Naomi Klein

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pages: 717 words: 150,288

Cities Under Siege: The New Military Urbanism by Stephen Graham

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airport security, anti-communist, autonomous vehicles, Berlin Wall, call centre, carbon footprint, clean water, congestion charging, credit crunch, DARPA: Urban Challenge, defense in depth, deindustrialization, edge city, energy security, European colonialism, failed state, Food sovereignty, Gini coefficient, global supply chain, Google Earth, illegal immigration, income inequality, knowledge economy, late capitalism, loose coupling, market fundamentalism, McMansion, megacity, mutually assured destruction, Naomi Klein, New Urbanism, offshore financial centre, pattern recognition, peak oil, planetary scale, private military company, RAND corporation, RFID, Richard Florida, Scramble for Africa, Silicon Valley, smart transportation, surplus humans, The Bell Curve by Richard Herrnstein and Charles Murray, urban decay, urban planning, urban renewal, urban sprawl, Washington Consensus, white flight

Henriksen , The Israeli Approach to Irregular Warfare, 40. 95 Imri Tov, ‘Economy in a Prolonged Conflict: Israel 2000–2003’, Strategic Assessment 6: 1, 2003, available at www.tau.ac.il. 96 USA Today, ‘US Military Employs Israeli Technology in Iraq War’, 24 March 2003. 97 Bernel Goldberg, ‘Introduction to WTCTA Breakfast Series: Israeli Investment and Trade Opportunities with the Pacific Northwest’, 4 May 2007, Tacoma, WA. 98 Naomi Klein, ‘Laboratory for a Fortressed World’, The Nation, 14 June 2007. 99 Donald Snyder, ‘Israel’s Technology Creates an Investment Goliath’, Fox Business. com, 16 January 2008. 100 Goldberg, ‘Israeli Investment and Trade Opportunities with the Pacific Northwest’. 101 Fairfax County Ecibiomic Development Authority, ‘Special Event: United States-Israel HLS Technologies Conference and B2B (Business to Business) Meetings between Israeli and US Companies’, 16–18 January 2007, available at www.fairfaxcountyeda.org. 102 Naomi Klein, ‘Laboratory for a Fortressed World’. 103 Israel High-Tech Investment Report, February 2008, available at www.ishitech.co.il. 104 Klein, ‘Laboratory for a Fortressed World’. 105 Jeffrey Larsen and Tasha Pravecek, ‘Comparative US-Israeli Homeland Security’, The Counterproliferation Papers, Future Warfare Series no. 34, Air University, Maxwell Air Force Base, AL: United States Air Force Counterproliferation Center. 106 See Israeli Export and Economic Cooperation Institute, undated, at www.export.gov.il. 107 Klein, ‘Laboratory for a Fortressed World’. 108 Rafael Corporation, ‘Anti-Terror Homeland Security Solutions’, brochure, undated, available at www.rafael.co.il. 109 Ali Kravitz, ‘US Homeland Security Market Beckons’, Jerusalem Post, 18 January 2007. 110 James Carafano, Jonah Czerwinski, and Richard Weitz, ‘Homeland Security Technology, Global Partnerships, and Winning the Long War’, The Heritage Foundation, 5 October 2006, available at www.heritage.org. 111 Consuella Pockett, ‘The United States and Israeli Homeland Security: A Comparative Analysis of Emergency Preparedness Efforts’, Counterproliferation Papers Future Warfare Series no. 33, Air University, Maxwell Air Force Base, AL: United States Air Force Counterproliferation Center, 150. 112 Ibid., 147. 113 State of Israel Ministry of Public Security, ‘Israel-USA Homeland Security Cooperation’, undated, available at www.mops.gov.il. 114 Joe Charlaff, ‘Joint Israeli-American Initiative to Streamline Homeland Security Management’, Israel 21c, 28 November 2004, available at www.usistf.org. 115 Fairfax County Economic Development Authority conference. 116 Ali Kravitz, ‘US Homeland Security Market Beckons’. 117 Defensoft.com press release. 118 Fairfax County Economic Development Authority conference. 119 Laura Goldman, ‘Israeli Technology to Keep US Borders Safe’, Israel21c.org, 15 Oct 2006. 120 Irreversible Consequences: Racial Profiling and Lethal Force in the ‘War on Terror’, briefing paper, New York University School of Law, Center for Human Rights and Global Justice, 2006, 5. 121 Ibid., 13. 122 Nick Vaughan-Williams, ‘The Shooting of Jean Charles de Menezes: New Border Politics?’

Such states of exception are declared not only to constitute the geographies of permanent violence that sustain the dominant economy but also to create what Achille Mbembe calls ‘death worlds’ – spaces such as Palestine, where vast populations are forced to exist as the living dead.92 In this way, states of emergency support broader geographies of accumulation through dispossession, which, while as old as colonialism, prove especially useful for neoliberal globalization. Here we confront the complex political economies of the new military urbanism and their central integration into what Naomi Klein has diagnosed as the tendency within contemporary neoliberal capitalism to engineer and/or to profit from catastrophic ‘natural’ or political-economic shocks.93 At issue is the character of what could be called the ‘new state spaces’ of war and violence, and their relation to political violence and contemporary geographies of dispossession.94 Citing the systematic Israeli bulldozing of homes and towns in Palestine, the similar erasure of Fallujah and other loci of Iraqi resistance, and the widespread erasure of informal settlements across the globe as city authorities entrepreneurially reorganize urban spaces, Kanishka Goonewardena and Stefan Kipfer point to ‘an ominously normalised reality experienced by the “damned of the earth” after the “end of history”’.

New York: Routledge, 2003. 74 Simon Dalby ‘A Critical Geopolitics of Global Governance’, International Studies Association. 75 See Matt Hidek, ‘Networked Security in the City: A Call to Action for Planners’, Planners Network, 2007; Katja Franko, Analysing a World in Motion: Global Flows Meet ‘‘Criminology of the Other’’’, Theoretical Criminology 1: 2, 2007, 283–303 76 Amy Kaplan, ‘Homeland Insecurities: Reflections on Language and Space’, Radical History Review 85, 2003, 82–93. 77 Ibid. 78 Ibid. 79 Paul Gilroy, ‘‘Where Ignorant Armies Clash by Night’’: Homogeneous community and the planetary aspect’, International Journal of Cultural Studies 6: 3, 2003, 266. 80 Ibid, 261. 81 Lorenzo Veracini, ‘Colonialism Brought Home: On the Colonialization of the Metropolitan Space’, Borderlands 4: 1, 2005. 82 Sally Howell and Andrew Shryock, ‘Cracking Down on Diaspora: Arab Detroit and America’s ‘‘War on Terror’’’, Anthropological Quarterly 76:3, 2003, 443–62. 83 Jennifer Hyndman, ‘Beyond Either/Or: A Feminist Analysis of September 11th, ACME: An International E-Journal for Critical Geographies, February 2006. 84 Tim Watson, ‘Introduction: Critical Infrastructures After 9/11’, Postcolonial Studies 6, 109–11. 85 Ibid. 86 Allen Feldman, ‘Securocratic Wars of Public Safety’, 330–50. 87 Tony Blair, statement to the Press Association, 7 July 2005, quoted in Angharad Closs-Stephens, ‘7 million Londoners, 1 London’: National and Urban Ideas of Community in the Aftermath of the 7th July Bombings’, Alternatives 32: 2, 2007, 155–76. 88 Close-Stephens, ‘7 Million Londoners, 1 London’. 89 Paul Gilroy, ‘Multiculture in Times of War: An Inaugural Lecture Given at the London School of Economics’, Critical Quarterly 48:4, 29. 90 Ibid. 91 John Gray, ‘A Shattering Moment in America’s Fall from Power’, Observer, 28 October 2008. 92 Achille Mbembe, ‘Necropolitics’ Public Culture 15: 1, 2003, 11–40. 93 Naomi Klein, The Shock Doctrine: The Rise of Disaster Capitalism, London: Allen Lane, 2007. 94 The term ‘new state spaces’ comes from the pioneering book of that title by Neil Brenner, New State Spaces: Urban Governance and the Rescaling of Statehood, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2004. 95 Goonewardena and Kipfer, ‘Postcolonial Urbicide’. 96 See Chapter 9 and also Stephen Graham, ‘Switching Cities Off: Urban Infrastructure and US Air Power’, City 9: 2, 2005. 97 Kipfer and Goonewardena ‘Colonization and the New Imperialism’. 98 UN HABITAT, State of the World Cities 2006/7, Nairobi: United Nations, xi. 99 Frantz Fanon, The Wretched of the Earth, New York: Grove, 2004. 100 Goonewardena and Kipfer, ‘Postcolonial Urbicide’, 28. 101 See Chapter 11. 102 Eyal Weizman, Hollow Land, London: Verso, 2007. 103 Eyal Weizman, ‘Lethal Theory’, LOG Magazine April 2005, 74. 104 Goonewardena and Kipfer, ‘Postcolonial Urbicide’, 28. 105 Ibid., 29. 106 ‘Predatory planning’ can be defined as ‘the intended process of dispossession through aggressive, global-powered planning processes and use of multiple redevelopment tactics (building blocks), in the wake of existing trauma.


pages: 278 words: 82,069

Meltdown: How Greed and Corruption Shattered Our Financial System and How We Can Recover by Katrina Vanden Heuvel, William Greider

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Asian financial crisis, banking crisis, Bretton Woods, capital controls, carried interest, central bank independence, centre right, collateralized debt obligation, conceptual framework, corporate governance, credit crunch, Credit Default Swap, credit default swaps / collateralized debt obligations, declining real wages, deindustrialization, Exxon Valdez, falling living standards, financial deregulation, financial innovation, Financial Instability Hypothesis, fixed income, floating exchange rates, full employment, housing crisis, Howard Zinn, Hyman Minsky, income inequality, kremlinology, Long Term Capital Management, margin call, market bubble, market fundamentalism, McMansion, mortgage debt, Naomi Klein, new economy, offshore financial centre, payday loans, pets.com, Plutocrats, plutocrats, Ponzi scheme, price stability, pushing on a string, race to the bottom, Ralph Nader, rent control, Robert Shiller, Robert Shiller, Ronald Reagan, savings glut, sovereign wealth fund, structural adjustment programs, The Great Moderation, too big to fail, trade liberalization, transcontinental railway, trickle-down economics, union organizing, wage slave, Washington Consensus, women in the workforce, working poor, Y2K

Stiglitiz 191 View from Asia by Walden Bello 196 Born-Again Democracy by William Greider 199 The Suicide Solution by Barbara Ehrenreich 207 The Great Depression II by Nicholas von Hoffman 210 We’re All Minskyites Now by Robert Pollin 213 The Bailout: Bush’s Final Pillage by Naomi Klein 217 Part Four: The Road to Recovery How to Fix Our Broken Economy by Jeffrey Madrick 225 Ending Plutocracy: A 12-Step Program by Sarah Anderson and Sam Pizzigati 234 Trust but Verify by James K. Galbraith and William K. Black 244 King George and Comrade Paulson by Ralph Nader 247 A Big Government Bailout by Howard Zinn 249 Water the Roots by Rev. Jesse L. Jackson 253 America Needs a New New Deal by Katrina vanden Heuvel and Eric Schlosser 255 What Do We Want? An Emergency Town Hall Featuring William Greider, Francis Fox Piven, Doug Henwood, Arun Gupta and Naomi Klein. Moderated by Christopher Hayes 260 The Global Perspective by Will Hutton 270 How to End the Recession by Robert Pollin 287 In Praise of a Rocky Transition by Naomi Klein 297 Acknowledgments 301 List of Contributors 303 Preface The year 2008 will live in infamy in the annals of American economic history.

Moderated by Nation Washington editor Christopher Hayes, the panel featured national correspondent William Greider, famed author of the classic book on the Fed, Secrets of the Temple; Frances Fox Piven, longtime poor people’s activist and author of many books, including The Breaking of the American Social Compact; contributing editor Doug Henwood, author of Wall Street; Arun Gupta, activist and editor of the Indypendent newspaper; and columnist Naomi Klein, author of the bestseller, The Shock Doctrine: The Rise of Disaster Capitalism. Following is an edited transcript of their discussion. Chris Hayes: There are a lot of technical questions about this crisis that I don’t think we’re going to be able to resolve tonight: what’s a credit default swap and how does it work, for example. But the key two political questions a lot of us are asking are: how do we fit what is happening now into our political understanding, into our power analysis—what has led us to the moment we’re in politically?

People don’t want to confront the need for organization and the need to have a clear ideology because once you do that, it leads to political battles. And that is not necessarily a bad thing, but without an ideology, something to counter the neoliberal ideology, we can’t really say what we’re for, we can’t say who the agent of change is, we don’t have anything to organize around. So I think that is really one of the biggest tasks ahead. … Naomi Klein: As Doug Henwood said, crises are not new, and we may be in uncharted territory but we have experienced these bursting bubbles before. I want to talk about two recent crises that have something to teach us. One of them is the Asian financial crisis in 1997–98, and the other is the Argentina economic meltdown in December 2001. In The Shock Doctrine, I have a chapter about the Asian financial crisis.


pages: 246 words: 74,341

Financial Fiasco: How America's Infatuation With Homeownership and Easy Money Created the Economic Crisis by Johan Norberg

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accounting loophole / creative accounting, bank run, banking crisis, Bernie Madoff, Black Swan, capital controls, central bank independence, collateralized debt obligation, credit crunch, Credit Default Swap, credit default swaps / collateralized debt obligations, David Brooks, diversification, financial deregulation, financial innovation, helicopter parent, Home mortgage interest deduction, housing crisis, Howard Zinn, Hyman Minsky, Isaac Newton, Joseph Schumpeter, Long Term Capital Management, market bubble, Martin Wolf, Mexican peso crisis / tequila crisis, millennium bug, moral hazard, mortgage tax deduction, Naomi Klein, new economy, Northern Rock, Own Your Own Home, price stability, Ronald Reagan, savings glut, short selling, Silicon Valley, South Sea Bubble, The Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith, too big to fail

His book In Defense of Global Capitalism, originally published in Swedish in 2001, has since been published in over 20 different countries. He is also the author of Nar manniskan skapade varlden, 2006 (When Mankind Created the World), the coauthor of Ett annat Sverige ar mojligt, 2006 (Another Sweden Is Possible), and Global rattvisa ar mojlig, 2001 (Global Justice Is Possible), the coauthor of Allt om Naomi Kleins nakenchock, 2008 (Naomi Klein's Baseless Shock) and the coeditor of Frihetens klassiker, 2003 (The Classics of Freedom), all of which are available only in Swedish at this time. His personal website is http://www.johannorberg.net/. He wrote and hosted Globalisation Is Good, a documentary for Channel Four in Britain. Norberg's articles and opinion pieces appear regularly in both Swedish and international newspapers, and he is a regular commentator and contributor on television and radio around the world discussing globalization and free trade.

