sustainable-tourism

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pages: 570 words: 158,139

Overbooked: The Exploding Business of Travel and Tourism by Elizabeth Becker

airport security, Asian financial crisis, barriers to entry, Berlin Wall, BRICs, car-free, carbon footprint, clean water, collective bargaining, colonial rule, computer age, corporate governance, Costa Concordia, Deng Xiaoping, European colonialism, Exxon Valdez, Fall of the Berlin Wall, Frank Gehry, global village, happiness index / gross national happiness, haute cuisine, indoor plumbing, Kickstarter, Masdar, Murano, Venice glass, open borders, out of africa, race to the bottom, Ralph Nader, Scramble for Africa, Silicon Valley, statistical model, sustainable-tourism, the market place, union organizing, urban renewal, wage slave, young professional, éminence grise

It’s easier to build that way and provide standard service, but how can you preserve a sense of place and culture? The complexity of the tourism industry works against sustainability.” “Unless you create some tie to a place and its people, you won’t have demand for sustainable tourism,” she continued. “Our certification program will help all tourists find the places that are still authentic.” That sounds high-minded and slightly boring. It is the opposite. Behind the phrase “sustainable tourism” is the wish to keep all of the intriguing, messy and exotic differences in the world. The rules and regulations of sustainable tourism are meant, ironically, to avoid a world that looks the same. The criteria for certification were unveiled, reviewed and revised by 2011, with nearly universal praise. That was the criteria I used to evaluate our voyage in Costa Rica.

“We are more like the police that recognize and enforce the standards,” said Janice Lichtenwald of the Global Sustainable Tourism Council. Companies are lining up to become official certifiers. Green Globe, which is privately owned, has already adopted the sustainable tourism standards and hopes to be able to certify hotels with the “Global Sustainable” label. “Green Globe and other companies will make money from this, yes they will,” said Lichtenwald. “There is a consumer desire for labeling—they expect it.” Hotels, resorts and tour operators are willing to pay companies to certify they are on the side of the angels, that visitors on vacation know they are not destroying the environment, or playing on a golf course that had been home to poor peasants a year earlier. • • • This drive for certification and sustainable tourism grew out of the environmental movement.

I was covering the negotiations: Elizabeth Becker, “A Pact on Central America Trade Zone, Minus One,” New York Times, December 18, 2003. From 1985 to 1991, visits to the park quadrupled: www.travelcostaricaonline.com/costa-rica-history.html. I reviewed all the categories for sustainable tourism: “The Global Sustainable Tourism Criteria,” http://new.gstcouncil.org/resource-center. “Sustainability is just like the old business adage”: U.N. Foundation press release, October 6, 2008, http://www.unfoundation.org/press-center/press-releases/2008/ted-turner-global-sustainable-tourism-criteria.html. “We grew up seeing tourism”: Author interviews with Erika Harm, March 25, 2008, and July 14, 2009. “We are more like the police”: Author interview with Janice Lichtenwald, September 9, 2011. “The industry had become all about promoting”: Author interview with Jonathan Tourtellot, September 23, 2011.


Fodor's Costa Rica 2012 by Fodor's

Berlin Wall, buttonwood tree, call centre, car-free, carbon footprint, David Attenborough, haute cuisine, Pepto Bismol, place-making, sustainable-tourism, urban renewal, urban sprawl

In-hotel: restaurant, bar, gym, business center, parking | Breakfast * * * Eco- or Sustainable Tourism Ecotourism, a relatively recent addition to the English language, has been defined as travel to natural areas to observe and learn about wildlife, tourism that refrains from damaging the environment, or tourism that strengthens conservation and improves the lives of local people. The latter two definitions could also apply to sustainable tourism, which has a wider scope than ecotourism and pushes for improvements in everything from city hotels to cruise ships. Whereas proponents of ecotourism believe it has the potential to conserve nature by providing economic opportunities for the rural poor, who are responsible for much of the deforestation in the tropics, sustainable tourism advocates note that all tourism has the potential for negative impacts, and they push for improvement across the entire industry.

Whereas proponents of ecotourism believe it has the potential to conserve nature by providing economic opportunities for the rural poor, who are responsible for much of the deforestation in the tropics, sustainable tourism advocates note that all tourism has the potential for negative impacts, and they push for improvement across the entire industry. If you define ecotourism as tourism that contributes to conservation and community development, then ecotourism is always sustainable tourism. However, not all sustainable tourism is ecotourism, since tourism businesses located far from natural areas can and should implement sustainable practices. The list of hotels certified by the Costa Rican Tourism Board’s Sustainable Tourism Certification program, for example, ranges from award-winning eco-lodges to city hotels that have made improvements such as installing sewage treatment systems and switching to energy-saving lightbulbs. For conscientious travelers who are looking for close contact with nature, sustainable may not be enough. Previous Chapter | Beginning of Chapter | Next Chapter | Table of Contents Previous Chapter | Next Chapter | Table of Contents The Arts | Nightlife The Arts The best source for theater, dance, film, and arts information is the “Viva” entertainment section of the Spanish-language daily La Nación.

Shopping in Volcán Poás National Park The Neotrópica Foundation sells nature-themed T-shirts, cards, and posters in the national park’s visitor center and devotes a portion of the profits to conservation projects. * * * Certificate of Sustainable Tourism One trip to Costa Rica and you’ll swear everything here is eco-lodges, ecotourism, eco-this, eco-that. But sustainability, the buzzword in Costa Rican tourism these days, also has to do with conserving cultural, as well as natural, resources. The Certification for Sustainable Tourism (CST) program, administered jointly by the Costa Rican Tourism Institute, National Chamber of Tourism, Ministry of the Environment, and University of Costa Rica, recognizes businesses that adhere to those ideals. Those that submit to a rigorous assessment are evaluated on their employment of local people, respect for local culture, contribution to the economic and social well-being of the community, and preservation of natural resources.


pages: 201 words: 33,620

Lonely Planet's Best in Travel 2020 by Lonely Planet

Airbnb, car-free, carbon footprint, happiness index / gross national happiness, Hyperloop, Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), Ronald Reagan, sustainable-tourism, trade route

However, with fewer water sources causing wildlife to congregate, and thinner foliage increasing sight lines in the bush, the dry season (May to September) is best for safaris. The Umhlanga Dance Festival takes place during the first week of September, with the main event happening on the 7th. • By Matt Phillips Trekking through the dense jungle near Quepos © KATHRIN ZIEGLER / GETTY IMAGES COSTA RICA Costa Rica flies the flag for sustainable tourism. This small country’s vast biodiversity attracts visitors keen to spot sleepy sloths in trees, red-eyed frogs paralysing their predators, and whales in the Pacific. Costa Ricans understand the importance of preserving their slice of tropical paradise and have found a way to invite others in while living in harmony with their neighbours – from leafcutter ants to jaguars. Ninety per cent of the country’s energy is created by renewable sources, and it could become one of the first carbon-neutral countries in 2020.

© FRANS LEMMENS / GETTY IMAGES A camel caravan makes its way through the sand dunes of Erg Chigaga © ELOJOTORPE / GETTY IMAGES The esplanade of Piriápolis, on Rocha’s coast URUGUAY If Uruguay isn’t already on your South American bucket list, 2020 is the perfect year to add it. While economic and political turmoil roil much of the continent, Uruguay stands as an oasis of calm stability: an advanced, developed nation that has proudly championed a progressive social agenda in recent years – from marijuana legalisation to the open embrace of LGBTQ+ rights. Uruguay regularly wins plaudits as South America’s only ‘full democracy’ and a leader in sustainable tourism and eco-friendliness. But what visitors remember most are Uruguay’s laid-back, welcoming and down-to-earth people and the subtle but profound beauty of the country’s landscape – from the long, untamed Atlantic coastline to the boundless open spaces of the pampas. ‘The cliff of La Pedrera is like a balcony into the sea. From there you can see whales, big waves, surfers and paragliders.

Travel gives us so much: adventure, delicious food, expanded horizons and lasting memories being just a few of its personal rewards. Perhaps less obvious is the effect our travels have on the places and people we visit. In Travel Well, we explore how well- planned, sustainable travel can be a force for good for all involved – good for the environment, for the local people, and for ourselves. WHAT IS SUSTAINABLE TRAVEL? The World Tourism Organisation defines sustainable tourism as that which ‘takes full account of its current and future economic, social and environmental impacts, addressing the needs of visitors, the industry, the environment and host communities.’ In this chapter we discuss ways our travel choices can benefit the destinations we visit. We present unforgettable journeys and experiences that have a low environmental impact; we look at how to spend the tourist dollar for the benefit of local communities; and we suggest meaningful and immersive tours that also help preserve ancient lifestyles and cultures.


Fodor's Costa Rica 2013 by Fodor's Travel Publications Inc.

airport security, Berlin Wall, buttonwood tree, call centre, car-free, carbon footprint, David Attenborough, glass ceiling, haute cuisine, Pepto Bismol, place-making, sustainable-tourism, urban sprawl

. | Average main: $21 | 400 m south and 40 m east of the Contraloría, Sabana Sur | 10108 | 2296–1917 | Closed weekends. * * * Eco- or Sustainable Tourism Ecotourism, a relatively recent addition to the English language, has been defined as travel to natural areas to observe and learn about wildlife, tourism that refrains from damaging the environment, or tourism that strengthens conservation and improves the lives of local people. The latter two definitions could also apply to sustainable tourism, which has a wider scope than ecotourism and pushes for improvements in everything from city hotels to cruise ships. Whereas proponents of ecotourism believe it has the potential to conserve nature by providing economic opportunities for the rural poor, who are responsible for much of the deforestation in the tropics, sustainable tourism advocates note that all tourism has the potential for negative impacts, and they push for improvement across the entire industry.

Whereas proponents of ecotourism believe it has the potential to conserve nature by providing economic opportunities for the rural poor, who are responsible for much of the deforestation in the tropics, sustainable tourism advocates note that all tourism has the potential for negative impacts, and they push for improvement across the entire industry. If you define ecotourism as tourism that contributes to conservation and community development, then ecotourism is always sustainable tourism. However, not all sustainable tourism is ecotourism, since tourism businesses located far from natural areas can and should implement sustainable practices. The list of hotels certified by the Costa Rican Tourism Board’s Sustainable Tourism Certification program, for example, ranges from award-winning eco-lodges to city hotels that have made improvements such as installing sewage treatment systems and switching to energy-saving lightbulbs. For conscientious travelers who are looking for close contact with nature, sustainable may not be enough. * * * Lubnan. $$ | MIDDLE EASTERN | Negotiate the quirky wrought-iron-and-burlap revolving door at the entrance, and you’ve made it into one of San José’s few Middle Eastern restaurants.

The refrescos (fresh fruit drinks) are top-drawer, especially the ones made from locally grown fresas (strawberries) and moras (blackberries) blended with milk. | Average main: $8 | 1 km/½ mile north of Laguna de Fraijanes | 20801 | 2482–2280 | No dinner. * * * Certificate of Sustainable Tourism One trip to Costa Rica and you’ll swear everything here is eco-lodges, ecotourism, eco-this, eco-that. But sustainability, the buzzword in Costa Rican tourism these days, also has to do with conserving cultural, as well as natural, resources. The Certification for Sustainable Tourism (CST) program, administered jointly by the Costa Rican Tourism Institute, National Chamber of Tourism, Ministry of the Environment, and University of Costa Rica, recognizes businesses that adhere to those ideals. Those that submit to a rigorous assessment are evaluated on their employment of local people, respect for local culture, contribution to the economic and social well-being of the community, and preservation of natural resources.


Lonely Planet Panama (Travel Guide) by Lonely Planet, Carolyn McCarthy

California gold rush, carbon footprint, clean water, cognitive dissonance, Francisco Pizarro, Frank Gehry, Guggenheim Bilbao, land tenure, low cost airline, Panamax, post-Panamax, Ronald Reagan, sustainable-tourism, trade route, transcontinental railway, urban renewal, women in the workforce

The organization also offers lodging and economical horseback riding (US$10 per hour), boat tours and nature walks. Providing luxury camping (mid-December through mid-May), meals and smart rooms, Hotel Heliconia (Tanager Tourism; 6676-0220; www.hotelheliconiapanama.com; tented rancho s/d US$18/30, s/d incl breakfast US$50/75; ) is in nearby Palmilla. The excellent retreat was thoughtfully crafted by Dutch biologists who also offer recommended area tours. They also work with the local community in sustainable tourism projects and in the reforestation of their own property. From Santiago, coaster buses leave hourly for Mariato, then go on to Palmilla (US$4, 1½ hours). Get off in Palmilla. Top of Chapter Parque Nacional Coiba With the exception of the Galápagos and Isla de Coco, few destinations off the Pacific coast of the Americas are as exotic (and difficult to access) as this national park centered on the 503-sq-km Isla de Coiba.

Hotel Bocas del Toro INN $$$ OFFLINE MAP GOOGLE MAP ( 757-9018; www.hotelbocasdeltoro.com; Calle 2; d incl breakfast from US$129; ) A fine getaway, this three-story waterfront house is decked in comforts, with spacious hardwood rooms that feature firm beds with luxuriant linens, warm decor and seafront balconies. Perks include great service, travel-agency assistance and kayak rentals. There’s also a deckside restaurant-bar and spa treatments are available. American-run, the hotel is a member of APTSO, Panama’s sustainable tourism alliance. Punta Caracol Aqua Lodge CABIN $$$ OFFLINE MAP GOOGLE MAP ( 612-1088; www.puntacaracol.com; s/d incl 2 meals US$374/430) A poster child for Caribbean luxury, Punta Caracol has a handful of exquisite cabins perched on a boardwalk over warm waters. Two-story thatched cabins feature king-sized canopy beds, big skylight windows and soft lighting. There are solar panels and local renewable mat­erials used in construction, but everything eco stops there, since the resort is built on a reef.

Tropix Surfshop OUTDOOR EQUIPMENT OFFLINE MAP GOOGLE MAP ( 757-9727; Calle 3; 9am-7pm) Sells custom-made surfboards and a few used boards, as well as a large selection of bikinis and other island apparel. LOCAL KNOWLEDGE SUSTAINABLE BOCAS Bocas is not ready for massive tourism, though it presents itself otherwise. What can you do to make your visit sustainable? Stop using small plastic water bottles; support sustainable tourism with a visit to the Ngöbe-run restaurant in Bahía Honda OFFLINE MAP ; make sure your boat in Dolphin Bay keeps a respectable distance from the dolphins; and use the co-op of local boaters (Boteros Unidos), who show more consciousness in their boating practices. Daniel Suman, coastal planner Information Emergency Police ( 104) Dangers & Annoyances The surf can be dangerous and there are frequently strong riptides – use caution when going out into the waves.


Central America by Carolyn McCarthy, Greg Benchwick, Joshua Samuel Brown, Alex Egerton, Matthew Firestone, Kevin Raub, Tom Spurling, Lucas Vidgen

airport security, Bartolomé de las Casas, California gold rush, call centre, centre right, clean water, cognitive dissonance, currency manipulation / currency intervention, digital map, Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test, failed state, Francisco Pizarro, Frank Gehry, haute cuisine, illegal immigration, Joan Didion, land reform, liberation theology, low cost airline, low cost carrier, Mahatma Gandhi, Monroe Doctrine, Ronald Reagan, Skype, sustainable-tourism, trade route, transcontinental railway, urban renewal, urban sprawl, women in the workforce

* * * Return to beginning of chapter ALEX EGERTON Nicaragua A journalist by trade, Alex has been hanging around in Central America for almost a decade, teaching at universities, contributing to magazines and searching for the perfect fried cheese. He currently divides his time between suburban Managua and Bluefields, where he lives in a recording studio and writes about all things Caribbean. Alex is also actively involved in a project promoting sustainable tourism in remote indigenous communities in Nicaragua. While on the road for this guide, Alex twice bought medicine from persuasive pharmaceutical salesmen on intercity buses, but has yet to try either pill. Return to beginning of chapter MATTHEW D FIRESTONE Costa Rica Matthew is a trained anthropologist and epidemiologist, though he postponed his academic career to spend his youth living out of a backpack.

Conap (Map; Consejo Nacional de Áreas Protegidas; 2238-0000; http://conap.online.fr; Edificio IPM, 5a Av 6-06, Zona 1, Guatemala City) The government arm in charge of protected areas. Fundación Defensores de la Naturaleza (off Map; 2310-2900; www.defensores.org.gt; 2a Av 14-08, Zona 14, Guatemala City) NGO that owns and administers several protected areas. Planeta (www.planeta.com/guatemala.html) Focuses on sustainable tourism in Guatemala. ProPetén (7867-5296; www.propeten.org; Calle Central, Flores, El Petén) NGO that works in conservation and natural resources management in Parque Nacional Laguna del Tigre. Proyecto Ecoquetzal (7952-1047; www.ecoquetzal.org; 2a Calle 14-36, Zona 1, Cobán, Alta Verapaz) Works in forest conservation and ecotourism. TRANSPORTATION GETTING THERE & AWAY Air Guatemala’s two major international airports are in Guatemala City (Aeropuerto Internacional La Aurora; Click here) and near Flores and Santa Elena (Aeropuerto Internacional Mundo Maya; Click here).

Grab a table streetside for people-watching and sample some of the good Thai cooking. Restaurante Buga Mama (Calle Marcos Sánchez Díaz; mains Q40-100; breakfast, lunch & dinner; ) This place enjoys the best location of any restaurant in town, and profits go to the Asociación Ak Tenemit. There’s a wide range of seafood, homemade pasta, curries and other dishes on the menu, including a very good tapado (Q100). Most of the waiters here are trainees in a community sustainable tourism development scheme, so service can be sketchy, but forgivable. Restaurante Bahía Azul (Calle Principal; mains Q60-100; breakfast, lunch & dinner) The Bahía’s central location, happy decor and good fresh food keep it popular. The menu selection is wide, with a good mix of Caribbean, Guatemalan and Asian influences. It opens early for breakfast. Drinking Adventurous drinkers should try guifiti, a local concoction made from coconut rum, often infused with herbs.


pages: 260 words: 130,109

Frommer's Kauai by Jeanette Foster

airport security, indoor plumbing, Maui Hawaii, Skype, sustainable-tourism

Manufactured in the United States of America 5 4 3 2 1 CONTENTS LIST OF MAPS vi 1 BEST OF KAUAI 1 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 The Best Beaches . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 The Best Kauai Experiences . . . . . . . .4 The Best Adventures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 The Best of Natural Hawaii . . . . . . . . .5 The Best of Underwater Hawaii. . . . .6 The Best Golf Courses . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6 The Best Luxury Hotels & Resorts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7 8 The Best Moderately Priced Accommodations. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8 9 The Best Inexpensive Accommodations. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10 10 The Best Bed & Breakfasts . . . . . . . . .10 11 The Best Restaurants . . . . . . . . . . . . . .11 12 The Best Shops & Galleries . . . . . . . .13 Pampering in Paradise . . . . . . . . . . . . .14 13 The Best Spas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .15 2 HAWAII IN DEPTH 1 2 3 4 History 101 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .16 Hawaii Today. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .19 Life & Language. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .20 A Taste of Hawaii . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .21 16 5 The Natural World: An Environmental Guide to the Islands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .24 6 Hawaii in Popular Culture: Books, Film & Music . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .33 3 PLANNING YOUR TRIP TO KAUAI 1 When to Go. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .38 What to Pack . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .39 That Long Flight to Hawaii: How to Stay Comfortable . . . . . . . . . .40 Kauai Calendar of Events . . . . . . . . . . .42 Honoring the Dead: Obon Festival. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .45 2 Entry Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .47 3 Getting There & Getting Around . . . .48 38 Coping with Jet Lag . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .51 4 Money & Costs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .53 What Things Cost in Kauai . . . . . . . . .55 5 Health . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .55 What to Do If Your Luggage Is Delayed or (Gasp!) Lost . . . . . . . . . . .56 Don’t Get Burned: Smart Tanning Tips. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .58 6 Safety . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .60 iv 7 Specialized Travel Resources . . . . . .62 8 Getting Married on Kauai . . . . . . . . .63 9 Sustainable Tourism. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .65 General Resources for Green Travel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .68 10 The Active Vacation Planner. . . . . . .69 Fun for Less: Don’t Leave Home Without a Gold Card . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71 11 Money-Saving Package Deals . . . . .71 12 Staying Connected. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .73 The Welcoming Lei . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .74 13 Tips on Accommodations . . . . . . . . .75 Hawaii on the Web. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .79 4 SUGGESTED KAUAI ITINERARIES CO N T E N T S K AUA I The Island in Brief . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .80 Niihau: The Forbidden Island . . . . . . .82 1 One Week on Kauai . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .84 5 WHERE TO STAY 1 Lihue & Environs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .96 Family-Friendly Hotels . . . . . . . . . . . . . .98 2 The Poipu Resort Area. . . . . . . . . . . 101 Construction in Poipu . . . . . . . . . . . . 104 The King of Condos . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 107 What’s the Story on “Cleaning Fees?”

See also Accommodations Index B&B etiquette, 113 bargaining on prices, 78 best, 8–11 “cleaning fees,” 108 the Coconut Coast, 116–125 environmentallyfriendly, 68 family-friendly, 98–99 Lihue and environs, 96–101 nickel-&-dime charges at high-priced hotels, 78 the North Shore, 125–131 Poipu Resort Area, 101–115 super-cheap sleeps the Coconut Coast, 124 Kalaheo, 115 Lihue area, 101 the North Shore, 131 timeshares, 118 types of, 75–78 western Kauai, 115–116 Ace Island Hardware, 178 Active vacation planner, 69–71 Activities and Attractions Association of Hawaii Gold Card, 71 Activities desks, 70–71 Ae’o, 29 African tulip trees, 26 Agricultural screening at the airports, 50 Air Canada, 48 Air Canada Vacations, 72 Airfarewatchdog.com, 49 Air New Zealand, 48 Air Pacific, 48 Air Tickets Direct, 50 Air travel health concerns, 51 to Kauai, 48–51 staying comfortable on long flights, 40 AITO (Association of Independent Tour Operators), 68 Alakai Swamp Trail, 183 Alala, 29 Alekoko (Menehune) Fishpond, 200–201 All Angels Jazz Festival (Lihue), 43 Allerton Garden of the National Tropical Botanical Garden, 5, 202 All Nippon Airways, 48 All Stings Considered: First Aid and Medical Treatment of Hawaii’s Marine Injuries, 57, 59, 60 All-Terrain-Vehicle (ATV) tours, 194–195 All Woman’s Koloa Rodeo (Poipu), 45 Aloha Festivals, 45–46 Aloha Kauai Tours, 200 Amakihi, 29 Amberjack, 31 American Airlines, 49 American Airlines FlyAway Vacations, 72 American Automobile Association (AAA), 230 American Express Travel, 72 American Express traveler’s checks, 54 America West, 49 Anahola Beach Park, 169 beach camping, 187 ANARA Spa (Koloa), 101 Angelfish, 30 Angel’s trumpets, 26 Anianiau, 29 Animal Quarantine Facility, 62 Anini Beach, 83, 175 Anini Beach County Park, 2, 169, 187–188 Annual Coconut Festival, 46 Annual Family Ocean Fair (Kilauea National Wildlife Refuge), 44 Annual Festival of Lights (Lihue), 46 Annual Hula Exhibition (Lihue), 44 Annual Royal Paina (Lihue), 43 Annual Taste of Hawaii (Kapaa), 43–44 Annual Visitor Industry Charity Walk (Lihue), 43 Anthuriums, 26 Apapane, 29 A Pocket Guide to Hawaii’s Birds, 34 Area code, 230 Art galleries, Hanapepe, 221 A Simple Marriage, 64 Association of Independent Tour Operators (AITO), 68 ATMs (automated-teller machines), 53, 54 ATV (All-Terrain-Vehicle) tours, 194–195 Aunty Lilikoi’s passion fruit products (Waimea), 217 Australia customs regulations, 48 embassy of, 231 green travel resources, 68 passports, 232 visas, 234 Avis, 52, 62 A Vow Exchange, 64 Awaawapuhi Trail, 182–183 Backcountry camping, 184–185 Bali Hai Photo (Hanalei), 75 Bambulei (Wailua), 222 Banana Joe’s, 216 Banana Patch Studio (Hanapepe), 221 Banana Poka Roundup (Kokee State Park), 44 Banyan trees, 26 Barking Sands Beach, 2, 168 Beach camping Anahola Beach Park, 187 Lucy Wright Park, 186 Polihale State Park, 185–186 Beaches, 161–171 Anahola Beach Park, 169 Anini Beach County Park, 2, 169 Barking Sands Beach, 2, 168 best, 1–2 the Coconut Coast, 168–169 Haena Beach, 2 Haena Beach Park, 170, 188–189 Hanakapiai Beach, 190–191 Hanalei Beach, 2, 188 Hanamaulu Beach Park, 164 Kalapaki Beach, 1–2, 161–162 Kee Beach State Park, 170–171 Lihue and environs, 161–164 Lumahai Beach, 170 Lydgate State Park, 168 Mahaulepu Beach, 164 Ninini Beach, 162 Niumalu Beach Park, 162 the North Shore, 169–171 Poipu Beach Park, 2, 164–165 Poipu Resort Area, 164–167 Polihale State Park, 2, 168 Prince Kuhio Park, 165–166 Queen’s Pond, 168 safety, 59 Salt Pond Beach Park, 168 sustainable tourism, 66 trespassing and, 60 Tunnels Beach, 170 Wailua Beach, 168–169 western Kauai, 168 Bed & breakfasts (B&Bs), 77–79. See also Accommodations best, 10–11 Bento, 23 Bergeron, Vic, 18 Big Island, 25 Big Save (Waimea), 221 Biking, 195–196 Billfish, 31 Birds, 29 Birds-of-paradise, 26 Bird-watching, 34, 196 Bisexual/Transgender/Gay/ Lesbian Community Bulletin Board, 62 Black Pot, 169 Blennies, 30 Blue Hawaii (film), 36 Blue Hawaiian, 206–207 Boating (rentals, charters, and cruises), 171–172 Bodyboarding (boogie boarding) and bodysurfing, 172 Bonefish, 31 Booking agencies for accommodations, 79 Books, recommended, 33–35 Bottom fish, 145 Bouchons Restaurant and Sushi Bar (Hanalei), 228 Bougainvillea, 26–27 Box jellyfish, 59 Breadfruit trees, 27 Bridge etiquette, 211 Bromeliads, 27 Bubbles Below Scuba Charters, 174–175 Bucket shops (consolidators), 50 Budget, 52 Bugs, 55–57 Burns Supper (Waimea), 42 Business hours, 230 Business Support Services (Kapaa), 75 Bus travel, 53 Butterfly fish, 30 By Wind, By Wave: An Introduction to Hawaii’s Natural History, 34 Calling cards, prepaid, 73 Campgrounds and wilderness cabins, 177 backcountry, 184–185 at beaches Anahola Beach Park, 187 Lucy Wright Park, 186 Polihale State Park, 185–186 Kokee State Park, 183–185 Polihale State Park, 185–186 Camp Sloggett, 183 Canada customs regulations, 48 embassy of, 231 green travel resources, 68 passports, 232 Cannons Beach, 175 Canyon Trail, 182 Captain Andy’s Sailing Adventures, 172, 227 Captain Cook Fun Run (Waimea), 43 Carbonfund, 68 Carbon Neutral, 68 Car insurance, 52 Car rentals, 51–52 Carrying capacity of the Hawaiian Islands, 67 Car travel, 51, 67 Caverns, 6, 174 Cellphones, 73 Centipedes, 55–57 Cheapflights.com, 49 Chickens and roosters, wild, 111 Children, families with, 63 hotels, 98–99 restaurants, 142–143 sights and activities, 176 suggested itinerary, 90–93 sun protection, 58 China Airlines, 48 Ching Young Village Shopping Center (Hanalei), 225 Christmas Parade, Waimea Lighted, 46 CJM Country Stables (Koloa), 196 “Cleaning fees,” 108 Clinton, Bill, 20 The Coconut Coast, 80 accommodations, 116–125 beaches, 168–169 brief description of, 82 hiking and camping, 186–187 237 238 The Coconut Coast (cont.) nightlife, 228 restaurants, 143, 148–153 vegetarian-friendly, 151 shopping, 222–224 sights and attractions, 208–210 Coconut Coast Weddings & Honeymoons, 64 Coconut Festival, 46 Coconut Marketplace (Kapaa), 223 nightlife, 228 Coffee, 27 Collect calls, 73 Collectibles and Fine Junque (Waimea), 221 Concert in the Sky (Lihue), 44 Condos, 76 Conger eels, 30 Connection kit, 75 Consolidators (bucket shops), 50 Consulates, 230–231 Continental Airlines Vacations, 72 Cook, Capt.

See also Accommodations Index B&B etiquette, 113 bargaining on prices, 78 best, 8–11 “cleaning fees,” 108 the Coconut Coast, 116–125 environmentallyfriendly, 68 family-friendly, 98–99 Lihue and environs, 96–101 nickel-&-dime charges at high-priced hotels, 78 the North Shore, 125–131 Poipu Resort Area, 101–115 super-cheap sleeps the Coconut Coast, 124 Kalaheo, 115 Lihue area, 101 the North Shore, 131 timeshares, 118 types of, 75–78 western Kauai, 115–116 Lost luggage, 56 The Lost World: Jurassic Park (film), 35 Lotus Gallery (Kilauea), 224 Luaus, 156–157 Lucy Wright Park, beach camping, 186 Lumahai Beach, 170, 211 Lydgate State Park, 168 Macadamia, 28 Mahaulepu Beach, 164 Mahaulepu Shoreline Trail, 180 Mahimahi, 31 Mail, 232 Mail2web, 75 Malama Hawaii, 66 Manapua, 23 Maniniholo, 188 Maps, 52–53 Margo Oberg’s School of Surfing, 176 Marine life, 30–32 ecosystem problems and, 32 sustainable tourism, 66 Marriage, 63–65 Marriage License Office, 64 Marta’s Boat (Kapaa), 223 241 242 MasterCard traveler’s checks, 55 Maui, 25 McBryde Garden, 202 Meadow Gold Dairies, 140 Medeiros Farms (Kalaheo), 220 Medical insurance, 60 Medical requirements for entry, 48 Menehune (little people), 201 Menehune Ditch (Kiki a Ola), 201, 203–204 Menehune (Alekoko) Fishpond, 200–201 Michener, James A., 33 Microclimates, 39 Milolii, 191 Missionaries, 17, 20 Moa (wild chickens), 29, 111 Mokulele Airlines, 49 Molokai, 25–26 Molokai: The Story of Father Damien (film), 36 Molokini, 32 Money and costs, 53–55 Monkeypod trees, 28 Monk seals, 66, 164 Moray eels, 30 More Hawaii For Less, 72 Mosquitoes, 55–57 MossRehab ResourceNet, 62 Motorcycle rentals, 53 Na Aina Kai Botanical Gardens, 5, 213 Na Pali Coast, 4–5, 214 boating, 171–172 brief description of, 83–84 camping, 190–191 Na Pali Coast State Park, 189 Na Pali Explorer (Waimea), 75 Na Pali Sunset Dinner, 227 National, 52 National Weather Service, 61 Nation Within: The Story of America’s Annexation of the Nation of Hawaii, 35 Native Planters in Old Hawaii: Their Life, Lore, and Environment, 34 Nene, 29 Newspapers and magazines, 232–233 New Year’s Eve Fireworks (Poipu), 46 New Zealand customs regulations, 48 embassy of, 231 passports, 232 visas, 234 Night-blooming cereus, 28 Nightlife, 226–229 the Coconut Coast, 228 Lihue and environs, 226 the North Shore, 228–229 Poipu Resort Area, 226–227 Niihau, 82 Niihau Helicopter, 82, 208 Niihau shell leis, 220 Ninini Beach, 162 9th Annual Kauai Polynesian Festival: Heiva I Kauai Ia Orana Tahiti (Kapaa), 45 Niumalu Beach Park, 162 None But the Brave (film), 35–36 The North Shore, 80 accommodations, 125–131 beaches, 169–171 brief description of, 83 golf, 194 hiking and camping, 187–190 nightlife, 228–229 restaurants, 143, 154–160 shopping, 224–225 sights and attractions, 210–214 Nounou Mountain Trail East (The Sleeping Giant Trail), 186 Nounou Mountain Trail West, 187 Nualolo Trail, 183 Nudity, 60 Nukumoi Surf Shop (Poipu Beach Park), 176, 219 O ahu, 25 Obon Days & Festival (Koloa), 44 Obon Festival, 45 Oceanarium, 6, 174 Ocean safety, 57 Odyssey Publishing, 52 Official Kauai Travel Planner, 64 Off seasons, 38 Ola’s (Hanalei), 224 Old Koloa Town, shopping, 219 On The Road to Hanalei, 225 Opaekaa Falls, 5 Opodo, 49 Orbitz.com, 49 Orchid Alley (Kapaa), 224 Orchid and Art Festival (Hanapepe), 43 Orchids, 28 Out and About, 62–63 Outdoor etiquette, 71 Outfitters, 69–70 Outfitters Kauai, 173–174, 180, 195–196 Outrigger Canoe Season, 43 Outrigger Hotel and Resorts chain, 72 Pacific Missile Range Facility (PMRF), 203 Pacific Ocean Holidays, 62 Package deals, 71–73 Pandanus (hala), 28 Papayas Natural Foods (Hanalei), 225 Papayas Natural Foods (Kapaa), 223 Paradise Clothing (Old Koloa Town), 219 Paradise Sportswear (Waimea), 222 The Parrish Collection (Koloa), 107 Parrotfish, 31 Passports, 47, 232 Pau Hana Bar and Grill (Kauai Village Shopping Center), 228 Peacock, W.


