pages: 309 words: 95,495

Foolproof: Why Safety Can Be Dangerous and How Danger Makes Us Safe by Greg Ip

Affordable Care Act / Obamacare, Air France Flight 447, air freight, airport security, Asian financial crisis, asset-backed security, bank run, banking crisis, break the buck, Bretton Woods, business cycle, capital controls, central bank independence, cloud computing, collateralized debt obligation, credit crunch, Credit Default Swap, credit default swaps / collateralized debt obligations, currency peg, Daniel Kahneman / Amos Tversky, diversified portfolio, double helix, endowment effect, Exxon Valdez, financial deregulation, financial innovation, Financial Instability Hypothesis, floating exchange rates, full employment, global supply chain, hindsight bias, Hyman Minsky, Joseph Schumpeter, Kenneth Rogoff, lateral thinking, London Whale, Long Term Capital Management, market bubble, money market fund, moral hazard, Myron Scholes, Network effects, new economy, offshore financial centre, paradox of thrift, pets.com, Ponzi scheme, quantitative easing, Ralph Nader, Richard Thaler, risk tolerance, Ronald Reagan, Sam Peltzman, savings glut, technology bubble, The Great Moderation, too big to fail, transaction costs, union organizing, Unsafe at Any Speed, value at risk, William Langewiesche, zero-sum game

If anyone should have seen it coming, it was Gorton. The great irony is that he didn’t. Not until his life was being torn apart by the crisis did he realize he was in the middle of what he had spent his career studying. Gorton took a circuitous route to economics. He went to the University of Michigan intending to pursue a PhD in Chinese literature, then dropped out, unable to see the purpose in such a degree. He worked as a union organizer, started law school then dropped out, worked as a machinist’s apprentice at an auto assembly plant for a few months, and drove a taxi at night. Then one day in a bookstore he picked up a microeconomics textbook, became engrossed in the mathematics, and decided to apply to graduate school for economics. Gorton chose bank panics as his dissertation topic. At the time, economists understood that bank panics could lead to a contraction in the money supply and a depression, but there hadn’t been much empirical research on exactly how panics occurred.


pages: 338 words: 92,465

Reskilling America: Learning to Labor in the Twenty-First Century by Katherine S. Newman, Hella Winston

active measures, blue-collar work, business cycle, collective bargaining, Computer Numeric Control, deindustrialization, desegregation, factory automation, interchangeable parts, invisible hand, job-hopping, knowledge economy, longitudinal study, low skilled workers, performance metric, reshoring, Ronald Reagan, Silicon Valley, social intelligence, two tier labour market, union organizing, upwardly mobile, War on Poverty, Wolfgang Streeck, working poor

The notion that we should turn away from the dire consequences of the educational disaster unfolding in inner-city America and trust in the power of the college ideal is an irresponsible position as long as the pathway to college is strewn with so many obstacles. Moreover, it draws upon a different kind of prejudice: biases against careers that utilize the kind of intelligence and skill it takes to program a huge high-speed precision lathe, determine the cause of a plumbing problem, or spot a mistake in a drug dose in a hospital ward. This kind of talent built a booming nation and was once the bedrock of a proud blue-collar working class, whose unions organized for good wages. As a country, we stood in collective admiration of their achievements written in stone, glass, and metal. The United States was a mighty industrial power in the past and could be one again, but not until we find it in ourselves to respect what workers produce as much as we admire lawyers, doctors, or Silicon Valley computer wizards. * * * Modern manufacturers in the newly reindustrializing states are looking for people who can work with their hands and their heads, and they are having a hard time finding enough of them.


pages: 293 words: 91,412

World Economy Since the Wars: A Personal View by John Kenneth Galbraith

business cycle, central bank independence, full employment, income inequality, James Hargreaves, James Watt: steam engine, John Maynard Keynes: Economic Possibilities for our Grandchildren, joint-stock company, means of production, price discrimination, price stability, road to serfdom, Ronald Reagan, spinning jenny, The Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith, Thorstein Veblen, union organizing, War on Poverty

Meanwhile the revenues of these units of government, in contrast with those of the federal government, are relatively inelastic. In consequence of the heavy dependence on the property tax, when prices rise, the revenues of these units of government lag behind. The problem of financing services thus becomes increasingly acute as and when inflation proceeds. In very recent times in the larger cities, stronger union organization among municipal employees has arrested and in some communities reversed the tendency for wages of public workers to lag. So the competitive position of the public services does not, with inflation, automatically become adverse. But the inelasticity of the revenues remains. And with high labor costs, the constraints on services—cuts, on occasion, instead of urgent expansion—have become more severe.