The costs appear to outweigh the benefits."38 But it is not certain that the Treasury Department felt the ban to be a failure, because its main intention in introducing it had been to build crisis awareness and come across as strong and active. An official admitted to the New York Times that Treasury did not expect any practical results. It was a symbolic action "to scare the hell out of everybody," as that official put it 39 As such, it was successful beyond expectations. Socialism for the Rich In her book The Shock Doctrine, Canadian writer Naomi Klein claimed that politicians and economists exploit crises to scare voters so that they can push through unpopular liberalizations, tax cuts, and privatizations. A look at the history of government in the Western world shows her to be right that politicians exploit crises, though seldom to liberalize and reduce the size of the state but rather to increase government control, public spending, and their own power.4o The Great Depression of the 1930s is one example of that; the week following the fall of Lehman Brothers in September 2008 is another.

Chanos, "Short Sellers Keep the Markets Honest"; Tsang, "Short Sellers under Fire." 36. Donovan, "Investment Bankers of the World, Unite!" 37. Oakley, "Short-Selling Ban Has Minimal Effect." 38. Younglai, "SEC's Cox Regrets Short-Selling Ban." 39. Nocera, "Alarm Led to Action." 40. For critical scrutiny of her book, see Norberg, "The Klein Doctrine" (and for more exhaustive treatment of the issue in Swedish, Benulic and Norberg, Allt oni Naomi Kleins nakenchock). 41. The next administration thinks along similar lines. On November 19, 2008, Barack Obama's chief of staff, Rahm Emanuel, treated the Wall Street Journal CEO Council to a description of the opportunity to create new political projects and regulate financial markets: "You never want a serious crisis to go to waste.... This crisis provides the opportunity for us to do things that you could not do before."


pages: 501 words: 134,867

A Line in the Tar Sands: Struggles for Environmental Justice by Tony Weis, Joshua Kahn Russell

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Bakken shale, bilateral investment treaty, call centre, carbon footprint, clean water, colonial exploitation, conceptual framework, corporate social responsibility, decarbonisation, Deep Water Horizon, en.wikipedia.org, energy security, energy transition, Exxon Valdez, failed state, global village, guest worker program, happiness index / gross national happiness, hydraulic fracturing, immigration reform, investor state dispute settlement, invisible hand, LNG terminal, market fundamentalism, means of production, Naomi Klein, new economy, Occupy movement, oil shale / tar sands, peak oil, profit maximization, race to the bottom, smart grid, special economic zone, working poor

To our elders and mentors, who remind us that the struggle has always been urgent, and that justice is a journey, not a destination. To everyone doing their part to co-create a better world, which the tar sands industry has no place in. The editors’ proceeds from this book will be donated to frontline grassroots environmental justice groups and campaigns. Table of Contents List of Contributors Foreword NAOMI KLEIN AND BILL MCKIBBEN Introduction: Drawing a Line in the Tar Sands TONY WEIS, TOBAN BLACK, STEPHEN D’ARCY, AND JOSHUA KAHN RUSSELL Part I: Tar Sands Expansionism 1. Petro-Capitalism and the Tar Sands ANGELA V. CARTER 2. Assembling Consent in Alberta: Hegemony and the Tar Sands RANDOLPH HALUZA-DELAY 3. The Rise of Reactionary Environmentalism in the Tar Sands RYAN KATZ-ROSENE 4. Canadian Diplomatic Efforts to Sell the Tar Sands YVES ENGLER 5.

He teaches and has published widely in sociology, environmental education, geography, and leisure studies, and co-edited How the World’s Religions are Responding to Climate Change: Social Scientific Investigations (Routledge). Ryan Katz-Rosene is a PhD candidate in Geography at Carleton University in Ottawa. His research interests include critical perspectives on growth, energy, and transportation, and environmental political economy. Naomi Klein is an award-winning journalist, syndicated columnist, and author of the international bestsellers The Shock Doctrine and No Logo (both with Picador). Melina Laboucan-Massimo is a member of the Lubicon Cree First Nation in Alberta, Canada, and an Indigenous and environmental activist. She has worked with Redwire Media Society, the Indigenous Environmental Network, and, most recently, as a tar sands, climate, and energy campaigner with Greenpeace.

Will Wooten is an online organizer with the Tar Sands Blockade, a progressive political activist, and a freelance writer based in Texas. Jess Worth is a co-founder of the UK Tar Sands Network. She is a former co-editor of the award-winning magazine New Internationalist, and was a member of the campaign organization People & Planet. Lilian Yap is a doctoral student in Political Science at York University, analyzing the nature of “green work” and the recycling sectors in Toronto and Buenos Aires. Foreword NAOMI KLEIN AND BILL McKIBBEN The fight over the tar sands is among the epic environmental and social justice battles of our time, and one of the first that managed to marry quite explicitly concern for frontline communities and immediate local hazards with fear for the future of the entire planet. It began, of course, with many years of resistance from Indigenous people in the Athabasca region to the destruction of their ancestral landscapes and to the calamitous health conditions they faced.


pages: 464 words: 121,983

Disaster Capitalism: Making a Killing Out of Catastrophe by Antony Loewenstein

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Affordable Care Act / Obamacare, anti-communist, Asian financial crisis, British Empire, Capital in the Twenty-First Century by Thomas Piketty, Chelsea Manning, clean water, collective bargaining, colonial rule, corporate social responsibility, Edward Snowden, facts on the ground, failed state, falling living standards, Ferguson, Missouri, financial independence, full employment, Goldman Sachs: Vampire Squid, housing crisis, illegal immigration, immigration reform, income inequality, Julian Assange, market fundamentalism, Naomi Klein, neoliberal agenda, obamacare, Occupy movement, offshore financial centre, open borders, private military company, profit motive, Ralph Nader, Ronald Reagan, Scramble for Africa, Slavoj Žižek, stem cell, the medium is the message, trade liberalization, WikiLeaks

., “In Egypt, Corruption Cases Had an American Root,” Washington Post, October 20, 2011. 12Jennifer Schuessler, “In History Departments, It’s Up with Capitalism,” New York Times, April 6, 2013. 13Andrew Hussey, “Occupy Was Right: Capitalism Has Failed the World,” Observer, April 13, 2014. 14Gillian Tett, “Anxiety in the Age of Inequality,” Foreign Policy, November/December 2014. 15Naomi Klein, The Shock Doctrine: The Rise of Disaster Capitalism (London: Penguin, 2007), pp. 3–21. 16A poll conducted by Essential Research in 2012 found that a majority of Australians believed that the economic “reforms” introduced by successive governments had “[most] benefited” corporations; only 5 percent thought that “ordinary Australians benefited.” Essential Research, Economic Reforms, June 4, 2012. 17Naomi Klein, “Super Storm Sandy—A People’s Shock?” Nation, November 5, 2012. 18Andrew Martin, “Hurricane Sandy and the Disaster-Preparedness Economy,” New York Times, November 10, 2012. “Disaster economics,” writes a New Yorker columnist, “should ensure that the state prepares for disasters before they happen, rather than just dealing with them after they have hit.”

“This is the only civilized solution,” he told the Observer newspaper.13 In 2014, even the world’s leading economic think-tank, the Paris-based Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development, urged higher taxes for the rich to help the bottom 40 percent of the population. When establishment magazine Foreign Policy publishes an article by the US managing editor of the Financial Times, Gillian Tett, which closes expressing a wish for an “honest debate” about “wealth redistribution,” it is clear that the world has gone a little mad.14 Canadian journalist Naomi Klein coined the term “disaster capitalism” in her best-selling 2007 book, The Shock Doctrine: The Rise of Disaster Capitalism, in which she observes that privatization, government deregulation, and deep cuts to social spending are often imposed after megadisasters, man-made or natural, “all before victims of war or natural disaster [are] able to regroup and stake their claims to what [is] theirs.” The aim of privatizing government itself has existed for decades, but the attacks of September 11, 2001, accelerated the process in the United States because the Bush administration saw its “war on terror” as a boon for the private sector.

Make sure that wars, including those started for tenuous reasons, last as long as possible to ensure ongoing work for mercenaries, guards, and intelligence officials. Industries such as mining, construction, and security feed off each other. It is a global gravy train—when one country is sucked dry, it moves off to the next lucrative destination. During a visit to Greece in 2013 to investigate the reality of extreme austerity and those workers resisting it, Canadian writer Naomi Klein issued a stark warning: “We really are in a midst of what I’ve come to think of as a final colonial pillage for the hardest to reach natural resources in some of the most beautiful protected parts of the world using some of the most dangerous and damaging extractive practices.”3 Nothing remains untouched. “The privatisation of everything,” writes Arundhai Roy, “has also meant the NGO-isation of everything.”


pages: 924 words: 198,159

Blackwater: The Rise of the World's Most Powerful Mercenary Army by Jeremy Scahill

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air freight, anti-communist, Berlin Wall, Bernie Sanders, business climate, business intelligence, centralized clearinghouse, collective bargaining, Columbine, facts on the ground, Fall of the Berlin Wall, Naomi Klein, private military company, Ronald Reagan, school choice, school vouchers, stem cell, urban planning

See: www.nixoncenter.org/publications/Program%20Briefs/vol6no19 Bremer.htm. 5 See Marsh & McLennan Web site www.mmc.com/about/history.php. 6 L. Paul Bremer, “What Now? Crush Them; Let Us Wage Total War on Our Foes,” Wall Street Journal, September 13, 2001. 7 Fox Special Report with Brit Hume transcript, “Terrorism Hits America,” Fox News, September 11, 2001. 8 Naomi Klein, “Downsizing in Disguise,” The Nation, June 23, 2003. 9 Ibid. 10 Ibid. 11 L. Paul Bremer, My Year in Iraq, pp. 6-7. 12 Knut Royce (Newsday), “Diplomat Expected to Take Charge in Iraq; Bremer to Replace Garner as Leader of Postwar Transition,” Seattle Times, May 2, 2003. 13 Naomi Klein, “Downsizing in Disguise,” The Nation, June 23, 2003. 14 Romesh Ratnesar with Simon Robinson, “Life Under Fire,” Time, July 14, 2003. 15 David Leigh, “General Sacked by Bush Says He Wanted Early Elections,” Guardian, March 18, 2004. 16 Mike Allen, “Expert on Terrorism to Direct Rebuilding,” Washington Post, May 2, 2003. 17 Bremer, My Year in Iraq, p. 8. 18 Scott Wilson, “Bremer Adopts Firmer Tone for U.S.

When Blackwater first came out, it was barely reviewed and TV news was so afraid of lawsuits that the book was nearly shut out. Fast-forward to this autumn, when the Iraqi government accused Blackwater of massacring civilians in downtown Baghdad. Suddenly the book looked prescient and we learned that the same press corps that had cheered on the war had also missed the biggest story in the war zone: that Iraq is more than a failed occupation; it’s a radical experiment in corporate rule.”—Naomi Klein, The Guardian (London) “Andy McNab couldn’t have invented this prescient tale of the private army of mercenaries run by a Christian conservative millionaire who, in turn, bankrolls the president. A chilling expose of the ultimate military outsource.” —Christopher Fowler, The New Review’s “Best Books of 2007” “Fascinating and magnificently documented . . . Jeremy Scahill’s new book is a brilliant exposé and belongs on the reading list of any conscientious citizen.”

“But we’ve seen this enormous escalation of this industry so that now it’s billions and billions of dollars. This is definitely an expansion.”189 The U.S. government pays contractors as much as the combined taxes paid by everyone in the United States with incomes under $100,000, meaning “more than 90 percent of all taxpayers might as well remit everything they owe directly to [contractors] rather than to the [government],” according to a 2007 investigative report in Vanity Fair.190 As journalist Naomi Klein put it, “According to this radical vision, contractors treat the state as an ATM, withdrawing massive contracts to perform core functions like securing borders and interrogating prisoners, and making deposits in the form of campaign contributions.”191 “I think it’s extraordinarily dangerous when a nation begins to outsource its monopoly on the use of force and the use of violence in support of its foreign policy or national security objectives,” said veteran U.S. diplomat Joe Wilson, who served as the last Ambassador to Iraq before the 1991 Gulf War.


pages: 304 words: 96,930

Starbucked: A Double Tall Tale of Caffeine, Commerce, and Culture by Taylor Clark

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Berlin Wall, cuban missile crisis, David Brooks, deskilling, Edmond Halley, fear of failure, Honoré de Balzac, indoor plumbing, Isaac Newton, Jeff Bezos, McJob, McMansion, Naomi Klein, Ray Oldenburg, Ronald Reagan, The Great Good Place, trade route

In fact, if you read a comment by a Starbucks employee and he or she doesn’t mention the “Starbucks Experience,” the phrase “surprise and delight,” or the company mission statement, something has gone horribly wrong. Because once Starbucks figured out what its customers wanted, it never went off-message again. Phase 2: Salivating at the Dinner Bell That Starbucks would seek to become — in the liberal social critic Naomi Klein’s words — “the coffee shop that wants to stare deep into your eyes and ‘connect’ ” was no surprise, given the tenor of the time. After the minor cataclysm known as “Marlboro Friday” sent Wall Street into a panic, every American company with a pulse scrambled to infuse itself with a lofty “purpose.” On April 2, 1993, Philip Morris announced that, because of competition from generic brands, it was slashing the price of a pack of Marlboros by 20 percent, a previously unthinkable defeat.