Frommer's Egypt by Matthew Carrington

airport security, centre right, colonial rule, Internet Archive, land tenure, low cost airline, Maui Hawaii, open economy, rent control, rolodex, sustainable-tourism, trade route, urban planning, urban sprawl, walkable city, Yom Kippur War

Dollar, the Euro & the British Pound . . . . . .23 What Things Cost in Egypt . . . . . . . .24 7 Specialized Travel Resources . . . . . . .31 3 Suggested Egypt Itineraries 1 2 3 4 4 7 8 9 10 11 12 Cairo in 3 Days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .55 Cairo & Alexandria in 5 Days . . . . . .57 Luxor: 3 Days of Ancient Egypt . . . . .58 Luxor & Aswan: 5 Days of Ancient Egypt . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .59 Active Vacation Planner 1 Activities A to Z . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .65 The Best Budget Hotels . . . . . . . . . . .5 The Best Restaurants . . . . . . . . . . . . .6 The Best Christian Cultural Sites . . . . .6 The Best Resorts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7 The Best Diving Spots . . . . . . . . . . . . .8 The Best Museums . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8 10 8 Sustainable Tourism/Ecotourism . . . .36 9 10 11 12 13 14 Frommers.com: The Complete Travel Resource . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .37 Staying Connected . . . . . . . . . . . . . .38 Packages for the Independent Traveler . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .40 Escorted General-Interest Tours . . . . .41 Getting Around Egypt . . . . . . . . . . . .41 Tips on Accommodations . . . . . . . . .43 Tips on Dining . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .47 Fast Facts: Egypt . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .48 55 5 Western Desert/4-Day Desert Safari . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .60 6 Sinai Peninsula . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .61 65 02_259290-ftoc.qxp iv 7/22/08 12:23 AM Page iv CONTENTS 5 6 Cairo 72 1 Orientation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .73 The 30-Second Taxi Survival Guide . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .76 The Neighborhoods in Brief . . . . . . .77 2 Getting Around . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .78 3 What to See & Do . . . . . . . . . . . . . .82 4 Where to Stay . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .101 5 6 7 8 Where to Dine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .110 Outdoor Activities A to Z . . . . . . . .116 Shopping . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .116 Cairo After Dark . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .119 Coffee Culture . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .121 9 The Gay & Lesbian Scene . . . . . . . .122 10 Day Trips from Cairo . . . . . . . . . . . .122 Alexandria & the North Coast 127 1 Alexandria . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .128 7 The Sinai Peninsula 1 Taba Heights . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .156 2 Nuweiba . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .159 3 Dahab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .162 8 The Red Sea Coast 1 Marsa Alam . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .186 2 El Quseir . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .194 3 Safaga . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .198 9 Upper Egypt 1 Luxor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .216 Karnak Sound & Light Show . . . . . .225 Slow Boat to the Past . . . . . . . . . . .228 10 The Western Desert 1 Siwa . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .255 2 Bahareya . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .266 3 Farafra . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .274 156 4 St.

Happy Cow’s Vegetarian Guide to Restaurants & Health Food Stores (www.happycow.net) has a restaurant guide with more than 6,000 restaurants in 100 countries, though at the time of writing, it has only one, outdated, listing for Cairo. Hopefully, this will expand with reader contributions. VegDining. com (www.vegdining.com) also lists vegetarian restaurants (with profiles) around the world. Vegetarian Vacations (www. vegetarian-vacations.com) offers vegetarian tours and itineraries. 05_259290-ch02.qxp 36 7/28/08 8:31 AM Page 36 C H A P T E R 2 . P L A N N I N G YO U R T R I P TO E G Y P T 8 Sustainable Tourism/Ecotourism Until a few years ago, scant attention was paid in Egypt to the environmental impact of the millions of tourists who visit every year. This has started to change, as foreign donors have pressed the government on the consequences of environmental degradation caused by massive development along the Red Sea coast. Egypt has established 21 protected areas, and foreign donors, including the European Union, have contributed large amounts of capital to develop them on behalf of future generations of Egyptians.

We’ve also added weekly podcasts, interactive maps, and hundreds of new images across the site. Finally, don’t forget to visit our Message Boards, where you can join in conversations with thousands of fellow Frommer’s travelers and post your trip report once you return. Choose forward-looking companies that embrace responsible development practices, helping preserve destinations for the future by working alongside local people. An increasing number of sustainable tourism initiatives can help you plan a family trip and leave as small a “footprint” as possible on the places you visit. Responsible Travel (www.responsible travel.com) contains a great source of sustainable travel ideas run by a spokesperson for responsible tourism in the travel industry. Sustainable Travel International (www.sustainabletravelinternational.org) promotes responsible tourism practices and issues an annual Green Gear & Gift Guide.


Lonely Planet Nicaragua (Travel Guide) by Lonely Planet, Alex Egerton, Greg Benchwick

agricultural Revolution, British Empire, car-free, carbon footprint, centre right, clean water, land reform, liberation theology, off grid, place-making, race to the bottom, Ralph Nader, Ronald Reagan, sustainable-tourism, traveling salesman

Afterward, Ortega nationalized this farmland and gave it back to the people who organized themselves into colectivos . This population may look and act humble, but it has war stories and ambitious, utopian dreams of economic equality burned into its collective brain. These days most of the cooperatives have been dissolved and the lands distributed among their former members. And while many locals now own their lands, poverty remains widespread and sustainable tourism is just one of the ways local residents eke out a living. Advanced reservations are essential to ensure visitor income is distributed evenly among participating farmers and your hosts are prepared for your arrival. UCA Miraflor (Click here) in Estelí manages the reserve and can help you plan a visit, hook you up with an English-speaking guide and book family homestays. Alternatively, Tree Huggers (Click here) provides detailed, impartial advice on planning a trip and also makes reservations.

La Biosfera FARM ( 8427-8414, 8698-1439; www.hijuela.com/labiosferaretreat; Carretera vieja Matagalpa) This American-run permaculture farm just 3km outside town has fantastic views and 7 hectares of forest to explore. It offers subsidized accommodation for those that want to volunteer on the farm. Tours Cuculmeca CULTURAL ( 2782-3579; www.cuculmeca.org; Barrio Daniel Teller, Salida al Guayacán; 9am-5pm Mon-Fri) This dynamic NGO arranges accommodation and guides for visits to farms and sustainable tourism projects in the Reserva Natural Cerro Datanlí–El Diablo and around San Rafael del Norte. Among the farms involved is Finca La Estrella , 20km from Jinotega, where you can tour organic coffee plots, hike through trails of intact forest or take part in the harvest. Festivals & Events Festival de la Cruz RELIGIOUS ( May 3) One of Nicaragua’s most athletic fiestas ; since 1703 visitors have been shamed into climbing to the cross by area octogenarians.

Sleeping & Eating The Indio-Maíz is a restricted area and there are no accomodations in this part of the reserve; however, there are a couple of excellent options just outside its boundaries on the other side of the Río Bartola. Basecamp Bartola COMMUNITY LODGE $$$ ( 8913-8215; indio.maiz@gmail.com; Comunidad Bartola; per person incl meals & transport US$66) Run by the tiny community of Bartola, 6km up the Río Bartola, this groundbreaking new project is the future of sustainable tourism in the region. Visitors sleep in tents (complete with mattresses and towels folded into swans) on wooden platforms overlooking the thick canopy of the Indio Maíz across the river. Activities include fantastic guided treks through nearby virgin forest full of monkeys and trips in traditional boats. Prices vary depending on number of visitors. Refugio Bartola NATURE RESERVE $$$ ( 8885-7386, 8376-6979; www.refugiobartola.com; r per person incl meals US$50, day-use fee US$5, guides per day US$20) Set at the confluence of Ríos San Juan and Bartola opposite the ranger post, this rustic wooden lodge and private reserve is the superlative option for true nature lovers in the region yet receives surprisingly few travelers.


pages: 251 words: 76,868

How to Run the World: Charting a Course to the Next Renaissance by Parag Khanna

Albert Einstein, Asian financial crisis, back-to-the-land, bank run, blood diamonds, Bob Geldof, borderless world, BRICs, British Empire, call centre, carbon footprint, charter city, clean water, cleantech, cloud computing, commoditize, continuation of politics by other means, corporate governance, corporate social responsibility, Deng Xiaoping, Doha Development Round, don't be evil, double entry bookkeeping, energy security, European colonialism, facts on the ground, failed state, friendly fire, global village, Google Earth, high net worth, index fund, informal economy, Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), invisible hand, Kickstarter, laissez-faire capitalism, Live Aid, Masdar, mass immigration, megacity, microcredit, mutually assured destruction, Naomi Klein, Nelson Mandela, New Urbanism, off grid, offshore financial centre, oil shock, open economy, out of africa, Parag Khanna, private military company, Productivity paradox, race to the bottom, RAND corporation, reserve currency, Silicon Valley, smart grid, South China Sea, sovereign wealth fund, special economic zone, sustainable-tourism, The Fortune at the Bottom of the Pyramid, The Wisdom of Crowds, too big to fail, trade liberalization, trickle-down economics, UNCLOS, uranium enrichment, Washington Consensus, X Prize

Virgin Nigeria and Kenya’s Flamingo Airlines are starting to build regional airline networks. Bringing in professional partners and demanding private-sector partners is perhaps the only way to noticeably improve the efficiency of these infrastructure projects while decreasing corruption. Furthermore, just about every sub-Saharan African border should be turned into a trans-boundary conservation park jointly managed by sustainable tourism agencies and tax authorities. Their collective motto should be “make safari, not war.” Africa will achieve a broad renaissance only if its many micro-economies fuse into just a few. Facts on the Ground: The Middle East The artificial confines of the state have always been uncomfortable for Arabs, who once presided over mighty caliphates that fostered prosperous relations among the great cities of Cairo, Baghdad, and others.

In New Caledonia, Vale cooperates with local authorities to hire people from tribal communities and train them as environmental technicians to protect plant species. NGOs have also convinced Vale not to mine in areas designated as UNESCO World Heritage sites. Marriott, too, has partnered with the provincial government of Amazonas to protect 1.4 million acres of endangered forest, where it promotes sustainable tourism, while UNESCO and Expedia have combined to rehabilitate war-ravaged forests in Congo and hurricane-devastated communities in Mexico, opening them both to ecotourists. NGOs are also the key drivers of government policy in the environmental arena. Conservation International spends more than $100 million per year in forty-four countries to protect endangered species, something few governments bother to advocate for, while the International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN) directly advises seventy-five countries on biodiversity strategy and runs online training programs for environmental management professionals.


pages: 666 words: 131,148

Frommer's Seattle 2010 by Karl Samson

airport security, British Empire, Frank Gehry, glass ceiling, global village, haute cuisine, place-making, sustainable-tourism, transcontinental railway, urban sprawl, white picket fence

If you’re no longer a student but are still 25 or under, you can get an International Youth Travel Card (IYTC) from the same people, which entitles you to some discounts. Travel CUTS ( 80 0/592-2887;www.travelcuts.com) offers similar services for both Canadians and U.S. residents. Irish students may prefer to turn to USIT ( 0 1/602-1906;www.usit.ie), an Ireland-based specialist in student, youth, and independent travel. 7 Sustainable Tourism Sustainable tourism is conscientious travel. It means being careful with the environments you explore and respecting the communities you visit. Two overlapping components of sustainable travel are ecotourism and ethical tourism. The International Ecotourism Society (TIES) defines ecotourism as responsible travel to natural areas that conserves the environment and improves the well-being of local people.

. & Forests & Mountains, Too 1 The Most Unforgettable Seattle Experiences 2 The Best Splurge Hotels 3 The Best Moderately Priced Hotels 4 The Most Unforgettable Dining Experiences 5 The Best Things to Do for Free (or Almost) 6 The Best Outdoor Activities 7 The Best Offbeat Experiences 8 The Best Things to Do on a Rainy Day 9 The Best Activities for Families Chapter 2: Seattle in Depth 1 Seattle Today 2 Looking Back at Seattle Pioneer Years Up from the Ashes The Boeing Years 3 Seattle in Popular Culture: Books, Film, TV & Music Books Films & TV Music 4 Eating & Drinking in Seattle Chapter 3: Planning Your Trip to Seattle 1 When to Go 2 Entry Requirements Visas Customs Medical Requirements 3 Getting There & Getting Around Getting into Town from the Airport Getting Around 4 Money & Costs ATMs Credit Cards & Debit Cards 5 Health & Safety Staying Safe 6 Specialized Travel Resources Gay & Lesbian Travelers Travelers with Disabilities Family Travel Senior Travel Student Travel 7 Sustainable Tourism 8 Special-Interest Trips Food & Wine Trips/Cooking classes Packages for the Independent Traveler 9 Staying Connected Cellphones Internet & E-mail Chapter 4: Suggested Seattle Itineraries 1 The Best of Seattle in 1 Day 2 The Best of Seattle in 2 Days 3 The Best of Seattle in 3 Days Chapter 5: Where to Stay Surfing for Hotels Saving on Your Hotel Room Landing the Best Room Helping Hands 1 Best Hotel Bets 2 The Waterfront Very Expensive Expensive 3 Downtown & First Hill Very Expensive Expensive Moderate Inexpensive 4 Belltown Expensive Moderate Inexpensive 5 Pike Place Market Expensive 6 Pioneer Square & the International District Expensive Moderate 7 Queen Anne & Seattle Center Expensive Moderate Inexpensive 8 Lake Union Expensive Moderate 9 Capitol Hill & East Seattle Moderate Inexpensive 10 North Seattle (The University District) Moderate Inexpensive 11 Near Sea-Tac Airport Moderate 12 The Eastside Expensive Moderate Inexpensive 13 Bainbridge Island Moderate Chapter 6: Where to Dine 1 Best Dining Bets 2 Restaurants by Cuisine 3 The Waterfront Expensive Moderate Inexpensive 4 Downtown & First Hill Very Expensive Expensive Moderate Inexpensive 5 Belltown Very Expensive Expensive Moderate Inexpensive 6 Pike Place Market Expensive Moderate Inexpensive 7 Pioneer Square & the International District Moderate Inexpensive 8 Queen Anne & Seattle Center Very Expensive Expensive Moderate Inexpensive 9 Lake Union & South Lake Union Moderate Inexpensive 10 Capitol Hill & Madison Valley Very Expensive Expensive Moderate Inexpensive 11 The University District Inexpensive 12 Wallingford, Fremont & Phinney Ridge Expensive Moderate Inexpensive 13 Ballard Expensive Moderate Inexpensive 14 West Seattle Expensive Moderate Inexpensive 15 The Eastside Moderate 16 Coffee, Tea, Bakeries & Pastry Shops Cafes, Coffee Bars & Tea Shops Bakeries & Pastry Shops 17 Quick Bites Market Munching Chapter 7: Exploring Seattle 1 The Waterfront 2 Pike Place Market to Pioneer Square 3 Seattle Center & Lake Union 4 The Neighborhoods The International District First Hill (Pill Hill) & Capitol Hill North Seattle (Including Ballard, Fremont, Montlake & the U District) South Seattle North of Seattle The Eastside 5 Architectural Gems 6 Parks & Public Gardens Parks Public Gardens 7 Especially for Kids 8 Organized Tours Walking Tours Boat Tours Scenic Flights & Hot-Air Balloon Rides 9 Outdoor Pursuits Beaches Biking Golf Hiking Jogging Sea Kayaking, Canoeing, Rowing & Sailing Skiing Tennis 10 Spectator Sports Baseball Basketball Football Horse Racing The Marathon Soccer 11 Day Spas Chapter 8: City Strolls Chapter 9: Seattle Shopping 1 The Shopping Scene 2 Shopping A to Z Antiques & Collectibles Art Galleries Books Coffee & Tea Crafts Department Stores Discount Shopping Fashion Food Gifts/Souvenirs Housewares, Home Furnishings & Garden Accessories Jewelry Malls/Shopping Centers Markets Music Musical Instruments Perfume Recreational Gear Salmon Toys Wine Chapter 10: Seattle After Dark 1 The Performing Arts Opera & Classical Music Theater Dance Major Performance Halls Performing-Arts Series 2 The Club & Music Scene Rock, Folk, Reggae & World Beat Jazz & Blues Comedy, Cabaret & Dinner Theater Dance Clubs 3 The Bar Scene Bars Brewpubs Irish Pubs Other Pubs 4 The Gay & Lesbian Scene Bars Dance Clubs 5 Movies 6 Only in Seattle Chapter 11: Side Trips from Seattle 1 The San Juan Islands Visitor Information Getting There San Juan Island Orcas Island Lopez Island 2 Port Townsend: A Restored Victorian Seaport Essentials Exploring the Town Fort Worden State Park Port Townsend from the Water Area Wineries Where to Stay Where to Dine 3 Sequim: Lavender Fields Forever Essentials Lavender, Wine & Wildlife Where to Stay Where to Dine 4 Olympic National Park & Environs Visitor Information Getting There Exploring the Park’s North Side Rainforests & Wild Beaches: Exploring Olympic National Park West Outdoor Pursuits Where to Stay Where to Dine 5 Mount Rainier Exploring the Park Where to Stay 6 Ferry Excursions from Seattle Bainbridge Island & Poulsbo Bremerton & Its Naval History 7 Snoqualmie Falls & the Snoqualmie Valley Where to Stay 8 The Woodinville Wine Country Where to Stay Where to Dine 9 Snohomish: Antiques Capital of the Northwest 10 Tacoma’s Museums & Gardens Museums Gardens Where to Dine 11 Mount St.


Frommer's Denver, Boulder & Colorado Springs by Eric Peterson

airport security, Columbine, glass ceiling, life extension, Maui Hawaii, Ronald Reagan, Skype, sustainable-tourism, transcontinental railway, upwardly mobile, young professional

Manufactured in the United States of America 5 4 3 2 01_382288-ffirs.indd ii 1 12/19/08 11:37:48 PM CONTENTS LIST OF MAPS vi WHAT’S NEW IN DENVER, BOULDER & COLORADO SPRINGS 1 1 THE BEST OF DENVER, BOULDER & COLORADO SPRINGS 1 Frommer’s Favorite Denver, Boulder & Colorado Springs Experiences. . . .3 2 Best Hotel Bets. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6 3 Best Dining Bets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8 2 DENVER, BOULDER & COLORADO SPRINGS IN DEPTH 1 Denver, Boulder & Colorado Springs Today. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .11 2 Looking Back at Denver, Boulder & Colorado Springs. . . . . . .12 Dateline. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 02_382288-ftoc.indd iii 11 3 The Lay of the Land . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .18 4 Denver, Boulder & Colorado Springs in Popular Culture: Books, Film, TV, Music . . . . . . . . . . . . .19 5 Eating & Drinking in Denver, Boulder & Colorado Springs. . . . . . .20 3 PLANNING YOUR TRIP TO DENVER, BOULDER & COLORADO SPRINGS 1 Visitor Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .21 2 Entry Requirements & Customs . . . .21 Destination: Denver, Boulder, Colorado Springs—Predeparture Checklist . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 Cut to the Front of the Airport Security Line as a Registered Traveler . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 3 When to Go. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .25 Calendar of Events . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 4 Getting There & Getting Around . . . .29 3 21 5 6 7 8 9 Money & Costs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .33 Health . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .34 Safety . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .35 Specialized Travel Resources . . . . . .36 Sustainable Tourism. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .38 It’s Easy Being Green . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39 Frommers.com: The Complete Travel Resource . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40 10 Packages for the Independent Traveler . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .40 12/19/08 11:38:19 PM CO N T E N T S D E N V E R , B O U L D E R & C O LO R A D O S P R I N G S iv 11 Escorted General-Interest Tours . . . .41 12 Special-Interest Trips . . . . . . . . . . . . . .41 13 Staying Connected. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .42 Online Traveler’s Toolbox. . . . . . . . . . . . 42 14 Tips on Accommodations . . . . . . . . .43 4 SUGGESTED ITINERARIES IN DENVER, BOULDER & COLORADO SPRINGS 1 Denver, Boulder & Colorado Springs in 1 Week. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .45 2 Denver, Boulder & Colorado Springs in 2 Weeks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .46 3 Denver, Boulder & Colorado Springs for Families . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .47 4 A Beer-Lover’s Trip to Colorado’s FrontRange . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .48 5 SETTLING INTO DENVER 1 Orientation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .49 Neighborhoods in Brief. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53 2 Getting Around . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .55 Fast Facts: Denver . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57 3 Where to Stay. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .58 49 Family-Friendly Hotels. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66 4 Where to Dine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .68 Family-Friendly Restaurants. . . . . . . . . 69 A Good City for Green Chile Fiends . . . 76 6 WHAT TO SEE & DO IN DENVER 1 The Top Attractions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .79 Robbery at the Mint. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83 2 More Attractions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .84 3 Amusement Parks & Places Especially for Kids . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .90 The Big Blue Bear. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91 Walking Tour: Downtown Denver. . . 92 4 Organized Tours. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .94 7 BOULDER 1 Orientation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 122 2 Getting Around . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 124 Fast Facts: Boulder . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .125 3 Where to Stay. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 126 Family-Friendly Hotels. . . . . . . . . . . . . .131 4 Where to Dine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 133 Family-Friendly Restaurants. . . . . . . .135 5 Attractions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 138 02_382288-ftoc.indd iv 45 79 5 6 7 8 Outdoor Activities. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .96 Spectator Sports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 101 Shopping . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 103 Denver After Dark . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 107 Brewery Tours . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .110 9 A Side Trip to Colorado’s Gold Circle Towns. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 113 122 6 Sports & Outdoor Activities . . . . . 145 7 Shopping . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 149 8 Boulder After Dark . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 151 Lyons: On the Beaten Path . . . . . . . . .153 9 A Side Trip to Rocky Mountain National Park. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 155 One Gutsy Lady!.

Aside from regulations, though, you need to be concerned with your pet’s wellbeing. Just as people need extra water in Colorado’s dry climate, so do pets. We especially like those clever spill-resistant travel water bowls sold in pet shops. And keep in mind that many trails are rough, and jagged rocks can cut the pads on your dog’s feet. For more resources about traveling with pets, go to Frommers.com. 9 S U S TA I N A B L E TO U R I S M Sustainable tourism is conscientious travel. It means being careful with the environments you explore, and respecting the communities you visit. Two overlapping components of sustainable travel are ecotourism and ethical tourism. The International Ecotourism Society (TIES) defines ecotourism as responsible travel to natural areas that conserves the environment and improves the well-being of local people. TIES suggests that ecotourists follow these principles: • Minimize environmental impact. • Build environmental and cultural awareness and respect. • Provide positive experiences for both visitors and hosts. • Provide direct financial benefits for conservation and for local people. • Raise sensitivity to host countries’ political, environmental, and social climates. • Support international human rights and labor agreements.

See also Restaurant Indexes best, 8–10 Boulder, 2, 133–138 Colorado Springs, 2, 184–190 Denver, 68–78 Golden, 118 RipBoard (Denver), 97 Ritz Grill (Colorado Springs), 210 Riverboarding, Denver, 97 River rafting, 205, 214 Rock Bottom Brewery (Denver), 110 Rock Canyon Swim Beach (Pueblo), 221 Rock Cut, 159 The Rock Flour Mill Warehouse (Golden), 114 Rock Ledge Ranch Historic Site (Colorado Springs), 196 Rockmount Ranch Wear (Denver), 104–105 Rocky Mountain (Boulder), 150 Rocky Mountain Arsenal National Wildlife Refuge (Denver), 90 Rocky Mountain Audio Guides (Denver), 95 Rocky Mountain National Park, 147, 155–164 Rocky Mountain Nature Association, 162 Rocky Mountain Quilt Museum (Golden), 118 Rocky Mountain Wild (Colorado Springs), 201 Rodeos, 27, 28, 102, 199, 206, 222 Rooftop Rodeo & Parade (Estes Park), 27 Rosemount Museum (Pueblo), 219–220 ‘Round Midnight (Boulder), 152 Roxborough State Park, 98 Royal Gorge, 213–216 Royal Gorge Bridge and Park, 213, 214 Royal Gorge Regional Museum and History Center (Cañon City), 215 Royal Gorge Route Railroad, 214 RTD (Regional Transportation District), 55, 124 Rum Bay (Colorado Springs), 209 Running, Boulder, 147–148 241 Safety Colorado Springs, 176 Denver, 58 Safety concerns, 35–36 Saint Patrick’s Day (Denver), 26 Samba Room (Denver), 111 Sandy Carson Gallery (Denver), 104 Sangre de Cristo Arts & Conference Center (Pueblo), 220 Santa’s Workshop (Colorado Springs), 203 Scenic Railway (near Cañon City), 215 Scheitler Recreation Center (Denver), 99 Scott Carpenter Park (Boulder), 138 Senior travel, 36–37 7-Eleven Velodrome (Colorado Springs), 195 Seven Falls (Colorado Springs), 200–201 Shopping Boulder, 149–151 Colorado Springs, 206–208 Denver, 103–107 Sights and attractions Boulder, 138–145 Colorado Springs, 190–203 Denver, 1, 79–96 Sing Sing (Denver), 111 The Sink (Boulder), 152 16th Street Mall (Denver), 94 Sixth Street (Georgetown), 120 12/19/08 11:43:58 PM 242 Skiing Boulder area, 148 Denver area, 99–100 Rocky Mountain National Park, 163 SKIP (Boulder), 124 Ski Train, 100 Snowshoeing, 163 Soccer, Denver, 102 Sommers-Bausch Observatory (Boulder), 142 Southeastern Colorado Heritage Center (Pueblo), 220 Southern Sun (Boulder), 152 South Marina (Pueblo), 221 Southwest Airlines, 29 Special events and festivals, 26–29 Special-interest trips, 41 Spectator sports Colorado Springs, 205–206 Denver, 101–102 Sports Authority (Boulder), 151 Sports Authority (Colorado Springs), 208 Sports Authority Sportscastle (Denver), 107 Sports Center II (Colorado Springs), 195 Sportsfan (Denver), 106 Sputnik (Denver), 108 Stampede (Denver), 109 Star Bar Players (Colorado Springs), 210 Starsmore Discovery Center (Colorado Springs), 202 State Capitol (Denver), 79, 94 State parks, near Denver, 100–101 STA Travel, 37 Steelworks Museum of Industry & Culture (Pueblo), 220 Student travel, 37 Sundown Saloon (Boulder), 152 SuperShuttle Boulder, 122 Denver, 30, 50 Sustainable tourism, 38–40 Swimming Boulder, 148 Colorado Springs, 205 Denver, 100 Pueblo, 221 T abor Center (Denver), 94 Tattered Cover (Denver), 104 14_382288-bindex.indd 242 Taxes, 229 Boulder, 126 Colorado Springs, 176 Denver, 58 Taxis, 30 Boulder, 125 Colorado Springs, 175 Denver, 56 Telegraph and telex services, 229 Telephones, 42, 229 Temperatures, average, 25 Tennis, 100, 148, 205 Territorial Capitol (Golden), 114 3 Kings Tavern (Denver), 108 TIES (The International Ecotourism Society), 38 Timber Lake Trail, 163 Tiny Town and Railroad (Denver), 91 Tony’s (Colorado Springs), 210 Tours Denver, 94–96 Colorado Springs, 203 Trail of Light (Denver), 28 Trail Ridge Road, 155, 158–161 Trains and railways, 32–33 Buckskin Joe Frontier Town & Railway (near Cañon City), 214–215 Colorado Railroad Museum (Golden), 116 Cripple Creek & Victor Narrow Gauge Railroad Co., 213 Pikes Peak Cog Railway (Colorado Springs), 191, 194 Royal Gorge Route Railroad, 214 Ski Train, 100 Transportation, 32–33 Boulder, 124–125 Colorado Springs, 174–175 Denver, 55–56 green, 39 Pueblo, 217 Transportation Security Administration (TSA), 24 Travel CUTS, 37 Travelex Insurance Services, 227 Travel Guard International, 227 Traveling to Denver, Boulder and Colorado Springs, 29–32 Travel Insured International, 227 TravelSafe, 227 Tundra World Nature Trail, 159 20th Street Recreation Center (Denver), 99 Twenty Ninth Street (Boulder), 149 UMC Art Gallery (Boulder), 143 The Underground (Colorado Springs), 209 Union Avenue Historic District (Pueblo), 218 Union Depot (Pueblo), 218 United Airlines, 29 United Kingdom customs regulations, 24 embassy/consulates, 225 passports, 229 visas, 230 United States Air Force Academy (Colorado Springs), 194–195 United States Olympic Complex (Colorado Springs), 195 University of Colorado (Boulder), 139, 148–149 University of Colorado Buffaloes, 102 University of Colorado Museum (Boulder), 142 University of Denver, spectator sports, 102 Upstart Crow Theatre Company (Boulder), 154 US Airways, 29 USA Rail Pass, 32 U.S.


Costa Rica by Matthew Firestone, Carolina Miranda, César G. Soriano

airport security, Berlin Wall, centre right, desegregation, illegal immigration, Monroe Doctrine, new economy, Pepto Bismol, purchasing power parity, Ronald Reagan, Rosa Parks, Skype, sustainable-tourism, the payments system, trade route, urban sprawl, women in the workforce, young professional

Conservation and ecotourism are administered by two powerful bureaucracies – the Ministry of Environment & Energy (Minae) and the Costa Rica Tourism Board (ICT) – who frequently clash. There is also a widening gap between the motives of the San José–based eco-elite and the concerns of the rural residents, who still use the land to survive. The success of the ‘green revolution’ has created a new concern, namely the need for sustainable tourism. The increasing number of visitors to Costa Rica has led to more hotels, more transportation and more infrastructure upgrades. This tourist-driven encroachment on the rainforest inevitably places stress on the fragile ecosystem that people are flocking to see. However, although Costa Rica is certainly not without its problems, it is one of the few countries in the region where environmental issues are given a proper forum for discussion as opposed to mere lip service.