pages: 326 words: 88,905

Days of Destruction, Days of Revolt by Chris Hedges, Joe Sacco

Berlin Wall, Bernie Sanders, clean water, collective bargaining, corporate personhood, dumpster diving, Exxon Valdez, Goldman Sachs: Vampire Squid, Howard Zinn, Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), invisible hand, laissez-faire capitalism, Mahatma Gandhi, mass immigration, mass incarceration, Naomi Klein, Nelson Mandela, Occupy movement, oil shale / tar sands, race to the bottom, Ralph Nader, Silicon Valley, Steve Jobs, strikebreaker, union organizing, urban decay, wage slave, white flight, women in the workforce

Army was ordered into the coalfields that the miners gave up. By the time the five days of shooting ended, perhaps one hundred miners were dead. The state of West Virginia indicted 1,217 miners for complicity in the rebellion, including charges of murder and treason. Many miners spent several years in prison. The union was effectively broken. It was not reconstituted until 1935, when the Roosevelt administration legalized union organizing.62 The physical eradication of Blair Mountain, part of the methodical destruction of southern West Virginia, will obliterate not only a peak, but also one of the most important physical memorials to the long struggle for justice. The battle marked a moment when miners came close to breaking the stranglehold of the coal companies. And its neglected slopes, soon perhaps to be blasted into rubble, are a reminder of the relentless assault of corporations.


pages: 277 words: 88,539

Singular Intimacies: Becoming a Doctor at Bellevue by Danielle Ofri

index card, medical residency, placebo effect, union organizing

Josh was living in Haifa, studying at the Technion Institute. His apartment had no heat and it was freezing inside the ancient stone walls. We rigged up a strategic system with the single electric heater, two summer blankets, and his electric teapot so we could stay warm while playing an all-night backgammon tournament. Was Josh thinking about his IHSS then? I thought about when Josh had worked as a union organizer, traipsing through factories in the Midwest, talking with the workers. Was he thinking about his IHSS then? People shared stories—some touching, others hilarious. At times I laughed so hard that I choked on my tears. Open caskets are generally not part of Jewish funerals, but there was a viewing before the service. Rachel and I could not bring ourselves to look. After the service, however, I was overcome with a pressing need to look.


pages: 784 words: 229,648

O Jerusalem by Larry Collins, Dominique Lapierre

back-to-the-land, colonial rule, illegal immigration, Internet Archive, lateral thinking, union organizing

One of their fundamental concepts was the idea of a kind of redemption of the Jewish race through a return to manual labour, a flushing out of the mentality of the ghetto in the sweat of tasks long unperformed by Jews. Ditch-diggers were as important to their idea of a Jewish state as were philosophers. Determined to build a Jewish working class with a wide variety of skills, they called for Jewish labour for Jewish enterprises. The Histadrut, the Jewish trade-union organization, compelled Jewish firms to limit their hiring to Jewish workers. As the Zionists acquired land, much of it from absentee Arab landlords in Beirut, they evicted the Arab tenant farmers living on it. to make way for Jewish settlers. Those peasants displaced by one Zionist policy drifted to the cities, where they found that another Zionist policy, Histadrut's, prevented them from working in the predominantly Jewish-owned commerce and industry.

.: Retired from active service, the last commander of the British forces in Palestine lives in Scotland, where he heads the MacMillan clan. ISRAELIS Allon, Yigal: The commander of the Palmach in 1948 went on to a political career and is now deputy prime minister. With Moshe Dayan. he is considered one of Golda Meir's heirs apparent. Avidar, Joseph: The man who ran the Haganah's supply efforts in 1948 now is a director of the nation's trade-union organization, Histadrut. Avriel, Ehud: Avriel served for years as Israel's ambassador to Rome. The man who was responsible for the purchase of so many arms is now a member of the International Zionist Action Committee, Charny, Carmi: The man who helped stop the Legion's armour at Sheikh Jarrah still lives in Jerusalem and has become one of Israel's outstanding Hebrew poets. Chore v. Amos: Chorev, who helped discover the 'Burma Road*, remains in active service as a general in the Israeli Army.