Some of the shrewdest independents have even stolen one of the chain’s signature moves, to great effect. “These guys at Starbucks are seriously good at locating coffee bars,” wrote one of them, David Schomer of Seattle’s Espresso Vivace, in a primer on how to compete with Starbucks. “Just open your coffee bar next to one.” As Schomer knows, in a side-by-side comparison, customers will often choose quality and uniqueness over efficiency and uniformity. Naomi Klein, creator of the antichain “No Logo” movement, has lambasted Starbucks over its habit of clustering stores and opening next to mom and pops, but in the coffee-house business, a cluster of cafés can do better as a group than each café would alone. Just as a thicket of restaurants or gas stations will amplify business for everyone by forming a nexus people instinctively gravitate toward when they think food or gas, a Starbucks and an independent can work in tandem to draw more coffee drinkers.

For more on Starbucks’s marketing and the story of the “Big Dig,” see Scott Bedbury and Stephen Fenichell, A New Brand World: 8 Principles for Achieving Brand Leadership in the 21st Century (New York: Viking, 2002); and Kim Murphy, “More Than Coffee, a Way of Life,” Los Angeles Times, September 22, 1996. Page 92. The story of Starbucks hypnotizing “hip young people” comes from Ruth Shalit, “Hypnotizing Slackers for Starbucks, and Other Visionary Acts of Marketing Research,” Salon.com, September 28, 1999. Page 93. Naomi Klein, No Logo (New York: Picador, 2002). David Brooks, Bobos in Paradise: The New Upper Class and How They Got There (New York: Simon & Schuster, 2000). Page 94. Howard Schultz and Dori Jones Yang, Pour Your Heart into It: How Starbucks Built a Company One Cup at a Time (New York: Hyperion, 1997). Page 96. David Shields, “The Capitalist Communitarian,” New York Times Magazine, March 24, 2002.


pages: 233 words: 75,712

In Defense of Global Capitalism by Johan Norberg

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Asian financial crisis, capital controls, clean water, correlation does not imply causation, Deng Xiaoping, Edward Glaeser, Gini coefficient, half of the world's population has never made a phone call, Hernando de Soto, illegal immigration, income inequality, informal economy, Joseph Schumpeter, Kenneth Rogoff, land reform, Lao Tzu, manufacturing employment, market fundamentalism, Mexican peso crisis / tequila crisis, Naomi Klein, new economy, open economy, profit motive, race to the bottom, rising living standards, school vouchers, Silicon Valley, Simon Kuznets, structural adjustment programs, The Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith, Tobin tax, trade liberalization, trade route, transaction costs, trickle-down economics, union organizing

Anti-globalists characterize the free zones as havens for slave-driving and inhuman working conditions. There are indeed abuses and scandals in some quarters, and resolute action is needed to prohibit them. Mostly, abuse and scandal happen in poor dictatorships, and so, instead of freedom having ‘‘gone too far,’’ it has not gained a foothold. In her book No Logo, which quickly became popular in anticapitalist circles, Canadian activist Naomi Klein claims that Western companies have created terrible working conditions in such zones. But she does not offer any proof. She has only heard a few rumors of bad conditions in one Philippine export-processing zone, which she admits having traveled to only because it was one of the worst. When the OECD tried to obtain an overall picture of these zones, it found that they had multiplied job opportunities for the poor, and that wages there were higher than in the rest of the country.

The presence of multinational corporations in oppressive governments can very often be an aid to the pursuit of democracy, because those corporations are sensitive to pressure from Western consumers, which has a direct impact on sales. It can be easier to influence Nigerian politics by boycotting Shell than by trying to bring pressure to bear on the Nigerian government. This is hinted at in the subtitle of Naomi Klein’s book No Logo: Taking Aim at the Brand Bullies. Klein points out that the big corporations have tried to create a special positive aura for their trademarks through many decades of advertising and goodwill. But by doing so they have also shot themselves in the foot. The trademarks, being their biggest asset, are hugely sensitive to adverse publicity. It can take a company decades to build up a trademark but only a few weeks for activists to demolish it.

But international effects run both ways. Positive events in one country can produce positive effects elsewhere. The previous upturn in Latin America and Asia contributed to good times in Europe and the United States. And very possibly it was the subsequently strong economy of the United States that saved the world from depression in connection with the Asian crisis and quickly pulled the Asian economies up again. Claims by Naomi Klein and others that all the progress achieved in East Asia was obliterated by the crisis are sheer nonsense. One country that was very badly hit, South Korea, saw its per capita GDP, adjusted for purchasing power, decline in 1998 to just over the 1995 level, which in turn was more than twice the level 10 years earlier. And only a year later, in 1999, South Korean GDP registered an all-time high. Certain aspects of the crisis have also been hugely exaggerated by activists on the left.


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This Changes Everything: Capitalism vs. The Climate by Naomi Klein

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1960s counterculture, battle of ideas, Berlin Wall, big-box store, bilateral investment treaty, British Empire, business climate, Capital in the Twenty-First Century by Thomas Piketty, carbon footprint, clean water, Climategate, cognitive dissonance, colonial rule, Community Supported Agriculture, complexity theory, crony capitalism, decarbonisation, deindustrialization, dematerialisation, Donald Trump, Downton Abbey, energy security, energy transition, equal pay for equal work, Exxon Valdez, failed state, Fall of the Berlin Wall, feminist movement, financial deregulation, food miles, Food sovereignty, global supply chain, hydraulic fracturing, ice-free Arctic, immigration reform, income per capita, Internet Archive, invention of the steam engine, invisible hand, Isaac Newton, James Watt: steam engine, market fundamentalism, moral hazard, Naomi Klein, new economy, Nixon shock, Occupy movement, offshore financial centre, oil shale / tar sands, open borders, patent troll, planetary scale, post-oil, profit motive, quantitative easing, race to the bottom, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Rana Plaza, Ronald Reagan, smart grid, special economic zone, Stephen Hawking, Stewart Brand, structural adjustment programs, Ted Kaczynski, the scientific method, The Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith, trade route, transatlantic slave trade, transatlantic slave trade, trickle-down economics, Upton Sinclair, uranium enrichment, urban planning, urban sprawl, wages for housework, walkable city, Washington Consensus, Whole Earth Catalog, WikiLeaks

He is about to learn that the world is a lot bigger than our neighborhood. Photograph © Suzanne DeChillo/The New York Times/Redux NAOMI KLEIN is an award-winning journalist and the author of the critically acclaimed #1 international bestseller The Shock Doctrine: The Rise of Disaster Capitalism and No Logo: Taking Aim at the Brand Bullies, which The New York Times called “a movement bible.” Klein is a contributing editor for Harper’s magazine, a reporter for Rolling Stone, and a syndicated columnist for The Nation and The Guardian. She is a member of the board of directors of 350.org and a Puffin Foundation Writing Fellow at The Nation Institute. MEET THE AUTHORS, WATCH VIDEOS AND MORE AT SimonandSchuster.com authors.simonandschuster.com/Naomi-Klein ALSO BY NAOMI KLEIN The Shock Doctrine: The Rise of Disaster Capitalism No Logo: Taking Aim at the Brand Bullies Fences and Windows: Dispatches from the Front Lines of the Globalization Debate We hope you enjoyed reading this Simon & Schuster eBook

James, 53 Woolworth, 16 workers, see labor; trade unions in Industrial Revolution, 171 public sector, 157 work hours, shorter, 93–94 World Academy of Sciences, 257 World Bank, 47–48, 59, 81, 152, 180, 219, 359 austerity promoted by, 77 on carbon tax, 114 free market ideology and, 62 new coal projects opposed by, 348–49 on 2 degrees Celsius limit, 12–13 World Conference Against Racism (2001), 414 World Conference on the Changing Atmosphere, 55, 73–74 World Economic Forum, 112 World Future Council, 97 World Health Organization, 351 world markets, liberation of, 20–21 World People’s Conference on Climate Change and the Rights of Mother Earth, 444n World Resources Institute, 196, 226 World Trade Organization (WTO), 5, 16, 19, 39, 76, 77, 80, 84 green energy programs challenged by, 64–65, 68–73, 126 worldview: communitarian, 36, 59, 182, 460, 461, 462, 466 dominance-based, 36–37, 41, 44, 56–57, 59–60, 75, 177, 184, 186, 424, 462 extractivist, see extractivism regenerative, 23, 25, 60–61, 182, 395, 396, 424, 442–48 World War I, collective sacrifice in, 16, 115 World War II: collective sacrifice in, 16–17, 115–16 social programs in wake of, 10 World Wildlife Fund, 84, 196, 264 World Wind Energy Association, 132 World Wrestling Entertainment, 212n Wretched of the Earth, The (Fanon), 459 Wright, Malcolm, 290 Wright, Wayne, 68 Wyoming, 215, 320 Xcel Energy, 98–99 Xeni Gwet’in First Nation, 345 Yale University, 36, 56 Yanza, Luis, 291 Yara, 135 Yasuní-ITT initiative, 410 Yasuní rainforest, 408–11 Yergin, Daniel, 311 Yoshitani, Miya, 155–56 Young, Neil, 383–84 Youngstown, Ohio, 329 zero-carbon energy sources, 18, 128 zero-carbon public services, 19–20 zero-waste design, 16 Zimbabwe, famine in, 272 Simon & Schuster 1230 Avenue of the Americas New York, NY 10020 www.SimonandSchuster.com Copyright © 2014 by Naomi Klein All rights reserved, including the right to reproduce this book or portions thereof in any form whatsoever. For information address Simon & Schuster Subsidiary Rights Department, 1230 Avenue of the Americas, New York, NY 10020. First Simon & Schuster hardcover edition September 2014 SIMON & SCHUSTER and colophon are registered trademarks of Simon & Schuster, Inc. The Simon & Schuster Speakers Bureau can bring authors to your live event. For more information or to book an event, contact the Simon & Schuster Speakers Bureau at 1-866-248-3049 or visit our website at www.simonspeakers.com. Interior design by Joy O’Meara Library of Congress Cataloging-in-Publication Data Klein, Naomi, 1970– This changes everything : capitalism vs. the climate / Naomi Klein.—First Simon & Schuster hardcover edition.

Blockadia: The New Climate Warriors 10. Love Will Save This Place: Democracy, Divestment, and the Wins So Far 11. You and What Army? Indigenous Rights and the Power of Keeping Our Word 12. Sharing the Sky: The Atmospheric Commons and the Power of Paying Our Debts 13. The Right to Regenerate: Moving from Extraction to Renewal Conclusion  The Leap Years: Just Enough Time for Impossible Acknowledgments About Naomi Klein Notes Index For Toma “We need to remember that the work of our time is bigger than climate change. We need to be setting our sights higher and deeper. What we’re really talking about, if we’re honest with ourselves, is transforming everything about the way we live on this planet.” —Rebecca Tarbotton, Executive Director of the Rainforest Action Network, 1973–20121 “In my books I’ve imagined people salting the Gulf Stream, damming the glaciers sliding off the Greenland ice cap, pumping ocean water into the dry basins of the Sahara and Asia to create salt seas, pumping melted ice from Antarctica north to provide freshwater, genetically engineering bacteria to sequester more carbon in the roots of trees, raising Florida 30 feet to get it back above water, and (hardest of all) comprehensively changing capitalism.”

The Corporation: The Pathological Pursuit of Profit and Power by Joel Bakan

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Berlin Wall, Cass Sunstein, corporate governance, corporate personhood, corporate social responsibility, energy security, Exxon Valdez, IBM and the Holocaust, joint-stock company, laissez-faire capitalism, market fundamentalism, Naomi Klein, new economy, race to the bottom, Ralph Nader, Ronald Reagan, shareholder value, South Sea Bubble, The Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith, Triangle Shirtwaist Factory, urban sprawl

People should confront corporations directly, in the streets and through nongovernmental organizations and community coalitions , they say, rather than relying on governments to forge solutions. "We should be directly pointing the finger at businesses, not even bothering with the governments," says Anita Roddick,19 reflecting a widely held view that is also expressed by antiglobalization activist and pundit Naomi Klein: "We see corporations as the most powerful Page 151 political entities of our time, and we are responding to them as citizens , citizens to political organizations. . . . The corporation has become the new site of protest. . . . Rather than protesting on the doorsteps of governments on Sunday afternoon when no one is there, they're protesting outside of the Niketown on Fifth Avenue." Though the movement against corporate rule would be impossible , even senseless, without robust nongovernmental institutions, community activism, and political dissent, the belief these can be a substitute for government regulation, rather than a necessary complement to it, is dangerously mistaken.

As Jonathan Chait recently observed about the Bush administration in The New Republic, "Government and business have melded into one big 'us' " (as cited by Paul Krugman, "Channels of Influence," The New York Times, March 25, 2003). Robert Monks says, "Particularly since the Berlin Wall came down in 1989, it probably is clear that the heads of large corporations have more impact on your life and the lives of citizens around the world than the head of any country." 51. Interviews with Chris Komisarjevsky and Clay Timon. For an excellent critical discussion of branding and its implications for society, see Naomi Klein, No Logo: Taking Aim at the Brand Bullies (Toronto: Knopf Canada, 2000). More generally, the notion that corporations are persons-individuals- Back Matter Page 7 176 NOTES has served throughout history to obscure, in both law and public opinion, the fact that corporations exercise the collective economic power of vast numbers of shareholders and thus are profoundly more powerful than the rest of us. 52.