The hotel is owned by the two sons of Paul Smith, who first arrived in Monteverde in the 1950s and is a well-known local artist whose work graces the walls. Hotel El Sapo Dorado (2645-5010; www.sapodorado.com; s/d incl breakfast US$116/138, extra person US$30; ) This hotel is owned by the Arguedas family, which first settled in the Monteverde area 10 years prior to the Quakers. Today the family is extremely active in the community, and they’re regular promoters of the virtues of sustainable tourism. The ‘Golden Toad’ has 30 spacious rooms mostly in duplex cabins. All have two queen-sized beds, a table and chairs, and private hot shower. Various deluxe suites have minibar, refrigerator and French doors that open to private terraces with views of the Golfo de Nicoya. The private forest behind the hotel has an extensive system of trails, and the restaurant (mains US$10 to US$20; open from 6:30am to 9am, noon to 3pm and 6pm to 9pm) is renowned for its use of locally grown produce and wide range of vegetarian dishes.

Hotel Sí Como No (2777-0777; www.sicomono.com; r US$210-265, ste US$305-340, child under 6yr free; ) This flawlessly designed hotel is an example of how to build a resort while maintaining environmental sensibility. Buildings are insulated for comfort and use energy-efficient air-con units; water is recycled into the landscape, and solar-heating panels are used to heat the water. No surprise here that the Sí Como No is one of only four hotels in the country to have been awarded five out of five leaves by the government-run Certified Sustainable Tourism campaign. Ecofriendliness aside, the hotel is also gorgeous and packed full of family-friendly amenities. The rooms themselves are accented by rich woods and bold splashes of tropical colors, and feature enormous picture windows and sweeping balconies – you’ll never feel closed in from the surrounding rainforest and distant ocean. The hotel has two pools (one with a slide for kids, one for adults only, both with swim-up bars), two solar-heated Jacuzzis, a health spa, THX movie theater and two excellent restaurants.


Lonely Planet Cancun, Cozumel & the Yucatan (Travel Guide) by Lonely Planet, John Hecht, Sandra Bao

Bartolomé de las Casas, carbon footprint, colonial rule, illegal immigration, income inequality, low cost airline, low cost carrier, mass immigration, Skype, sustainable-tourism, trade route, traffic fines

Xibalba doubles as a hotel and offers attractive packages combining lodging, diving and/or technical training if so desired. Tours Community Tours Sian Ka’an ECOTOUR MAP GOOGLE MAP ( 871-2202; www.siankaantours.org; cnr Osiris & Sol; office 7am-8pm) Community Tours Sian Ka’an runs tours to the magnificent Reserva de la Biosfera Sian Ka’an, stopping at various ancient Maya sites, including the Muyil archaeological site south of Tulum. Community Tours is a sustainable tourism project run by locals from Maya communities. Sleeping The biggest decision, aside from budget, is whether to stay in the town center or out along the beach. Both have their advantages: most of the daytime action is at the beach or the ruins, while at night people tend to hit the restaurants and bars in town. 4 Tulum Pueblo Unless you’re up for a long walk, you’ll have to take a taxi, bike or hitchhike to the beach.

Cobá 984 / pop 1300 Though not as large as some of the more famous ruins, Cobá is ‘cool’ because you feel like you’re in an Indiana Jones flick. It’s set deep in the jungle and many of the ruins are yet to be excavated. Walk along ancient sacbes (stone-paved avenues), climb vine-covered mounds, and ascend to the top of Nohoch Mul for a spectacular view of the surrounding jungle. From a sustainable-tourism perspective, it’s great to stay the night in small communities such as Cobá, but truthfully it has pretty slim pickings in the way of hotel offerings. Other ways to help are by hiring local guides, buying local crafts and simply stopping here for lunch. TINY TRAILBLAZERS The small trails you’ll see crisscrossing the cleared areas in many of the Cobá ruins baffle observant visitors.

Tours include a guided walk of the interpretive trail at the Muyil archaeological site south of Tulum, and a boat trip or float trip (M$1287) through Lagunas Muyil, Chunyaxché and Boca Paila via an ancient Maya trade route along a natural channel. On the way you can see abundant birdlife and visit little-known Maya temples. It also offers snorkeling (M$975), birding, and fly-fishing trips (M$7150) further into the reserve. If you’re with young ones, ask about discounts for children under 12. Community Tours Sian Ka’an is a sustainable tourism project run by locals from Maya communities. Punta Allen 984 The town of Javier Rojo Gómez is more commonly called by the name of the point 2km south, Punta Allen. Hurricane Gilbert nearly destroyed the town in 1988, and there was some damage and a lot of wind-scrubbed palms, after Hurricane Dean. But Punta Allen is still walking tall. This is truly the end of the road; the 400-odd residents mostly work as fishers, although some residents work in restaurants popular with day-trippers.


pages: 356 words: 186,629

Frommer's Los Angeles 2010 by Matthew Richard Poole

call centre, car-free, carbon footprint, Charles Lindbergh, clean water, Donald Trump, El Camino Real, Frank Gehry, Guggenheim Bilbao, Haight Ashbury, Joan Didion, Maui Hawaii, Saturday Night Live, sustainable-tourism, upwardly mobile

Manufactured in the United States of America 5 4 3 2 1 CONTENTS LIST OF MAPS vi WHAT’S NEW IN LOS ANGELES 7 1 THE BEST OF LOS ANGELES 1 The Most Unforgettable Travel Experiences. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 2 The Best Splurge Hotels . . . . . . . . . . . .6 3 The Best Moderately Priced Hotels. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7 4 4 The Most Unforgettable Dining Experiences. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8 5 The Best Things to Do for Free (or Almost). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10 6 The Best Outdoor Experiences . . . .10 7 The Best Offbeat Experiences . . . . .11 2 LOS ANGELES IN DEPTH 1 Los Angeles Today . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12 2 Looking Back at Los Angeles . . . . . .12 Timeline. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 3 Art & Architecture. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .14 12 4 L.A. in Popular Culture: Books & Autos . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .19 5 Eating & Drinking in Los Angeles . .21 3 PLANNING YOUR TRIP TO LOS ANGELES 1 When to Go. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .22 Los Angeles–Area Calendar of Events. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 2 Entry Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .27 3 Getting There & Getting Around . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .29 4 Money & Costs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .38 What Things Cost in Los Angeles. . . . 39 5 Health . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .40 22 6 Safety . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .41 7 Specialized Travel Resources . . . . . .42 Website-Seeing: The Best of L.A. Online . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44 8 Sustainable Tourism. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .46 General Resources for Green Travel. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48 9 Staying Connected. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .49 iv 4 SUGGESTED LOS ANGELES ITINERARIES 1 The Neighborhoods in Brief . . . . . . .51 2 The Best of Los Angeles in 1 Day . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .57 3 The Best of Los Angeles in 2 Days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .61 4 The Best of Los Angeles in 3 Days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .62 CO N T E N T S LO S A N G E L E S 2010 5 WHERE TO STAY 1 2 3 4 Best Hotel Bets. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .66 Santa Monica & the Beaches . . . . . .67 L.A.’s Westside & Beverly Hills . . . . . .78 Hollywood . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .92 65 5 Downtown . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .95 Family-Friendly Hotels. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 98 6 Universal City . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .99 7 Pasadena & Environs . . . . . . . . . . . . 101 6 WHERE TO DINE 1 Best Dining Bets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105 2 Santa Monica & the Beaches . . . . 107 L.A.’s Best Sushi & Stir-Fried Crickets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .113 Sea Breezes & Sunsets: Oceanview Dining in Malibu. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .115 3 L.A.’s Westside & Beverly Hills . . . . 118 105 4 Hollywood & West Hollywood. . . 129 5 Downtown . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 138 L.A.

Any one 50 and o ver can join. Recommended publications offering travel r esources and discounts for seniors include the quar terly magazine Travel 50 & Beyond (www.travel50andbeyond.com) and the bestselling paperback Unbelievably Good Deals and G reat Adventures That Y ou A bsolutely C an’t G et U nless You’re Ov er 50 2009– 2010 (McGrawHill), by Joann Rattner Heilman. 8 S U S TA I N A B L E TO U R I S M Sustainable tourism is conscientious travel. I t means being car eful with the environments y ou explor e and r especting the communities y ou visit. Two o verlapping components of sustainable trav el are ecotourism and ethical tourism. The International Ecotourism Society (TIES) defines ecotourism as responsible travel to natural ar eas that conser ves the envir onment and improves the well-being of local people.

See also The South Coast Orange Stinger (Disney’s California Adventure), 221 Orpheum Theatre, 275 The Other Side, 269 Outdoor activities, 203–210 best, 10–11 Santa Barbara, 309–310 the South Coast, 289–290 Ozzie Dots, 243 P acific Asia Museum, 177 Pacific Design Center, 16, 181, 247 Pacific Park, 157 Pacific Spin (Knott’s Soak City), 233 Pacific Wharf (Disney’s California Adventure), 220 Package deals, Disneyland Resort, 215 Page Museum at the La Brea Tar Pits, 160–161 Paley Center for Media, 165, 167, 280 Pan Pacific Park, 187 Pantages Theatre, 276 Panty Raid, 243 Paradise Cove, 201 Paradise Pier (Disney’s California Adventure), 221 Paramount Pictures, 191–192 Paramount Studios, tickets for live audience shows, 197 Park Hopper tickets, 215 Parking, 35 Venice Beach, 156 Parks, 187–188 Pasadena and environs, 18–19 accommodations, 101–104 architectural highlights, 186–187 architectural tours, 180 brief description of, 56–57 restaurants, 147–149 shopping, 245–246, 248, 252 sights and attractions, 177 Pasadena Antique Center, 246 Pasadena Heritage, 194 Pasadena Playhouse, 276 Paseo Colorado, 248 Paseo Nuevo (Santa Barbara), 311 Passports, 27–28, 318–319 Patagonia, 240 Paul Smith, 240 Pavilion for Japanese Art, 168 Peninsula Spa, 257 Performing arts, 273–278 Perilous Plunge (Knott’s Berry Farm), 231 Petersen Automotive Museum, 170 Petrol, 317 Pets, traveling with, 46 Pho-Siam Thai Spa, 258–259 Pirate’s Lair at Tom Sawyer’s Island (Disneyland), 218 Pirates of the Caribbean (Disneyland), 218 Planning your trip, 22–50 entry requirements, 27–29 getting around, 33–37 health concerns, 40–41 Internet access, 50 money and costs, 38–40 safety concerns, 41 331 332 Planning your trip (cont.) specialized travel resources, 42–46 sustainable tourism, 46–49 telephones, 49–50 traveling to Los Angeles, 29–33 websites, 44–45 when to go, 22–23 Playboy Jazz Festival, 25 Playclothes, 256 Playhouse Disney-Live on Stage! (Disney’s California Adventure), 221 Police, 319 Polkadots & Moonbeams, 254 Polo, 211 Polo/Ralph Lauren, 237 Ponte Vecchio, 241 Prada, 237 Presley, Elvis, 154 Prestige Tickets, 260 The Price Is Right, 196, 197 Prime Time Shuttle, 32 Privé Salon, 235 Pull My Daisy, 243 Puzzle Zoo, 242 Queen Mary (Long Beach), 283–285 R age, 269 Rancho Park Golf Course, 205 REDCAT, 277 Red Line Tours, 180, 194 Red Lion Tavern, 272 Redondo Beach, 54 Redondo State Beach, 203 Red Tile Tour (Santa Barbara), 308 Redwood Creek Challenge Trail (Disney’s California Adventure), 220 Re-Mix, 235 Renaissance Pleasure Faire (Irwindale), 24 Restaurants, 105–149.


Frommer's London 2009 by Darwin Porter, Danforth Prince

airport security, British Empire, double helix, East Village, Edmond Halley, glass ceiling, haute cuisine, Isaac Newton, Maui Hawaii, Murano, Venice glass, New Urbanism, place-making, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Ronald Reagan, Sloane Ranger, Stephen Hawking, sustainable-tourism, urban renewal, young professional

TravelChums (& 212/787-2621; www.travelchums. com) is an Internet-only travel-companion matching service with elements of an online personals-type site, hosted by the respected New York–based Shaw Guides travel service. Many reputable tour companies offer singles-only trips. Singles Travel International (& 877/765-6874; www. singlestravelintl.com) offers singles-only trips to London. Backroads (& 800/4622848; www.backroads.com) offers more than 160 active trips to 30 destinations worldwide, including England. For more information on traveling single, go to www.frommers.com. 9 Sustainable Tourism Sustainable tourism is conscientious of local people. TIES suggests that ecotravel. It means being careful with the tourists follow these principles: environments you explore, and respecting • Minimize environmental impact. the communities you visit. Two overlap• Build environmental and cultural ping components of sustainable travel are awareness and respect. ecotourism and ethical tourism. The • Provide positive experiences for both International Ecotourism Society visitors and hosts.

Dollar, the Euro & the Canadian Dollar . . . .56 What Things Cost in London . . . . . .57 6 Health . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .58 7 Safety . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .59 5 The Best Museums . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8 6 The Best Activities for Families . . . . . .9 7 The Best Things to Do for Free (or Almost) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10 11 4 London in Popular Culture: Books, Film, TV & Music . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .24 5 Eating & Drinking in London . . . . . . .31 35 8 Specialized Travel Resources . . . . . . .60 9 Sustainable Tourism . . . . . . . . . . . . .64 It’s Easy Being Green . . . . . . . . . . . .65 10 Packages for the Independent Traveler . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .66 Frommers.com: The Complete Travel Resource . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .67 11 Escorted General-Interest Tours . . . . .67 12 Staying Connected . . . . . . . . . . . . . .68 Online Traveler’s Toolbox . . . . . . . . .70 13 Tips on Accommodations . . . . . . . . .70 14 Tips on Dining . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .72 02_285596-ftoc.qxp iv 7/22/08 5:26 PM Page iv CONTENTS 4 5 Suggested London Itineraries 73 1 Neighborhoods in Brief . . . . . . . . . . .73 2 The Best of London in 1 Day . . . . . . .88 3 The Best of London in 2 Days . . . . . .90 4 The Best of London in 3 Days . . . . . .92 Where to Stay 1 Best Hotel Bets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .98 2 In & Around the City . . . . . . . . . . . .99 3 The West End . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .101 Family-Friendly Hotels . . . . . . . . . . .106 4 Westminster & Victoria . . . . . . . . . .115 6 Where to Dine 1 2 3 4 Some Dining Notes . . . . . . . . . . . . .140 Best Dining Bets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .141 Restaurants by Cuisine . . . . . . . . . .143 In & Around the City . . . . . . . . . . .146 Family-Friendly Restaurants . . . . . .155 5 The West End . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .156 7 Exploring London 1 Sights & Attractions by Neighborhood . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .202 2 The Top Attractions . . . . . . . . . . . . .204 Trafalgar: London’s Most Famous Square . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .211 3 More Central London Attractions . . .220 A Neighborhood of One’s Own: The Homes of Virginia Woolf . . . . .236 8 Shopping 1 Shopping London . . . . . . . . . . . . . .265 How to Get Your VAT Refund . . . . .266 2 Central London Shopping . . . . . . . .267 GST: Greenwich Shopping Time . . .268 3 The Department Stores . . . . . . . . . .270 95 5 Hotels from Knightsbridge to South Kensington . . . . . . . . . . . . . .119 6 Hotels from Marylebone to Holland Park . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .127 7 The South Bank . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .137 8 Near the Airports . . . . . . . . . . . . . .138 140 6 Westminster & Victoria . . . . . . . . . .176 7 Knightsbridge to South Kensington . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .178 8 Marylebone to Notting Hill Gate . . .188 9 A Bit Farther Afield . . . . . . . . . . . . .196 10 Teatime . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .197 202 A Money-Saving Pass . . . . . . . . . . .238 4 Exploring London by Boat . . . . . . . .249 Bird’s-”Eye” View of London . . . . .251 5 Attractions on the Outskirts . . . . . .252 6 Especially for Kids . . . . . . . . . . . . . .259 7 Organized Tours . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .262 8 Spectator Sports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .263 265 4 Goods A to Z . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .271 Go East, Art Lover . . . . . . . . . . . . .273 The Comeback of Carnaby Street . . .279 5 Street & Flea Markets . . . . . . . . . . .286 02_285596-ftoc.qxp 7/22/08 5:26 PM Page v CONTENTS 9 London After Dark 1 The Play’s the Thing: London’s Theater Scene . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .288 New Venues for London Opera Lovers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .290 2 Classical Music, Dance & Opera . . .292 288 3 4 5 6 The Club & Music Scene . . . . . . . . .295 Dance, Disco & Eclectic . . . . . . . . . .297 Bars & Cocktail Lounges . . . . . . . . .303 The Best of London’s Pubs: The World’s Greatest Pub Crawl . . . . . .305 10 Side Trips from London 1 Windsor & Eton . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .313 2 Oxford: The City of Dreaming Spires . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .319 3 The Pursuit of Science: Cambridge . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .327 313 4 Shakespeare’s Stratford-upon-Avon . . . . . . . . . . . .335 5 Salisbury & Stonehenge . . . . . . . . .347 Appendix: Fast Facts, Toll-Free Numbers & Websites 1 Fast Facts: London . . . . . . . . . . . . .350 Index General Index . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .358 Accommodations Index . . . . . . . . .368 v 350 2 Toll-Free Numbers & Websites . . . .354 358 Restaurant Index . . . . . . . . . . . . . .369 Tearooms Index . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .370 02_285596-ftoc.qxp 7/22/08 5:26 PM Page vi List of Maps Central London Neighborhoods 74 Greater London Area 86 Where to Stay in the West End 102 Where to Stay in Westminster & Victoria 117 Where to Stay from Knightsbridge to South Kensington 120 Where to Stay from Marylebone to Holland Park 128 Where to Stay & Dine In & Around “the City” 147 Where to Dine in the West End & Theatre District 158 Where to Dine in Westminster & Victoria 177 Where to Dine from Knightsbridge to South Kensington 180 Where to Dine from Marylebone to Notting Hill Gate 190 Teatime in London 199 The Top Attractions 206 St.

., 284 Satellite phones, 69 SATH (Society for Accessible Travel & Hospitality), 61 The Savoy Theater, 290 Science Museum, 245–246 16_285596-bindex.qxp 366 7/22/08 6:13 PM Page 366 INDEX Seasons, 39 Self-catering accommodations, 96 Selfridges, 276 Semi-State Chambers (Windsor), 314 Senior travel, 62 The Serpentine, 248 The Seven Stars, 309 Sexual Health Information Line, 351 Shadow Lounge, 302–303 Shakespeare Birthplace Trust, 334 Shakespeare Centre (Stratfordupon-Avon), 338 Shakespeare’s Birthplace (Stratford-upon-Avon), 337–338 Shakespeare’s Globe Theatre & Exhibition, 246, 291 Shakespeare’s Tomb (Holy Trinity Church; Stratford-uponAvon), 336–337 Shakespeare Under the Stars, 42 Shelly’s, 285 Shepherd’s Bush, accommodations, 137 Shepherd’s Bush Empire, 295 Shepherd’s Tavern, 311 Sherlock Holmes Museum, 246 Sherlock Holmes (pub), 312 Shipping your purchases, 265–266 Shoes, 285 Shopping, 265–287 department stores, 270–271 duty-free airport shopping, 267 hours, 266 Knightsbridge and Chelsea, 269 sales, 266–267 shipping your purchases, 265–266 street and flea markets, 286–287 Sunday, 268 taxes, 265 The West End, 267–269 Shoreditch, restaurants, 151–152 Sights and attractions, 202–263 boat tours and cruises, 249–252 churches and cathedrals, 220, 224–230 discounts, 202 free or almost free, 10 hours, 202 literary and musical landmarks, 234–236 money-saving pass, 238 museums and galleries, 236–247 by neighborhood, 202–204 on the outskirts, 252–259 parks and gardens, 247–249 top, 204–220 Silverware, 276 Singles Travel International, 64 Single travelers, 64 Sir John Soane’s Museum, 246–247 606 Club, 297 Slick Willies, 248 Smoking, 34, 353 Soane, John, 24 Society of London Theatre, 288 Soho, 80–81 accommodations, 109–111 pub, 311 restaurants, 163–168 tearoom, 201 Soul of America, 63 Sound, 295–296 South Bank, restaurants, 154–156 Southbank, pubs, 311–312 The South Bank accommodations, 137–138 shopping, 287 South Kensington accommodations, 125–126 brief description of, 83–84 restaurants, 184–187 shopping, 269 Southwark, pub, 312 Southwark Cathedral, 229 Speakers Corner, 248 Spectator sports, 263–264 Spencer House, 234 Stanfords, 275 Stansted Airport, 51–52 Stansted Express train, 51 Stationery and paper goods, 286 STA Travel, 45, 63 Steinberg & Tolkien, 282 Stella McCartney, 279 Steve Furgal’s International Tennis Tours, 42 Stone Gallery, 213 Stonehenge, 347–349 The Strand accommodations, 107–108 brief description of, 79–80 restaurants, 156–161 Stranger’s Galleries, 209 The Stratford Brass Rubbing Centre (Stratford-uponAvon), 338 Stratford-upon-Avon, 333–347 accommodations, 338–343 pubs, 346–347 restaurants, 343–346 sights and attractions, 334–338 theater, 338 traveling to, 334 visitor information, 334 Street maps, 36 Students, 63–64 cheap lodging for, 105 Studio Valbonne, 299 Summerill & Bishop, 283 Sunday shopping, 268 Sustainable tourism, 64–66 T ap and Spiel (The Mill; Cambridge), 333 Tate Britain, 214 Tate Modern, 214–215 Tate to Tate boat, 215 Tauck World Discovery, 67 Taxes, 353 Taxis, 54 from Gatwick Airport, 51 from Heathrow Airport, 50 The Tea House, 286 Tearooms, 197–201. See also Tearooms Index Kew, 257 Telephones, 68–69 area codes, 350 Television, English, 29–30 Temple Bar, 230 Temple Church, 229–230 Tennis Lawn Tennis Championships (Wimbledon), 42, 264 tours, 42 Thames Barrier, Raising of the, 43 Thames Barrier Park, 250 Thameside pubs, 312 Thames River cruises, 249–250 Thames River Services, 249–250 Theater, 288–292 Theatre Direct International (TDI), 289 Theatre Royal Drury Lane, 291 Thistle Hotels, 71–72 Thomas Goode, 276 Thomas Pink, 278 Ticketmaster, 289 16_285596-bindex.qxp 7/22/08 6:13 PM Page 367 GENERAL INDEX Time zone, 353–354 Tipping, 354 at restaurants, 72 Toilets, 354 Topshop, 281 Tottenham Hotspur, 263–264 Tourist information, 35–36 Cambridge, 325–326 Greenwich, 255 Oxford, 320 Salisbury, 347 Stratford-upon-Avon, 334 Windsor, 313 Tours.


Frommer's Israel by Robert Ullian

airport security, British Empire, car-free, Chuck Templeton: OpenTable:, East Village, haute cuisine, Khartoum Gordon, mass immigration, Maui Hawaii, place-making, Silicon Valley, Skype, sustainable-tourism, trade route, urban planning, urban sprawl, Yom Kippur War

Also in Mitzpe Ramon, the Isrotel Ramon Inn is one of Israel’s few environmentally friendly major hotels (p. 452). 79 The organic farming community of Klil, near the northwestern border of Israel, does not have overnight accommodations for tourists, but is filled with artists and craftspeople who have built unusual homes and studios. It also hosts a ceramics workshop that helps preserve and encourage the artistry of traditional Ethiopian Jewish potters (p. 322). In Jordan, the Royal Society for the Conservation of Nature (www.rscn. org.jo) maintains a careful network of nature reserves and a sustainable tourism base among the tribal people of the magnificent, wild Dana Nature Reserve. Sustainable tourism is conscientious travel. It means being careful with the environments you explore and respecting the communities you visit. Two overlapping components of sustainable travel are eco-tourism and ethical tourism. The International Ecotourism Society (TIES) defines eco-tourism as responsible travel to natural areas that conserves the environment and improves the well-being of local people.

Manufactured in the United States of America 5 4 3 2 1 02_289693-ftoc.qxp 10/20/08 2:34 PM Page iii Contents List of Maps 1 What’s New in Israel, Jordan & Sinai 1 The Best of Israel, Jordan & Sinai 5 1 The Best Travel Experiences . . . . . . . . .6 2 The Most Evocative Ancient Sites . . . .8 3 The Most Important Holy Places . . . . .9 Important but (Currently) Off-Limits Sites . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10 4 The Best Lost Ancient Cities . . . . . . .11 5 The Best Nature & Outdoor Experiences . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12 2 6 7 8 9 10 11 Israel in Depth 1 The Lay of the Land . . . . . . . . . . . . .23 2 History 101 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .25 Dateline . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .25 3 Israel’s Famous People . . . . . . . . . . .35 4 Architecture . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .37 5 Language . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .39 6 Religion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .40 3 vii 23 7 A Taste of Israel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .41 Israeli Street Food . . . . . . . . . . . . . .43 Dining Bargains . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .44 8 Recommended Books . . . . . . . . . . . .46 9 Recordings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .47 10 Films . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .48 Planning Your Trip to Israel Frommer’s Planning Information . . . .49 1 Visitor Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . .50 2 Entry Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . .50 3 When to Go . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .52 Israel Calendar of Holidays & Events . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .55 4 Getting There & Getting Around . . . .59 5 Money & Costs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .67 What Things Cost in Israel . . . . . . . .68 The Shekel, the Dollar & the Pound . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .69 The Best Beaches . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .13 The Best Museums . . . . . . . . . . . . . .14 The Best Luxury Hotels . . . . . . . . . . .15 The Best Value Hotels . . . . . . . . . . . .17 The Best Luxury Dining . . . . . . . . . . .19 The Best Moderate Dining . . . . . . . .21 49 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 Health . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71 Safety . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .73 Specialized Travel Resources . . . . . . .74 Sustainable Tourism . . . . . . . . . . . . .78 Packages for the Independent Traveler . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .81 Escorted General-Interest Tours . . . . .81 Special-Interest Trips . . . . . . . . . . . . .81 Private Guides . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .82 Staying Connected . . . . . . . . . . . . . .86 Tips on Accommodations . . . . . . . . .88 02_289693-ftoc.qxp iv 10/20/08 2:34 PM Page iv CONTENTS 4 Suggested Itineraries 93 Lyne’s Other Kid-Friendly Picks in Israel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .99 1 The Regions in Brief . . . . . . . . . . . . .93 2 Israel in 2 Weeks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .95 3 8 Days in Northern Israel with Young Kids . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .97 5 Settling Into Jerusalem 1 A Brief History . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .102 Saints & Warriors: Caliph Omar & Saladin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .108 2 Orientation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .110 Neighborhoods in Brief . . . . . . . . . .113 3 Getting Around . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .115 Fast Facts: Jerusalem . . . . . . . . . . .116 6 4 Where to Stay . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .119 Family-Friendly Hotels . . . . . . . . . . .126 5 Where to Dine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .139 Family-Friendly Restaurants . . . . . .147 Getting Connected in Jerusalem . . . .149 Coffee & People-Watching . . . . . . .153 Street Meals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .156 Exploring Jerusalem 1 The Old City . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .164 Walking Tour: The Old City . . . . . . .185 2 West Jerusalem Attractions . . . . . . .193 3 Exploring West Jerusalem Neighborhoods . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .204 4 East Jerusalem Attractions . . . . . . .207 The Peoples’ Princess . . . . . . . . . . .210 5 Especially for Kids . . . . . . . . . . . . . .211 6 Organized Tours . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .212 7 101 164 7 Outdoor Pursuits & Sports . . . . . . .213 8 Shopping . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .214 The Art of Bargaining . . . . . . . . . . .221 9 Jerusalem After Dark . . . . . . . . . . .224 Wineries in the Hill Country . . . . . .227 10 Side Trips Outside Jerusalem . . . . . .228 Driving Tour: The Mountains West of Jerusalem . . . . . . . . . . . . .230 Tel Aviv 1 Orientation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .236 2 Getting Around . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .238 Fast Facts: Tel Aviv . . . . . . . . . . . . .239 3 Where to Stay . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .240 Family-Friendly Hotels . . . . . . . . . . .248 4 Where to Dine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .251 Family-Friendly Restaurants . . . . . .254 An Ethnic Dining Experience . . . . . .257 5 What to See & Do . . . . . . . . . . . . .269 235 6 7 8 9 10 Frommer’s Favorite Tel Aviv Experiences . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .273 Organized Tours & Special Events . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .277 Outdoor Pursuits & Sports . . . . . . .278 Shopping . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .279 Tel Aviv & Jaffa After Dark . . . . . . .283 Side Trips from Tel Aviv . . . . . . . . . .287 02_289693-ftoc.qxp 10/20/08 2:34 PM Page v CONTENTS 8 The Golden Coast 1 Herzlia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .290 2 Netanya . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .294 The Anglo-Saxon Connection . . . . .296 3 Caesarea . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .302 4 Israel’s Wine Country . . . . . . . . . . .307 9 289 5 Akko (Acre) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .311 Ethiopian Pottery: The Jewish Women Ceramists of Beta Israel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .322 6 Nahariya & North to the Border . . .323 Haifa 1 Orientation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .330 2 Getting Around . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .332 Fast Facts: Haifa . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .332 3 Where to Stay . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .334 4 Where to Dine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .339 5 Attractions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .344 Suggested Itinerary . . . . . . . . . . . . .345 10 Galilee 1 Nazareth & the Yizreel Valley . . . . .357 Archaeology Update: Ancient Church at Megiddo . . . . . . . . . . . .366 2 Tiberias . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .368 Tiberias Archaeology Update . . . . .370 Fast Facts: Tiberias . . . . . . . . . . . . .372 11 The Dead Sea & the Negev 1 South to Beersheva . . . . . . . . . . . .425 2 Arad, Neve Zohar/Ein Bokek & Sodom . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .433 3 Qumran, Ein Gedi & Masada . . . . .438 The Shepherds, the Shoemaker, the Professor & the Scrolls . . . . . . .439 v 329 6 7 8 9 10 Frommer’s Favorite Haifa Experiences . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .349 Organized Tours . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .351 Outdoor Activities, Sports & Other Pursuits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .351 Shopping . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .352 Haifa After Dark . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .353 Day Trips from Haifa . . . . . . . . . . . .354 356 3 The Sea of Galilee . . . . . . . . . . . . .384 4 Safed (Zefat) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .397 5 Upper Galilee & the Golan Heights . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .408 6 South of Galilee: The Jordan Valley . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .420 425 4 Into the Negev . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .448 5 Eilat . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .456 Wings over Israel . . . . . . . . . . . . . .464 6 Side Trips to Sinai . . . . . . . . . . . . . .479 Ascending Mount Sinai . . . . . . . . . .482 02_289693-ftoc.qxp vi 10/20/08 2:34 PM Page vi CONTENTS 12 A Side Trip to Petra 1 Planning a Trip to Petra . . . . . . . . .486 A Look at Jordan’s Past . . . . . . . . .488 2 Essentials . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .489 Fast Facts: Petra . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .491 3 Exploring Petra . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .491 486 Walking Tour: Petra . . . . . . . . . . . .494 4 Where to Stay . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .498 5 Excursions North & South of Petra . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .500 Appendix A: Fast Facts, Toll-Free Numbers & Websites 1 Fast Facts: Israel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .502 Etiquette & Customs . . . . . . . . . . . .504 2 Toll-Free Numbers & Websites . . . .509 Appendix B: Useful Terms & Phrases 1 Hebrew Terms & Expressions . . . . .512 Index General Index . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .516 Accommodations Index . . . . . . . . .528 502 512 2 Arabic Terms & Expressions . . . . . .515 516 Restaurant Index . . . . . . . . . . . . . .529 02_289693-ftoc.qxp 10/20/08 2:34 PM Page vii List of Maps Israel 7 History of Israel 26 Historic Jerusalem 103 Where to Stay in Downtown West Jerusalem 123 Where to Stay & Dine in Jerusalem 134 Where to Dine in Downtown West Jerusalem 143 Jerusalem: Old City 166 Temple Mount (Haram es Sharif ) 175 Church of the Holy Sepulcher 183 Walking Tour: The Old City 186 Jerusalem Attractions 194 Driving Tour: The Mountains West of Jerusalem 233 Where to Stay & Dine in Tel Aviv 242 Tel Aviv Attractions 270 The Golden Coast 291 Akko (Acre) 313 Haifa 336 Tiberias 369 Galilee & the Golan Heights 385 The Negev 427 Masada 445 Eilat 457 Sinai 481 Jordan 487 Petra 493 03_289693-flast.qxp 10/28/08 9:26 AM Page viii Acknowledgments Sadek Shweiki, research assistant and multi-lingual translator, deserves very special gratitude.