pages: 740 words: 227,963

The Warmth of Other Suns: The Epic Story of America's Great Migration by Isabel Wilkerson

anti-communist, Berlin Wall, California gold rush, card file, desegregation, Gunnar Myrdal, index card, indoor plumbing, invisible hand, labor-force participation, Mason jar, mass immigration, medical residency, Rosa Parks, strikebreaker, trade route, traveling salesman, union organizing, white flight, Works Progress Administration

The FBI began an investigation, and an agent was seen visiting the picker’s wife, Annie. Local whites got wind of it and began plotting mob action because they saw her as “stirring up trouble for the sheriff and the county” by talking to the FBI. Neighbors warned the wife, and upon the picker’s release, the Fryars fled to Harlem, “leaving all their possessions, except some money from the sale of her chickens.”108 George, now an unintended union organizer, somehow managed to stay under the radar screen for months, or so it appeared, in the eleven hundred square miles of citrus land being policed by Sheriff McCall. But that could not go on forever. The orange groves had become a battlefield over more than just fruit but over the rights of the people lowest down in the citrus world and the caste system itself, and the only thing that couldn’t be known was how far George, Mud, and Sam could push it.

So when her union local announced it was going on strike at the beginning of 1968, Ida Mae and her friend Doris never considered that they would stop going to work. Decades earlier, colored migrants, unaccustomed to unions and not understanding labor politics, had been brought in by northern industrialists specifically to break up strikes. White union members resented the migrants and beat them for breaching the picket lines they had unwittingly been brought in to cross. Ida Mae was not schooled in the protocols of union organizing, but she knew she couldn’t afford to lose her job and couldn’t see how not working was going to help her keep it. She was under more pressure than ever. She and George had just bought their first house, the three-flat in South Shore, and had new and different bills coming at them than ever before—from the mortgage to the utilities to property taxes and hazard insurance. “My pastor was just begging me,” Ida Mae remembered.


pages: 337 words: 103,273

The Great Disruption: Why the Climate Crisis Will Bring on the End of Shopping and the Birth of a New World by Paul Gilding

airport security, Albert Einstein, Bob Geldof, BRICs, carbon footprint, clean water, cleantech, Climategate, commoditize, corporate social responsibility, creative destruction, decarbonisation, energy security, Exxon Valdez, failed state, fear of failure, income inequality, Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), Joseph Schumpeter, market fundamentalism, mass immigration, Naomi Klein, Nelson Mandela, new economy, nuclear winter, oil shock, peak oil, Ponzi scheme, purchasing power parity, Ronald Reagan, shareholder value, The Spirit Level, The Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith, union organizing, University of East Anglia

Relatively small groups could now mobilize public opinion on a large scale with the clever use of the increasingly globalized media. The Rainbow Warrior bombing and the broader public debate on the prospects for a nuclear war led me to reengage in activism from my then role as a serving member of the Australian military. I had joined the Royal Australian Air Force in 1983. Prior to that, I had worked as labor union organizer for a Communist-led trade union, the Builders Labourers Federation, in Sydney. While I felt I was making a contribution to society by protecting workers’ rights and safe working conditions, in what was at that stage a pretty shoddy industry, I soon became disaffected with the ideological obsession of the leadership and their blind support of their political beliefs. There were too many examples where the leadership was focused more on the power and influence of the union rather than on the interests of the workers.


pages: 309 words: 65,118

Ruby by example: concepts and code by Kevin C. Baird

Benevolent Dictator For Life (BDFL), David Heinemeier Hansson, Debian, digital map, Donald Knuth, en.wikipedia.org, Firefox, fudge factor, general-purpose programming language, Guido van Rossum, Larry Wall, MVC pattern, Paul Graham, Perl 6, premature optimization, union organizing, web application

The map method performs the block’s operation on every member of its calling object, while find_all returns a collection that only contains members that passed the test that the block describes. In both cases, the specifics are completely determined by the block. Conceptually, that’s all a callback is. Let’s see a specific useful example that uses Procs instead of blocks to describe callbacks. #37 Overnight DJ (radio_player1.rb) One of my friends has had a very colorful employment history. He’s been a DJ and general manager of a radio station, a union organizer, a journalist and translator in Japan, and a professional nightclub musician.1 Back when he was running a jazz radio station, he had a problem: His station relied heavily on volunteers and automation, as many jazz stations do, and the station operators would set up an automated computer system to play sound files overnight. The drawback was that the system had no logging, so if a listener heard something he or she liked at 2:47 AM, the operators couldn’t find out what the specific tune was.


pages: 364 words: 99,613