And today I think that corporations are externalizing a lot of costs onto the community, whether it's the cost of burning up employees by increasing the work time, by working them for a few years and then throwing them out, by not paying the full cost of the labor that employees give to a firm, by coming into a community, getting all sorts of grants, and then turning around and leaving it in worse shape than they entered. All of those things externalize the cost onto the community of the corporation." 19. Quoted in Editorial, The Sunday Herald (Scotland), August 26, 2001. 20. Interview with Naomi Klein. 21. Interview with Noam Chomsky. 22. Indeed, from the perspective of its supposed beneficiaries, the regulatory system was imperfect from the beginning. Historically, regulation was a compromise, supported by many among the business elite, between business 's desire for freedom from controls and calls for more radical change. As Harvard's Elaine Bernard points out, "It wasn't the labor movement and the reformers who proposed regulation.


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Dreaming in Public: Building the Occupy Movement by Amy Lang, Daniel Lang/levitsky

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Bay Area Rapid Transit, bonus culture, British Empire, clean water, cognitive dissonance, collective bargaining, corporate governance, corporate personhood, crowdsourcing, David Graeber, deindustrialization, facts on the ground, glass ceiling, housing crisis, Kibera, late capitalism, Naomi Klein, Occupy movement, oil shale / tar sands, out of africa, Plutocrats, plutocrats, Port of Oakland, Rosa Parks, Saturday Night Live, Slavoj Žižek, structural adjustment programs, the medium is the message, too big to fail, trade liberalization, union organizing, upwardly mobile, urban renewal, War on Poverty, We are Anonymous. We are Legion, We are the 99%, white flight, working poor

Library of Congress Cataloguing-in-Publication Data A catalogue record for this book is available from the Library of Congress. ISBN 978-1-78026-085-3 Contents Preface Staughton Lynd Foreword Eileen Myles Anonymous Introduction Amy Schrager Lang & Daniel Lang/Levitsky The Politics of the Impossible Information Desk Richard Kim The Audacity of Occupy Wall Street Ira Livingston Darth Vader and Occupy Wall Street: A Twitter Essay Naomi Klein The Most Important Thing in the World Media Declaration of the Occupation of New York City Occupy Student Debt Campaign Pledges & Principles The Mortville Declaration of Independence Council of Elders Occupy Wall Street Statement of Solidarity UAW Local 2865 Resolution in Support of Occupy Oakland General Strike American Library Association Occupy Wall Street Library Resolution & Press Statement jóvenes en resistencia alternativa Solidarity Statement: We walk by asking, we reclaim by Occupying Organization of Women’s Freedom in Iraq Message of Solidarity to Occupy Wall Street Comrades from Cairo Response to OWS Egypt Delegation Proposal Library Barbara Kingsolver Another American Way Angus Johnston What I Saw at #OccupyWallStreet Last Night, and What I Saw When I Left Adrienne Maree Brown from liberty plaza; let it breathe Adrienne Maree Brown, Jenny Lee, Yusef Shakur, et al One Step in Building the ‘Occupy/Unify’ Movement in Detroit Keguro Macharia Occupy DC (Hasty Notes) Jaime Omar Yassin Occupy Oakland Day Four: Wherein I speak to some folks, and the General Assembly debates MoveOn’s move in Facilitation Anne Tagonist Heirs to the Autonomen DeColonize LA Statement Larisa Mann On Occupy Wall Street Hannah Chadeyane Appel The Bureaucracies of Anarchy (Parts 1 & 2) Sonny Singh Occupying Process, Processing Occupy: Spokes Council musings by one POC Safer Spaces Jaime Omar Yassin Occupy Oakland: Hugs Are Also an Option Occupy Boston Women’s Caucus Statement A Bunch of Trans Women Occupiers OWS Must Resist Cis-Supremacy and Trans-Misogyny Aaron Bady Society Must Be Defended From Rats Occupy Wall Street Safer Spaces Working Group Transforming Harm & Building Safety: Confronting sexual violence at Occupy Wall Street and beyond People of Color Bruce A Dixon Occupy Where?

Ira Livingston, by contrast, in Twitter-inspired 140-character lines echoing the way information circulates about Occupy, meditates on the impossibility of inhabiting neoliberal late capitalism. Deploying the fantasies of omnipotence that in US commercial culture carry fascist overtones, but in lived experience provide the possibility for social agency, he considers how we move from a sudden sense of political vitality to an active political stance. Naomi Klein, recalling the successful direct action that shut down the 1999 World Trade Organization Ministerial Conference in Seattle and the less successful subsequent actions at international financial institution summits that followed, addresses the difference that unlimited time and a changed target makes. The Audacity of Occupy Wall Street Richard Kim 2 November 2011 A few years ago, Joe Therrien, a graduate of the NYC Teaching Fellows program, was working as a full-time drama teacher at a public elementary school in New York City.

. ♦ (Acknowledgments: Many thanks to Thad Ziolkowski for insight into the VW ad, Jennifer Miller for citing Dread Scott, and apologies to Jayna for the Woody Guthrie references!) bullybloggers.wordpress.com/2011/11/13/darth-vader-and-occupy-wall-street-a-twitteressay-by-ira-livingston/trackback/ I’LL BELIEVE CORPORATIONS ARE PEOPLE WHEN TEXAS EXECUTES ONE The Most Important Thing in the World Naomi Klein 6 October 2011 I was honored to be invited to speak at Occupy Wall Street on Thursday night. Since amplification is (disgracefully) banned, and everything I say will have to be repeated by hundreds of people so others can hear (aka ‘the human microphone’), what I actually say at Liberty Plaza will have to be very short. With that in mind, here is the longer, uncut version of the speech. I love you.


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Zero-Sum Future: American Power in an Age of Anxiety by Gideon Rachman

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Asian financial crisis, bank run, battle of ideas, Berlin Wall, Big bang: deregulation of the City of London, Bonfire of the Vanities, borderless world, Bretton Woods, BRICs, capital controls, centre right, clean water, collapse of Lehman Brothers, colonial rule, currency manipulation / currency intervention, deindustrialization, Deng Xiaoping, Doha Development Round, energy security, failed state, Fall of the Berlin Wall, financial deregulation, Francis Fukuyama: the end of history, full employment, global reserve currency, greed is good, Hernando de Soto, illegal immigration, income inequality, invisible hand, Jeff Bezos, laissez-faire capitalism, market fundamentalism, Martin Wolf, Mexican peso crisis / tequila crisis, Mikhail Gorbachev, moral hazard, mutually assured destruction, Naomi Klein, offshore financial centre, open borders, open economy, Peace of Westphalia, peak oil, pension reform, Plutocrats, plutocrats, price stability, RAND corporation, reserve currency, rising living standards, road to serfdom, Ronald Reagan, shareholder value, Sinatra Doctrine, sovereign wealth fund, special economic zone, Steve Jobs, Stewart Brand, The Chicago School, The Great Moderation, The Myth of the Rational Market, Thomas Malthus, trickle-down economics, Washington Consensus, Winter of Discontent

For, in its own way, al-Qaeda was also attacking an American-dominated, capitalist global order. The original antiglobalizers had been outflanked by a much more violent, ruthless, and radical rejectionist movement. The critics of globalization were so diverse that it is impossible to pick a single figure to exemplify the movement. They ranged all the way from a Nobel Prize–winning economist like Joseph Stiglitz to fulminating journalists like Naomi Klein to—at the extreme end—terrorist movements like al-Qaeda. The antiglobalization crowd included far-left radicals who despised global capitalism and far-right radicals who believed that globalization was an excuse for the creation of a single world government. Some argued that globalization was destroying the livelihoods of Western workers by subjecting them to merciless competition from Asians laboring for less than a dollar a day.

South Korea and Thailand were two of the biggest victims of the Asian economic crisis, but the South Koreans only had to look across the border to North Korea to be reminded that economic isolation offered far worse and more devastating prospects. The Thais could perform the same exercise by looking across their western border into isolated, dictatorial, impoverished Burma, where a military junta had violently repressed the country’s democracy movement in 1990. What Joseph Stiglitz and Naomi Klein put their fingers on was a feeling that globalization was a project that benefited elites more than ordinary people. It was certainly true that the globalization consensus seemed firmest in places where the international political and business elite gathered, such as the World Economic Forum in Davos. It was also true that there were some common themes to the complaints made about globalization in countries as different as the United States, China, India, and Russia.

Mark Leonard, Why Europe Will Run the 21st Century (London: Fourth Estate, 2005), p. 7. 16. THE ANTIGLOBALIZERS: FROM THE ASIAN CRISIS TO 9/11 1. Philippe Legrain, Open World: The Truth about Globalisation (London: Abacus, 2002), 17. 2. Quoted in Derek Chollet and James Goldgeier, America Between the Wars: From 11/9 to 9/11 (New York: PublicAffairs, 2008), 256. 3. Ibid., 257. 4. Naomi Klein, The Shock Doctrine (New York: Henry Holt, 2007). 5. Quoted in Legrain, Open World, 25. 6. Cited in William Greider, Come Home America: The Rise and Fall (and Redeeming Promise) of Our Country (New York: Rodale, 2009), 70. 7. Joseph Stiglitz, Globalization and Its Discontents (London: Penguin, 2002), 4. 8. Ibid., 21. 9. Lou Michel and Dan Herbeck, American Terrorist: Timothy McVeigh and the Oklahoma City Bombing (New York: ReganBooks, 2001), 59. 10.


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Equal Is Unfair: America's Misguided Fight Against Income Inequality by Don Watkins, Yaron Brook

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3D printing, Affordable Care Act / Obamacare, Apple II, barriers to entry, Berlin Wall, Bernie Madoff, blue-collar work, business process, Capital in the Twenty-First Century by Thomas Piketty, Cass Sunstein, collective bargaining, colonial exploitation, corporate governance, correlation does not imply causation, Credit Default Swap, crony capitalism, David Brooks, deskilling, Edward Glaeser, Elon Musk, en.wikipedia.org, financial deregulation, immigration reform, income inequality, indoor plumbing, inventory management, invisible hand, Isaac Newton, Jeff Bezos, Jony Ive, laissez-faire capitalism, Louis Pasteur, low skilled workers, means of production, minimum wage unemployment, Naomi Klein, new economy, obamacare, Peter Singer: altruism, Peter Thiel, profit motive, rent control, Ronald Reagan, Silicon Valley, Skype, statistical model, Steve Jobs, Steve Wozniak, The Spirit Level, too big to fail, trickle-down economics, Uber for X, urban renewal, War on Poverty, women in the workforce, working poor

There are critics of economic inequality who are largely indifferent to its impact on opportunity and want to level down society even if it means crippling economic progress. In their popular critique of economic inequality, The Spirit Level, Richard Wilkinson and Kate Pickett tell us that “we need to limit economic growth severely in rich countries,” because “[o]nce we have enough of the necessities of life, it is the relativities which matter.”13 Similarly, best-selling author Naomi Klein argues that to truly deal with the problem of inequality, we must reject capitalism altogether, give up on the idea of economic progress, and embrace a decentralized agrarian form of socialism.14 Left-wing radio host Thom Hartmann will settle merely for banning billionaires: “I say it’s time we outlaw billionaires by placing a 100% tax on any wealth over $999,999,999. Trust me, we’ll all be much better off in a nation free of billionaires.”15 Should We Be Suspicious of Inequality?

Not according to Piketty. In every case, Piketty acknowledges that “these very high brackets never yield much” in the way of tax revenues. That is not the point. The point, he says, is “to put an end to such incomes and large estates.”78 The most consistent alarmists—those who value equality above all else—openly admit that they do not care about freedom and progress. Best-selling author Naomi Klein argues that to truly deal with the problem of inequality, we must reject capitalism altogether, give up on the idea of economic progress, and embrace a decentralized agrarian form of socialism.79 In The Spirit Level, Wilkinson and Pickett reach a similar conclusion, telling us that “we need to limit economic growth severely in rich countries.” Would this mean greater human suffering? Absolutely not, they say.

We Can Choose Otherwise,” Washington Monthly, November/December 2014, http://www.washingtonmonthly.com/magazine/novemberdecember_2014/features/conclusion_slow_growth_and_ine052716.php (accessed April 12, 2015). 11. Obama, “Remarks by the President on Economic Mobility.” 12. Piketty, Capital in the Twenty-First Century, pp. 513, 517. 13. Richard Wilkinson and Kate Pickett, The Spirit Level (New York: Bloomsbury Press, 2009), pp. 225–26. 14. Naomi Klein, This Changes Everything: Capitalism vs. the Climate (New York: Simon & Schuster, 2014). 15. Thom Hartmann, “The No Billionaires Campaign,” OpEdNews, July 18, 2012, http://www.opednews.com/populum/printer_friendly.php?content=a&id=153218 (accessed April 12, 2015). 16. Stiglitz, The Price of Inequality, p. 8. 17. Obama, “Remarks by the President on Economic Mobility.” 18.


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The End of Doom: Environmental Renewal in the Twenty-First Century by Ronald Bailey

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3D printing, additive manufacturing, agricultural Revolution, Albert Einstein, autonomous vehicles, Cass Sunstein, Climatic Research Unit, Commodity Super-Cycle, conceptual framework, corporate governance, credit crunch, David Attenborough, decarbonisation, dematerialisation, demographic transition, diversified portfolio, double helix, energy security, failed state, financial independence, Gary Taubes, hydraulic fracturing, income inequality, invisible hand, knowledge economy, meta analysis, meta-analysis, Naomi Klein, oil shale / tar sands, oil shock, pattern recognition, peak oil, phenotype, planetary scale, price stability, profit motive, purchasing power parity, race to the bottom, RAND corporation, rent-seeking, Stewart Brand, Tesla Model S, trade liberalization, University of East Anglia, uranium enrichment, women in the workforce, yield curve

In his 2014 book, Oil and Honey, McKibben sees future climate change as portending “an endless chain of disasters that will turn civilization into a never-ending emergency response drill.” McKibben’s prescription is a turn away from global consumerism toward the organic and local, to “a nation of careful, small-scale farmers who can adapt to the crazed new world with care and grace, and who don’t do much more damage in the process.” Fierce progressive activist Naomi Klein in her newest screed, This Changes Everything: Capitalism vs. the Climate, declares, “Our economic system and our planetary system are now at war.” Klein asserts that the progressive values and policies she advocates are “currently being vindicated, rather than refuted, by the laws of nature.” Climate science, she further claims, has given progressives “the most powerful argument against unfettered capitalism” ever.