AACI offices in Jerusalem, 6 Mane St. (& 02/561-7151; fax 02/566-1186), and in Netanya, 28 Shmuel Ha-Naziv St. (& 09/833-0950), are especially active, but there are branches throughout the country, including Haifa, Tel Aviv, and in the Negev. Check the “In Jerusalem” and the “Tel Aviv City Lights” supplements to the Friday Jerusalem Post for their list of activities. The AACI website is at www.aaci.org.il. 9 Sustainable Tourism In Israel, the enormously active and inventive Society for Protection of Nature in Israel, or SPNI (www.spni.org), sponsors projects that protect the environment and promote awareness of threats to the natural beauty of the county, the urban landscape, and the ecological balance of the region. SPNI offers a program of superb walks, hikes, tours, 1-day to weeklong trips, and lectures about issues of conservation.


pages: 803 words: 415,953

Frommer's Mexico 2009 by David Baird, Lynne Bairstow, Joy Hepp, Juan Christiano

airport security, AltaVista, Bartolomé de las Casas, centre right, colonial rule, East Village, glass ceiling, haute cuisine, indoor plumbing, low cost airline, low cost carrier, out of africa, Pepto Bismol, place-making, Skype, sustainable-tourism, the market place, urban planning, young professional

However, more hostels have entered the student travel scene. Hostelling 75 International México (& 55/55181726; www.hostellingmexico.com) offers a list of hostels that meet international standards in Guadalajara, Guanajuato, Merida, Mexico City, Oaxaca, and Puebla. Hostels.com offers a list of hostels in Acapulco, Cancún, Guadalajara, Mexico City, Oaxaca, Playa del Carmen, Puerto Escondido, Puebla, and Zacatecas. 9 Sustainable Tourism Sustainable tourism is conscientious travel. It means being careful with the environments you explore and respecting the communities you visit. Two overlapping components of sustainable travel are ecotourism and ethical tourism. The International Ecotourism Society (TIES) defines ecotourism as responsible travel to natural areas that conserves the environment and improves the well-being of local people.

Manufactured in the United States of America 5 4 3 2 1 02 285619-ftoc.qxp 7/22/08 10:50 AM Page iii Contents List of Maps 1 viii What’s New in Mexico 1 The Best of Mexico 7 by David Baird, Lynne Bairstow, Juan Cristiano & Joy Hepp 1 The Best Beach Vacations . . . . . . . . . .7 7 2 The Best Cultural Experiences . . . . . .10 3 The Best Archaeological Sites . . . . . .11 8 4 The Best Active Vacations . . . . . . . . .12 9 5 The Best of Natural Mexico . . . . . . . .13 10 11 6 The Best Places to Get Away from It All . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .14 12 2 Mexico in Depth by David Baird 1 Mexico Today . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .23 2 Looking Back at Mexico . . . . . . . . . .24 It’s Just a Game . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .26 A Sticky Habit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .28 3 Eating & Drinking in Mexico . . . . . . .32 3 Planning Your Trip to Mexico by Juan Cristiano 1 Visitor Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . .45 2 Entry Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . .46 Cut to the Front of the Airport Security Line . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .48 Calendar of Events . . . . . . . . . . . . . .51 3 When to Go . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .50 4 Getting There & Getting Around . . . .57 5 Money & Costs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .63 The Best Art, Architecture & Museums . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .15 The Best Shopping . . . . . . . . . . . . . .16 The Best Luxury Hotels . . . . . . . . . . .17 The Best Inexpensive Inns . . . . . . . . .19 The Best Spa Resorts . . . . . . . . . . . .20 The Best Mexican Food & Drink . . . .21 23 Dining Service Tips . . . . . . . . . . . . . .35 4 The Regions in Brief . . . . . . . . . . . . .36 5 Mexico’s Art & Architecture . . . . . . . .38 6 Mexico in Popular Culture: Books, Film & Music . . . . . . . . . . . . .40 45 6 Health . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .65 7 Safety . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .68 Smoke Free Mexico? . . . . . . . . . . . .68 8 Specialized Travel Resources . . . . . . .71 9 Sustainable Tourism . . . . . . . . . . . . .75 It’s Easy Being Green . . . . . . . . . . . .76 02 285619-ftoc.qxp iv 7/22/08 10:50 AM Page iv CONTENTS Frommers.com: The Complete 11 Special-Interest Trips . . . . . . . . . . . . .80 Travel Resource . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .77 12 Staying Connected . . . . . . . . . . . . . .83 10 Packages for the Independent 13 Tips on Accommodations . . . . . . . . .85 Traveler . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .78 Suggested Mexico Itineraries 87 by David Baird 1 Central Mexico’s Pre-Columbian Treasures in a Week . . . . . . . . . . . . .87 2 The Best of Western Mexico in a Week . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .89 3 Los Cabos to Copper Canyon . . . . . .90 4 La Ruta Maya in 2 Weeks . . . . . . . . .91 4 5 Mexico City by Juan Cristiano 1 Orientation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .96 Taxi Safety Precautions in Mexico City . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .99 The Neighborhoods in Brief . . . . . .102 2 Getting Around . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .105 Fast Facts: Mexico City . . . . . . . . . .110 3 Where to Stay . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .113 4 Where to Dine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .120 6 Silver, Spas & Spiritual Centers: From Taxco to Tepoztlán by Juan Cristiano 1 Taxco: Cobblestones & Silver . . . . .159 Spanish Lessons & Art Classes in Taxco . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .164 2 Ixtapan de la Sal: A Thermal Spa Town . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .170 3 Valle de Bravo & Avándaro: Mexico’s Switzerland . . . . . . . . . . .172 94 5 6 7 8 9 ¡Café, Por Favor!

See Fishing Delgado, Leandro, 205 Delta Vacations, 78, 79 De Santos (Puerto Vallarta), 333 Día de la Candelaria (Candlemas), 51 Día de la Constitución, 51–52 Día de la Marina, 53 Día de los Muertos Janitzio, 268 Oaxaca City, 451 Pátzcuaro, 263 Día de los Reyes, 51 Día de San Pedro y San Pablo, 53 Díaz, Porfirio, 29 Diego Rivera Murals (Mexico City), 132 Dietary red flags, 66 Disabilities, travelers with, 71–72 Disco Club Paco Paco (Puerto Vallarta), 335 Diseño Artesano (Pátzcuaro), 264 Diving Acapulco, 388 Akumal, 608 Cabo San Lucas, 722 Cancún, 548–549 Chinchorro Reef, 618–619 Cozumel, 574, 576–577 Isla Mujeres, 561 Ixtapa/Zihuatanejo, 410 La Paz, 736–737 Manzanillo, 373 Paamul, 606 Puerto Angel, 434 Puerto Morelos, 594 Puerto Vallarta, 306 Riviera Maya, 589 San José del Cabo, 706 Veracruz, 520 Xel-Ha area, 610 Zihuatanejo, 408 26 285619-bindex.qxp 776 7/22/08 Page 776 INDEX Dog racing, Tijuana, 754 Dolores Hidalgo, 205–206 Dolphins, swimming with, 78 Acapulco, 390 Cancún, 551 Cozumel, 577–578 Isla Mujeres, 562 Ixtapa, 410 Puerto Aventuras, 606 Puerto Vallarta, 309 Riviera Maya, 589 Xel-Ha, 609 Dolphin shows, Acapulco, 390 Dominico de la Navidad, former convent, 187 The Dovecote (Uxmal), 655 Drinking laws, 761 Drinks, 34–35 Drugs, 31–32 over-the-counter, 67 Dzibanché, 624 Dzibilchaltún, 626, 649 Dzitnup, Cenote, 674–675 E 11:47 AM aster Pátzcuaro, 263 Uruapan, 270 Ecotours. See also Sustainable tourism Bahías de Huatulco, 437, 438 La Paz, 736 Mérida, 647 Puerto Escondido area, 426 Puerto Vallarta, 306–307 Ek Balam, 675 El Acuario (Veracruz), 519 El Agora (Xalapa), 512 El Arco, 720 El Artesano (Querétaro), 227 El Bar de Félix (Manzanillo), 378 El Bosque (Morelia), 255 El Botazoo (Punta Celeste), 435 El Carmen, church and former convent of (Morelia), 255 El Castillo Chichén Itzá, 667 Cobá, 616–617 El Charro (Guadalajara), 290 El Divisadero, 678, 684–685, 687 Electricity, 761 El Encuentro (San Cristóbal), 490 El Estribo, 268 Elevation sickness, 66–67 El Faro (Mazatlán), 347 El Faro Lighthouse Bar (Puerto Vallarta), 333 El Fuerte, 681–683 El Garrafón Natural Park, 548–550, 563 El Mercado (San Cristóbal), 487 El Mirador (Mazatlán), 349 El Mirador (San Miguel), 198 El Nuevo Olimpo (Mérida), 634 El Palacio de los Estucos (Acanceh), 651 El Pípila (Guanajuato), 210–211 El Rosario, 259 El Sagrario (San Luis), 244 El Santuario de Guadalupe (Morelia), 255 El Squid Roe (Cabo San Lucas), 729 El Tajín, 524, 525 El Tecolote Libros (Todos Santos), 731 El Tigre golf course (Nuevo Vallarta), 308 El Tule tree (Santa María del Tule), 465–466 El Vizcaíno Biosphere Reserve, 748 Embassies, Mexican, 46 Embassies and consulates, 761–762 Emergencies, 762 Emigration to the U.S., 32 Encuentro Internacional del Mariachi (Guadalajara), 284–285 Enrique Estrada Park (Zacatecas), 236 Ensenada, 700, 759–760 Escobilla Beach (near Puerto Escondido), 425 Escondido (near San Miguel), 199 Escuinapa, 349 Estero San José (San José del Cabo), 705 Etc.


pages: 190 words: 50,133

Lonely Planet's 2016 Best in Travel by Lonely Planet

Airbnb, Albert Einstein, anti-communist, British Empire, David Attenborough, haute cuisine, Maui Hawaii, sharing economy, South China Sea, Stanford marshmallow experiment, sustainable-tourism, urban planning, walkable city

Palau has as much to fear from rising sea levels and environmental degradation as any other Pacific nation, but it’s tackling those fears head-on, and is leading conservation efforts in the region. Such progressive thinking makes these islands a haven for diving and snorkelling (among the best in the world) as well as kayaking, sailing and wildlife watching. The secret is out in East Asia already, which means Palau is looking to limit the number of tourists it can host at a time. What’s hot… Diving, sustainable tourism, underwater photography ___ What’s not… Dynamite fishing, rising sea levels, missionaries Life-changing experiences Cutely dubbed an ‘underwater Serengeti’, Palau’s waters are stunningly diverse and it’s unquestionably one of the most magical underwater destinations in the world. Divers and snorkellers enjoy hundreds of species of fish and coral, sharks, dolphins, dugongs and turtles, all attracted by the confluence of nutritive currents that meets in this corner of the Pacific vastness.


pages: 389 words: 210,632

Frommer's Oregon by Karl Samson

airport security, Burning Man, carbon footprint, Frank Gehry, glass ceiling, haute cuisine, indoor plumbing, sustainable-tourism, transcontinental railway, upwardly mobile, urban renewal, urban sprawl, white picket fence, Works Progress Administration

Manufactured in the United States of America 5 4 3 01_537718-ffirs.indd ii 2 1 3/17/10 2:02 PM CONTENTS LIST OF MAPS vi 1 THE BEST OF OREGON 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 The Best Natural Attractions. . . . . . . .1 The Best Outdoor Activities . . . . . . . .2 The Best Beaches . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 The Best Hikes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 The Best Scenic Drives . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 The Best Museums . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 The Best Family Attractions. . . . . . . . .5 The Best Historical Sites . . . . . . . . . . . .5 1 9 10 11 12 13 14 The Best Hotels for Families . . . . . . . .6 The Best B&Bs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7 The Best Small Inns & Lodges . . . . . .8 The Best Historic Hotels & Lodges. . .8 The Best Dining with a View. . . . . . . .9 The Best Off-the-Beaten-Path Restaurants . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10 15 The Best Wineries Open to the Public . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .11 2 OREGON IN DEPTH 1 Oregon Today. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12 2 Looking Back at Oregon. . . . . . . . . . .14 3 The Lay of the Land . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .19 12 4 Oregon in Popular Culture: Books & Film . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .21 5 Eating & Drinking in Oregon . . . . . .23 3 PLANNING YOUR TRIP TO OREGON 1 When to Go. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .25 Oregon Calendar of Events . . . . . . . . .26 2 Entry Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . .29 3 Getting There & Getting Around . . .30 4 Money & Costs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .33 What Things Cost in Oregon. . . . . . . .34 5 Health . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .34 6 Safety . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .35 02_537718-ftoc.indd iii 25 7 Specialized Travel Resources . . . . . .35 8 Sustainable Tourism. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .37 General Resources for Green Travel. . .38 9 Special Interest Trips . . . . . . . . . . . . . .39 10 The Active Vacation Planner. . . . . . .40 Serious Reservations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .41 11 Staying Connected. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .44 12 Tips on Accommodations . . . . . . . . .46 3/17/10 2:02 PM iv 4 SUGGESTED OREGON ITINERARIES 1 The Regions in Brief . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .47 2 Oregon in 1 Week. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .51 3 Oregon in 2 Weeks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .53 4 Oregon for Families . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .55 5 A Week in Willamette Valley Wine Country . . . . . . . . . . . . . .57 6 Exploring the Oregon Coast. . . . . . .58 5 PORTLAND 60 CO N T E N T S OREGON 1 Orientation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .61 Did You Know?

The city has a well-marked network of bike routes, including special bike lanes downtown. Of course, if you’re not a cyclist, Portland also has a great public transit system that includes light rail, street cars, buses, and even an aerial tram. Even wineries and vineyards in Oregon are doing their part to help the environment. More and more vineyards are P L A N N I N G YO U R T R I P TO O R E G O N Sustainable tourism is conscientious travel. It means being careful with the environments you explore and respecting the communities you visit. Two overlapping components of sustainable travel are ecotourism and ethical tourism. The International Ecotourism Society (TIES) defines ecotourism as responsible travel to natural areas that conserves the environment and improves the well-being of local people. TIES suggests that ecotourists follow these principles: • Minimize environmental impact. • Build environmental and cultural awareness and respect. • Provide positive experiences for both visitors and hosts. • Provide direct financial benefits for conservation and for local people. • Raise sensitivity to host countries’ political, environmental, and social climates. • Support international human rights and labor agreements.

See also Crosscountry skiing Diamond Lake, 279 Joseph, 351 La Grande and Baker City area, 345–346 Mount Ashland, 291 Mount Bachelor, 330–331 Mount Hood, 269–270 Santiam Pass, 273 Skinner Butte Park, 165 Smelt Sands State Recreation Site, 218 Smith Berry Barn Farm and Garden Market, 140 Smith Rock State Park, 324 Sokol Blosser Winery, 133 Soléna Estate, 135 Sorosis Park, 263 South Beach State Park, 212, 215 Southern Oregon, 50, 286–317 Southern Oregon coast, 236–244 Southern Oregon Historical Society’s Jacksonville Museum, 301 Southpark Seafood Grill & Wine Bar, 122 South Slough National Estuarine Research Reserve, 229 South Stage Cellars, 303 Spangler Vineyards, 316 Sparks Lake, 333 Spindrift Cellars, 160 Spouting horns, 206, 218 Springhouse Cellar, 256 Stangeland Vineyards, 138 Stark’s Vacuum Museum, 98 Steens Mountain, 359–360 Stoller Vineyards, 133 Stonehenge Monument, 264 Storm-watching, 233 Stormy Weather Arts Festival, 28 Sturgeon Viewing Center, 249 Succor Creek State Natural Area, 357 Summer Lake Hot Springs, 359 Sumpter, 346 Sumpter Valley Dredge State Heritage Area, 346 17_537718-bindex.indd 375 Sumpter Valley Railroad, 346 Sundance Kayak School, 43 Sundance Wine Cellars, 166 Sunriver, 327–338 Sunriver Nature Center & Observatory, 330 Sunset Bay State Park, 228 Sunset Beach State Recreation Area, 178 Surfing Cannon Beach, 186 Lincoln City, 202 Seaside, 183 Surreys and funcycles, 183 Cannon Beach, 186 Sustainable tourism, 37–39 Sweet Cheeks Winery, 167 Sweet Oregon Berry Farm, 140 T ahkenitch Trail Head, 223 Tamástslikt Cultural Institute, 341 TamKaLiks Celebration, 350 Tamolitch Pool, 274 The Tasting Room, 134 Taxes, 363 Telephones, 44–45 Territorial Vineyards & Wine Company, 167 Terwilliger Hot Springs, 273–274 Thirst Wine Bar & Bistro, 122 The Thirsty Woman, 262 Thomas Condon Paleontology Center, 321 Thomas Creek Bridge, 239 Three Arch Rocks, 197 Three Capes Scenic Loop, 197–199 3D Center of Art & Photography, 98 Three Sisters Wilderness, 332 Tillamook, 196–197 Tillamook Air Museum, 197 Tillamook Cheese Factory, 196 Tillamook County, 192–200 Tillamook County Pioneer Museum, 196 Tillamook Forest Center, 196–197 Tillamook Rock Lighthouse, 188 Timberline Lodge, 267 Timberline Mountain Guides, 43, 269 Timberline Ski Area, 267–269 Timberline Trail, 267 Time zones, 363 Tipping, 364 Todd Lake, 333 Toilets, 364 Toketee Falls, 278 Toledo, 213 Tom McCall Preserve, 262 Tom McCall Waterfront Park, 99, 107 Torii Mor Winery, 133 Trains and railways, 31, 32 Crooked River Dinner Train, 324 Eagle Cap Excursion Train, 350 excursions from Portland, 108–109 Mount Hood Railroad, 255–256 Oregon Coast Historical Railway, 229 Oregon Coast Scenic Railroad, 196 Sumpter Valley Railroad, 346 Transportation, 31–32 Traveling to Oregon, 30–31 Travel Portland, 62, 63, 71, 96, 364 Trinity Vineyard, 154 Trisaetum Vineyards, 131 Trium, 290 Tryon Creek State Park, 110 Tulip Fest, 26 Turtle Rock Wayside, 239 TuTuNis, 236 Twilight Creek Eagle Sanctuary, 178 Twin Lakes, 333 Tyee Wine Cellars, 160 Tyrus Evan/The Depot, 135 375 Umpqua Hot Springs, 278 Umpqua Lighthouse State Park, 225 Umpqua River Lighthouse, 225 Undersea Gardens, 212 Union Station, 31, 61 University of Oregon Museum of Natural and Cultural History, 164 Upper Klamath Canoe Trail, 284 Upper Klamath Lake, 282, 284, 285 Urban Decanter, 136 3/17/10 2:09 PM 376 Vale, 356 Valley Bronze of Oregon, 350 Valley View Winery, 303 Vancouver, Washington, accommodations, 78–79 Van Duzer Vineyards, 154 Vault Martini, 122 Vera Katz Eastbank Esplanade, 99 Viento, 257 Viento State Park, 250, 260 Vietnam Veterans Living Memorial, 103 Vino Paradiso, 122 Visas, 29, 364 Visitor information, 364–365 Vista Balloon Adventures, 139 Volcanoes, 20 Volunteer and working trips, 39–40 W ahclella Falls, 249 Waldo Lake, 276 Wallowa County Museum, 350 Wallowa Lake State Park, 350–351 Wallowa Lake Tramway, 351 The Wallowa Mountains, 349–354 Walnut City WineWorks, 134 Wasco County Courthouse, 264 Wasco County Historical Museum, 263 Washington Park, 103–106 Washington Park and Zoo Railway, 105 Waterfront Blues Festival, 27 Waterfront Park, 99, 107 Weather, 25–26 Weather Machine, 96 Wednesday Wines, 133 Weisinger’s, 290 Wellness trips, 39 Wells Fargo History Museum, 98 West Coast Game Park Safari, 233 Western Antique Aeroplane and Automobile Museum, 258 Westmoreland, 65 Whalehead Beach Viewpoint, 239 17_537718-bindex.indd 376 Whale-watching, 19, 44 Bandon, 232 Depoe Bay, 206–207 Florence, 225 Garibaldi, 195 Newport, 213 Yachats, 218 Wheeler, 194–195 White Bird, 119 White Bird Gallery, 186 White River Falls State Park, 320 Whitespires Church, 158 White-water boating, 43, 44, 254, 357 Ashland, 290 Deschutes River, 332 Grants Pass, 307 Hells Canyon, 355 Jacksonville/Medford area, 301 Mount Hood, 268–269 north central Oregon, 319–320 Santiam Pass, 273 Whittington, Joe, 43 Widmer Brewing and Gasthaus, 124 Wildlife Images Rehabilitation & Education Center, 308 Wildlife Safari, 314 Wildwood Recreation Site, 268 WillaKenzie Estate, 135 Willamette Falls overlook, 125 Willamette Jetboat Excursions, 108 Willamette Mission State Park, 150 Willamette Pass, 275–277 Willamette Pass Ski Area, 276, 277 Willamette Queen, 148 Willamette River, 62 Portland waterfront, 99–103 Willamette Shore Trolley, 108–109 Willamette Valley National Wildlife Refuge Complex, 151 Willamette Valley Vineyards, 155 Willamette Valley wine country, 47, 127–171.


Frommer's England 2011: With Wales by Darwin Porter, Danforth Prince

airport security, British Empire, carbon footprint, centre right, Columbine, congestion charging, double helix, Edmond Halley, George Santayana, haute couture, Isaac Newton, James Watt: steam engine, Murano, Venice glass, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Ronald Reagan, Skype, Sloane Ranger, spinning jenny, Stephen Hawking, sustainable-tourism, the market place, University of East Anglia, urban planning, urban renewal, urban sprawl, young professional

The student union has a swimming pool, fitness center, gymnasium, general store, sports shop, ticket agency, banks, bars, inexpensive restaurants, venues for live events, an office of STA Travel, and many other facilities. It’s open Monday to Thursday 8:30am to 11pm, Friday 8:30am to 1pm, Saturday 9am to 2pm, and Sunday 9:30am to 10:30pm. Bulletin boards provide a rundown on events; some you may be able to attend, others may be “closed door.” 74 06_615386-ch03.indd 7406_615386-ch03.indd 74 8/24/10 2:06 PM8/24/10 2:06 PM Single Travelers SUSTAINABLE TOURISM Sustainable Tourism England is a land of beautiful landscapes beloved by painters such as Thomas Gainsborough and John Constable. Hikers find it one of the most rewarding terrains in Europe. So it only makes sense that long before most of the world became concerned with ecotourism, England took strides to maintain its “greenness.” More than three dozen districts of England have been designated as areas of natural beauty; in addition, England boasts 10 national parks, 12 national trails, and a protected coastline that stretches for miles and miles, including around the entire peninsula of Cornwall.

Manufactured in the United States of America 54321 01_615386-ffirs.indd ii01_615386-ffirs.indd ii 8/24/10 2:05 PM8/24/10 2:05 PM CONTENTS List of Maps ix 1 THE BEST OF ENGLAND & WALES The Best Travel Experiences 1 1 The Best of Literary England 2 The Best Castles, Palaces & Historic Homes 7 The Best of Legendary England 3 The Best Gardens 8 The Best of Ancient & Roman England 3 The Best London Experiences 9 The Best of Norman & Medieval England 4 The Most Charming Villages 10 The Best of Tudor & Georgian England 5 The Best Historic Luxury Hotels 12 The Best of Modern Britain 10 The Best Walks & Hikes 11 The Best of Victorian England 5 The Best Moderately Priced Hotels 12 The Best Museums 6 The Best B&Bs 14 The Best Cathedrals 7 The Best Restaurants 14 The Best Pubs 15 2 ENGLAND & WALES IN DEPTH England Today 18 DATELINE 18 17 England in Popular Culture: Books, Film & Music 36 Looking Back at England 20 Eating & Drinking in England 43 England’s Art & Architecture 30 TAXES & TIPPING 43 CHURCH ARCHITECTURE 101 32 3 PLANNING YOUR TRIP TO ENGLAND & WALES 48 When to Go 48 Specialized Travel Resources 71 ENGLAND & WALES CALENDAR OF EVENTS 49 Sustainable Tourism 75 Entry Requirements 54 Getting There & Getting Around 55 Special-Interest Trips & Escorted General-Interest Tours 77 Money & Costs 65 Staying Connected 81 Health 69 Tips on Accommodations 83 BRITAIN BANS PUBLIC SMOKING 87 Safety 70 02_615386-ftoc.indd iii02_615386-ftoc.indd iii 8/24/10 2:06 PM8/24/10 2:06 PM 4 SUGGESTED ENGLAND ITINERARIES The Regions in Brief 88 England for Families 97 England in 1 Week 91 England’s Best Gardens in 1 Week 99 England in 2 Weeks 95 5 SETTLING INTO LONDON 88 102 Orientation 102 Where to Stay 116 LONDON'S NEIGHBORHOODS IN BRIEF 105 Where to Dine 139 Getting Around 111 Afternoon Tea 165 FAST FACTSLONDON 115 6 EXPLORING LONDON 167 The Top Attractions 167 Organized Tours 207 More Attractions 182 Shopping 208 London’s Parks & Gardens 198 THE COMEBACK OF CARNABY STREET 213 Sights on the Outskirts 199 London After Dark 216 Especially for Kids 205 7 THE THAMES VALLEY: ROYAL WINDSOR & REGAL OXFORD 233 Windsor & Eton 234 PUBS WITH A PEDIGREE 266 Ascot 246 Woodstock & Blenheim Palace 267 Henley-on-Thames & the Royal Regatta 248 Aylesbury 269 Oxford: The City of Dreaming Spires 252 Woburn Abbey: England’s Great Georgian Manor 275 St.

Rambler’s Right of Way One of the most sustainable ways to explore England is on foot, and doing so was made easier in 2000, when the country passed the Rights of Way Act, granting countryside ramblers access to open land even if it is held by a private owner. Of course, all walkers must leave the land as they find it, including carrying out all trash and personal belongings. 75 06_615386-ch03.indd 7506_615386-ch03.indd 75 8/24/10 2:06 PM8/24/10 2:06 PM PLANNING YOUR TRIP TO ENGLAND & WALES Sustainable Tourism 3 A trio of national parks in Wales covers around 20% of the land mass of this tiny country. With the addition of the South Downs and the New Forest, designated for preservation in 2011, 10% of the land mass in England and Wales combined will be part of the national park system. Park officials can offer advice on hiking and camping, and will also steer you to festivals or special events being staged.


pages: 675 words: 344,555

Frommer's Hawaii 2009 by Jeanette Foster

airport security, California gold rush, Charles Lindbergh, glass ceiling, gravity well, haute couture, haute cuisine, indoor plumbing, Maui Hawaii, place-making, polynesian navigation, South China Sea, sustainable-tourism, urban renewal, urban sprawl, white picket fence, Yogi Berra

Recommended family-travel websites include Family Travel Forum (www. familytravelforum.com), a comprehensive site that offers customized trip planning; Family Travel Network (www. familytravelnetwork.com), an online magazine providing travel tips; and Travel WithYourKids.com (www.travelwith yourkids.com), a comprehensive site written by parents for parents offering sound advice for long-distance and international travel with children. For a list of more family-friendly travel resources, turn to the experts at frommers.com. 9 Sustainable Tourism Sustainable tourism is conscientious travel. It means being careful with the environments you explore and respecting the communities you visit. Two overlapping components of sustainable travel are ecotourism and ethical tourism. The International Ecotourism Society (TIES) defines ecotourism as responsible travel to natural areas that conserves the environment and improves the well-being of local people.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .31 3 vii Planning Your Trip to Hawaii 1 Visitor Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . .48 Hawaii on the Web . . . . . . . . . . . . .49 2 Entry Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . .50 3 When to Go . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .51 Hawaii Calendar of Events . . . . . . . .53 4 Getting There & Getting Around . . . .61 5 Money & Costs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .64 6 Health . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .66 Don’t Get Burned: Smart Tanning Tips . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .67 7 Safety . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .69 8 Specialized Travel Resources . . . . . . .70 8 The Best Moderately Priced Accommodations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .16 9 The Best Places to Stay with the Kids . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .18 10 The Best Resort Spas . . . . . . . . . . . .19 Pampering in Paradise . . . . . . . . . . .20 11 The Best Dining, Hawaii Style . . . . . .22 12 The Best Restaurants . . . . . . . . . . . .23 13 The Best Spots for Sunset Cocktails . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .25 27 Pidgin: ’Eh Fo’Real, Brah . . . . . . . . .32 3 The Lay of the Land . . . . . . . . . . . . .33 4 Hawaii in Popular Culture: Books, Film & Music . . . . . . . . . . . . .40 5 Eating & Drinking in Hawaii . . . . . . .45 48 9 Sustainable Tourism . . . . . . . . . . . . .72 Frommers.com: The Complete Travel Resource . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .73 10 Packages for the Independent Traveler . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .73 11 Special-Interest Trips . . . . . . . . . . . . .74 Don’t Leave Home Without Your Gold Card . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .79 12 Staying Connected . . . . . . . . . . . . . .81 13 Tips on Accommodations . . . . . . . . .83 14 Getting Married in the Islands . . . . .87 02_285558-ftoc.qxp iv 8/11/08 10:28 PM Page iv CONTENTS 4 Suggested Hawaii Itineraries 1 A Week on Oahu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .89 2 A Week on the Big Island of Hawaii . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .91 3 A Week on Maui . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .94 5 Oahu, the Gathering Place 1 Orientation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .103 The Island in Brief . . . . . . . . . . . . .106 2 Getting Around . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .114 Fast Facts: Oahu . . . . . . . . . . . . . .118 3 Where to Stay . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .119 It’s Not Your Father’s Waikiki . . . . .124 A Room for Everyone in Waikiki: The Outrigger & Ohana Hotels Dynasty . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .129 Waikiki Beach Walk . . . . . . . . . . . .131 4 Where to Dine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .146 Tasty Tours for the Hungry Traveler . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .154 Attention, Condo Dwellers: Fix, Freeze & Feed Dinners . . . . . . .158 Local Chains & Familiar Names . . .166 Luau!

See Fishing Sports Authority (Honolulu), 247 Sports Page Bar (Maui), 490 Spouting Horn (Kauai), 612 Stand-by Golf, 197, 320, 452, 606 657 Stargazing Big Island, 336 Honolulu Zoo (Oahu), 212 Kauai, 593 Starseed (Big Island), 358 Statehood, 32–33 State Library (Honolulu), 227 Steam Vents (Big Island), 348 Stings, 67–68 Studio 7 (Big Island), 353 Subaru Telescope (Big Island), 336 Submarine dives Big Island, 316–317 Maui, 444 Oahu, 188–189 Sugi Grove (Kauai), 604 Sulphur Banks (Big Island), 348 Summer, 52 Summerhouse (Maui), 476 Sun exposure, 67 Sunrise Protea (Maui), 484 Sunset Beach (Oahu), 236 Sunshine Cabs of Maui, 376 Sunshine Markets (Kauai), 621 Sun Yat-sen, statue of (Honolulu), 218 Surf & Sea Surf Sail & Dive Shop (Oahu), 249 Surf-and-sports shops, Oahu, Honolulu, 246 Surfing, 80 Big Island, 317 Kauai, 598 Lanai, 535 Maui, 444–445 Molokai, 507 Oahu, 189 Haleiwa area beaches, 236 North Shore Surf and Cultural Museum (Oahu), 236 Surf News Network Surfline (Oahu), 189 Surf-N-Sea (Oahu), 185–187, 189 Surf shops, Oahu, 249 Sushi Company (Honolulu), 242 Sushi Go! (Maui), 490 Sustainable tourism, 72–73 Sweet Wind (Big Island), 357 Swing Zone (Big Island), 320–321 T ahiti Fete (Maui), 58 Takaki, Randy, 362 Takamiya Market (Maui), 478 16_285558-bindex.qxp 658 8/11/08 10:52 PM Page 658 INDEX Take’s Variety Store (Molokai), 519 Tamashiro Market (Honolulu), 240 Taro, 36 Taro Ko Chips Factory (Kauai), 625 Taro Patch Gifts (Big Island), 358 Taxes, 636 Tedeschi Vineyards and Winery (Maui), 469 Telegraph and telex services, 636 Telephones, 81–82 Tennis, 80 Big Island, 325 Kauai, 610 Lanai, 537 Maui, 456–457 Molokai, 511 Oahu, 200 Terran Tours (Kauai), 609 T.


Egypt Travel Guide by Lonely Planet

call centre, carbon footprint, Eratosthenes, friendly fire, G4S, haute cuisine, Khartoum Gordon, late fees, low cost airline, low cost carrier, spice trade, sustainable-tourism, Thales and the olive presses, trade route, urban planning, urban sprawl

Red Sea Diving Safari Diving ( 02-337 1833, 02-337 9942; www.redsea-divingsafari.com; Marsa Shagra) PADI. Run by environmentalist and long-time diver Hossam Hassan, who pioneered diving in the Red Sea’s deep south. Sleeping There are few places to stay in Marsa Alam village itself but north and south along the coast there’s an ever-growing number of all-inclusive resorts, plus a handful of simpler, diver-oriented camps, many of which focus on sustainable tourism practices. Wadi Lahami Village Beach Camp $$ ( 023-337 1833; www.redsea-divingsafari.com; Wadi Lahami; tent/royal tent/chalet full board per person €40/45/55) Tucked into a remote mangrove bay 120km south along the main road from Marsa Alam, just north of Ras Banas, this simple place is worth the extra effort it takes to get here. Diving is the main activity, with the famed pristine reefs of the Fury Shoals easily accessed by boat, but the lonely location, and nearby mangrove forests, are a perfect setting for nature lovers and bird watchers as well.

A superb choice for those seeking beautiful vistas and lashings of tranquillity. Marsa Shagra Village Beach Camp $$ ( 023-337 1833; www.redsea-divingsafari.com; tent/royal tent/chalet full board per person €40/45/55) The big sister camp to Wadi Lahami, Shagra was one of the first eco-minded places to open up on the Red Sea and, despite the development that has gone on around it, has stayed true to its sustainable tourism credentials. It’s a similar setup as Lahami (with the same environmental policy in place) but on a larger scale and offers excellent snorkelling just offshore as well as diving – which is the real attraction here. It’s 24km north of Marsa Alam along the main road. Oasis Resort Resort $$$ ( 0100 505 2855; www.oasis-marsaalam.de; s/d half board €68/112) 24km north of Marsa Alam along the main road, and smaller than many of the mega-resorts along this stretch of sand, Oasis is unique for utilising local materials and traditional architecture rather than the usual concrete-splurge.

You can download a Wadi Rayyan Protected Area atlas, which contains 15 chapters of photos and maps, at www.eiecop.org/ambiente2/projects_2/wadiel rayan_atlas.htm. Fortunately, there have been some positive developments. A National Parks office (see boxed text Click here) has opened in Hurghada and is hoping to rein in some of the more grandiose development plans in the Marsa Alam area. And new ‘green’ guidelines for running hotels are being trialled under a joint US–Egyptian Red Sea Sustainable Tourism Initiative (RSSTI). Recommendations focus on energy use, water conservation, and the handling and disposal of waste, including simple measures such as installing foot-pedal taps at sinks, which make it harder to leave water running. Finally, Egypt has an increasing number of high-profile eco-lodges. It started with the fabulous Basata (Click here) in Sinai and Adrére Amellal (Click here) at Siwa and they appear to have inspired a few others towards environmentally responsible tourism.


Frommer's Paris 2013 by Kate van Der Boogert

Airbnb, airport security, British Empire, Chuck Templeton: OpenTable:, clean water, eurozone crisis, haute couture, Honoré de Balzac, housing crisis, music of the spheres, place-making, starchitect, sustainable-tourism, urban renewal

Many hotels in Paris have undertaken measures to preserve the environment, and those that have are awarded with a green label; in Paris, look for hotels with the title of La Clef Verte (Green Key; www.laclefverte.org) or the European Eco-Label. Both labels reward hotels that take a more environmental approach to water, energy, and waste, and raise the awareness of their guests. In Paris, the Best Western Premier Regent’s Garden boasts a European Eco-Label and the Radisson Blu Le Dokhan’s Hotel claims the title of La Clef Verte, among others. Although there are currently only a few hotels that boast such labels, sustainable tourism is becoming increasingly important in the hotel industry. Even if you don’t stay at a green hotel, you can still do your bit: turn down the air-conditioning when you leave the room, request that your sheets aren’t changed every day, and use your towels more than once. Laundry makes up around 40% of an average hotel’s energy use. Responsible tourism means leaving a city in the same condition as you found it.

Support the local economy and culture of the city by shopping in smaller, neighborhood shops, and eating in local, family-run restaurants rather than big chain stores and restaurants. Vegetarianism is still not particularly widespread in France, but organic food (bio) is becoming increasingly popular—look out for the bio tag in shops and restaurants. For more information about Paris’s sustainability, go to http://en.parisinfo.com/sustainable-tourism. 3 Suggested Paris Itineraries by Sophie Nellis The Seine. © Fridmar Damm/Corbis Bridge/Alamy by Sophie Nellis From the Louvre to the Eiffel Tower, Paris is home to some of the world’s most famous museums and monuments. All of these sights are well worth visiting, but the city is so much more than a mere collection of buildings. Visiting Paris is as much about soaking up the atmosphere and getting to know the city as it is about sightseeing.


Lonely Planet Colombia (Travel Guide) by Lonely Planet, Alex Egerton, Tom Masters, Kevin Raub

airport security, call centre, car-free, carbon footprint, centre right, colonial rule, Columbian Exchange, Downton Abbey, El Camino Real, Francisco Pizarro, friendly fire, glass ceiling, haute couture, land reform, low cost airline, low cost carrier, race to the bottom, sustainable-tourism, urban sprawl

New themes focused on beers, literature and gay nightlife are in development. Andes EcotoursECOTOURS ( MAP GOOGLE MAP ; %310-559-9729; www.andesecotours.com; Carrera 3 No 12B-89)S Offers nature-focused day trips in and around Bogotá (Choachi cloud-forest hike, Sumapaz Páramo and Chingaza National Park hikes) as well as more far-flung multiday trips to Lago de Tota and coffee agrotourism adventures. All have a strong emphasis on sustainable tourism and community development. zFestivals & Events A mix of local and national festivals takes place constantly throughout the year. The following is a selection of the best. Also ask around as smaller festivals are held each month. Salsa al ParqueSALSA (www.festivalsalsaalparque.blogspot.com; hAug) A salsa extravaganza in Parque Simón Bolívar. Festival de VeranoCULTURAL (hAug) Ten days of free music and culture in Parque Simón Bolívar.

Colombian Journeys ( MAP GOOGLE MAP ; %1 618 0027; www.colombianjourneys.com; Carrera 13 No 90-36, oficina 701, Ed Boulevard 90; h8am-5pm Mon-Fri) Bogotá-based company offering multilingual tours countrywide. De Una Colombia Tours This Dutch-owned company in Bogotá focuses on many far-flung destinations. Expotur (www.expotur-eco.com) Santa Marta; Taganga; Riohacha Professionally run agency particularly strong for trips to Ciudad Perdida and Punta Gallinas. Mambe Travel (%1 629 8880; www.mambe.org; Carrera 5 No 117-25) Bogotá-based sustainable tourism NGO that digs deeper into six off-the-beaten-track destinations: the Amazon, the Chocó, La Guajira peninsula, Sierra Nevada de Santa Marta, Vichada and Caño Cristales. Car & Motorcycle Considering how cheap and extensive bus transportation is in Colombia, there is little reason to bring your own vehicle. What's more, the security situation remains dodgy in remote and rural parts of the country, substantially increasing the risk of vehicle theft and/or assault in isolated parts of the country.


pages: 264 words: 71,821

How Bad Are Bananas?: The Carbon Footprint of Everything by Mike Berners-Lee

air freight, carbon footprint, en.wikipedia.org, energy security, food miles, Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), Richard Feynman, ride hailing / ride sharing, Skype, sustainable-tourism, University of East Anglia

So there is no need for anyone to line up when the lane closes, provided that no one leaves it to the last moment to change lanes. In reality most drivers don’t leave as much as their stopping distance between them and the car in front, but the principles here still apply if they keep leaving the same proportion of that stopping distance between themselves and the next car as they slow down. 7. The carbon footprint tool is available as a free download from the Cumbria Tourism website, at www.cumbriatourism.org/sustainable-tourism/carbon-footprint-toolkit.aspx. It sets out to include just about everything that a business buys and does. For the most part it uses the same input–output model that I have drawn upon in this book (see above note 4 in the “Under 10 grams” section. The calculator itself was put together on a limited budget but seems to work fine. It is designed for use by businesses of any size, and the ambitious intention is for this to be possible without businesses needing any external help.


pages: 258 words: 77,601

Everything Under the Sun: Toward a Brighter Future on a Small Blue Planet by Ian Hanington

agricultural Revolution, Albert Einstein, Bretton Woods, carbon footprint, clean water, Climategate, Climatic Research Unit, energy security, Enrique Peñalosa, Exxon Valdez, Google Earth, happiness index / gross national happiness, Hedy Lamarr / George Antheil, hydraulic fracturing, Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), oil shale / tar sands, stem cell, sustainable-tourism, the scientific method, University of East Anglia, urban planning, urban sprawl

“Only a total ban on trophy hunting will ensure that bear populations can support the high-end viewing operations that add valuable income to coastal communities.” Protecting opportunities for Aboriginal businesses to participate in the multi-million-dollar ecotourism industry in B.C. must be a priority for government. Art Sterritt, executive director of the Coastal First Nations Turning Point Initiative, argued that government must manage bears to promote sustainable tourism. “This is not a sustainable industry,” Sterritt has said of trophy hunting. “It is jeopardizing the sustainable industries we are trying to create.” Killing bears for sport makes no sense scientifically, but it is also unethical and immoral to hunt these animals so that they become a head on a wall or a rug in front of a fireplace when tourists are willing to pay for the chance to photograph them alive and in the wild.


Frommer's Mexico 2008 by David Baird, Juan Cristiano, Lynne Bairstow, Emily Hughey Quinn

airport security, AltaVista, Bartolomé de las Casas, centre right, colonial rule, East Village, glass ceiling, haute cuisine, indoor plumbing, low cost airline, low cost carrier, Maui Hawaii, out of africa, Pepto Bismol, place-making, Skype, sustainable-tourism, the market place, urban planning

Manufactured in the United States of America 5 4 3 2 1 Contents 1 List of Maps ix What’s New in Mexico 1 The Best of Mexico 7 by David Baird, Juan Cristiano & Emily Hughey Quinn 1 2 3 4 5 6 2 The Best Beach Vacations . . . . . . . . . .7 The Best Cultural Experiences . . . . . .10 The Best Archaeological Sites . . . . . .11 The Best Active Vacations . . . . . . . . .12 The Best of Natural Mexico . . . . . . . .13 The Best Places to Get Away from It All . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .14 Planning Your Trip to Mexico 1 The Regions in Brief . . . . . . . . . . . . .22 2 Visitor Information & Maps . . . . . . . .24 Destination Mexico: Red-Alert Checklist . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .24 3 Entry Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . .25 4 When to Go . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .26 Calendar of Events . . . . . . . . . . . . . .27 5 Getting There . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .33 Luxury Bus Service from the Mexico City Airport . . . . . . . . . .34 Getting Through the Airport . . . . . . .35 6 Money & Costs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .39 7 Travel Insurance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .42 8 Health . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .43 7 The Best Art, Architecture & Museums . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .15 8 The Best Shopping . . . . . . . . . . . . . .16 9 The Best Luxury Hotels . . . . . . . . . . .17 10 The Best Inexpensive Inns . . . . . . . . .18 11 The Best Spa Resorts . . . . . . . . . . . .19 12 The Best Mexican Food & Drink . . . .20 22 9 Safety . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .46 10 Specialized Travel Resources . . . . . . .48 11 Sustainable Tourism/Ecotourism . . . .52 Frommers.com: The Complete Travel Resource . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .52 12 Staying Connected . . . . . . . . . . . . . .53 Online Traveler’s Toolbox . . . . . . . . .55 13 Packages for the Independent Traveler . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .55 14 Special-Interest Trips . . . . . . . . . . . . .57 15 Getting Around Mexico . . . . . . . . . .60 16 Tips on Accommodations . . . . . . . . .63 17 Tips on Dining . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .66 Fast Facts: Mexico . . . . . . . . . . . . . .69 iv CONTENTS 3 Suggested Mexico Itineraries 78 by David Baird 1 Central Mexico’s Pre-Columbian Treasures in a Week . . . . . . . . . . . . .78 2 The Best of Western Mexico in a Week . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .80 4 3 Los Cabos to Copper Canyon . . . . . .81 4 La Ruta Maya in 2 Weeks . . . . . . . . .82 Mexico City 85 by Juan Cristiano 1 Orientation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .86 Important Taxi Safety Precautions in Mexico City . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .89 The Neighborhoods in Brief . . . . . . .93 2 Getting Around . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .95 Fast Facts: Mexico City . . . . . . . . . .100 3 Where to Stay . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .103 4 Where to Dine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .111 5 5 6 7 8 9 ¡Café, Por Favor!

Hostelling International México (& 55/55181726; www.hostellingmexico.com) offers a list of hostels that meet international standards in Mexico City, Cuernavaca and surrounding areas, Oaxaca, and Veracruz. Hostels.com offers a list of hostels in Mexico City, Zacatecas, Guanajuato, Puerto Escondido, Uxmal, Palenque, Tulum, Cancún, and Playa del Carmen. 52 C H A P T E R 2 . P L A N N I N G YO U R T R I P TO M E X I C O 11 Sustainable Tourism/Ecotourism Each time you take a flight or drive a car CO2 is released into the atmosphere. You can help neutralize this danger to our planet through “carbon offsetting”—paying someone to reduce your CO2 emissions by the same amount you’ve added. Carbon offsets can be purchased in the U.S. from companies such as Carbon fund.org (www.carbonfund.org) and TerraPass (www.terrapass.org), and from Climate Care (www.climatecare.org) in the U.K.

Although one could argue that any vacation that includes an airplane flight can’t be truly “green,” you can go on holiday and still contribute positively to the environment. You can offset carbon emissions from your flight in other ways. Choose forward-looking companies that embrace responsible development practices, helping preserve destinations for the future by working alongside local people. An increasing number of sustainable tourism initiatives can help you plan a family trip and leave as small a “footprint” as possible on the places you visit. Responsible Travel (www.responsible travel.com) contains a great source of sustainable travel ideas run by a spokesperson for responsible tourism in the travel industry. Sustainable Travel International (www.sustainabletravelinternational.org) promotes responsible tourism practices and issues an annual Green Gear & Gift Guide.


Culture Shock! Costa Rica 30th Anniversary Edition by Claire Wallerstein

anti-communist, bilateral investment treaty, call centre, card file, fixed income, Kickstarter, liberal capitalism, out of africa, Silicon Valley, sustainable-tourism, trade route, urban sprawl

It is a friendly town with a big Saturday farmers’ market. Santa Elena/Monteverde ¦ A s t ra g g l i n g c o m m u n i t y s p re a d o u t a l o n g t h e u n p ave d ro a d to t h e wo r l d - fa m o u s M o n t eve rd e cloud forest reserve. Monteverde has a sizeable community of American dairy-farming Quakers, foreign and local artists, a cheese factory making real Cheddar, and the Monteverde Institute, which carries out research into sustainable tourism, agriculture, etc. Zarcero ¦ At around 1,700 m (5,577 ft) in the mountains of the Cordillera Central north of San José and near San Ramón, the Zarcero area has an almost Alpine feel. The town is most famous for its bizarre Dalí-esque topiary in front of the church. Local artist Evangelisto Blanco has sculpted dozens of trees into various human and animal shapes, and surreal arches. Look out also for regional food specialities such as palmito cheese and peach preserves.


pages: 449 words: 85,924

Lonely Planet Maldives (Travel Guide) by Planet, Lonely, Masters, Tom

British Empire, car-free, carbon footprint, haute cuisine, income inequality, Skype, sovereign wealth fund, sustainable-tourism, trade route, women in the workforce

The entire plateau is submerged beneath the Indian Ocean and only scattered, flat-topped peaks are visible at the surface. These peaks are capped not with snow, but with coconut palms. Tourism Tourism development is strictly regulated and resorts are established only on uninhabited islands that the government makes available. Overwhelmingly, the regulations have been effective in minimising the impact on the environment – the World Tourism Organization has cited the Maldives as a model for sustainable tourism development. Construction and operation of the resorts does use resources, but the vast majority of these are imported. Large amounts of diesel fuel are used to generate electricity and desalinate water, and the demand for hot running water and air-conditioning has raised the overall energy cost per guest. Extraordinarily, most resorts simply pump sewage directly out into the sea. While an increasing number of resorts do treat their own sewage and dispose of it responsibly, the majority still do not.


pages: 1,510 words: 218,417

Lonely Planet Norway (Travel Guide) by Lonely Planet, Donna Wheeler

car-free, carbon footprint, centre right, energy security, illegal immigration, low cost airline, mass immigration, Mikhail Gorbachev, North Sea oil, place-making, Skype, sustainable-tourism, trade route, urban renewal

Although it took a while to catch on, around 50% of household waste and two-thirds of industrial waste is now recycled, while Norway is a world leader when it comes to recycling electrical and electronics products. Methane from waste nonetheless still accounts for 7% of Norway's greenhouse gas emissions and Norwegians consume more than 130,000 tonnes of plastic packaging every year. SUSTAINABLE NORWAY 2015 In 2007, Norway's government announced its flagship manifesto on sustainable tourism. Entitled 'Sustainable Norway 2015', it aims to increase awareness of sustainable tourism (both within the industry and wider community), as well as place sustainability at the heart of all new and existing tourism developments. Run through the quasi-government Innovation Norway (www.innovasjonnorge.no/no/english), the program is both a marketing tool and a code of practice for the tourism industry, although its impact upon (and visibility for) your average tourist remains minimal.


Norman Foster: A Life in Architecture by Deyan Sudjic

Buckminster Fuller, carbon footprint, credit crunch, cuban missile crisis, Frank Gehry, interchangeable parts, James Dyson, Jane Jacobs, low cost airline, Masdar, megacity, megastructure, Murano, Venice glass, Norman Mailer, Pearl River Delta, Peter Eisenman, sustainable-tourism, The Death and Life of Great American Cities, University of East Anglia, urban decay, urban renewal, white flight, young professional

It is a strategy that allows one group to learn from the experiences of another, to retain a unified approach to architecture, and for the firm to maintain a sense of intellectual and aesthetic cohesion. And it has enabled the company to recognise new talent. The groups allow such individuals as Stefan Behling to pursue his passionate interest in sustainability and solar power, and maintain his professorship in Germany, at the same time as exploring the potential for sustainable tourism in Libya. It embraces both more recent recruits, such as Gerard Evenden, as well as veterans like Mark Sutcliffe who first worked with Foster in the Team Four period. Foster has tried hard to create the conditions that will avoid the firm’s work becoming reduced to a formula. He has built one of the strongest international architectural brands, which skilfully combines the aura of an individual approach with corporate reliability, words of course that architects are congenitally disposed to be uncomfortable with.


pages: 288 words: 90,349

The Challenge for Africa by Wangari Maathai

Berlin Wall, Bob Geldof, carbon footprint, carbon-based life, clean water, colonial rule, corporate social responsibility, deliberate practice, F. W. de Klerk, failed state, Fall of the Berlin Wall, Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), Live Aid, Mahatma Gandhi, Mikhail Gorbachev, Nelson Mandela, Scramble for Africa, sovereign wealth fund, structural adjustment programs, sustainable-tourism, trade liberalization, transatlantic slave trade, urban planning, War on Poverty, Washington Consensus

In addition, many of Kenya's national parks, and the wildlife within them, benefit from the Tana River and the rainfall from Mount Kenya and the Aberdares. (The presence of two species of monkey, more commonly found in Uganda and Congo, in the Tana basin is a reminder of the rainforests that once covered much of Africa from west to east.) If the mountains' ecosystems are destroyed, the savannahs will not be sustained. Tourism then will be a thing of the past, even though it's one of the most important sectors of the Kenyan economy and a major generator of employment, which, of course, contributes to poverty reduction. It goes without saying that city dwellers also depend on the environment's capacity to provide food, sources of energy, and water. All of these challenges to human development could be avoided or their intensity reduced if the government managed the forested mountain ecosystems more sustainably.


Lonely Planet Mexico by John Noble, Kate Armstrong, Greg Benchwick, Nate Cavalieri, Gregor Clark, John Hecht, Beth Kohn, Emily Matchar, Freda Moon, Ellee Thalheimer

AltaVista, Bartolomé de las Casas, Burning Man, call centre, clean water, colonial rule, glass ceiling, haute cuisine, illegal immigration, informal economy, low cost airline, low cost carrier, Mahatma Gandhi, New Urbanism, off grid, place-making, Rosa Parks, Rubik’s Cube, Skype, sustainable-tourism, trade route, traffic fines, urban sprawl, wage slave

For More Information Eco Travelling (www.ecotravelling.co.uk) Information and tips on ways of moving with a minimal footprint. International Ecotourism Society (www.ecotourism.org) Promotes responsible travel to natural areas and has listings of sustainable-tourism outfits in Mexico. Mexican Adventure and Ecotourism Association (www.mexicosagaz.org) Nearly 60 active member organizations and companies around the country. Mexiconservación (www.mexiconservacion.org) Has an online Green Guide to the Mexican Caribbean. Planeta.com (www.planeta.com) Multifarious ecotravel and sustainable tourism resource, with a strong Mexico emphasis. responsibletravel.com (www.responsibletravel.com) Promotes tourism for the benefit of local people and the environment as well as for tourists, and lists responsible holidays in Mexico.

Mexico’s contribution to 20th-century art and architecture is marked by the UNAM university campus in Mexico City, and Guadalajara’s Instituto Cultural de Cabañas, which contains the mural masterpieces of José Clemente Orozco. Return to beginning of chapter BIOSPHERE RESERVES Biosphere reserves are protected natural areas that aim to combine conservation with sustainable human economic activity. Their sustainable tourism schemes provide opportunities to see some of Mexico’s most pristine, spectacular and remote areas. Mexico recognizes 53 Unesco and national biosphere reserves (reservas de la biosfera) totaling over 130,000 sq km and encompassing huge ecological variety, from the northern deserts of Bolsón de Mapimí to the southern forests of Montes Azules and Calakmul. The coastal wetland reserves of Sian Ka’an on the Caribbean, La Encrucijada on the Pacific, and Ría Celestún and Ría Lagartos on the Gulf of Mexico all harbor bountiful wildlife and infrastructure for visitors.

A century later revolutionary Francisco Madero released his revolutionary Plan de San Luis Potosí and the 1917 signing of Mexico’s constitution in Querétaro cemented the region’s leading role in Mexican political affairs. In more recent times, under the governership of Vicente Fox, the region has flourished economically, due in part to the boom in the motor, manufacturing and agricultural industries, particularly in Querétaro and Guanajuato. This led to the creation of international airports at León (Aeropuerto Internacional del Bajío) and Querétaro, which has helped sustain tourism and provided essential services links to the region. Climate The majority of the region is upland semidesert. The northern higher reaches are drier and cooler, while the southern latitudes have temperate valleys with rich oak-forested hills and chaparral. The more humid semitropical cloud forests are in the Sierra Gorda in the east of the region. Parks & Reserves The distinctive rock formations of the Parque Nacional Sierra de Órganos Click here create a land of fantastic towering sand castles petrified by time.


pages: 2,020 words: 267,411

Lonely Planet Morocco (Travel Guide) by Lonely Planet, Paul Clammer, Paula Hardy

air freight, Airbnb, call centre, car-free, carbon footprint, clean water, illegal immigration, low cost airline, Nelson Mandela, Norman Mailer, place-making, Skype, spice trade, sustainable-tourism, trade route, urban planning, urban sprawl, women in the workforce, working poor, young professional

Sights & Activities Although there are plenty of mountainous hikes in the region – with summit-baggers heading straight for Irhil M’Goun (4068m) – ambling between villages along the valley floor is enormously rewarding. Along the way, drop in at some of the valley’s 40 local associations and cooperatives and find out more about how these mountain communities are evolving their own unique brand of sustainable tourism and providing much needed education to future generations. One such example is the non-profit école vivante (www.ecolevivante.com) , a free primary school that is part of a global educational youth project. At the very upper (northeastern) end of the valley at Ifrane a track heads east to Zaouiat Oulmzi. From here you can trek down to the seasonal Lac Izoughar, a favoured watering hole for the nomadic Aït Atta tribe.

Morocco’s Green Key program also certifies hotels and guesthouses that institute a range of resource-conserving measures, from low-flow toilets to environmentally friendly cleaning products, although it has received criticism from some quarters for granting certificates to hotels with distinctly high-impact facilities like swimming pools. Add these traditional, national and local resource-saving practices together, and Morocco is poised not only to make the switch to sustainable tourism, but to show Europe how it’s done. Survival Guide Directory A–Z Accommodation Customs Regulations Electricity Embassies & Consulates Gay & Lesbian Travellers Insurance Internet Access Language Courses Legal Matters Maps Money Opening Hours Photography Post Public Holidays Safe Travel Telephone Time Toilets Tourist Information Travellers with Disabilities Visas Volunteering Women Travellers Work Transport GETTING THERE & AWAY Entering Morocco Air Land Sea GETTING AROUND Bicycle Bus Car & Motorcycle Local Transport Tours Train Tram Health Insurance Medical Checklist Websites Availability & Cost of Health Care Infectious Diseases Traveller’s Diarrhoea Environmental Hazards Women’s Health Directory A–Z BOOK YOUR STAY ONLINE For more accommodation reviews by Lonely Planet authors, check out http://hotels.lonelyplanet.com.


Discover Maui by Lonely Planet

California gold rush, carbon footprint, Charles Lindbergh, land reform, Maui Hawaii, sustainable-tourism, trade route

Fourteen additional wind turbines should be added to the slopes by the end of 2012. Sustainable Icon It seems like everyone’s going ‘green’ these days, but how can you know which Maui businesses are genuinely eco-friendly and which are simply jumping on the sustainable bandwagon? Throughout the book, this Sustainable icon indicates listings that we are highlighting because they demonstrate an active sustainable-tourism policy. Some are involved in conservation or environmental education, while others maintain and preserve Hawaiian identity and culture, and many are owned and operated by local and indigenous operators. Sustainable Maui As you plan your trip, consider your impact on the island. There are numerous ways to lighten your tourist footprint. Transportation On a short trip, consider ditching the car.


Discover Hawaii the Big Island by Lonely Planet

land reform, Maui Hawaii, new economy, sustainable-tourism

Visitors can participate in that self-perpetuating, good karma cycle by yielding to other drivers, sharing waves, helping the elderly cross the road, staying off private property and myriad other ways suggested throughout this book. Sustainable Icon It seems like everyone’s going ‘green’ these days, but how can you know which Big Island businesses are genuinely ecofriendly and which are simply jumping on the sustainable bandwagon? Throughout the book, this sustainable icon indicates listings that we are highlighting because they demonstrate an active sustainable-tourism policy. Some are involved in conservation or environmental education, while others maintain and preserve Hawaiian identity and culture, and many are owned and operated by local and indigenous operators. The Land Myth, science and motion meet in a mesmerizing tango on the Big Island, with plate tectonics, a geologic ‘hot spot’ and the volcano goddess Pele conspiring to create a powerfully majestic landscape.


Caribbean Islands by Lonely Planet

Bartolomé de las Casas, big-box store, British Empire, buttonwood tree, call centre, car-free, carbon footprint, clean water, colonial rule, cuban missile crisis, discovery of the americas, Donald Trump, glass ceiling, haute cuisine, income inequality, intermodal, jitney, Kickstarter, microcredit, offshore financial centre, place-making, Ronald Reagan, Rubik’s Cube, Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence, sustainable-tourism, urban planning, urban sprawl, white picket fence

Good Seafood Choices Barramundi (farm-raised) Conch (farm-raised) Maine lobster Shrimp Tilapia (farm-raised) Yellowtail snapper Seafood to Avoid Atlantic salmon Conch (wild-caught) Florida pompano Grouper Spiny lobster Wild turtle Tourism pays the bills in most of the Caribbean, and the impact on the environment and the culture is huge. Most islands are still putting economic development ahead of the environment because poverty is so widespread, but there are some ‘green’ trailblazers worth supporting. Sustainable listings in this book have been selected by Lonely Planet authors because they demonstrate an active sustainable-tourism policy, are involved in conservation or environmental education, or are operated with a view to maintaining and preserving regional identity and culture. Environmental Issues The popularity of the Caribbean as a tourist destination means that many environmental problems have been created or aggravated by an influx of visitors. There is a reliance on fossil fuels to power resorts, which is a problem in an area that is gas- and oil-poor (Trinidad excepted).

CHOOSING THE RIGHT FISH Trying to set an environmentally conscious course through the seafood menus of the Caribbean can be tough. The Cayman Islands National Trust offers a downloadable guide (see www.nationaltrust.org.ky/seasense.html) to sensible seafood choices, as well as a list of member Cayman restaurants that only serve sustainable catches. Be Ecosmart » Go green Look for hotels and resorts that carry an audited green certification. A good place to start your search is at Eco-Index Sustainable Tourism (www.eco-indextourism.org), which features businesses that have been recognized as environmentally and socially responsible. » Ask questions Ask your hotel or tour operator about its green practices. Even if they have none, it’ll tell them it matters to customers. » Travel globally, shop locally Not only will buying local products infuse the local economy, it will also help to save you money.