In addition, the researchers note, beliefs about the risks of climate change “come to bear meanings congenial to some cultural outlooks but hostile to others.” In this case, Egalitarian/Communitarians, who are generally eager to rein in what they regard as the unjust excesses of technological progress and commerce, see carbon rationing as an effective tool to achieve that goal. This view is distilled in Naomi Klein’s book This Changes Everything: Capitalism vs. the Climate. Not surprisingly, Hierarchical/Individualists are highly suspicious when proposals involving carbon rationing just happen to fit the cultural values and policy preferences of Egalitarian/Communitarians. Kahan and his colleagues at the Yale Cultural Cognition Project suggest the Hierarchical/Individualists discount scientific information about climate change because it is strongly associated with the promotion of carbon rationing as the exclusive policy remedy for the problem.

Given those figures, the ITIF’s estimate of what it would take to develop cheap zero-carbon technologies looks like a bargain. The Climate Change Bottom Line Despite the current pause in global warming and the real failings in climate computer model projections, the balance of the scientific evidence suggests that man-made climate change could become a significant problem by the end of this century. As we have seen, political progressives and environmentalists like Naomi Klein fervently promote the “climate crisis” as a pretext for radically transforming the world’s economy in ways that ratify their own ideological predilections. Thus they advocate the imposition of vast top-down regulatory schemes that ultimately amount to various forms of carbon and energy rationing. As a response, lots of supporters of free markets and economic growth tend to underplay the science that suggests the possibility that continued unrestrained emissions of greenhouse gases could have really undesirable effects on the planet’s climate by the end of the century.


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Pity the Billionaire: The Unexpected Resurgence of the American Right by Thomas Frank

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Affordable Care Act / Obamacare, bank run, big-box store, bonus culture, collateralized debt obligation, collective bargaining, Credit Default Swap, credit default swaps / collateralized debt obligations, crony capitalism, Deng Xiaoping, financial innovation, housing crisis, invisible hand, Naomi Klein, obamacare, payday loans, profit maximization, profit motive, road to serfdom, Ronald Reagan, shareholder value, strikebreaker, The Chicago School, The Myth of the Rational Market, Thorstein Veblen, too big to fail, union organizing, Washington Consensus, white flight, Works Progress Administration

Over the last four decades, Thatcher’s ideological comrades brought their free-market plans to countries all around the globe, remaking the souls of Chileans, Argentines, Poles, and Iraqis as the opportunities presented. Societies were “transformed,” all right: dynamited, bulldozed, privatized, swept away. And in the classic 2007 account of this particular chapter in civilization’s development, the journalist Naomi Klein explains that it often happened in the aftermath of crises: hurricanes, military coups, civil wars. An entire program of market-based reforms would be installed all of a sudden as a sort of “shock therapy” when traditional social systems had been knocked off balance.8 Let me repeat, before we proceed, that what I am describing were the acts of conservatives: professional economists using crisis to impose what they knew to be the correct social model—the market model—on nations that were not really interested in it.

An entire program of market-based reforms would be installed all of a sudden as a sort of “shock therapy” when traditional social systems had been knocked off balance.8 Let me repeat, before we proceed, that what I am describing were the acts of conservatives: professional economists using crisis to impose what they knew to be the correct social model—the market model—on nations that were not really interested in it. Also: that this really happened, that the economists talked about it openly. To hear the resurgent Right tell it, however, the only place where you’ll find such ruinous strategies in discussion are in the war rooms of the sneaky Left, as they plot to destroy the free market itself. In a curious inversion of Naomi Klein’s argument, the rejuvenated Right fastened on a single flippant 2008 remark from then-incoming White House chief of staff Rahm Emanuel—“You never want a serious crisis to go to waste”—and convinced itself on the basis of this one clue that a cadre of left-wingers were planning all manner of offenses against democracy including, in some tellings, the overthrow of capitalism itself, with the financial crisis as a pretext.

According to political scientist David Campbell and sociologist Robert Putnam, Tea Party activists tended to be highly partisan Republicans before the Tea Party conquered the headlines in 2009. See Campbell and Putnam, “Crashing the Tea Party,” New York Times, August 16, 2011. 7. See, for example, http://www.washingtonexaminer.com/opinion/blogs/Examiner-Opinion-Zone/matthew-vadum-The-Lefts-Blueprint-for-perpetual-power-94527604.html. 8. See Naomi Klein, The Shock Doctrine (New York: Metropolitan, 2007), pp. 6–7. 9. Glenn Beck, The Overton Window, p. 147. 10. Ibid., pp. 74, 276, 286, 296–97, and again on 303–4. 11. FEMA’s plans also would have outlawed strikes. See Jack Anderson’s column on the subject, September 25, 1984. See also Alfonso Chardy, “Reagan Advisers Ran ‘Secret’ Government,” Miami Herald, July 5, 1987. 12. According to the historian David Caute, the act included a measure “providing for camps in times of national emergency, invasion or insurrection to detain without trial anyone who had been a member of the Communist Party since January 1, 1949.”


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Double Entry: How the Merchants of Venice Shaped the Modern World - and How Their Invention Could Make or Break the Planet by Jane Gleeson-White

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Affordable Care Act / Obamacare, Bernie Madoff, Black Swan, British Empire, carbon footprint, corporate governance, credit crunch, double entry bookkeeping, full employment, Gordon Gekko, income inequality, invention of movable type, invention of writing, Islamic Golden Age, Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, joint-stock company, joint-stock limited liability company, Joseph Schumpeter, means of production, Naomi Klein, Ponzi scheme, shareholder value, Silicon Valley, Simon Kuznets, spice trade, spinning jenny, The Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith, Thomas Malthus, trade route, traveling salesman, upwardly mobile

Employing the rhetoric of religion, Ahrens describes the high priest of the quants, James Simons, who works ‘in a form of high math decipherable to a handful of humans on the planet. As such, practitioners of the rare mathematic arts can become the powerful priests of investing, thanks to their strange and obscure language, much the way the medieval church trafficked in Latin’. The antics of the share market and its mathematical wizards manipulate not only the wealth of individuals and corporations, they also dramatically shape the political life of nations. Naomi Klein gives a stark example of the impact of markets on politics. Following the election of Nelson Mandela as President of South Africa, ‘Every time a top party official said something that hinted that the ominous Freedom Charter might still become policy, the market responded with a shock, sending the rand into free fall. The rules were simple and crude, the electronic equivalent of monosyllabic grunts: justice—expensive, sell; status quo—good, buy.’

A grand plan to remake their country—a plan which had been conceived in the aftermath of the civil war—was carried out after the tsunami had ruined the beaches where the fishermen lived. International organisations, including the United States Agency for International Development (USAID), the World Bank and the Asian Development Bank, arrived to ‘plot Sri Lanka’s entry into the world economy’, as Naomi Klein puts it. Before the makeover overseen by these organisations, the men’s small-scale fishing had been their livelihood, giving them enough to feed their families. But their subsistence fishing did not contribute to economic growth as measured by the GDP figures used by organisations such as the World Bank and so it was expendable. The land where their huts had been was converted to more profitable use—in money terms—and they were left without a means to feed their children.

p. 218 ‘how Harold of Salisbury borrowed money . . .’ Carruthers and Espeland, op. cit., p. 57. p. 219 ‘accounts are used to . . .’ Ibid., p. 47. p. 220 ‘Most are idiot savants brought . . .’ Frank Ahrens, ‘For Wall Street’s math brains, miscalculations’, Washington Post, 21 August 2007. p. 220 ‘Math’s universal principles . . .’ Ibid. p. 221 ‘Every time a top party official said something . . .’ Naomi Klein, The Shock Doctrine, Penguin Books, Camberwell, 2007, p. 207. p. 222 Economist Raj Patel points out that . . . The discussion of the corporation draws extensively on Raj Patel, The Value of Nothing, Black Inc., Melbourne, 2009, p. 41. p. 222 Enron is revealed as having behaved . . . Niall Ferguson, The Ascent of Money: A financial history of the world, Penguin Books, Melbourne, 2008, p. 172.


pages: 262 words: 66,800

Progress: Ten Reasons to Look Forward to the Future by Johan Norberg

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agricultural Revolution, anti-communist, availability heuristic, Bartolomé de las Casas, Berlin Wall, British Empire, business climate, clean water, Daniel Kahneman / Amos Tversky, demographic transition, desegregation, Donald Trump, Flynn Effect, germ theory of disease, Gini coefficient, Haber-Bosch Process, Hans Island, Hans Rosling, Ignaz Semmelweis: hand washing, income inequality, income per capita, indoor plumbing, Isaac Newton, Jane Jacobs, John Snow's cholera map, Kibera, Louis Pasteur, Mahatma Gandhi, meta analysis, meta-analysis, Mikhail Gorbachev, more computing power than Apollo, moveable type in China, Naomi Klein, open economy, place-making, Rosa Parks, special economic zone, Steven Pinker, telerobotics, The Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith, transatlantic slave trade, very high income, working poor, Xiaogang Anhui farmers

Stockholm: Bonniers, 2009, p. 15. 4 ‘Hearing to receive testimony on the impacts of sequestration and/or full-year continuing resolution of the Department of Defense’, US Senate, Committee on Armed Services, Washington DC, 12 February 2013. http://www.armed-services.senate.gov/imo/media/doc/13-03%20-%202-12-13.pdf (accessed on 12 April 2016). 5 ‘Pope criticizes globalization, denies he is Marxist’, TeleSUR, 11 January 2015. http://www.telesurtv.net/english/news/Pope-Criticizes-Globalization-Denies-he-is-Marxist-20150111-0015.html (accessed on 12 April 2016). 6 Suzanne Goldenberg, ‘Naomi Klein: “We tried it your way and we don’t have another decade to waste” ’, Guardian, 14 September 2015, http://www.theguardian.com/books/2014/sep/14/naomi-klein-interview-capitalism-vs-the-climate (accessed on 12 April 2016). 7 John Gray, Heresies: Against Progress and Other Illusions. London: Granta UK, 2004, p. 32. 8 Angus Maddison, The World Economy: Historical Statistics. Paris: OECD, 2003, p. 262. 1 Food 1 Jonathan Swift, Gulliver’s Travels. London: J. Walker, 1819, p. 148. 2 Christer Byström, ‘Nödår’, section in ‘Sidensjös historia fore år 1900’, http://web.comhem.se/chby/sidensjo/sidensjo.htm (accessed on 12 April 2016). 3 FAO, The State of Food and Agriculture 1947.

General Martin Dempsey, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, recently testified before US Congress: ‘I will personally attest to the fact that . . . [the world] is more dangerous than it has ever been.’4 Pope Francis claims that globalization has condemned many people to starve: ‘It is true that in absolute terms the world’s wealth has grown, but inequality and poverty have arisen.’5 On the political left, activist Naomi Klein argues our civilization is ‘on a collision course’, and that we are ‘destabilising our planet’s life support system’.6 On the right, philosopher John Gray thinks that human beings are ‘homo rapiens’, a predatory and destructive species that is approaching the end of civilization.7 I used to share their pessimism. When I began to shape my worldview in Sweden in the 1980s, I found modern civilization hard to stomach.


pages: 385 words: 133,839

The Coke Machine: The Dirty Truth Behind the World's Favorite Soft Drink by Michael Blanding

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carbon footprint, clean water, collective bargaining, corporate social responsibility, Exxon Valdez, Gordon Gekko, Internet Archive, laissez-faire capitalism, market design, Naomi Klein, New Journalism, Ponzi scheme, profit motive, Ralph Nader, rolodex, Ronald Reagan, shareholder value, The Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith, Thorstein Veblen, union organizing, Upton Sinclair

Page 69 “We don’t know how”: Morris, “Roberto Goizueta and Jack Welch: The Wealth Builders.” Page 69 Coke’s annual spending on advertising: Naomi Klein, No Logo: Taking Aim at the Brand Bullies (New York: Picador, 1999), 471. Page 69 alienating many: Hays, 123–124; Pendergrast, 400. NOTES 3 10 Page 69 “move the needle”: Zyman, 3–5, 118, 172. Page 69 “The sole purpose of marketing”: Zyman, 11. Page 69 “spending to sell” . . . “we poured on more”: Zyman, 15. Page 69 The domestic ad budget rose: Klein, No Logo, 471. Page 70 It was Zyman’s job: Zyman, 138. Page 70 “These are the consumers”: Zyman, 125. Page 70 “dimensionalizing” . . . at every occasion: Zyman, 124, 129. Page 70 compete for Coke’s vast advertising war chest: Zyman, 207. Page 71 Hollywood powerhouse Creative Artists Agency: Naomi Klein, No Logo, 59. Page 71 computer-generated family of polar bears: Matthew Grimm, “Coke Plans to Put Its Polar Bears to Work,” Adweek, June 21, 1993; Dottie Enrico, “Coke’s Polar Bear Is a Papa Bear,” USA Today, December 8, 1994.