Set high on a ridge near Puerto Plata with breathtaking views of the valley below, Tubagua Plantation Eco-Village ( 809-696-6932; www.tubagua.com; r with shared bathroom incl breakfast US25; ) is the vision of longtime DR resident and Canadian consul Tim Hall. By his own description, accommodation here is ‘Robinson Crusoe style,’ which shouldn’t discourage anyone. There are several wooden cabins with palapa roofs (made from palm leaves) and basic bedding – simple but comfortable. Tim, an enthusiastic advocate of low-impact sustainable tourism, can arrange day, overnight and week-long itineraries for travel anywhere in the country. Don’t try driving here at night – 20km from Puerto Plata (taxi US$30) and around 40km from Santiago – since the road is rough and there are no lights. Drinking Nikki Beach BAR, NIGHTCLUB ( 9am-late) St Tropez comes to the DR in this swish club with its own sommelier; DJs get the party started late.


Egypt by Matthew Firestone

call centre, clean water, credit crunch, friendly fire, haute cuisine, Khartoum Gordon, Right to Buy, spice trade, sustainable-tourism, Thales and the olive presses, trade route, urban sprawl, young professional

Large residential areas in Luxor are also being demolished to clear areas around historical sites, despite protests from some locals and organisations (see also boxed text,). Fortunately, there have been some positive developments. A National Parks office (boxed text,) has opened in Hurghada and it is hoping to rein in some of the more grandiose development plans in the Marsa Alam area. And new ‘green’ guidelines for running hotels are being trialled under a joint US-Egyptian Red Sea Sustainable Tourism Initiative (RSSTI). Recommendations focus on energy use, water conservation, and handling and disposal of waste, including simple measures such as installing foot-pedal taps at sinks, which make it harder to leave water running. Finally, Egypt now has a growing number of high-profile ecolodges – including the fabulous Basata in Sinai and Adrére Amellal at Siwa – which may be the harbingers of a new, environmentally responsible trend in Egyptian tourism.

Soma Bay Sheraton (off Map; 354 5845; www.sheraton-somabay.com; s/d from €115/125; ) Located 25km south of Hurghada proper, this 298-room resort is part of the Ras Abu Soma ‘resort cluster’, one of a number of self-contained tourist centres being built along the coast south of Hurghada. Built in pseudo-Pharaonic style, the Sheraton boasts the typical five-star amenities including a golf course, tennis courts and a postcard-perfect beach of powdery sand. The Soma Bay is noteworthy for its continued efforts to foster a Red Sea sustainable-tourism initiative targeted at helping hotels become environmentally friendly. Oberoi Sahl Hasheesh (off Map; 344 0777; www.oberoihotels.com; Sahl Hasheesh; ste from €200; ) Peaceful, exclusive and opulent beyond your imagination, the Oberoi features palatial suites decorated in minimalist Moorish style. Each individually decorated accommodation comes complete with sunken marble baths, walled private courtyards – some with private pools – and panoramic sea views.


pages: 537 words: 135,099

The Rough Guide to Amsterdam by Martin Dunford, Phil Lee, Karoline Thomas

banking crisis, haute cuisine, illegal immigration, low cost airline, Nelson Mandela, place-making, plutocrats, Plutocrats, spice trade, sustainable-tourism, trade route, upwardly mobile, urban sprawl, young professional

Getting there | Airlines and agents | Agents and operators ebookers UK 0800/082 3000, Republic of Ireland 01/431 1311, www.ebookers.com. Low fares on an extensive selection of scheduled flights and package deals. North South Travel UK 01245/608 291, www.northsouthtravel.co.uk. Friendly, competitive travel agency, offering discounted fares worldwide. Profits are used to support projects in the developing world, especially the promotion of sustainable tourism. STA Travel UK 0871/2300 040, US 1-800/781-4040, Australia 134 STA, New Zealand 0800/474 400, SA 0861/781 781; www.statravel.com. Worldwide specialists in independent travel; also student IDs, travel insurance, car rental, rail passes and more. Good discounts for students and under-26s. Trailfinders UK 0845/058 5858, Republic of Ireland 01/677 7888, Australia 1300/780 212; www.trailfinders.com.


The Rough Guide to Prague by Humphreys, Rob

active transport: walking or cycling, Albert Einstein, anti-communist, Berlin Wall, centre right, clean water, Fall of the Berlin Wall, Frank Gehry, Johannes Kepler, land reform, Live Aid, Mikhail Gorbachev, Peace of Westphalia, sexual politics, sustainable-tourism, trade route, upwardly mobile

Low fares on an extensive selection of scheduled flights and package deals. Martin Randall Travel Wwww.martinrandall.com. Small-group cultural tours to European destinations, including Prague, led by experts on art, archaeology or music. North South Travel Wwww.northsouthtravel .co.uk. Friendly, competitive travel agency, offering discounted fares worldwide. Profits are used to support projects in the developing world, especially the promotion of sustainable tourism. STA Travel W www.statravel.com. Worldwide specialists in independent travel; also student IDs, travel insurance, car rental, rail passes, and more. Good discounts for students and under-26s. Trailfinders W www.trailfinders.com. One of the best-informed and most efficient agents for independent travellers. Travel CUTS Wwww.travelcuts.com. Canadian youth and student travel firm. USIT Wwww.usit.ie.


pages: 496 words: 131,938

The Future Is Asian by Parag Khanna

3D printing, Admiral Zheng, affirmative action, Airbnb, Amazon Web Services, anti-communist, Asian financial crisis, asset-backed security, augmented reality, autonomous vehicles, Ayatollah Khomeini, barriers to entry, Basel III, blockchain, Boycotts of Israel, Branko Milanovic, British Empire, call centre, capital controls, carbon footprint, cashless society, clean water, cloud computing, colonial rule, computer vision, connected car, corporate governance, crony capitalism, currency peg, deindustrialization, Deng Xiaoping, Dissolution of the Soviet Union, Donald Trump, energy security, European colonialism, factory automation, failed state, falling living standards, family office, fixed income, flex fuel, gig economy, global reserve currency, global supply chain, haute couture, haute cuisine, illegal immigration, income inequality, industrial robot, informal economy, Internet of things, Kevin Kelly, Kickstarter, knowledge worker, light touch regulation, low cost airline, low cost carrier, low skilled workers, Lyft, Malacca Straits, Mark Zuckerberg, megacity, Mikhail Gorbachev, money market fund, Monroe Doctrine, mortgage debt, natural language processing, Netflix Prize, new economy, off grid, oil shale / tar sands, open economy, Parag Khanna, payday loans, Pearl River Delta, prediction markets, purchasing power parity, race to the bottom, RAND corporation, rent-seeking, reserve currency, ride hailing / ride sharing, Ronald Reagan, Scramble for Africa, self-driving car, Silicon Valley, smart cities, South China Sea, sovereign wealth fund, special economic zone, stem cell, Steve Jobs, Steven Pinker, supply-chain management, sustainable-tourism, trade liberalization, trade route, transaction costs, Travis Kalanick, uber lyft, upwardly mobile, urban planning, Washington Consensus, working-age population, Yom Kippur War

Islands such as Hainan have branded themselves a mix of Hawaii and Dubai and attract throngs of Asians looking for safe low-cost holidays and a first contact with China. As Asia becomes a more attractive tourist destination, it is also learning not to destroy the habitats the world is so eager to visit. Bhutan has pioneered high-value, low-impact eco-tourism. On Bali and other Indonesian islands, visitors often spend a day working with cashew growers or learning about fragile shark habitats. Thailand and the Philippines have also developed a sustainable tourism culture to support local communities. In 2018, the Duterte government announced a six-month closure of the popular island of Boracay to give resorts time to modify their infrastructure to minimize the pollution caused by the constant crush of tourists. A sustainable Asia is one that both Asians and the world are far more likely to continue to appreciate. Recycling Asian Culture True to their syncretic history, Asians continue to absorb Western influences, often as a means toward bridging diversity in their own societies.


Frommer's Caribbean 2010 by Christina Paulette Colón, Alexis Lipsitz Flippin, Darwin Porter, Danforth Prince, John Marino

European colonialism, haute cuisine, jitney, Murano, Venice glass, offshore financial centre, Saturday Night Live, Skype, sustainable-tourism, white picket fence, young professional

Manufactured in the United States of America 5 4 3 2 1 CONTENTS LIST OF MAPS ix WHAT’S NEW IN THE CARIBBEAN 1 1 THE BEST OF THE CARIBBEAN 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 The Best Beaches . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 The Best Snorkeling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9 The Best Diving . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10 The Best Sailing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .11 The Best Golf Courses . . . . . . . . . . . . .12 The Best Tennis Facilities . . . . . . . . . .13 The Best Places to Honeymoon . . .14 The Best Places to Get Away from It All . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .16 9 The Best Family Vacations . . . . . . . . .16 10 The Best Inns. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .18 1 1 The Best Eco-Friendly Resorts . . . . .19 1 2 The Best Dining . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .20 1 3 The Best Destinations for Shoppers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .20 1 4 The Best Nightlife . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .22 2 PLANNING YOUR TRIP TO THE CARIBBEAN 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 The Islands in Brief . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .24 When to Go. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .31 Entry Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .32 Getting There & Getting Around . . .33 Money & Costs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .33 Health . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .35 Safety . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .36 Specialized Travel Resources . . . . . .36 Sustainable Tourism & Eco-Tourism . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .37 5 24 General Resources for Green Travel. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38 10 Special-Interest Trips . . . . . . . . . . . . . .39 1 1 Staying Connected. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .40 1 2 Tips on Accommodations . . . . . . . . .41 1 3 Getting Married in the Caribbean . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .44 1 4 Chartering Your Own Boat . . . . . . . .47 iv 3 ANGUILLA 1 Essentials . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .50 Fast Facts: Anguilla . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52 2 Where to Stay. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .53 3 Where to Dine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .57 4 Anguilla’s Beaches. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .60 C A R I B B E A N 2010 4 ANTIGUA & BARBUDA 1 Essentials . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .67 Fast Facts: Antigua. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70 2 Where to Stay on Antigua. . . . . . . . .71 3 Where to Dine on Antigua . . . . . . . .76 4 Antigua’s Beaches . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .80 5 Sports & Other Outdoor Pursuits. . .81 CO N T E N T S 5 ARUBA 1 Essentials . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .96 Fast Facts: Aruba. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 98 2 Where to Stay. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .99 3 Where to Dine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105 4 Aruba’s Beaches. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 110 6 BARBADOS 1 Essentials . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 119 Special Events . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .123 Fast Facts: Barbados . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .124 2 Where to Stay. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 126 3 Where to Dine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 133 4 The Beaches . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 138 7 BONAIRE 1 Essentials . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 153 Fast Facts: Bonaire . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .154 2 Where to Stay. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 156 3 Where to Dine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 159 49 5 6 7 8 Sports & Other Outdoor Pursuits. . .62 Exploring Anguilla . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .63 Shopping . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .63 Anguilla After Dark . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .64 66 6 Exploring Antigua. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .83 7 Antigua Shopping . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .85 8 Antigua After Dark . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .86 9 Barbuda . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .87 10 Montserrat . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .89 95 5 Sports & Other Outdoor Pursuits. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 111 6 Seeing the Sights . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 114 7 Shopping . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 115 8 Aruba After Dark . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 116 119 5 Sports & Other Outdoor Pursuits. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 139 6 Seeing the Sights . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 141 7 Shopping . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 147 8 Barbados After Dark. . . . . . . . . . . . . 149 152 4 Bonaire’s Beaches . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 161 5 Diving & Snorkeling . . . . . . . . . . . . 162 6 Sports & Other Outdoor Pursuits. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 165 7 Exploring the Island . . . . . . . . . . . . . 166 8 Shopping . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 170 9 Bonaire After Dark. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 170 8 THE BRITISH VIRGIN ISLANDS 1 Essentials . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 173 Fast Facts: The British Virgin Islands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .173 2 Tortola . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 176 3 Virgin Gorda . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 185 4 5 6 7 1 Essentials . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 199 Fast Facts: The Cayman Islands . . . .201 2 Grand Cayman . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 202 Into the Deep: Submarine Dives. . . .216 3 Cayman Brac . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 222 4 Little Cayman . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 225 229 251 5 Exploring the Island . . . . . . . . . . . . . 265 6 Shopping . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 266 7 Dominica After Dark . . . . . . . . . . . . 267 12 THE DOMINICAN REPUBLIC 1 Essentials . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 269 Fast Facts: The Dominican Republic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .272 2 La Romana & Altos de Chavón . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 273 3 Punta Cana . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 278 4 5 6 7 268 Puerto Plata . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 282 Sosúa . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 289 Cabarete . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 291 Santo Domingo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 294 CO N T E N T S 5 Sports & Other Outdoor Pursuits. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 242 6 Exploring the Island . . . . . . . . . . . . . 244 7 Shopping . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 248 8 Curaçao After Dark . . . . . . . . . . . . . 249 11 DOMINICA 1 Essentials . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 252 Fast Facts: Dominica. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .254 2 Where to Stay. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 255 3 Where to Dine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 260 4 Sports & Other Outdoor Pursuits. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 262 Jost Van Dyke . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 193 Anegada . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 195 Peter Island . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 196 Guana Island . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 197 199 10 CURAÇAO 1 Essentials . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 230 Fast Facts: Curaçao . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .232 2 Where to Stay. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 233 3 Where to Dine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 237 4 Curaçao’s Beaches. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 240 172 C A R I B B E A N 2010 9 THE CAYMAN ISLANDS v vi 13 GRENADA 1 Essentials . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 305 Fast Facts: Grenada . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .308 2 Where to Stay. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 309 3 Where to Dine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 313 4 Beaches. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 317 305 5 Sports & Other Outdoor Pursuits. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 318 6 Exploring the Island . . . . . . . . . . . . . 319 7 Shopping . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 321 8 Grenada After Dark. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 322 CO N T E N T S C A R I B B E A N 2010 14 GUADELOUPE 1 Essentials . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 325 Fast Facts: Guadeloupe . . . . . . . . . . . .327 2 Pointe-à-Pitre . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 329 3 Le Bas du Fort. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 332 4 Gosier. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 332 5 Ste-Anne. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 334 6 St-François . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 335 7 Pointe des Châteaux . . . . . . . . . . . . 336 324 8 The North Coast of Grande-Terre . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 338 9 Around Basse-Terre . . . . . . . . . . . . . 339 10 Beaches. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 346 1 1 Sports & Other Outdoor Pursuits. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 348 1 2 Guadeloupe After Dark. . . . . . . . . . 350 1 3 Side Trips from Guadeloupe. . . . . 351 15 JAMAICA 1 Essentials . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 358 Fast Facts: Jamaica . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .362 2 Montego Bay . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 364 3 Negril . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 380 4 Ocho Rios . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 390 16 MARTINIQUE 1 Essentials . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 417 Fast Facts: Martinique . . . . . . . . . . . . .421 2 Fort-de-France . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 422 Martinique’s Traditional Dances . . .425 17 PUERTO RICO 1 Essentials . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 445 Fast Facts: Puerto Rico . . . . . . . . . . . . .449 2 San Juan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 450 To the Mountains . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .480 3 The North Coast . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 482 357 5 6 7 8 Runaway Bay. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 401 Port Antonio . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 404 Kingston & Vicinity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 408 The Blue Mountains . . . . . . . . . . . . 414 416 3 Pointe du Bout & Les Trois-Ilets. . . 427 4 The South Loop. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 432 5 The North Loop . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 438 444 4 Fajardo & the East . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 484 El Yunque Tropical Rainforest . . . . . .488 5 Ponce & the Southwest . . . . . . . . . 489 6 Rincon & the Northwest . . . . . . . . 494 18 SABA 1 Essentials . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 499 Fast Facts: Saba. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .501 2 Where to Stay. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 502 3 Where to Dine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 505 19 ST.

F or general inf o on v olunteer tra vel, visit www.volunteer abroad.org and www.idealist.org. still contribute positiv ely to the envir onment. You can offset carbon emissions from your flight in other ways. Choose for wardlooking companies that embrace r esponsible development practices, helping preserve destinations for the futur e b y wor king alongside local people. An incr easing number of sustainable tourism initiativ es can help y ou plan a family trip and leav e as small a “footprint” as possible on the places you visit. See “General Resources for Green Travel,” abo ve, for mor e information on how to travel green. 10 SPECIAL-INTEREST TRIPS offered by Sunventure Tours, 30 Balmoral Ave., Kingston 10, Jamaica, W.I. (& 876/ 960-6685; www .sunventuretours.com). For more information, refer to “ The Blue Mountains,” in chapter 15.

Croix), 762 Stellaris Casino (Aruba), 117 Stingray City (Grand Cayman), 9, 218 Stoney Bay Marine Park (Anguilla), 62 Student travel, 37 Submarine dives Aruba, 114 Barbados, 142 Grand Cayman, 216 St. Thomas, 726 Sulphur Springs (Dominica), 263 Sunbury Plantation House (Barbados), 146 Sun exposure, 35 Sunny Caribbee Herb and Spice Company (Tortola), 184 Sunsail, 48 Sunsail Club Colonna (Antigua), 83 Sunventure Tours, 39, 414 Super-Clubs, 44 Superclubs Ironshore Golf Club (Montego Bay), 376 Superior Producer (Curaçao), 242 Surfing Dominican Republic, 293 Puerto Rico, 497–498 Sustainable tourism, 37–39 Swimming, Dominica, 264 Synagogue (Barbados), 144 Synagogue of Beracha Veshalom Vegmiluth Hasidim (St. Thomas), 728 Taxes and service charges. See specific destinations Teatro Tapía (San Juan), 479 Telephones, 40. See also specific destinations Tennis Anguilla, 63 Antigua, 82–83 Aruba, 112–113 Barbados, 141 best facilities, 13 Dominican Republic Casa de Campo, 276 Puerto Plata, 287 Santo Domingo, 300 Grand Cayman, 219 Grenada, 319 Guadeloupe, 349 Jamaica, Ocho Rios, 397 Montego Bay, 377 Nevis, 564 Puerto Rico, San Juan, 472 St.


Southeast Asia on a Shoestring Travel Guide by Lonely Planet

active transport: walking or cycling, airport security, Alfred Russel Wallace, anti-communist, British Empire, call centre, car-free, carbon footprint, clean water, clockwatching, colonial rule, Google Earth, haute cuisine, indoor plumbing, Kickstarter, large denomination, low cost airline, low cost carrier, Mason jar, megacity, period drama, Skype, South China Sea, spice trade, superstar cities, sustainable-tourism, trade route, urban sprawl, white picket fence, women in the workforce

The kari saik trey (fish coconut curry) and other curries are particularly scrumptious. Information Acleda Bank An ATM located on the road to Phnom Penh. Greenhouse ( 017 905659; www.greenhouse-tour.blogspot.com) Offers internet access and the most comprehensive tour progam around the province. Bunong Place ( 012 474879; www.bunongcenter.org; 6am-6pm) This NGO-run ‘drop-in centre’ for Bunong people is a good source of information on sustainable tourism, village homestays and elephant rides. Sells authentic Bunong textiles and local coffee, sodas and beers are available. Also provides trained Bunong guides for local tours, costing US$15/25 per half/full day, including motorbike. Getting There & Away NH76 to Sen Monorom is now in fantastic shape, including some impressive bridges across the deep river valleys. Rith Mony and Phnom Penh Sorya run morning buses to/from Phnom Penh (US$7.50, eight hours) via Snuol (US$3.75, three hours) and Kompong Cham (US$6.25, five hours).

Miso Walai homestay program (http://misowalaihomestay.com) Gets travellers involved with local wetlands restoration projects. Regional Environmental Awareness Cameron Highlands (Reach; www.reach.org.my) Take part in reforestation and recycling programs in the Cameron Highlands. Sepilok Orang-utan Centre Has one of the best established volunteer centres (Click here). Wild Asia (www.wildasia.net) Options are generally connected with the environment and sustainable tourism in the region. Women Travellers Foreign women travelling in Malaysia can expect some attention, though most of it will just involve stares from locals unfamiliar with (or curious about) Westerners. It helps, and is much more respectful of the culture, if you dress conservatively by wearing long pants or skirts and loose tops that cover the shoulders. Western women are not expected to cover their heads with scarves (outside mosques, that is).

A decade later he returned to coordinate Lonely Planet’s Myanmar guide. The many guides for Lonely Planet Simon has worked on since 1999 include several in Southeast Asia. DANIEL ROBINSON Malaysian Borneo, Brunei Daniel has been writing about Southeast Asia since 1989, when he researched the award-winning first editions of Lonely Planet’s guides to Vietnam and Cambodia. He takes a special interest in tropical rainforest habitats and the role that sustainable tourism can play in their conservation. In Borneo, Daniel is especially fond of tramping through Gunung Gading National Park in search of giant Rafflesia flowers and watching orang-utans cavort in Semenggoh’s jungle canopy. ADAM SKOLNICK Nusa Tenggara, Papua Adam Skolnick writes about travel, culture, health, sports, and the environment for Lonely Planet, Men’s Health, Outside, and Travel & Leisure among others.


pages: 532 words: 155,470

One Less Car: Bicycling and the Politics of Automobility by Zack Furness, Zachary Mooradian Furness

active transport: walking or cycling, affirmative action, American Society of Civil Engineers: Report Card, back-to-the-land, Build a better mousetrap, Burning Man, car-free, carbon footprint, clean water, colonial rule, conceptual framework, dumpster diving, Enrique Peñalosa, European colonialism, feminist movement, ghettoisation, Golden Gate Park, interchangeable parts, intermodal, Internet Archive, Jane Jacobs, Kickstarter, market fundamentalism, means of production, Naomi Klein, New Urbanism, peak oil, place-making, post scarcity, race to the bottom, Ralph Nader, RAND corporation, ride hailing / ride sharing, Ronald Reagan, Silicon Valley, sustainable-tourism, the built environment, The Death and Life of Great American Cities, Thomas L Friedman, Thorstein Veblen, urban planning, Whole Earth Catalog, Whole Earth Review, working poor, Yom Kippur War

The literal dogma of free market capitalism is perhaps best articulated by an executive at Opportunity international (the company formerly run by Eric Thurman, coauthor of A Billion Bootstraps): “Serving the poor is an act of worship. Every time you serve the poor, you express your love for Jesus. If Jesus came today, he would be a microfinance banker” isaac phiri, “From Hand Out to Hand Up,” Christianity Today (October 2007). Emphasis is my own. David Mozer offers an expansive and substantive analysis of bicycling and sustainable tourism in the studies he publishes through the international Bicycle Fund, available at http://www.ibike.org. For more on the problematics of tourism, see John Urry, The Tourist Gaze (london: Sage publications, 2002). “pedals for progress to Hit Milestone,” Pedals for Progress, available at http:// www.p4p.org/pDF/100kcourier.pdf (originally published in Courier News Online, June 23, 2006); “impact,” World Bicycle Relief, available at http://www.worldbicyclerelief.org/ impact/index.php.


pages: 344 words: 161,076

The Rough Guide to Barcelona 8 by Jules Brown, Rough Guides

active transport: walking or cycling, bike sharing scheme, centre right, Frank Gehry, glass ceiling, Guggenheim Bilbao, haute couture, Kickstarter, sustainable-tourism, trade route, urban planning, urban renewal

A few operators offer rather more specialist holidays in and around Barcelona, concentrating on things like art and architecture, cooking classes, wine tours or rural Catalunya. General flight and travel agents 20 North South Travel T01245/608 291, W www .northsouthtravel.co.uk. Competitive travel agency, offering discounted fares worldwide – profits are used to support projects in the developing world, especially the promotion of sustainable tourism. STA Travel Australia T 134 782, Wwww.statravel .com.au; US T 800/781 4040, Wwww.statravel .com; UK T 0871/230 0040, W www.statravel .co.uk. Worldwide specialists in low-cost flights and tours for students and under-26s, though other customers welcome. Also student IDs, travel insurance, car rental and rail passes etc. Trailfinders Australia T 1300/780 212, W www.trailfinders.com.au; Republic of Ireland T 01/677 7888, W www.trailfinders.ie; UK T 0845/058 5858, W www.trailfinders.com.


pages: 311 words: 168,705

The Rough Guide to Vienna by Humphreys, Rob

centre right, ghettoisation, Peace of Westphalia, strikebreaker, sustainable-tourism, trade route, urban sprawl

SNCF-owned information and ticket agent for all European passes and journeys from London. They also have an office at 1 Regent St, London SW1 (Mon–Fri 10am–6pm, Sat 10am–4pm). TrainsEurope T0871/700 7722 (Mon–Fri 9am–5.30pm), Wwww.trainseurope.co.uk. Agent specializing in discounted international rail travel. | Getting there Airlines, Agents and Operators support projects in the developing world, especially the promotion of sustainable tourism. STA Wwww.statravel.com. Worldwide specialists in independent travel; also student IDs, travel insurance, car rental, rail passes, and more. Good discounts for students and under-26s. Trailfinders W www.trailfinders.com. One of the best-informed and most efficient agents for independent travellers. BASICS Once you’ve made it onto the continent, you face something in the region of 1200km of driving.


Barcelona by Damien Simonis

Berlin Wall, call centre, carbon footprint, Fall of the Berlin Wall, feminist movement, Frank Gehry, haute couture, haute cuisine, Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), Kickstarter, land reform, Murano, Venice glass, New Urbanism, North Sea oil, sustainable-tourism, urban planning, urban renewal, urban sprawl

Bike hire is an option but the introduction of a system of bicycles as public transport, the exponential explosion of bike tour companies and the inadequate network of bike lanes can, at times, make getting around by bike frustrating for cyclists, pedestrians and drivers alike! Instead of flying to Barcelona, consider lengthening your trip and travelling there by train. Direct overnight sleepers run from Paris, Geneva and Milan. From London you could start with the Eurostar and spend a day in Paris en route. Catalonia and 40 other European regions (including Tuscany and Provence) are members of a sustainable tourism network aimed at rendering tourism compatible with the environment, local quality of life and maintenance of local traditions. Return to beginning of chapter BACKGROUND * * * HISTORY SIGNS FROM THE DISTANT PAST ROMANS, VISIGOTHS & ISLAM A HAIRY BEGINNING THE COMTES DE BARCELONA MARRIAGE OF CONVENIENCE? MEDITERRANEAN EMPIRE THE RISE OF PARLIAMENT DECLINE & CASTILIAN DOMINATION WAR OF THE SPANISH SUCCESSION A NEW BOOM BARCELONA REBORN MAYHEM THE CIVIL WAR FROM FRANCO TO PUJOL A LEFTWARD LURCH & TUNNEL VISION ARTS ARCHITECTURE PAINTING & SCULPTURE LITERATURE MUSIC CINEMA THEATRE DANCE ENVIRONMENT & PLANNING THE LAND GREEN BARCELONA URBAN PLANNING & DEVELOPMENT GOVERNMENT & POLITICS MEDIA FASHION LANGUAGE TIMELINNE * * * Return to beginning of chapter HISTORY SIGNS FROM THE DISTANT PAST The area around present-day Barcelona was certainly inhabited prior to the arrival of the Romans in Catalonia in 218 BC.


pages: 497 words: 144,283

Connectography: Mapping the Future of Global Civilization by Parag Khanna

"Robert Solow", 1919 Motor Transport Corps convoy, 2013 Report for America's Infrastructure - American Society of Civil Engineers - 19 March 2013, 9 dash line, additive manufacturing, Admiral Zheng, affirmative action, agricultural Revolution, Airbnb, Albert Einstein, amateurs talk tactics, professionals talk logistics, Amazon Mechanical Turk, Asian financial crisis, asset allocation, autonomous vehicles, banking crisis, Basel III, Berlin Wall, bitcoin, Black Swan, blockchain, borderless world, Boycotts of Israel, Branko Milanovic, BRICs, British Empire, business intelligence, call centre, capital controls, charter city, clean water, cloud computing, collateralized debt obligation, commoditize, complexity theory, continuation of politics by other means, corporate governance, corporate social responsibility, credit crunch, crony capitalism, crowdsourcing, cryptocurrency, cuban missile crisis, data is the new oil, David Ricardo: comparative advantage, deglobalization, deindustrialization, dematerialisation, Deng Xiaoping, Detroit bankruptcy, digital map, disruptive innovation, diversification, Doha Development Round, edge city, Edward Snowden, Elon Musk, energy security, Ethereum, ethereum blockchain, European colonialism, eurozone crisis, failed state, Fall of the Berlin Wall, family office, Ferguson, Missouri, financial innovation, financial repression, fixed income, forward guidance, global supply chain, global value chain, global village, Google Earth, Hernando de Soto, high net worth, Hyperloop, ice-free Arctic, if you build it, they will come, illegal immigration, income inequality, income per capita, industrial cluster, industrial robot, informal economy, Infrastructure as a Service, interest rate swap, Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), Internet of things, Isaac Newton, Jane Jacobs, Jaron Lanier, John von Neumann, Julian Assange, Just-in-time delivery, Kevin Kelly, Khyber Pass, Kibera, Kickstarter, LNG terminal, low cost airline, low cost carrier, low earth orbit, manufacturing employment, mass affluent, mass immigration, megacity, Mercator projection, Metcalfe’s law, microcredit, mittelstand, Monroe Doctrine, mutually assured destruction, New Economic Geography, new economy, New Urbanism, off grid, offshore financial centre, oil rush, oil shale / tar sands, oil shock, openstreetmap, out of africa, Panamax, Parag Khanna, Peace of Westphalia, peak oil, Pearl River Delta, Peter Thiel, Philip Mirowski, plutocrats, Plutocrats, post-oil, post-Panamax, private military company, purchasing power parity, QWERTY keyboard, race to the bottom, Rana Plaza, rent-seeking, reserve currency, Robert Gordon, Robert Shiller, Robert Shiller, Ronald Coase, Scramble for Africa, Second Machine Age, sharing economy, Shenzhen was a fishing village, Silicon Valley, Silicon Valley startup, six sigma, Skype, smart cities, Smart Cities: Big Data, Civic Hackers, and the Quest for a New Utopia, South China Sea, South Sea Bubble, sovereign wealth fund, special economic zone, spice trade, Stuxnet, supply-chain management, sustainable-tourism, TaskRabbit, telepresence, the built environment, The inhabitant of London could order by telephone, sipping his morning tea in bed, the various products of the whole earth, Tim Cook: Apple, trade route, transaction costs, UNCLOS, uranium enrichment, urban planning, urban sprawl, WikiLeaks, young professional, zero day

Chinese will pay up to $24,000 for a sturdy white tusk, even if it is only used to make fancy chopsticks. The Lord’s Resistance Army has poached dozens of elephants in eastern Congo to fund its guerrilla campaign against the Ugandan government. Where the government barely protects humans, let alone animals, only outside-funded programs such as Poachers to Protectors in Odzala National Park can compel hunters into training programs within the more sustainable tourism industry. In Somalia, armadas of warships and private flotillas won’t stop piracy attacks on oil and cargo tankers, while basic fishing boats would help Somali fishermen return to a more legitimate economy. Bringing better supply chains to people is the only way to prevent them from being exploited by worse ones. GETTING BEYOND CORRUPTION? The world is awash not only in cheap capital but also in crony capital as trillions of dollars of wealth seeking safe havens from government crackdowns are laundered into real estate and other assets from New York and London to Dubai and Singapore.


The Rough Guide to Brussels 4 (Rough Guide Travel Guides) by Dunford, Martin.; Lee, Phil; Summer, Suzy.; Dal Molin, Loik

Berlin Wall, bike sharing scheme, British Empire, car-free, Fall of the Berlin Wall, glass ceiling, low cost airline, Peace of Westphalia, sustainable-tourism, trade route, urban planning

VLM Airlines (Vlaamse Luchttransportmaatschappij; Flemish Airlines) UK T0871/666 5050, W www.flyvlm.com. Travel agents ebookers UK T0871/223 5000, Republic of Ireland T01/431 1311; Wwww.ebookers.com. Low fares on an extensive selection of scheduled flights and package deals. North South Travel UK T 01245/608 291, W www.northsouthtravel.co.uk. Friendly travel agency offering discounted fares worldwide. Profits are used to support projects in the developing world, especially the promotion of sustainable tourism. Trailfinders UK T0845/058 5858, Republic of Ireland T01/677 7888; Wwww.trailfinders.com. One of the best-informed and most efficient agents for independent travellers. STA Travel US T1-800/781-4040, UK T0871/2300 040, Australia T134 782, NZ T0800/474 400, SA T0861/781 781; Wwww .statravel.com. Worldwide specialists in independent travel; also student IDs, travel insurance, car rental, rail passes and more.


pages: 505 words: 147,916

Adventures in the Anthropocene: A Journey to the Heart of the Planet We Made by Gaia Vince

3D printing, agricultural Revolution, bank run, car-free, carbon footprint, citizen journalism, clean water, congestion charging, crowdsourcing, decarbonisation, deindustrialization, energy security, failed state, Google Earth, Haber-Bosch Process, hive mind, informal economy, Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), Kickstarter, load shedding, M-Pesa, Mars Rover, Masdar, megacity, mobile money, off grid, oil shale / tar sands, out of africa, Peter Thiel, phenotype, planetary scale, Ray Kurzweil, Silicon Valley, Skype, smart cities, smart grid, smart meter, South China Sea, sovereign wealth fund, stem cell, supervolcano, sustainable-tourism

It was out of this work that Rosa first conceived a plan for a large national park, around her home in the Amazon, to protect one of the world’s most diverse areas of forestry. The range she chose included high Andean glaciers, cloud forest, dry forest, pampas and rainforest, hosting more than 1,000 species. It was also home to 1,700 indigenous people, and Rosa planned to create the park with their full support and participation. Part of her plan was to set up a sustainable tourism business that would provide livelihoods for the park’s tribes and encourage the protection of its wildlife. Local people were sceptical – logging companies promised them schools, roads and money in return for mahogany and forest clearance. However, over time, it became apparent that the companies’ promises were not being met – the loggers were stripping and burning the forest, shooting the wildlife, and their roads allowed incursion by others who also exploited the place.


pages: 641 words: 147,719

The Rough Guide to Cape Town, Winelands & Garden Route by Rough Guides, James Bembridge, Barbara McCrea

affirmative action, Airbnb, blood diamonds, British Empire, Cape to Cairo, carbon footprint, colonial rule, F. W. de Klerk, ghettoisation, haute cuisine, Maui Hawaii, Murano, Venice glass, Nelson Mandela, out of africa, ride hailing / ride sharing, Robert Gordon, Skype, sustainable-tourism, trade route, transfer pricing, young professional

Flexible package itineraries, including tailor-made tours, self-drive holidays and escorted small-group excursions, with a nine-night trip covering the classic sights around Cape Town. Good ideas for families too. North South Travel UK 01245 608 291, northsouthtravel.co.uk. Discounted fares worldwide. Profits are used to support projects in the developing world, especially the promotion of sustainable tourism. Okavango Tours and Safaris UK 07721 387 738, okavango.com. Top-notch outfit with on-the-ground knowledge of sub-Saharan Africa, offering fully flexible and individual tours across the country, including the Western Cape and family-focused packages. On the Go Tours UK 020 7371 1113, US 1866 377 6147; onthegotours.com. Group and tailor-made tours to South Africa including a two-week overland safari from Cape Town to Namibia.


Frommer's San Diego 2011 by Mark Hiss

airport security, California gold rush, car-free, Charles Lindbergh, desegregation, Donald Trump, East Village, El Camino Real, glass ceiling, New Journalism, Norman Mailer, Skype, South of Market, San Francisco, sustainable-tourism, transcontinental railway, urban renewal, white picket fence, Works Progress Administration

See also Walking tours animal parks, 129–134 Balboa Park, 138–146, 159–162 beaches, 134–138 Coronado, 157, 160 for kids, 160–162 La Jolla, 153–157, 160, 163 Mission Bay and the Beaches, 152–153 Old Town & Mission Valley, 149–153, 159 special-interest, 162–165 Silver Strand, 135 Singles Travel International, 45 Single travelers, 45 Skating, 178 Skysurfer Balloon Company, 169–170 Smoking, 293 Snorkeling, 178 Society for Accessible Travel & Hospitality, 41 Softball, 180 Solana Beach, 244–251 Soledad, Mount, 154 Soul of America, 45 South Carlsbad State Beach, 247 Southern California CityPass, 133 South Park, 57 Spanish Village Art Center, 205, 216–217 Spectator sports, 16, 180–182 San Diego Hall of Champions Sports Museum, 143–144 Tijuana, 279 Spencer-Ogden Building, 186 Spreckels Organ Pavilion, 145, 159, 203 Spreckels Theatre, 229 Sprinter rail service, 33 Starlight Theatre, 235–236 Starlite, 232 STA Travel, 45 Stay-for-the-Day pass, 140 Stingaree, 231 Street maps, 31–32 Street Scene, 21 Stuart Collection, 156 Student travel, 45 Summer Organ Festival, 20 Sunny Jim Cave, 215 SuperShuttle, 27, 41 Surfing, 178–179 competitions, 21 Oceanside, 252, 253 Sushi Performance & Visual Art, 223–224 Sustainable tourism, 46–47 Swami's Beach (Encinitas), 138, 246–247 Swimming, 179 Sycuan Resort & Casino, 175, 235 T Taboo Studio, 217 Tasende Gallery, 217 Tauck World Discovery, 49 Taxes, 293 Taxis, 35 airport, 27 Telephones, 49–50 Television, 15 Temecula, 258–259 wineries in, 165 Temecula Balloon & Wine Festival, 170 Temperatures, average, 18 Tennis, 179–180 Theater, 16, 224–226 The 3rd Corner, 222 Thomas Guide, 32 Thornton Winery, 258–259 Thoroughbred Racing Season, 21 Tide pools, 134 TIES (The International Ecotourism Society), 47 Tijuana, 271–284 exploring, 276–277 getting around, 274 nightlife, 283–284 shopping, 277–278 traveling to, 271–274 visitor information, 275–276 Time zone, 293 Timken Museum of Art, 145 Tipping, 293–294 The Tipsy Crow, 231–232 Top of the Hyatt, 194, 232 Top of the Park, 234 Toreo de Tijuana, 279 Torrey Pines Beach, 137–138 Torrey Pines Gliderport, 175–176 Torrey Pines Golf Course, 154, 175 Torrey Pines State Beach, 238 Torrey Pines State Reserve, 156–157, 171 nature walks, 168 Tourism Concern (U.K.), 47 Tourism for All (U.K.), 41 Tourmaline Surfing Park, 136 Tours, organized, 165–169 Toys, 221 Train travel, 33 to San Diego, 27–28 Transit information, 35, 36, 294 Transit Store, 27, 32, 33 discounted fares for disabled travelers, 41 Transportation, 32–36 Travel accessories, 221–222 TravelChums, 45 Travel CUTS, 45 Traveler's checks, 38 Traveler's Depot, 222 Travelex, 26 Travel Health Online, 39 Trolleys, 33–35 Tuna Harbor, 193 Turf Supper Club, 232–233 Turtle Lagoon, 158 U UCSD Medical Center-Hillcrest, 39 UCSD Thornton Hospital, 39 Unconditional Surrender Statue, 193 United Express, 26 United Nations Building, 141, 203 University of California, San Diego (UCSD), 153–154 University Towne Center (UTC), 220 The UPS Store, 49 Uptown.


The Rough Guide to Jerusalem by Daniel Jacobs

centre right, en.wikipedia.org, facts on the ground, Frank Gehry, haute cuisine, Khartoum Gordon, low cost airline, Skype, sustainable-tourism, trade route, urban planning, Wall-E

Longwood Holidays UK t020/8418 2500, w www.longwoodholidays.co.uk. Middle East specialists offering Jerusalem city breaks. North South Travel UK t 01245/608 291, w www.northsouthtravel.co.uk. Friendly, 01 Jerusalem Basics 17-44.indd 22 competitive travel agency, offering discounted fares worldwide. Profits are used to support projects in the developing world, especially the promotion of sustainable tourism. STA Travel UK t0871/230 0040, wwww .statravel.co.uk, US t1-800/781-4040, wwww .statravel.com, Australia t134 STA, wwww .statravel.com.au, New Zealand t0800/474400, wwww.statravel.co.nz, South Africa t0861/781 781, wwww.statravel.co.za. Specialists in independent travel; also student IDs, travel insurance, and more. Good discounts for students and under-26s. Superstar Holidays UK t020/7121 1500, w www.superstar.co.uk.


pages: 603 words: 182,781

Aerotropolis by John D. Kasarda, Greg Lindsay

3D printing, air freight, airline deregulation, airport security, Akira Okazaki, Asian financial crisis, back-to-the-land, barriers to entry, Berlin Wall, big-box store, blood diamonds, borderless world, Boris Johnson, British Empire, business cycle, call centre, carbon footprint, Cesare Marchetti: Marchetti’s constant, Charles Lindbergh, Clayton Christensen, cleantech, cognitive dissonance, commoditize, conceptual framework, credit crunch, David Brooks, David Ricardo: comparative advantage, Deng Xiaoping, deskilling, digital map, disruptive innovation, edge city, Edward Glaeser, failed state, food miles, Ford paid five dollars a day, Frank Gehry, fudge factor, full employment, future of work, Geoffrey West, Santa Fe Institute, George Gilder, global supply chain, global village, gravity well, Haber-Bosch Process, Hernando de Soto, hive mind, if you build it, they will come, illegal immigration, inflight wifi, intangible asset, interchangeable parts, Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), intermodal, invention of the telephone, inventory management, invisible hand, Jane Jacobs, Jeff Bezos, Joan Didion, Kangaroo Route, Kickstarter, knowledge worker, kremlinology, low cost airline, Marchetti’s constant, Marshall McLuhan, Masdar, mass immigration, McMansion, megacity, Menlo Park, microcredit, Network effects, New Economic Geography, new economy, New Urbanism, oil shale / tar sands, oil shock, peak oil, Pearl River Delta, Peter Calthorpe, Peter Thiel, pets.com, pink-collar, pre–internet, RFID, Richard Florida, Ronald Coase, Ronald Reagan, Rubik’s Cube, savings glut, Seaside, Florida, Shenzhen was a fishing village, Silicon Valley, Silicon Valley startup, Skype, smart cities, smart grid, South China Sea, South Sea Bubble, sovereign wealth fund, special economic zone, spice trade, spinning jenny, starchitect, stem cell, Steve Jobs, supply-chain management, sustainable-tourism, telepresence, the built environment, The Chicago School, The Death and Life of Great American Cities, The Nature of the Firm, thinkpad, Thomas L Friedman, Thomas Malthus, Tony Hsieh, trade route, transcontinental railway, transit-oriented development, traveling salesman, trickle-down economics, upwardly mobile, urban planning, urban renewal, urban sprawl, walkable city, white flight, white picket fence, Yogi Berra, zero-sum game

But don’t dismiss the aerotropolis just yet. In its ability to redraw the map, aviation possesses the power to sketch a more prosperous world. Even if there were no clean, renewable substitutes for jet fuel on the horizon, it would still be necessary to rearrange the rest of our overheating civilization to save it. Flying’s Inconvenient Truths In 2007, the Travel Foundation, a British nonprofit promoting sustainable tourism, asked a thousand Britons, “From what you have read and heard, roughly what percentage of carbon dioxide emissions do you believe are due to aircraft?” The percentage in question was the global total, a figure including everything from China’s coalfired power plants (where a new one is opening every week) to Mumbai’s surging traffic jams, to the hungover sprawl of our housing bubble. Put another way, how did binge flying’s sins stack up against the rest?


The Rough Guide to Jamaica by Thomas, Polly,Henzell, Laura.,Coates, Rob.,Vaitilingam, Adam.

buttonwood tree, call centre, centre right, colonial rule, computer age, ghettoisation, jitney, Kickstarter, post-work, Ronald Reagan, Saturday Night Live, sustainable-tourism, trade route

Newmont Travel UK T 020/8920 1155, Wwww .newmont.co.uk. Caribbean flight specialist that’s been around for years and offers some excellent deals; worth trying before any others. North South Travel UK T 01245/608 291, Wwww.northsouthtravel.co.uk. Friendly, competitive travel agency, offering discounted fares worldwide. Profits are used to support projects in the developing world, especially the promotion of sustainable tourism. Sackville Travel UK T 020/7274 2242, Wwww .sackvilletravel.com. Caribbean specialists offering cheap charter and scheduled fares. Simply Jamaica T 876/802 2023, Wwww .seejamaicacheaply.com. Jamaica-based agent representing an excellent selection of hotels and guesthouses islandwide. Spring Break Travel US T1-800/678-6386, Wwww.springbreaktravel.com. Large tour company specializing exclusively in Spring Break packages.


pages: 416 words: 204,183

The Rough Guide to Florence & the Best of Tuscany by Tim Jepson, Jonathan Buckley, Rough Guides

air freight, Bonfire of the Vanities, car-free, housing crisis, land reform, Nelson Mandela, plutocrats, Plutocrats, sustainable-tourism, trade route, upwardly mobile, urban planning

One of the best operators in the sector: imaginative art, music and cultural tours ranging from three to twelve nights, including Piero della Francesca, Florence & Siena and Florence Revisited (lesserknown sights and private palaces). North South Travel UK Wwww.northsouthtravel .co.uk. Friendly, competitive travel agency, offering discounted fares worldwide. Profits are used to support projects in the developing world, especially the promotion of sustainable tourism. STA Travel UK W www.statravel.co.uk, US W www.statravel.com, Australia W www.statravel .com.au, W www.statravel.co.nz. Worldwide specialists in low-cost flights and tours for students and under-26s, though other customers welcome. Also offers student IDs, travel insurance, car rental, rail passes and more. Sunvil Holidays UK Wwww.sunvil.co.uk. City breaks and hotel and villa packages, but especially strong on tailor-made fly-drive packages in three- to five-star hotels.


Bali & Lombok Travel Guide by Lonely Planet

Airbnb, car-free, carbon footprint, clean water, first-past-the-post, Kickstarter, land reform, Mahatma Gandhi, Mikhail Gorbachev, Nelson Mandela, Skype, spice trade, sustainable-tourism

Guru RatnaGUESTHOUSE ( MAP GOOGLE MAP ; %0813 3719 4398; www.guru-ratna.com; r 175,000-350,000Rp; W) The cheapest place in the village has seven comfortable hot-water rooms (some share bathrooms). The best rooms have some style, carved wood details, nice porches and are in a colonial Dutch house. oPuri Lumbung CottagesGUESTHOUSE ( MAP GOOGLE MAP ; %0362-701 2887, 0812 383 6891; www.purilumbung.com; cottages US$80-160; iW)S Founded by Nyoman Bagiarta to develop sustainable tourism, this lovely hotel has 43 bright two-storey cottages and rooms set among rice fields. Enjoy intoxicating views (units 32 to 35 have the best) down to the coast from the upstairs balconies. Dozens of trekking options and courses are offered. The hotel's restaurant, Warung Kopi Bali (mains 45,000Rp to 85,000Rp), is sponsored by a Swiss cooking school. The hotel is on the right-hand side of the road coming from Bedugul, 700m before Munduk.


Nepal Travel Guide by Lonely Planet

call centre, carbon footprint, clean water, happiness index / gross national happiness, illegal immigration, Kickstarter, land reform, load shedding, Mahatma Gandhi, mass immigration, Skype, sustainable-tourism, trade route, traffic fines

Tiger Mountain Pokhara Lodge Hotel $$$ Offline map Google map ( 691887, in Kathmandu 01-4361500; www.tigermountainpokhara.com; cottages per person US$250; ) This lodge is set on a lofty ridge about 10km east of Pokhara, and the owners have made a real effort to make it blend into the surroundings. Rooms are contained in stylish stone bungalows and there’s an amazing mountain-view swimming pool. Rates include meals and transfers to/from Pokhara. Tiger Mountain prides itself on its sustainable tourism, such as growing its own produce and minimising imported goods. Fulbari Resort Luxury Hotel $$$ Offline map Google map ( 523451; www.fulbari.com; r from US$175, ste from US$400; ) Dramatically sited on the bank of the Seti River Gorge south of Pokhara, the Fulbari is a vast, five-star resort hotel. It’s far enough from town for uninterrupted mountain views, and beyond the stunning lobby you’ll find every conceivable luxury, including a huge pool, health spa, tennis courts and golf club.


pages: 388 words: 211,314

Frommer's Washington State by Karl Samson

airport security, British Empire, California gold rush, centre right, Frank Gehry, glass ceiling, global village, place-making, sustainable-tourism, Tacoma Narrows Bridge, transcontinental railway, white picket fence

See also specific neighborhoods accommodations, 67–88 eco-friendly, 39 average temperature and days of rain, 27 car travel and rentals, 66–67 doctors and dentists, 149 downtown, 62 accommodations, 71–77 nightlife, 142–145 restaurants, 90–91 emergencies, 149 excursions from, 147–148 finding an address, 61 gay and lesbian scene, 146–147 getting around, 65–67 hospitals, 149 Internet access, 149 layout of, 61 main arteries and streets, 61, 62 maps, 62 neighborhoods attractions, 117–121 in brief, 62, 64–65 newspapers and magazines, 149 nightlife, 139–147 orientation, 59–62 outdoor pursuits, 128–130 parking, 67 pharmacies, 149 police, 149 restaurants, 88–109 eco-friendly, 39 restrooms, 149 safety, 149 shopping, 131–139 sights and attractions, 109–128 for kids, 124 organized tours, 125–128 saving money on sightseeing, 110 spectator sports, 130 street maps, 61–62 taxes, 149 taxis, 67 transit info, 150 visitor information, 60 walking in, 67 the waterfront, 62 accommodations, 70–71 nightlife, 144 restaurants, 89 shopping, 132 sights and attractions, 109–112 weather, 150 Seattle Antique Market (Seattle), 133 Seattle Aquarium, 112 Seattle Art Museum (SAM), 114 Seattle Asian Art Museum, 118 Seattle by Foot, 125 370 16_607510-bindex.indd 37016_607510-bindex.indd 370 9/28/10 8:50 PM9/28/10 8:50 PM Smith Tower (Seattle), 116 Smoking, 360 Snohomish, 132–133 Snoqualmie, 301 Snoqualmie Falls, 300–301 Snoqualmie Pass route, 300–304 Snoqualmie Valley, 300–301 Snoqualmie Valley Railroad, 301 Snoqualmie Vineyards (Prosser), 329 Snow Creek Wall, 296 Snow Lake, 306 Snowshoe walks, 240 Paradise, 307 Soap Lake, 357 Sol Duc Falls, 238 Sol Duc Hot Springs, 238 Sorensen Cellars (near Port Townsend), 227 Sound Lounge (Seattle), 144 South Beach, 258 restaurants, 261–262 South Bend, 260 South Seattle, attractions, 120 Southwest Washington, 47, 255–270 South Whidbey Historical Museum (Whidbey Island), 154 South Whidbey State Park, 155 Souvenir (Seattle), 133 Space Needle (Seattle), 116, 124 The Spanish Table (Seattle), 137 Spencer Spit State Park, 182 The Spit (Lopez), 182 Spokane, 347–355 wine touring, 350–352 Spokane Falls SkyRide, 349 Spokane House Interpretive Site, 352 Spokane Lilac Festival, 28, 348 Spokane River Centennial Trail, 352 Spray Park, 306 Spring Barrel Tasting (Yakima Valley), 28, 325 Spring Release Weekend (Walla Walla), 336 Spring Street Landing Aquarium (San Juan Island), 166 Spring Valley Vineyard (Walla Walla), 338 Spruce Nature Trail, 248 Spruce Railroad Trail, 238 Staircase Trail, 253 State Capital Museum & Outreach Center (Olympia), 217 Stehekin, 286 accommodations, 289–290 restaurants, 291 Steinbrueck Native Gallery (Seattle), 134 Steppe Cellars (Sunnyside), 327 Steptoe Butte State Park, 346 Stevens Pass, 297 Stonehenge Monument, 317 Stonington Gallery (Seattle), 134–135 Stormking, 306 Storm King, Mount, 238 Summer Concerts at the Chateau (Woodinville), 142 Summerland Trail, 306 The Summit at Snoqualmie, 302 Summit Nordic Center (Snoqualmie Pass area), 302 Sun Lakes-Dry Falls State Park, 356 Sunnyside, 327 restaurants, 334 Sunrise, 305, 306 Sunrise Visitor Center, 305 Sunset Beach (Anacortes), 160 Suquamish, 203 Suquamish Clearwater Casino Resort, 203 Suquamish Museum, 203 Sustainable tourism, 39–40 Swell City, 318 The Swiss (Tacoma), 215 Syncline (near Lyle), 316 Syzygy (Walla Walla), 339 GENERAL INDEX Seattle Center accommodations, 79–83 attractions, 114–116 entertainment, 139 for kids, 124 performing arts, 140 restaurants, 96 Seattle Children's Theatre, 124 Seattle Duck Tours, 126 Seattle Food Tours, 125 Seattle International Film Festival, 28 Seattle Maritime Festival, 28 Seattle Monorail, 65–66 Seattle Opera, 140 Seattle Repertory Theatre, 140 Seattle Seahawks, 131 Seattle Seaplanes, 128 Seattle Storm, 130 Seattle Streetcar, 65 Seattle Super Saver, 70 Seattle Symphony, 140 Seattle-Tacoma International Airport, 32, 59–60 Seattle Times, 140 Seattle Walking Tours, 125 Seattle Weekly, 140 Second Beach, 247 Senior travel, 38–39 Sequim, 231–235 Sequim Irrigation Festival, 28 Sequim Lavender Festival, 29 Seven Hills Winery (Walla Walla), 338 Seward Park (Seattle), 129 Shafer Museum (Winthrop), 281 Shark Reef Sanctuary, 183 Shaw Island, 185 Shepherd's Croft, 167 Showbox at the Market (Seattle), 143 Si, Mount, 301–302 Sierra Club Outings Department, 42 Silvara Vineyards (near Leavenworth), 293–294 Silver Lake at Roza Hills (Zillah), 327 Silver Lake Winery (Woodinville), 148 Six Seven Lounge (Seattle), 144 Skagit County Historical Museum (La Conner), 187 Skagit River Interpretive Center (Rockport), 275 Skagit Valley, 186 Skagit Valley Tulip Festival (La Conner), 28, 186 Ski Bluewood (near Dayton), 346 Skiing.


pages: 420 words: 219,075

Frommer's New Mexico by Lesley S. King

Albert Einstein, clean water, El Camino Real, place-making, post-work, Ronald Reagan, sustainable-tourism, trade route, X Prize

See Cross-country skiing; Downhill skiing Skip Maisel's (Albuquerque), 104 Ski Santa Fe, 169–170 Sky City Cultural Center and Pueblo of Acoma, 249 Slaughter Canyon Cave, 383 Smokey Bear Historical Park, 370 Smoking, 388 Snowboarding, 73 Snow Lake, 307 Snowmobiling, Taos, 234 Socorro, 309–313 Soda Dam, 116 Solano's Boot & Western Wear (Raton), 296 Sombria (Santa Fe), 174 Sonoma Ranch Golf Course (Las Cruces), 308 South Broadway Cultural Center (Albuquerque), 107 Southeastern New Mexico, 57, 349–385 outdoor activities, 349–352 Southeastern region, hiking, 71 Southwest Chief, 46, 76 Southwestern New Mexico, 57, 305–348 outdoor activities, 306–308 Southwestern region, hiking, 71 Southwest Film Center (Albuquerque), 109 Southwest Nordic Center, 248–249 Southwest Safaris (Santa Fe), 166 Southwest Seminars, 52 Southwest Spanish Craftsmen (Santa Fe), 175 Spaceport America (near Las Cruces), 25, 315 Spanish Market (Santa Fe), 38 Spas Albuquerque, 102 Ruidoso, 361 Santa Fe, 169 Taos, 234 Truth or Consequences, 316 Spencer Theater for the Performing Arts (near Ruidoso), 361–362 Springer, 297 Spring River Park and Zoo (Roswell), 373 Stahmann Farms (near Las Cruces), 328 Stahmann's Country Store (near Las Cruces), 328 Stahmann's on the Plaza (Las Cruces), 324 Stephen Kilborn Pottery (Taos), 238 Steppin' Out (Ruidoso), 360 Stone Forest (Santa Fe), 177 Stone Lake Fiesta (Jicarilla Apache Reservation), 40, 278 Storrie Lake State Park, 286, 291 Storytellers and the Southwest: A Literary Walking Tour (Santa Fe), 165 Strictly Southwestern (Albuquerque), 106 Sugarite Canyon State Park, 286, 297 Summer Outdoor Theater (Farmington), 278 Summer Solstice (Española), 197 Sumner Lake State Park, 376 Sun exposure, 48 Sunland Park Racetrack and Casino, 326 Sunport Shuttle, 43 Albuquerque, 76 Sunset dances, Gallup, 260 Sunset Unlimited, 46 Sustainable tourism, 51–52 Swimming Farmington, 273 Navajo Lake State Park, 249 northeastern New Mexico, 287 Santa Fe, 170 southwestern New Mexico, 308 Taos, 234 Swimming pools, Larry R. Walkup Aquatic Center (Los Alamos), 190 T Tanner Chaney Galleries (Albuquerque), 104 Taos, 200–244 accommodations, 205–213 area code, 203 arriving in, 201 business hours, 203 climate, 203 currency exchange, 203–204 dentists, 204 doctors, 204 emergencies, 204 getting around, 202–203 hospital, 204 hot lines, 204 Internet access, 204 layout of, 202 library, 204 lost property, 204 maps, 202 newspapers and magazines, 204 nightlife, 238–239 organized tours, 226 outdoor activities, 229–234 skiing, 226–229 parking, 202 pharmacies, 204 police, 204 post offices, 204 radio stations, 204 restaurants, 213–220 road conditions, 204 shopping, 234–238 sights and attractions, 220–226 taxes, 204–205 television, 205 time zone, 205 visitor information, 202 Taos Artisans Cooperative Gallery, 236 Taos Art Museum, 222 Three Rivers Petroglyph National Recreation Area, 371 Three Rivers Tap & Game Room (Farmington), 278 Ticketmaster Albuquerque, 107 Santa Fe, 177 Tierra Amarilla, 282 Tierra Wools (Los Ojos), 282 Time zones, 388 Tingley Beach (Albuquerque), 100 Tinkertown Museum (Sandia Crest), 119 Tipping, 388–389 Toilets, 389 Tombaugh, Clyde, 25 Tome on the Range (Las Vegas), 289 Torchlight Procession (Taos Ski Valley), 41 Towa Golf Resort (near Santa Fe), 167 Towa Golf Resort (Pojoaque Pueblo), 100 Towayalane, 263 Town of Taos Visitor Center, 202 Toy Train Depot (Alamogordo), 353–354 Trains and railways, 44, 46 Albuquerque, 76 Cumbres & Toltec Scenic Railroad, 279–280 Las Cruces Railroad Museum, 325 Las Vegas railroad district, 288 Mission Santa Fe Depot (Raton), 296 Santa Fe, 123–124 Santa Fe Railroad Depot (Gallup), 258 Santa Fe Southern Railway, 162–163 Transportation, 51 Traveling to New Mexico, 43–45 Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo, 22 Tresa Vorenberg Goldsmiths (Santa Fe), 176 Tri-Cultural Art Festival (Española), 197 Trinity Site (Alamogordo), 354 Truchas, 194–195 Trujillo Weaving Shop (Chimayo), 192–193 Truth or Consequences, 314–321 Truth or Consequences & Sierra County Chamber of Commerce, 315 Truth or Consequences Fiesta, 315 Truth or Consequences Golf Course, 308 Truth or Consequences Municipal Airport, 315 Tsankawi section (Bandelier National Monument), 191 Tucumcari, 301–303 Tucumcari Historical Museum, 301 Tucumcari Municipal Airport, 301 Tucumcari Municipal Golf Course, 286 Tucumcari-Quay County Chamber of Commerce, 301 Tularosa Vineyards, 371 Tumbleweeds (quarterly), 50 The Turquoise Trail, 118–121 Turquoise Village (Zuni Pueblo), 264 Turtle dance San Juan Pueblo, 186 Taos Pueblo, 224 Twin Heart Express & Transportation, 45 Twin Warriors Golf Club (near Albuquerque), 51 Twirl (Taos), 236 INDEX Taos Art School, 53 Taos Blue, 236 Taos Box, 233 Taos Center for the Arts (TCA), 238 Taos Chamber of Commerce, 205 Taos Community Auditorium, 238 Taos Convention Center, 238 Taos County Chamber of Commerce, 202, 238 Taos Drum Company, 237–238 Taos Fair, 200 Taos Fall Arts Festival, 40 Taos Historic Museums, 222–223 Taos Historic Walking Tours, 226 Taos Indian Horse Ranch, 72, 232 Taos Mountain Casino, 224 Taos Mountain Outfitters, 229, 232 Taos Pilates Studio, 231 Taos Public Library, 204 Taos Pueblo, 28, 223–224 Taos Pueblo Powwow, 38, 224 Taos Regional Airport, 201 Taos School of Music, 239 Taos Ski Valley, 227 accommodations, 211–213 Taos Ski Valley Sportswear, Ski & Boot Co., 226 Taos Society of Artists, 26, 200 Taos Solar Music Festival, 37 Taos Spa and Tennis Club, 231, 234 Taos Spring Arts Festival, 36–37 Taos Swimming Pool, 234 Taos Trade Fair, 39, 223 Taos Youth Family Center, 233–234 Tapetes de Lana & The Traveler's Café (Las Vegas), 289 Tapetes de Lana (Mora), 289 Taste of Santa Fe, 38 Tauck World Discovery, 54 Taxes, 388 Taxis, Albuquerque, 78 Taylor Streit Flyfishing Service (Taos), 231 Telephones, 54–55 Temperatures, 35 Tennis, 74 Albuquerque, 102 Santa Fe, 170 Taos, 234 Ten Thousand Waves (near Santa Fe), 169 Tesuque Flea Market (Santa Fe), 176 Tesuque Pueblo, 182–184 Theater Albuquerque, 108 Las Cruces, 327 Santa Fe, 179 Theater Grottesco (Santa Fe), 179 Theaterwork Studio (Santa Fe), 179 U UFO Festival, 37 UFO Festival (Roswell), 372 Ultimed (Santa Fe), 127 University of New Mexico Championship Golf Course (Albuquerque), 70 University of New Mexico Hospital (Albuquerque), 79 University of New Mexico Lobos (Albuquerque), 102 USA Rail Pass, 46 Ute Lake State Park, 302 V Valles Caldera National Preserve, 192 Valle Vidal, 242 Valle Vidal Recreation Area, 229, 294 Valley of Fires Recreation Area, 371 Val Verde Hotel (Socorro), 309 Vanessie of Santa Fe, 182 Vargas, Diego de, 21 Velarde, 196 Very Large Array National Radio Astronomy Observatory (VLA), 311 Victorio Hotel (Kingston), 318 Victory Alpaca Ranch (Mora), 290–291 Vietnam Veterans Memorial State Park, 243 Villanueva, 291 Villanueva State Park, 291 Vintage Wines (Mesilla), 327 Visas, 42, 389 Visa Waiver Program (VWP), 42 Visitor information, 389 Visit USA, 45 VLA (Very Large Array National Radio Astronomy Observatory), 311 Volunteer travel, 52, 53 Vortex Theatre (Albuquerque), 108 403 INDEX W 404 Walatowa Visitor Center (Jemez Pueblo), 115 Walking tours, Santa Fe, 165 War Dancer Designs & Gallery (Las Vegas), 289 War Eagles Air Museum (Santa Teresa Airport), 328–329 Water, 51 drinking, 389 Water Canyon, 307 Waterfall Dances (Nambe Pueblo), 185 Watersports, 73–74 Weather, 35, 48 Weaving (textiles).