“It’s one thing when your stock drops 10 percent because of a mistake your company has made . . . but it’s something else . . . when it drops because of a business with totally different financial and social dy­ namics.” For the next four hours, he patiently explained why people might not pay for a Marlboro but they would pay for a Coke. And he was right. Coke’s stock righted itself in a few weeks. As Naomi Klein recounts in her book No Logo, the real lesson of “Marl­ boro Friday” was that companies needed to invest more money in brand­ ing, not less. The companies that succeeded after the recession of the early 1990s were those that wrapped consumers in their products, creating not just an association with their product but a complete lifestyle—think Star­ bucks, Disney, Apple, Calvin Klein, and Nike.

NOTES 343 Page 219 owned some 50 million Coke shares: “SunTrust Sells Coca-Cola Shares It’s Held 88 Years,” CNBC.com, May 15, 2007, http://www.cnbc.com/id/18677410. Page 220 casualties of a globalizing economy: See Klein, No Logo. Page 220 protests at the WTO meetings: For an activists’ perspective on the event, see David Solnit and Rebecca Solnit, The Battle of the Story of the Battle of Seattle (Edinburgh, Scotland: AK Press, 2009). Page 220 patchouli-scented caravan of activists: See Naomi Klein, Fences and Windows: Dis­ patches from the Front Lines of the Globalization Debate (New York: Picador, 2002). Page 220 removed Coke from its campus: Lovell, “Students Call for Coke Boycott”; “Boycott Killer Coke!” Colombia Action Network. Page 220 Bard College in upstate New York followed suit: Lovell, “Students Call for Coke Boycott”; Baran, “Stop Killer Coke!” Page 221 “Unfortunately, Bard College officials”: Lovell, “Students Call for Coke Boycott.”


pages: 479 words: 133,092

The Coke Machine by Michael Blanding

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carbon footprint, clean water, collective bargaining, corporate social responsibility, Exxon Valdez, Gordon Gekko, Internet Archive, laissez-faire capitalism, market design, Naomi Klein, New Journalism, Ponzi scheme, profit motive, Ralph Nader, rolodex, Ronald Reagan, shareholder value, The Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith, Thorstein Veblen, union organizing, Upton Sinclair

Page 69 “We don’t know how”: Morris, “Roberto Goizueta and Jack Welch: The Wealth Builders.” Page 69 Coke’s annual spending on advertising: Naomi Klein, No Logo: Taking Aim at the Brand Bullies (New York: Picador, 1999), 471. Page 69 alienating many: Hays, 123-124; Pendergrast, 400. Page 69 “move the needle”: Zyman, 3-5, 118, 172. Page 69 “The sole purpose of marketing”: Zyman, 11. Page 69 “spending to sell” . . . “we poured on more”: Zyman, 15. Page 69 The domestic ad budget rose: Klein, No Logo, 471. Page 70 It was Zyman’s job: Zyman, 138. Page 70 “These are the consumers”: Zyman, 125. Page 70 “dimensionalizing”... at every occasion: Zyman, 124, 129. Page 70 compete for Coke’s vast advertising war chest: Zyman, 207. Page 71 Hollywood powerhouse Creative Artists Agency: Naomi Klein, No Logo, 59. Page 71 computer-generated family of polar bears: Matthew Grimm, “Coke Plans to Put Its Polar Bears to Work,” Adweek, June 21, 1993; Dottie Enrico, “Coke’s Polar Bear Is a Papa Bear,” USA Today, December 8, 1994.

“It’s one thing when your stock drops 10 percent because of a mistake your company has made . . . but it’s something else . . . when it drops because of a business with totally different financial and social dynamics.” For the next four hours, he patiently explained why people might not pay for a Marlboro but they would pay for a Coke. And he was right. Coke’s stock righted itself in a few weeks. As Naomi Klein recounts in her book No Logo, the real lesson of “Marlboro Friday” was that companies needed to invest more money in branding, not less. The companies that succeeded after the recession of the early 1990s were those that wrapped consumers in their products, creating not just an association with their product but a complete lifestyle—think Starbucks, Disney, Apple, Calvin Klein, and Nike. “And then there were companies that had always understood that they were selling brands before product,” writes Klein, citing Coke at the top of her list.

Page 219 owned some 50 million Coke shares: “SunTrust Sells Coca-Cola Shares It’s Held 88 Years,” CNBC.com, May 15, 2007, http://www.cnbc.com/id/18677410. Page 220 casualties of a globalizing economy: See Klein, No Logo. Page 220 protests at the WTO meetings: For an activists’ perspective on the event, see David Solnit and Rebecca Solnit, The Battle of the Story of the Battle of Seattle (Edinburgh, Scotland: AK Press, 2009). Page 220 patchouli-scented caravan of activists: See Naomi Klein, Fences and Windows: Dispatches from the Front Lines of the Globalization Debate (New York: Picador, 2002). Page 220 removed Coke from its campus: Lovell, “Students Call for Coke Boycott”; “Boycott Killer Coke!” Colombia Action Network. Page 220 Bard College in upstate New York followed suit: Lovell, “Students Call for Coke Boycott”; Baran, “Stop Killer Coke!” Page 221 “Unfortunately, Bard College officials”: Lovell, “Students Call for Coke Boycott.”


pages: 422 words: 131,666

Life Inc.: How the World Became a Corporation and How to Take It Back by Douglas Rushkoff

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affirmative action, Amazon Mechanical Turk, banks create money, big-box store, Bretton Woods, car-free, colonial exploitation, Community Supported Agriculture, complexity theory, computer age, corporate governance, credit crunch, currency manipulation / currency intervention, David Ricardo: comparative advantage, death of newspapers, don't be evil, Donald Trump, double entry bookkeeping, easy for humans, difficult for computers, financial innovation, Firefox, full employment, global village, Google Earth, greed is good, Howard Rheingold, income per capita, invention of the printing press, invisible hand, Jane Jacobs, John Nash: game theory, joint-stock company, Kevin Kelly, laissez-faire capitalism, loss aversion, market bubble, market design, Marshall McLuhan, Milgram experiment, moral hazard, mutually assured destruction, Naomi Klein, new economy, New Urbanism, Norbert Wiener, peak oil, place-making, placebo effect, Ponzi scheme, price mechanism, price stability, principal–agent problem, private military company, profit maximization, profit motive, race to the bottom, RAND corporation, rent-seeking, RFID, road to serfdom, Ronald Reagan, short selling, Silicon Valley, Simon Kuznets, social software, Steve Jobs, Telecommunications Act of 1996, telemarketer, The Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith, Thomas L Friedman, too big to fail, trade route, trickle-down economics, union organizing, urban decay, urban planning, urban renewal, Vannevar Bush, Victor Gruen, white flight, working poor, Works Progress Administration, Y2K, young professional

When a Pentagon contract manager, Charles Smith, confronted Kellogg, Brown & Root, at the time a Halliburton subsidiary, about an extra billion dollars of unexplained war billings, he was summarily replaced by—you guessed it—an outsourced auditing company. The more expensive war gets, the less is available for social services and infrastructure at home. The poorer people get, the more easily they can be persuaded that foreign enemies greedy for oil profits and obsessed with religious violence are the real problem. The daily toll of bodies begins to feel less relevant than the escalating price at the pump. As Naomi Klein amply demonstrated in her book on the extension of war profiteering to other industries, Disaster Capitalism, human life is no longer even a valid component of the global business plan. It’s not really part of the equation. While privatized war provides direct evidence of the way market forces working within particular institutional structures can end up promoting conflict, with all the human and material waste that this implies, Klein sees the same essential dynamic at play elsewhere.

Britney Spears’s latest breakdown and the invasion of Iraq are both treated as major media events deserving of equal time and space. In the face of all this, the hippest way out is to adopt the attitude of amused and quizzical cynicism worn by Stephen Colbert and Jon Stewart. Besides, no matter how critical of corporatism some entertainers and journalists might be, the impact of their arguments is undercut by their dependence on corporatized media for dissemination. Stephen Colbert and Jon Stewart work for Viacom. Naomi Klein writes for a division of the German publisher Verlagsgruppe, and this book is published by a subsidiary of Bertelsmann. We all have mortgages to pay. Even most progressive journalism—just like the kind that emerged in the early 1900s—tends to frighten and isolate the middle classes rather than bring them out of their homes to improve their communities. Populists such as CNN’s Lou Dobbs, and others speaking out on behalf of working stiffs, stoke more rage and discontent than thoughtful engagement.

Ari Wallach Felipe Ribeiro Andrew Mayer Fernando Cervantes Bernard Lietaer Armanda Lewis Howard Rheingold David Pescovitz John Merryman Jonathan Taylor Propaganda Lance Strate John Leland John Rogers Darren Sharp Jules Marshall Amy Sohn Christina Amini Jason Liszkiewicz Jeff Newelt Kevin Werbach Xeni Jardin Timothy Mohn Anaid Gomez-Ortigoza Matthew Burton Max Brockman Josh Klein Russel Weinberger Jeff Gordiner Helen Churko Getachew Mengistie Courtney Turco Justin Vogt Joost Raessens Nancy Hechinger Rachel Dretzen Benjamin Kirshbaum Barak Goodman Ken Miller Naomi Klein David Feuer Kate Norris and, most of all, Barbara and Mamie Rushkoff NOTES CHAPTER ONE Once Removed: The Corporate Life-Form 4 Most history books recount For the best descriptions of late Middle Ages and Renaissance life and commerce, see Fernand Braudel, The Wheels of Commerce: Civilization and Capitalism, 15th-18th Century (Los Angeles: University of California Press, 1992), and Carlo M.


pages: 171 words: 54,334

Barefoot Into Cyberspace: Adventures in Search of Techno-Utopia by Becky Hogge, Damien Morris, Christopher Scally

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A Declaration of the Independence of Cyberspace, back-to-the-land, Berlin Wall, Buckminster Fuller, Chelsea Manning, citizen journalism, cloud computing, corporate social responsibility, disintermediation, Douglas Engelbart, Fall of the Berlin Wall, game design, Hacker Ethic, informal economy, Jacob Appelbaum, jimmy wales, Julian Assange, Kevin Kelly, Menlo Park, Mother of all demos, Naomi Klein, Network effects, New Journalism, Norbert Wiener, Richard Stallman, Silicon Valley, Skype, Socratic dialogue, Steve Jobs, Steve Wozniak, Steven Levy, Stewart Brand, technoutopianism, Telecommunications Act of 1996, Vannevar Bush, Whole Earth Catalog, Whole Earth Review, WikiLeaks

It goes unsaid why this might be a good idea – the lightning talk is mostly to pitch the micro-electronics lab Mitch will be running in the basement throughout the congress. But I know why I like it. Every time I visit London there are more TVs. The latest ones coat the walls of the escalator halls in the capital’s most-used underground stations, making me long for the static paper ads I once found so intrusive. Naomi Klein writes about the corporate takeover of “public” space in her best-selling anti-globalisation polemic No Logo. Mitch Altman’s device is the logical (and slightly less risky) extension of the activities of urban guerrillas like Adbusters, who reclaim public space by making midnight alterations to the billboards of major brands in order to turn them into satirical art. When I was growing up, it was activism like this that looked most relevant to me.

If what’s interesting about internet freedom is this idea of creating digital public spaces where we can debate whatever issues are relevant. And if what’s exciting about internet freedom is that countries that don’t have conventional public spaces could now have digital public spaces, then we have to recognise, those aren’t public spaces. Those are private spaces; those are corporate-controlled spaces.” * * * In No Logo, Naomi Klein details exactly what’s wrong with the real-world emergence of pseudo-public space in corporate America: The conflation of shopping and entertainment found at the superstores and theme-park malls has created a vast grey area of pseudo-public private space. Politicians, police, social workers and even religious leaders all recognize that malls have become the modern town square. But unlike the old town squares, which were and still are sites for community discussion, protests and political rallies, the only type of speech that is welcome here is marketing and other consumer patter.

Power Systems: Conversations on Global Democratic Uprisings and the New Challenges to U.S. Empire by Noam Chomsky, David Barsamian

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affirmative action, Affordable Care Act / Obamacare, Albert Einstein, Chelsea Manning, collective bargaining, colonial rule, corporate personhood, David Brooks, discovery of DNA, double helix, failed state, Howard Zinn, hydraulic fracturing, income inequality, inflation targeting, Julian Assange, land reform, Martin Wolf, Mohammed Bouazizi, Naomi Klein, new economy, obamacare, Occupy movement, oil shale / tar sands, pattern recognition, quantitative easing, Ralph Nader, Ralph Waldo Emerson, single-payer health, sovereign wealth fund, The Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith, theory of mind, Tobin tax, union organizing, Upton Sinclair, uranium enrichment, WikiLeaks

Just at the time that these emissions reports were coming out, the Financial Times euphorically suggested that the United States was entering a new age of plenty and might have a century of energy independence, even global hegemony, ahead of it thanks to the new techniques of extracting fossil fuels from shale rock and tar sands.32 Leaving aside the debates about whether these predictions are right or wrong, celebrating this prospect is like saying, “Fine, let’s commit suicide.” I’m sure the people who write such articles have read the same climate change reports I have and take them seriously. But their institutional role makes such positions a social or cultural necessity. They could make different decisions, but that would require real rethinking of the nature of our institutions. The propaganda barrage has been effective. As Naomi Klein writes in the Nation, “A 2007 Harris poll found that 71 percent of Americans believed that the continued burning of fossil fuels would cause the climate to change. By 2009 the figure had dropped to 51 percent. In June 2011 the number of Americans who agreed was down to 44 percent—well under half the population. According to Scott Keeter, director of survey research at the Pew Research Center for People and the Press, this is ‘among the largest shifts over a short period of time seen in recent public opinion history.’”33 A significant majority of Americans still think climate change is a serious problem, but it’s true that it has declined.

Fiona Harvey, “World Headed for Irreversible Climate Change in Five Years, IEA Warns,” Guardian (London), 9 November 2011. 30. Ibid. 31. Ibid. See also Andrew Revkin, “High Odds of Hot Times,” New York Times, Dot Earth blog, 20 May 2009. See also David Chandler, “Climate Change Odds Much Worse than Thought,” MIT News, 19 May 2009. 32. Edward Luce, “America Is Entering a New Age of Plenty,” Financial Times (London), 20 November 2011. 33. Naomi Klein, “Capitalism vs. the Climate,” Nation, 28 November 2011. 34. Clifford Krauss and Jad Mouawad, “Oil Industry Backs Protests of Emissions Bill,” New York Times, 18 August 2009. 35. Davis Asman, Interview with Ron Paul, Fox Business, 4 November 2009. 7. Learning How to Discover 1. William James, The Principles of Psychology, vol. 1 (New York: Henry Holt, 1918), p. 488. 2. Bill Keller, “Diplomats and Dissidents,” New York Times, 13 May 2012. 3.


pages: 391 words: 22,799

To Serve God and Wal-Mart: The Making of Christian Free Enterprise by Bethany Moreton

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affirmative action, anti-communist, Berlin Wall, big-box store, Bretton Woods, Buckminster Fuller, collective bargaining, corporate personhood, deindustrialization, desegregation, Donald Trump, estate planning, Fall of the Berlin Wall, Frederick Winslow Taylor, George Gilder, global village, informal economy, invisible hand, market fundamentalism, Mont Pelerin Society, mortgage tax deduction, Naomi Klein, new economy, New Urbanism, post-industrial society, postindustrial economy, prediction markets, price anchoring, Ralph Nader, RFID, road to serfdom, Ronald Reagan, Silicon Valley, Stewart Brand, strikebreaker, The Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith, union organizing, walkable city, Washington Consensus, white flight, Whole Earth Catalog, Works Progress Administration

To the contrary, it was an unstable compound, the 269 TO SERVE GOD AND WAL - M ART product in part of impressive agglomerations of power and money.21 But it was also the progeny of pragmatic responses to real needs, of idealistic hope in redemption, and of the elevation of serÂ�vice from its devalued position in the broader culture. The ideological work required to attach these human impulses to the market or contain them within a narrow defiÂ�niÂ�tion of the sacred was breathtaking. Surveying the free-market transitions imposed in places like postKatrina New Orleans and post-invasion Iraq, Naomi Klein rightly draws attention to what she terms “diÂ�sasÂ�ter capÂ�italism,” or “the orchestrated raids on the public sphere in the wake of catastrophic events.”22 Quoting the free market’s most inÂ�fluÂ�enÂ�tial recent spokesman, she offers us Milton Friedman’s instructions for social change: “Only a crisis—acÂ�tual or perceived—,” wrote the Nobel Prize–winning economist in 1962, “produces real change.

This summary of neoliberalism draws heavily on James Ferguson, “Introduction,” Global Shadows: Africa in the Neoliberal World Order (Durham, NC: Duke University Press, 2006), 1–23; Nancy Folbre, The Invisible Heart: Economics and Family Values (New York: New Press, 2001); David Harvey, A Brief History of Neoliberalism (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2005); and Robert Kuttner, Everything for Sale: The Virtues and Limits of Markets (New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 1997). 3. Elizabeth A. Fones-Wolf, Selling Free Enterprise: The Business Assault on Labor and Liberalism, 1945–60, History of Communication (Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1994); Naomi Klein, The Shock Doctrine: The Rise of Disaster Capitalism (New York: Metropolitan Books, 2007); Kim Phillips-Fein, “Top-Down Revolution: Businessmen, Intellectuals, and Politicians Against the New Deal, 1945–1964,” Enterprise & Society (2006): 686–94; Fred Turner, From Counterculture to Cyberculture: Stewart Brand, the Whole Earth Network, and the Rise of Digital Utopianism (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2007). 312 NOTES TO PAGES 127 – 1 3 1 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. 25.

See, for example, Elizabeth Fones-Wolf, Selling Free Enterprise: The Business Assault on Labor and Liberalism, 1945–1960 (Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1995); Kim Phillips-Fein, Invisible Hands: The Making of the Conservative Movement from the New Deal to Reagan (New York: W.W. Norton, 2009); James K. Galbraith, The Predator State: How Conservatives Abandoned the Free Market and Why Liberals Should, Too (New York: Free Press, 2008). 22. Naomi Klein, The Shock Doctrine: The Rise of Disaster Capitalism (New York: Metropolitan Books, 2007), 6. 23. Milton Friedman, quoted in Klein, Shock Doctrine, 6. 24. Liza Featherstone, “Down and Out in Discount America,” The Nation, January 8, 2005, 11–15; Steven Greenhouse, “Workers at Pork Plant in North Carolina Vote to Â�Unionize After a 15-Year Fight,” NYT, December 13, 2008, A10; George Packer, “The Hardest Vote,” New Yorker, October 13, 2008; Michael Luo and Karen Ann Cullotta, “Even Workers Surprised by the Success of Factory Sit-In,” NYT, December 13, 2008, A9; Carolyn Crist, “Group Seeks Higher Wage,” Red and Black [University of Georgia], February 29, 2008; www.econjustice.org. 349 Acknowledgments It takes a village to write a book, and I only wish the virtual village I have depended on for this one could be gathered into a single small town, maybe in the Ozarks.


pages: 482 words: 122,497

The Wrecking Crew: How Conservatives Rule by Thomas Frank

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affirmative action, anti-communist, barriers to entry, Berlin Wall, Bernie Madoff, British Empire, collective bargaining, corporate governance, Credit Default Swap, David Brooks, edge city, financial deregulation, full employment, George Gilder, guest worker program, income inequality, invisible hand, job satisfaction, Mikhail Gorbachev, Mont Pelerin Society, mortgage debt, Naomi Klein, new economy, P = NP, Plutocrats, plutocrats, Ponzi scheme, Ralph Nader, rent control, Richard Florida, road to serfdom, rolodex, Ronald Reagan, school vouchers, shareholder value, Silicon Valley, stem cell, Telecommunications Act of 1996, the scientific method, too big to fail, union organizing, War on Poverty

Not only would privatization have changed the soul; it would have permanently reversed the political valence of the famous “third rail of American politics,” transforming Social Security overnight from the bane of the business community into its most powerful weapon. Touch Wall Street and you’re dead. The longing for permanent victory over liberalism is not unique to the Anglo-Saxon world. In country after country, business elites have come up with ingenious ways to limit the public’s political choices. One of the most effective of these has been massive public debt. Naomi Klein, a journalist who has traveled the world documenting the great shift to the right, finds that in case after case, the burden of enormous debts—often piled up by dictatorships or other noxious regimes—forced democratic countries to accept a laissez-faire system that they otherwise found deeply distasteful. Regardless of who borrowed the money and the appalling ways in which it was spent, these debts had to be repaid—and repaying them, in turn, meant that a nation had to agree to restructure its economy the way the bankers preferred: by deregulating, privatizing, and cutting spending.6 The American version of the debt trick is the vast federal deficit that magically reappears whenever conservatives take the driver’s seat.

John Tierney, “From FEMA to WEMA,” New York Times, September 20, 2005. 29. Lincoln Steffens, The Shame of the Cities (1904; reprint, New York: Sagamore Press, 1957), p. 4. Lincoln Steffens, The Autobiography of Lincoln Steffens (New York: Harcourt, Brace, 1931), p. 413. 30. “In one place on Earth, the theory would finally be put into practice in its most perfect and uncompromised form,” writes Naomi Klein. “A country of 25 million would not be rebuilt as it was before the war; it would be erased, disappeared. In its place would spring forth a gleaming showroom for laissez-faire economics, a utopia such as the world had never seen.” Klein, “Baghdad Year Zero: Pillaging Iraq in Pursuit of a Neocon Utopia,” Harper’s, September 2004. “[Paul] Bremer had come to Iraq to build not just a democracy but a free market,” writes Rajiv Chandrasekaran, the Washington Post reporter, in Imperial Life in the Emerald City: Inside Iraq’s Green Zone (New York: Knopf, 2006).

Conservatives must establish their own doctrine and declare their victories permanent, not only in foreign policy, but in domestic policy as well. A revolution is not successful unless it succeeds in preserving itself.” Hart, The Third Generation, p. 158. 2. On breaking the cycle of nationalization and privatization, see John Burton, “Privatization: The Thatcher Case,” Managerial and Decision Economics, 8 (1987). On the privatization of housing, see Naomi Klein, Shock Doctrine: The Rise of Disaster Capitalism (New York: Metropolitan Books, 2007), p. 135. Eradicating Labor Party socialism: Richard A. Melcher, “Thatcher’s Revolution: Act III,” Business Week, May 25, 1987. 3. The quotes cited here are drawn from the following essays, most of them available on the Web site of Americans for Tax Reform. “Crush the structures”: Norquist, “The 2000 Elections Will Decide the Democrats’ Future,” American Spectator, April 1999.


pages: 525 words: 116,295

The New Digital Age: Transforming Nations, Businesses, and Our Lives by Eric Schmidt, Jared Cohen

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3D printing, access to a mobile phone, additive manufacturing, airport security, Amazon Mechanical Turk, Amazon Web Services, anti-communist, augmented reality, Ayatollah Khomeini, barriers to entry, bitcoin, borderless world, call centre, Chelsea Manning, citizen journalism, clean water, cloud computing, crowdsourcing, data acquisition, Dean Kamen, Elon Musk, failed state, fear of failure, Filter Bubble, Google Earth, Google Glasses, hive mind, income inequality, information trail, invention of the printing press, job automation, Julian Assange, Khan Academy, Kickstarter, knowledge economy, Law of Accelerating Returns, market fundamentalism, means of production, mobile money, mutually assured destruction, Naomi Klein, offshore financial centre, peer-to-peer lending, personalized medicine, Peter Singer: altruism, Ray Kurzweil, RFID, self-driving car, sentiment analysis, Silicon Valley, Skype, Snapchat, social graph, speech recognition, Steve Jobs, Steven Pinker, Stewart Brand, Stuxnet, The Wisdom of Crowds, upwardly mobile, Whole Earth Catalog, WikiLeaks, young professional, zero day

A parallel authority was set up to resolve disputes: Ibid., see Discussion of the Cassation Commission, pages 28 and 30. But despite their good intentions: Ibid, 29–31. The Somali diaspora: France Lamy, “Mapping Towards Crisis Relief in the Horn of Africa,” Google Maps, August 12, 2011, http://google-latlong.blogspot.com/2011/08/mapping-towards-crisis-relief-in-horn.html. The journalist Naomi Klein: Naomi Klein, The Shock Doctrine: The Rise of Disaster Capitalism (New York: Metropolitan Books/Henry Holt, 2007). hundreds of thousands were killed: “Paul Farmer Examines Haiti ‘After the Earthquake,’ ” NPR, July 12, 2011, http://www.npr.org/2011/07/12/137762573/paul-farmer-examines-haiti-after-the-earthquake. The Haitian government believes: “Haiti,” New York Times, updated August 26, 2012, http://topics.nytimes.com/top/news/international/countriesandterritories/haiti/index.html.

All it takes is a bit of creativity, plenty of bandwidth and the will to innovate. 1 These difficulties were compounded by the fact that the United States set up operational headquarters in Saddam Hussein’s former palaces, which had been turned into electronically shielded bunkers by the paranoid dictator. 2 We take these duties from a list of the ten functions of the state in the book Fixing Failed States, by Clare Lockhart and Ashraf Ghani, the founders of the Institute for State Effectiveness. 3 The journalist Naomi Klein famously called these actors “disaster capitalists” in her provocative book The Shock Doctrine. Klein argues that neo-liberal economics advocates seek to exploit a postcrisis environment to impose free-market ideals, usually to the detriment of the existing economic order. Like psychological shock therapy, this free-market fundamentalism uses the appearance of a “blank slate” to violently reshape the economic environment. 4 Estimates on the death toll of the Haitian earthquake vary widely.

The White Man's Burden: Why the West's Efforts to Aid the Rest Have Done So Much Ill and So Little Good by William Easterly

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airport security, anti-communist, Asian financial crisis, bank run, banking crisis, Bretton Woods, British Empire, call centre, clean water, colonial exploitation, colonial rule, Edward Glaeser, European colonialism, failed state, farmers can use mobile phones to check market prices, George Akerlof, Hernando de Soto, income inequality, income per capita, Indoor air pollution, invisible hand, Kenneth Rogoff, laissez-faire capitalism, land reform, land tenure, microcredit, moral hazard, Naomi Klein, purchasing power parity, randomized controlled trial, Ronald Reagan, Scramble for Africa, structural adjustment programs, The Fortune at the Bottom of the Pyramid, the scientific method, The Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith, transaction costs, War on Poverty, Xiaogang Anhui farmers

To reduce international threats and improve the prospects for individuals in such polities, alternative institutional arrangements supported by external actors, such as de facto trusteeships and shared sovereignty, should be added to the list of policy options. He concludes: “De facto trusteeships, and especially shared sovereignty, would offer political leaders a better chance of bringing peace and prosperity to the populations of badly governed states.” Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice appointed Stephen Krasner to be head of policy planning at the State Department on February 4, 2005. As Naomi Klein wrote in The Nation on May 2, 2005, the U.S. State Department has an interesting new office: On August 5, 2004, the White House created the Office of the Coordinator for Reconstruction and Stabilization, headed by former U.S. Ambassador to Ukraine Carlos Pascual. Its mandate is to draw up elaborate “post-conflict” plans for up to twenty-five countries that are not, as of yet, in conflict….

-led Coalition Provisional Authority (CPA) in 2003 drew up one of the most radical free-market reforms ever attempted anywhere. Stanford economist John McMillan likened it to the “big-bang” free-market programs that had failed in the ex-Communist countries. The Economist wrote in 2003 that the intention of the CPA for Iraq was to “abruptly transform its economy into a virtual free trade zone.2 Naomi Klein wrote in September 2004 in Harper’s magazine about the attempt to transform Iraq from the blank slate of post-invasion “Year Zero” into a “neocon utopia.” CPA chief Paul Bremer announced the layoffs of five hundred thousand soldiers and state workers, the privatization of two hundred state enterprises, no restrictions on foreign investment in the nonoil sector, minimal taxes, and no import tariffs.