The Rough Guide to Norway by Phil Lee

banking crisis, bike sharing scheme, car-free, centre right, glass ceiling, Nelson Mandela, North Sea oil, out of africa, place-making, sensible shoes, sustainable-tourism, trade route, walkable city, white picket fence

Inntravel UK 01653 617 001, inntravel.co.uk. Outdoor holidays in Norway including skiing, walking, dog-sledging, fjord cruises, and whale- and reindeer-watching. North South Travel UK 01245 608 291, northsouthtravel.co.uk. Friendly, competitive travel agency, offering discounted fares worldwide. Profits are used to support projects in the developing world, especially the promotion of sustainable tourism. Saddle Skedaddle UK 0191 265 1110, skedaddle.co.uk. Highly recommended company organizing a couple of cycling tours of Norway each year, usually one to the Lofoten islands and another round the western fjords. Scandinavian America World Tours US 1 800 545 2204, scandinaviantravel.com. Scandinavian specialist offering an extensive programme of group and individual tours and cruises within Norway.


Frommer's California 2009 by Matthew Poole, Harry Basch, Mark Hiss, Erika Lenkert

airport security, Asilomar, Bay Area Rapid Transit, California gold rush, call centre, car-free, Charles Lindbergh, clean water, Columbine, Donald Trump, Donner party, East Village, El Camino Real, European colonialism, Frank Gehry, Golden Gate Park, Haight Ashbury, housing crisis, indoor plumbing, Joan Didion, Mason jar, mass immigration, Maui Hawaii, post-work, Saturday Night Live, Silicon Valley, Skype, South of Market, San Francisco, sustainable-tourism, transcontinental railway, urban sprawl, white picket fence, Works Progress Administration, Y Combinator

Manufactured in the United States of America 54321 CONTENTS LIST OF MAPS viii WHAT’S NEW IN CALIFORNIA 1 THE BEST OF CALIFORNIA 1 2 3 4 The Best of Natural California. . . . . . .8 The Best Beaches . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9 The Best Golf Courses . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9 The Best California Travel Experiences. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10 5 The Best of Small-Town California . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .11 6 The Best Family Vacation Experiences. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12 7 The Best Architectural Landmarks. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .13 7 8 The Best Museums . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .14 9 The Best Luxury Hotels & Resorts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .15 10 The Best Affordable Small Hotels & Inns . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .16 11 The Best Places to Stay with the Kids. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .17 12 The Best Restaurants . . . . . . . . . . . . . .18 13 The Best Culinary Experiences. . . . .19 14 The Best of the Performing Arts & Special Events. . . . . . . . . . . . . .20 2 CALIFORNIA IN DEPTH 1 California Today . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .22 A Tale of Two States . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 2 Looking Back at California . . . . . . . .24 3 California in Popular Culture: Books, Film, TV & Music . . . . . . . . . . .27 22 4 Eating & Drinking in California. . . . .32 John Thoreen, the Wine Tutor, on Tasting California Wines. . . . . . . . . 33 5 The Premier Grape Varieties of the California Wine Country . . . . . . .34 3 PLANNING YOUR TRIP TO CALIFORNIA 1 Visitor Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .35 2 Entry Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .36 3 When to Go. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .38 Calendar of Events . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .39 1 35 4 Getting There & Getting Around . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .45 5 Money & Costs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .48 6 Health & Safety . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .49 7 Specialized Travel Resources . . . . . .50 iv 8 Sustainable Tourism/ Ecotourism . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .52 It’s Easy Being Green . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53 Frommers.com: The Complete Travel Resource . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54 9 Staying Connected. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .54 10 Tips on Accommodations . . . . . . . . .56 CO N T E N T S F R O M M E R ’S C A L I F O R N I A 2 0 0 9 4 SUGGESTED ITINERARIES 1 Pacific Coast Highway in 1 Week (San Francisco to Big Sur) . . . . . . . . .57 2 Lake Tahoe & Yosemite National Park Adventure in 1 Week . . . . . . . . .60 57 3 A Food & Wine Lover’s Movable Feast in 1 Week . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .62 5 SAN FRANCISCO 1 Orientation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .65 Money Saving Tourist Passes. . . . . . . .67 Neighborhoods in Brief . . . . . . . . . . . . .70 2 Getting Around . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .73 Fast Facts: San Francisco. . . . . . . . . . . . 75 3 Where to Stay. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .77 4 Where to Dine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .94 Dine in the Sunshine at Belden Place . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .103 5 The Top Attractions . . . . . . . . . . . . . 117 San Francisco Segway Tours . . . . . . .122 65 GoCar Tours of San Francisco . . . . . .123 6 Exploring the City . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 125 7 Organized Tours. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 132 8 Golden Gate National Recreation Area & the Presidio. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 133 9 Outdoor Pursuits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 134 10 Shopping . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 136 Amazing Grazing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .137 11 San Francisco After Dark . . . . . . . . 139 Straight Fun at Gay Bars . . . . . . . . . . .148 6 THE SAN FRANCISCO BAY AREA 1 Berkeley . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 150 2 Oakland. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 157 The USS Potomac: FDR’s Floating White House. . . . . . . . . . . . . .158 3 Sausalito . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 162 A Picnic Lunch, Sausalito Style . . . . .165 7 THE WINE COUNTRY 1 Napa Valley . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 181 Shipping Wine Home . . . . . . . . . . . . . .182 Hot-Air Ballooning over the Valley. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 187 150 4 Angel Island & Tiburon . . . . . . . . . . 165 5 Muir Woods & Mount Tamalpais . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 168 6 Half Moon Bay . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 169 7 San Jose . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 176 181 2 Sonoma Valley . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 198 Find the New You—in Mud. . . . . . . 192 Gourmet Picnics, Sonoma Style. . . . 206 3 Northern Sonoma. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 208 8 THE NORTHERN COAST 4 Fort Bragg . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 241 A Train Ride Through the Redwoods . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .242 5 The Avenue of the Giants . . . . . . . 244 6 Eureka & Environs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 247 7 Crescent City. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 254 8 Redwood National & State Parks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 256 9 THE FAR NORTH: LAKE TAHOE, MOUNT SHASTA & LASSEN VOLCANIC NATIONAL PARK 261 Skiing Tahoe in Squaw Valley Style. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .280 2 Mount Shasta & the Cascades . . . 288 3 Lassen Volcanic National Park . . . 297 4 Lava Beds National Monument . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 303 10 THE HIGH SIERRA: YOSEMITE, MAMMOTH LAKES, SEQUOIA & KINGS CANYON 305 1 Yosemite’s Gateways . . . . . . . . . . . . 305 Burgers & Bullets: The Iron Door Saloon . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .308 White-Water Rafting Adventures. . . 311 2 Yosemite National Park. . . . . . . . . . 312 Southern Yosemite Mountain Guides . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .318 3 Mammoth Lakes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 327 Winter Driving in the Sierra . . . . . . . 330 4 Devils Postpile National Monument . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 336 5 En Route to Sequoia & Kings Canyon . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 337 6 Sequoia & Kings Canyon National Parks. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 339 11 SACRAMENTO & THE GOLD COUNTRY 1 Sacramento . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 348 Where the Wild Things Are. . . . . . . . 351 Sacramento’s Best Budget Dining . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 356 348 2 The Gold Country . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 357 Pan for Gold. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .373 3 The Central Valley & Sierra National Forest. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 374 CO N T E N T S 1 Lake Tahoe. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 261 A Tale of Two Shores . . . . . . . . . . . . . 262 Lake Tahoe’s Best Cheap Thrills . . . .267 A Sailing Tour of Lake Tahoe . . . . . . .270 The “Heavenly Flyer” Zip-Line Thrill Ride . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 271 v F R O M M E R ’S C A L I F O R N I A 2 0 0 9 1 Point Reyes National Seashore. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 217 Stinson Beach: The Bay Area’s Best . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 220 Drake’s Bay Oyster Farm . . . . . . . . . . 222 Point Reyes Mountain Biking. . . . . . .226 2 Along the Sonoma Coast . . . . . . . 226 Renting a Home at the Beach. . . . . 231 3 Mendocino . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 234 217 CO N T E N T S F R O M M E R ’S C A L I F O R N I A 2 0 0 9 vi 12 THE MONTEREY PENINSULA & THE BIG SUR COAST 379 1 Santa Cruz . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 379 Seven Money-Saving Tips for Santa Cruz Tourists . . . . . . . . . . . . .382 2 Monterey . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 386 3 Pacific Grove . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 397 Where the Wild Things Are . . . . . . . . .399 4 Pebble Beach & 17-Mile Drive . . . 402 13 THE CENTRAL COAST 1 San Simeon: Hearst Castle. . . . . . . 424 Weekends at “the Ranch”. . . . . . . . . . .428 2 Morro Bay. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 432 3 San Luis Obispo. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 435 4 Pismo Beach . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 440 5 The Central Coast Wine Country: Paso Robles & the Santa Ynez Valley. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 443 14 LOS ANGELES 1 Orientation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 475 Neighborhoods in Brief . . . . . . . . . . . 483 2 Getting Around . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 494 Fast Facts: Los Angeles . . . . . . . . . . . . .496 3 Where to Stay. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 497 4 Where to Dine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 515 L.A.’s Best Sushi & Stir-Fried Crickets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 517 Sea Breezes & Sunsets: Ocean-View Dining in Malibu. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .518 5 L.A.’s Top Attractions. . . . . . . . . . . . . 537 6 Exploring the City . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 546 Stargazing in L.A., Part 2: The Less-Than-Lively Set . . . . . . . . . . .554 Free Culture . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .559 7 TV Tapings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 564 5 Carmel-by-the-Sea . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 405 6 Carmel Valley . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 412 7 The Big Sur Coast . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 413 Big Sur Lodging at Low Rates . . . . . 417 8 Pinnacles National Monument . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 421 424 6 Santa Barbara . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 455 The Ultimate Family Vacation, Santa Barbara Style. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .461 7 The Ojai Valley . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 465 8 En Route to Los Angeles: Ventura . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 469 9 Channel Islands National Park . . . 471 475 8 Beaches. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 565 9 Outdoor Pursuits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 569 Topanga Canyon: Nature’s Solution to L.A.’s Noise Pollution. . . . . . . . . . . . .570 10 Spectator Sports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 575 Polo, Anyone?

See also Northern Sonoma accommodations, 203–205 restaurants, 205–208 touring the valley and wineries, 200–203 traveling to, 200 visitor information, 200 Sonora, 372–373 Sony Pictures Studio Tour (Los Angeles), 562 South Carlsbad State Beach, 763 The South Coast, 640–651 South Entrance (Yosemite), 305, 309–312 Southern California climate, 38 northern California compared to, 23 Southern California CityPass, 738 The Southern California desert, 652–694 Southern coast, what’s new in, 4 Southern Yosemite Mountain Guides, 318 South Tufa Area, 331 Spaceland (Los Angeles), 591 Spec’s (San Francisco), 145 Squaw Valley, 273 Squaw Valley USA, 266 Stag’s Leap Wine Cellars (Napa), 186 The Standard Downtown (Los Angeles), 594 STAPLES Center (Los Angeles), 575 Starline Tours (Los Angeles), 563 Star Shoes (Los Angeles), 594 State parks, visitor information, 35 State Street (Santa Barbara), 459 Steamer Lane (Santa Cruz), 380 Stearns Wharf (Santa Barbara), 456 Sterling Vineyards (Calistoga), 192 Stinson Beach, 220 Strawberry Hill/Stow Lake (San Francisco), 125 Strybing Arboretum & Botanical Gardens (San Francisco), 125 The Stud (San Francisco), 149 Student travel, 51–52 Sugar Bowl, 266 Sugar Pine Point State Park, 269 Sugar Pine State Park, 273 Sulphur Works, 300 Summerwood Winery & Inn (Paso Robles), 445 Sunnyside, 273 Sunset Boulevard (Los Angeles), 542 Sunset Strip (Los Angeles), 543, 580 Sunstone Vineyards and Winery (Santa Ynez), 449 Surfing Los Angeles, 574–575 San Diego, 753 Santa Cruz, 380, 381 Surfrider Beach, 568 Sustainable tourism/ecotourism, 52–54 Sutro Baths (San Francisco), 135 Sutter Creek, 363–365 Sutter Gold Mine (near Sutter Creek), 364–365 Sutter’s Fort State Historic Park, 352 Swami’s Beach, 762 Swanson Vineyards & Winery (Rutherford), 188 Sweeney Ridge, 134 Sweetwater Marsh National Wildlife Refuge, 750 Tactile Dome (San Fran- cisco), 129 Tahoe City, 274 accommodations, 279–280 restaurants, 286–288 Tahquitz Canyon, 663–664 Tallac Historic Site, 273 Tall Trees Trail, 259 Tamalpais, Mount (Mount Tam), 168–169 Taylor Creek Snow Park, 268 Teatro ZinZanni (San Francisco), 142 Tech Museum of Innovation (San Jose), 177 Telegraph Avenue (Berkeley), 150, 152 Temescal Canyon, 572–573 Tenaya Lake, 319 1015 Folsom (San Francisco), 144 Tennis, 272, 294, 575, 664 Theme Building (Los Angeles), 551 Third Street Promenade (Los Angeles), 585 ThirstyBear Brewing Company (San Francisco), 147 Thomas Kinkade Places in the Heart Gallery (Solvang), 450 Thomas Vineyards (Rancho Cucamonga), 657 Thoroughbred Racing Season (Del Mar), 42 Three Rivers, 337 Tiburon, 165–167 Tides Wharf (Bodega Bay), 226 Tilden Park (Berkeley), 153 Tioga Pass, 319 Tobin James Cellars (Paso Robles), 445 Tomales Point Trail, 220 Tomorrowland (Disneyland), 625–626 The Tonga Room & Hurricane Bar (San Francisco), 146 Topanga, 570 Topanga Canyon, 570 Topanga State Beach, 568 Top of the Mark (San Francisco), 148 Tor House (Carmel), 406 Toronado (San Francisco), 146 Torrey Pines, 741 Torrey Pines State Beach, 759 Torrey Pines State Reserve, 748 Tosca Cafe (San Francisco), 146 Tournament of Roses (Pasadena), 39 Toyota Grand Prix, 40 Trail of the Sequoias, 343 Train travel, 45, 47 Tram Tour (Angel Island), 166 TransAmerica Pyramid (San Francisco), 126 Traveler’s checks, 48–49 Travel Town Transportation Museum (Los Angeles), 557 Trinidad, 252–254 Trinity Alps, 292 The Troubadour (Los Angeles), 591 Truckee River Bike Trail, 267 Tunnel View, 318 Tuolumne County Museum and History Center (Sonora), 372 Tuolumne Meadows, 319, 322 Twin Lakes State Beach, 381 Twin Peaks Tavern (San Francisco), 149 Two Bunch Palms (Desert Hot Springs), 665 Ubehebe Crater, 693, 694 UC Berkeley Art Museum, 152 UC Davis Bodega Marine Laboratory (Bodega Bay), 227 UCLA Center for the Performing Arts (Los Angeles), 589–590 Union Square (San Francisco), 70 accommodations, 77, 80–84 restaurants, 94–99 shopping, 136 Union Station (Los Angeles), 480, 554–556 Universal City (Los Angeles), 492 accommodations, 513–514 Universal CityWalk (Los Angeles), 544 Universal Studios (Los Angeles), 562 TV tapings at, 565 Universal Studios Hollywood (Los Angeles), 543–545 University of California at Berkeley, 152 University of California Botanical Garden (Berkeley), 153–154 Upper Yosemite Fall Trail, 317 Urban Shopping Adventures (Los Angeles), 578 USA Rail Pass, 47 US Bank Tower (Library Tower; Los Angeles), 556 787 788 U.S.


Italy by Damien Simonis

active transport: walking or cycling, airport security, bike sharing scheme, Bonfire of the Vanities, call centre, car-free, carbon footprint, centre right, clean water, congestion charging, discovery of the americas, Frank Gehry, haute couture, illegal immigration, Kickstarter, large denomination, low cost airline, low cost carrier, Murano, Venice glass, pension reform, period drama, Peter Eisenman, Skype, spice trade, starchitect, sustainable-tourism, trade route, urban planning, urban sprawl, women in the workforce

Responsible Travel Information Agriturismi (www.agriturismi.it) Online guide to farm accommodation. Fondo Per l’Ambiente Italiano (www.fondoambiente.it) A rough Italian equivalent of the UK’s National Trust, which restores historic houses and gardens and opens them up to the public. Legambiente Turismo (www.legambienteturismo.it) Look for the ‘Green Swan’ eco-label that flags up genuinely ecofriendly places to stay. Travel Foundation (www.thetravelfoundation.org.uk) The UK-based sustainable-tourism charity provides tips on how to travel more responsibly. World-Wide Opportunities on Organic Farms (www.wwoof.it) Learn about biodynamic and organic living in return for a few hours’ work. Return to beginning of chapter TRAVEL LITERATURE Reams have been written on Italy and it seems like everyone’s been at it, from DH Lawrence to Hermann Hesse, from Charles Dickens to Henry James.

Albergo Etruria ( 0588 8 73 77; www.albergoetruria.it; Via Giacomo Matteotti 32; s €60-70, d €80-90; closed Jan; ) This is a good-value hotel realised by two friendly English-speaking ladies. Look for the remains of an Etruscan wall upstairs and savour the fine views from the roof garden – a genuine garden with lawns and bushes. There’s also a self-catering kitchen. Agriturismo San Lorenzo ( 0588 3 90 80; www.agriturismosanlorenzo.it; B&B d €90, apt without breakfast €95-110; ) Just 3km outside Volterra on the road to Siena, this is a giddying fusion of sustainable tourism, countryside vistas, mod cons and wonderful food (dinner per person €28) served in the 12th-century Franciscan chapel. The mountain-spring-fed biological swimming pool, complete with frogs and salamanders, fronts the converted farmhouse (c 1400s). Rooms are ‘farmhouse chic’, individually decorated and colourful with modern kitchens and bathrooms. Walking, biking, horseback riding and hands-on, seasonal olive-oil production (October to November) are immediately available, as are cooking classes (per person €90).


The Rough Guide to New York City by Martin Dunford

Anton Chekhov, Berlin Wall, Bonfire of the Vanities, Buckminster Fuller, buttonwood tree, car-free, Charles Lindbergh, Chuck Templeton: OpenTable:, clean water, colonial exploitation, colonial rule, desegregation, Donald Trump, East Village, Edward Thorp, Exxon Valdez, Frank Gehry, glass ceiling, haute cuisine, illegal immigration, Jane Jacobs, market bubble, Norman Mailer, paper trading, post-work, Saturday Night Live, sustainable-tourism, The Death and Life of Great American Cities, the High Line, transcontinental railway, Triangle Shirtwaist Factory, upwardly mobile, urban decay, urban planning, urban renewal, white flight, Yogi Berra, young professional

New York City Vacation Packages US T 1-888/692-8701, Wwww.nycvp.com. All sorts of short, reasonably priced New York vacations, from spa weekends to Broadway shows. North South Travel UK T 01245/608 291, W www.northsouthtravel.co.uk. Friendly, competitive travel agency, offering discounted fares worldwide. Profits are used to support projects in the developing world, especially the promotion of sustainable tourism. STA Travel US T1-800/781-4040, UK T 0871/2300 040, Australia T134 782, Arrival Most visitors to New York arrive at one of the three major international airports that serve the city: John F. Kennedy (JFK; T 718/244-4444), LaGuardia (LGA; T 718/533-3400), and Newark (EWR; T 973/961-6000). All three share a website at W www.panynj.gov. You can find general information about getting to and from the airports on the website or by calling T 1-800/AIR-RIDE.


Lonely Planet Chile & Easter Island (Travel Guide) by Lonely Planet, Carolyn McCarthy, Kevin Raub

California gold rush, call centre, carbon footprint, centre right, Colonization of Mars, East Village, haute cuisine, Kickstarter, land reform, low cost airline, mass immigration, New Urbanism, off grid, place-making, QR code, Skype, sustainable-tourism, trade route, upwardly mobile, urban sprawl, white picket fence

It’s everything you want in a hostel: friendly, clean, well-equipped (and some things you don’t: creaky old floors mixed with rowdiness means it gets sleep-depriving loud). From the bus station, walk two blocks south to Juan MacKenna, five blocks east to Buenos Aires and one and a half blocks south to Toribio Medina. HUILLICHE HOLIDAY The indigenous Huilliche communities of Osorno’s gorgeous coast are sitting on an etnoturismo gold mine and have only just started to realize it. Fresh off an idea planted by a decade of sustainable tourism research by the WWF (World Wildlife Fund), these off-the-beaten-path communities are beginning to embrace visitors. You can immerse yourself in their way of life over multiday trips that involve some of Chile’s most stunning beaches, Valdivian forest treks, and sleeping in rural homes around San Juan de la Costa and Territorío Mapa Lahual (www.mapulahual.cl), an indigenous protected zone that stretches south into Río Negro province as well.


The Rough Guide to Chile by Melissa Graham, Andrew Benson

Atahualpa, California gold rush, call centre, centre right, cuban missile crisis, feminist movement, Francisco Pizarro, Murano, Venice glass, sensible shoes, sustainable-tourism, trade route, union organizing, women in the workforce

Agents and operators ebookers UK T 0871/223 5000, Republic of Ireland T 01/431 1311; W www.ebookers.com, www.ebookers.ie. Low fares on an extensive selection of scheduled flights and package deals. North South Travel UK T 01245/608291, W www.northsouthtravel.co.uk. Friendly, competitive travel agency, offering discounted fares worldwide. Profits are used to support projects in the developing world, especially the promotion of sustainable tourism. Trailfinders UK T0845/058 5858, Republic of Ireland T 01/677 7888; W www.trailfinders.com. One of the best-informed and most efficient agents for independent travellers. STA Travel US T 1-800/781-4040, UK T 0871/2300 040, Australia T 134 782, New Zealand T 0800/474 400, South Africa T 0861/781 781; W www.statravel.com. Worldwide specialists in independent travel; also student IDs, travel insurance, car rental, rail passes, and more.


Lonely Planet Greek Islands by Lonely Planet, Alexis Averbuck, Michael S Clark, Des Hannigan, Victoria Kyriakopoulos, Korina Miller

car-free, carbon footprint, credit crunch, eurozone crisis, G4S, haute couture, haute cuisine, low cost airline, low cost carrier, Norman Mailer, pension reform, period drama, sensible shoes, sustainable-tourism, trade route, transfer pricing, urban sprawl

SPONGE DIVING TOUR, KALYMNOS 1 Sponge diving was Kalymnos’ main industry from the days of Plato to the mid-’80s and remains integral to the island’s identity. There’s no formal training – divers learn from father to son. And now you can hop on a boat for a fascinating day at sea, learning about this dangerous occupation from one of the original sponge-diving families (Click here ). It’s part of the growing trend towards sustainable tourism on many of the islands. TEMPLE OF ATHENA, ATHENS 2 After a decade of work, the scaffolding has finally been removed from the Acropolis’ 5th-century Temple of Athena Nike (Click here ). Slender and visually arresting, it’s well worth a return visit. SELENE, SANTORINI 3 Selene (Click here ) worked hard to achieve its fame in the gourmet circle for inspirational, creative cuisine.


Hawaii by Jeff Campbell

airport security, big-box store, California gold rush, carbon footprint, centre right, Charles Lindbergh, commoditize, creative destruction, Drosophila, G4S, haute couture, land reform, lateral thinking, low-wage service sector, Maui Hawaii, polynesian navigation, risk/return, sustainable-tourism, upwardly mobile, urban sprawl, wage slave, white picket fence

In 1971 the first Hawaiian Masters surfing competition was held on O′ahu’s North Shore. By the 1980s, rampant tourist development had overbuilt Waikiki and turned some of O′ahu’s agricultural land into water-thirsty golf courses and sprawling resorts. The island’s last remaining sugar mills closed in the 1990s, leaving O′ahu more heavily dependent on tourism than ever. Debates about economic diversification, sustainable tourism and also the continuing US military presence continue today. * * * O′AHU ITINERARIES In Two Days Got only a weekend in the sun? Then it’s all about you and Waikiki (Click here). Laze on the beach (Click here), enjoy the sunset torch lighting and hula show at Kuhio Beach Park (Click here) and dine at Roy’s – Waikiki Beach (Click here). The next day get up early to snorkel at Hanauma Bay (Click here), then hike up Diamond Head (Click here) or out to the lighthouse at Makapu′u Point (Click here).


The Rough Guide to Ireland by Clements, Paul

Berlin Wall, bike sharing scheme, British Empire, Celtic Tiger, Columbine, digital map, East Village, haute couture, Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), Kickstarter, Murano, Venice glass, plutocrats, Plutocrats, Ronald Reagan, sustainable-tourism, the market place, trade route, urban planning, urban renewal, urban sprawl

Naturetrek UK 01962 733051, naturetrek.co.uk. Wildlife specialist offering four-day botanical tours of the Burren and four-day tours of the Northern Ireland coast. North South Travel UK 01245 608 291, northsouthtravel.co.uk. Friendly, competitive travel agency, offering discounted fares worldwide. Profits are used to support projects in the developing world, especially the promotion of sustainable tourism. South West Walks Ireland Republic of Ireland 066 718 6181, southwestwalksireland.com. Guided and self-guided walking holidays on the west coast, in Antrim and in Wicklow, as well as self-guided cycling holidays. STA Travel UK 0333 321 0099, US 1800 781 4040, Australia 134 782, New Zealand 0800 474 400, South Africa 0861 781 781, statravel.co.uk.


Lonely Planet Ireland by Lonely Planet

bank run, banking crisis, Berlin Wall, Bernie Sanders, bike sharing scheme, Bob Geldof, British Empire, carbon footprint, Celtic Tiger, credit crunch, G4S, glass ceiling, global village, haute cuisine, hydraulic fracturing, Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), Jacquard loom, Kickstarter, land reform, reserve currency, sustainable-tourism, young professional

There's been great interest in the shale-rich areas of the Northwest Ireland Carboniferous Basin, roughly covering parts of counties Leitrim, Roscommon, Sligo, Cavan, Donegal and Fermanagh, with pro-fracking groups lobbying hard for the exploitation of the area's reserves of shale gas, but a 2016 report by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) found that while many of the environmental problems related to the process could be overcome, not enough was known to ensure the protection of human health. Similarly, the north's environment minister Mark Durkan banned fracking until such time as there is 'sufficient and robust evidence on all environmental impacts of fracking.' Sustainable Tourism The annual number of tourists in Ireland far exceeds the number of residents (by a ratio of about 1½ to one), so visitors can have a huge impact on the local environment. Tourism is frequently cited as potentially beneficial to the environment – that is, responsible visitor spending can help stimulate ecofriendly sectors of the economy. Ecotourism is not really burgeoning in a formalised way, although EcoTourism Ireland (www.ecotourismireland.ie) is charged with maintaining standards for ecotourism on the island and promotes tour companies that comply with these standards.


pages: 769 words: 397,677

Frommer's California 2007 by Harry Basch, Mark Hiss, Erika Lenkert, Matthew Richard Poole

airport security, Asilomar, Bay Area Rapid Transit, car-free, Charles Lindbergh, Chuck Templeton: OpenTable:, clean water, Columbine, Donald Trump, Donner party, East Village, El Camino Real, Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test, Frank Gehry, Golden Gate Park, Guggenheim Bilbao, Haight Ashbury, indoor plumbing, Iridium satellite, Joan Didion, Maui Hawaii, Silicon Valley, South of Market, San Francisco, sustainable-tourism, transcontinental railway, upwardly mobile, urban sprawl, white picket fence, Works Progress Administration

Chains may be required in the Sierra dur- conservation.org)—which, with National ing icy weather at elevations above 3,000 Geographic Traveler, annually presents feet. The California Department of World Legacy Awards (www.wlaward. Transportation provides 24-hour info at org) to those travel tour operators, businesses, organizations, and places that & 916/445-1534. Conversely, driving in desert areas car- have made a significant contribution to ries its own hazards: Always be aware of sustainable tourism. 7 Specialized Travel Resources TRAVELERS WITH DISABILITIES California’s spirit of tolerance has made it a welcoming place for travelers with disabilities. Building codes make most public facilities and attractions accessible (though some historic sites and older buildings can’t accommodate drastic remodeling), and the state provides many services for those with disabilities. The Golden Access Passport gives visually impaired or permanently disabled persons (regardless of age) free lifetime 36 C H A P T E R 2 .


Ireland (Lonely Planet, 9th Edition) by Fionn Davenport

air freight, Berlin Wall, Bob Geldof, British Empire, carbon footprint, Celtic Tiger, centre right, credit crunch, glass ceiling, global village, haute cuisine, Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), Jacquard loom, Kickstarter, McMansion, new economy, period drama, reserve currency, risk/return, sustainable-tourism, urban planning, urban renewal, urban sprawl, young professional

Errigal Hostel Dunlewey, County Donegal;. Jampa Ling Buddhist Centre Bawnboy, County Cavan;. Omagh Independent Hostel Omagh, County Tyrone;. Dolphin Hotel & Restaurant Inishbofin, County Galway;. Phoenix Vegetarian Restaurant & Accommodation Mt Caherconree, County Kerry;. Rocky View Farmhouse Fanore, County Clare;. Rua Castlebar, County Mayo;. Shiplake Mountain Hostel Dunmanway, County Cork;. * * * Sustainable Tourism Ireland (www.sustourism.ie) is a handy starting point with a list of enterprises, from B&Bs to urban planning projects, that put eco-responsibility and sustainability at the fore. Fly Less There are numerous boat companies serving Ireland from Britain and France, and return fares often don’t cost that much more than one-way fares – not to mention the plethora of special offers designed to challenge the cheap flight hegemony.


pages: 3,292 words: 537,795

Lonely Planet China (Travel Guide) by Lonely Planet, Shawn Low

Albert Einstein, anti-communist, bike sharing scheme, carbon footprint, clean water, colonial rule, credit crunch, Deng Xiaoping, G4S, haute couture, haute cuisine, income inequality, indoor plumbing, Kickstarter, land reform, mass immigration, Pearl River Delta, place-making, Rubik’s Cube, Skype, South China Sea, special economic zone, sustainable-tourism, trade route, upwardly mobile, urban planning, urban renewal, urban sprawl, women in the workforce, Xiaogang Anhui farmers, young professional

TTours Khampa CaravanTOURS (Kangba Shangdao Tanxian Luxingshe MAP GOOGLE MAP ; %828 8648; www.khampacaravan.com; 2nd flr, cnr Dawa Lu & Changzheng Lu; h9am-noon & 2-5.30pm Mon-Fri, 9am-noon Sat) Tibetan-run, this well-established outfit organises some excellent treks and overland journeys, inside Tibet too, that get good feedback. The company also runs a lot of sustainable development programs within Tibetan communities. See www.shangrilaassociation.org for more details. Haiwei TrailsTOURS (%139 8875 6540; www.haiweitrails.com) Has a good philosophy towards local sustainable tourism, and over a decade of experience running treks and trips. 4Sleeping With so many guesthouses destroyed in the fire, good places to stay are at a premium, although that will change in the future. Cheap digs (¥60 a room) can be found around the bus station and the square off Dawa Lu at the edge of the old town. Despite Shangri-la’s often glacial night temperatures, many guesthouses are neither heated nor have 24-hour hot water.