Krishnan, “Professor Kingsfield Goes to Delhi: American Academics, the Ford Foundation, and the Development of Legal Education in India,” William Mitchell College of Law Working Paper no. 3, March 2005. CHAPTER 9. INVADING THE POOR 1.Quoted in http://www.socialstudieshelp.com/USRA_Imperialism_Justify.htm. 2.John McMillan, “Avoid Hubris: And Other Lessons for Reformers,” Stanford University mimeograph, July 2004. 3.Naomi Klein, “Baghdad Year Zero: Pillaging Iraq in Pursuit of a Neocon Utopia,” Harper’s, September 2004. 4.Ferguson, Colossus, p. 300. 5.Stephen Kinzer, Blood of Brothers: Life and War in Nicaragua, New York: Penguin, 1991, p. 364. 6.Lynn Horton, Peasants in Arms: War and Peace in the Mountains of Nicaragua, Athens: Ohio University Center for International Studies, 1988, p. 166. 7.The quote is from a Reagan speech made in 1986. 8.World Bank, Country Assistance Strategy, 2002. 9.Kinzer, Blood of Brothers, p. 179. 10.Horton, Peasants in Arms, p. 201. 11.Kinzer, Blood of Brothers, pp. 144–45. 12.Robert Kagan, A Twilight Struggle: American Power and Nicaragua, 1977–1990, New York: Free Press, 1996, pp. 210, 212. 13.Ibid., p. 218; Kinzer, Blood of Brothers, pp. 97–98 14.Horton, Peasants in Arms, pp. 233–35. 15.Ibid., pp. 267–69. 16.Ibid., pp. 281–82. 17.IMF, Article IV Report, February 2003, executive summary. 18.World Bank, Country Assistance Strategy, December 18, 2002. 19.Worth H.


pages: 475 words: 149,310

Multitude: War and Democracy in the Age of Empire by Michael Hardt, Antonio Negri

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affirmative action, Berlin Wall, Bretton Woods, British Empire, conceptual framework, David Graeber, Defenestration of Prague, deskilling, Fall of the Berlin Wall, feminist movement, Francis Fukuyama: the end of history, friendly fire, global village, Howard Rheingold, Howard Zinn, illegal immigration, Joseph Schumpeter, labour mobility, land reform, land tenure, late capitalism, means of production, Naomi Klein, new economy, private military company, race to the bottom, RAND corporation, reserve currency, Richard Stallman, Slavoj Žižek, The Chicago School, The Structural Transformation of the Public Sphere, Thomas Malthus, Thorstein Veblen, Tobin tax, transaction costs, union organizing, War on Poverty, Washington Consensus

There are also numerous books by left-wing journalists and scholars that counter that the mainstream media is not liberal but conservative. See, for example, Eric Alterman, What Liberal Media? The Truth about Bias and the News (New York: Basic Books, 2003); and Edward Herman, The Myth of the Liberal Media (New York: Peter Lang, 1999). 55 See David Morley and Kuan-Hsing Chen, Stuart Hall: Critical Dialogues in Cultural Studies (New York: Routledge, 1996). 56 For a description of the “social centers” in Italy, see Naomi Klein, Fences and Windows: Dispatches from the Front Lines of the Globalization Debate (New York: Picador, 2002), 224-27. 57 For a useful summary of grievances across the world, see Samir Amin and François Houtart, eds., Mondialisation des résistences: L’état des luttes (Paris: L’Harmattan, 2002). 58 The literature on the 2000 U.S. presidential election is voluminous and growing. For an excellent analysis that focuses on the role of the media and the dangers it poses for democracy, see Douglas Kellner, Grand Theft 2000: Media Spectacle and a Stolen Election (Lanham, MD: Rowman and Littlefield, 2001).

For a list of protests against the IMF in the global south, see Jessica Woodroffe and Mark Ellis-Jones, “States of Unrest: Resistance to IMF Policies in Poor Countries,” in the newsletter World Development Movement Report (London, September 2000). 79 See Jeffrey St. Clair, “Seattle Diary: It’s a Gas, Gas, Gas,” New Left Review, no. 238 (November-December 1999): 81-96. 80 See Mike Moore’s personal description of the successful path of the WTO from Seattle to Doha, A World Without Walls: Freedom, Development, Free Trade and Global Governance (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2003). 81 The articles that Naomi Klein wrote as she traveled among the various globalization protest movements give a beautiful picture of their commonality and coherence. See Fences and Windows: Dispatches from the Front Lines of the Globalization Debate (New York: Picador, 2002). 82 Social democrats (ever since the famous Bernstein debate) have insisted on the contradiction between reform and revolution, emphasizing the reasonableness of the former and the absurdity of the latter.

See “Many Roads to Morning: Rethinking Nonviolence,” in Webs of Power, 206-36. 132 It is unclear in Slavoj Žižek’s provocative book Repeating Lenin (Zabreb: Arkzin, 2001) whether he is advocating repeating, as we are, the democratic goals of Lenin’s project without the vanguard leadership of the Bolshevik Party or whether he is, on the contrary, advocating just such an elitist form of political leadership. 133 Clarisse Lispector, The Passion according to G. H., trans. Ronald Sousa (Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 1988), 3. 134 Shakespeare, Julius Caesar, act 4, scene 3. ACKNOWLEDGMENTS It would be impossible here to thank all of those who helped us in the course of writing this book. We would like simply to acknowledge those who read the entire manuscript and gave us comments: Naomi Klein, Scott Moyers, Judith Revel, and Kathi Weeks. aA bricoleur is someone who constructs by piecing things together ad hoc, something like a handyman.


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The Great Disruption: Why the Climate Crisis Will Bring on the End of Shopping and the Birth of a New World by Paul Gilding

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airport security, Albert Einstein, BRICs, carbon footprint, clean water, cleantech, Climategate, corporate social responsibility, decarbonisation, energy security, Exxon Valdez, failed state, fear of failure, income inequality, Joseph Schumpeter, market fundamentalism, Naomi Klein, new economy, nuclear winter, oil shock, peak oil, Ponzi scheme, purchasing power parity, Ronald Reagan, shareholder value, The Spirit Level, The Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith, union organizing, University of East Anglia

The 1980s also saw the spectacular growth of environmental organizations around the world and strong campaigning against corporate pollution, with individual companies targeted rather than just a general push for regulation. This was the birth of campaigns targeting brands, with activists deliberately using a company’s focus on its brand as a point of vulnerability, as they did with Nike over sweatshops. Writer Naomi Klein noted: “Brand image, the source of so much corporate wealth, is also, it turns out, the corporate Achilles’ heel.”13 The more a company is a brand image, the more vulnerable it becomes to activist campaigns targeting that image. This was also the era when the seriousness of fighting for environmental protection came into sharp focus, with the murder of a Greenpeace activist by a Western government.

Graham Turner, A Comparison of the “Limits to Growth” with 30 Years of Reality, Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization, 2008 (Canberra, Australia: CSIRO, 2005). Available online at http://www.csiro.au/files/files/plje.pdf. 11. Ingrid Eckerman, The Bhopal Saga—Causes and Consequences of the World’s Largest Industrial Disaster (India: Universities Press, 2005). 12. I first heard of this phrase in 1999 when used by John Passacantando, then of Ozone Action and later of Greenpeace. 13. Naomi Klein, No Logo (New York: Picador, 2002), 343. CHAPTER 3: A VERY BIG PROBLEM 1. Principle 15, Rio Declaration on Environment and Development, 1992. Available online at http://www.un.org/documents/ga/conf151/aconf15126-1annex1.htm. 2. Article 2, Framework Convention on Climate Change, 1992. Available online at http://unfcc.int. 3. Naomi Oreskes and Erik Conway, Merchants of Doubt: How a Handful of Scientists Obscured the Truth on Issues from Tobacco Smoke to Global Warming (New York: Bloomsbury Press, 2010). 4.


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Carjacked: The Culture of the Automobile and Its Effect on Our Lives by Catherine Lutz, Anne Lutz Fernandez

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barriers to entry, car-free, carbon footprint, collateralized debt obligation, failed state, feminist movement, fudge factor, Gordon Gekko, housing crisis, illegal immigration, income inequality, inventory management, market design, market fundamentalism, mortgage tax deduction, Naomi Klein, Nate Silver, New Urbanism, oil shock, peak oil, Ralph Nader, Ralph Waldo Emerson, ride hailing / ride sharing, Thorstein Veblen, traffic fines, Unsafe at Any Speed, urban planning, white flight, women in the workforce, working poor, Zipcar

Together with Firestone, Standard Oil, and Phillips Petroleum, GM eliminated their competition, buying and then ripping up entire street car systems in 45 cities between 1936 and 1950.28 The car system we have today is, in a thousand ways, a creature of the year-in-and-yearout decisions of these corporations and of government, including especially the choice to invest what is a comparatively very small amount in public transportation. As the various stimulus bills made their way through Congress in 2009 with the urgent prompt of the economic crisis, it was hardly surprising, then, that the government targeted much of the money to “shovelready” projects, which were most often roads and bridges—infrastructure for the car system. This is an example of what Naomi Klein has called “disaster capitalism,” the phenomenon in which companies garner their most massive profits in extreme or crisis conditions such as wars, earthquakes, tsunamis, hurricanes, and housing price collapses.29 While most people saw the crisis of 2008 as comeuppance for the car industry (and it certainly was unpleasant for the tens of thousands of laid-off auto workers), it in fact helped the car industry—both directly through bailout money and indirectly (and more importantly) through massive new road and road repair subsidies that will help sustain the car system far into the future.

Center for Responsive Politics, analysis of FEC data; Ken Dilanian, “Carmakers Funnel More Funds to Democrats,” USA Today, June 14, 2007. Andrew Ross Sorkin, “As Political Winds Shift, Detroit Charts New Course,” New York Times, May 20, 2009. By 1969, 600,000 people were working in local, state, and federal governments exclusively on the planning, maintaining, and repairing of roads. James Howard Kunstler, The Geography of Nowhere: The Rise and Decline of America’s ManMade Landscape (New York: Free Press, 1993). Naomi Klein, The Shock Doctrine: The Rise of Disaster Capitalism (New York: Metropolitan Books, 2007). Surface Transportation Policy Project, “The $300 Billion Question: Are We Buying a Better Transportation System?” January 2003. www.transact.org/report.asp?id=223. CHAPTER 2 1. 2. 3. While the Mercedes sponsorship should lead us to take this claim with a grain of salt, 36 percent of a random sample of Americans with cars who were surveyed said they loved their cars.


pages: 267 words: 106,340

Europe old and new: transnationalism, belonging, xenophobia by Ray Taras

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affirmative action, anti-communist, Ayatollah Khomeini, Berlin Wall, British Empire, carbon footprint, centre right, collective bargaining, energy security, full employment, illegal immigration, immigration reform, low skilled workers, Mikhail Gorbachev, Naomi Klein, North Sea oil, open economy, postnationalism / post nation state, Potemkin village, Ronald Reagan, World Values Survey

One of these economic interests, imputed to multinational corporations, is the effort to create a division of labor so as to keep labor costs to a minimum. In the case of the enlarged EU, a hierarchy based on a division of labor seems to have unfolded. Eastern Europe’s part in transnationalism has been construed by antiglobalization and nationalist critics as primarily economic in nature: the region serves as a sweatshop for western member states. This is a provocative claim to make. According to Naomi Klein, “Poland, Bulgaria, Hungary, and the Czech Republic are the postmodern serfs, providing low-wage labor for the factories where clothes, electronics, and cars are produced for 20–25 per cent of the cost of making them in Western Europe.” This is a cheap-labor substitution economy. As she asked about the 74 Chapter 3 EU, “How do you stay open to business and closed to people? Easy: First you expand the perimeter.

See Craig Calhoun, “The Class Consciousness of Frequent Travelers: Toward a Critique of Actually Existing Cosmopolitanism,” South Atlantic Quarterly 101, no. 4 (2002). For a different perspective, see Seyla Benhabib, Another Cosmopolitanism (New York: Oxford University Press, 2006). 51. Calhoun, “The Class Consciousness,” 872–73. 52. Calhoun, “The Class Consciousness,” 885. 53. Hedetoft, The Global Turn, 5. 54. Naomi Klein, “The Rise of the Fortress Continent,” The Nation, February 3, 2003. Metacultural Presumptions of European Elites 81 55. Angela Merkel (speech at at the official ceremony to celebrate the 50th anniversary of the signing of the Treaties of Rome, March 25, 2007), www.eu2007.de/ en/News/Speeches_Interviews/March/0325BKBerliner.html. 56. Merkel, speech. 57. Ernst Hirsch Ballin, “European Identity and Interreligious Dialogue,” in The Cultural Diversity of European Unity: Findings, Explanations and Reflections from the European Values Study, eds.


pages: 293 words: 89,712

After Zionism: One State for Israel and Palestine by Antony Loewenstein, Ahmed Moor

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Boycotts of Israel, British Empire, cognitive dissonance, colonial rule, facts on the ground, ghettoisation, land reform, Naomi Klein, Ronald Reagan, Rosa Parks, young professional

The slaughter of Gaza – nearly four hundred children killed in a brutally efficient twenty-two days – had wakened American Jews. There was my new friend, Code Pink’s Medea Benjamin, who had worked all her life on global political issues, but who grew up in a Zionist family and had long been held by that allegiance to say as little as possible about Israel. Horrified by Gaza, she had now thrown herself into the question and was doing more than anyone else to help the Gazans, defying the Israeli siege. Naomi Klein, the bestselling author, was also galvanised by Gaza. In an appearance on the West Bank after the onslaught, she had apologised to Palestinians for her “cowardice” in not being more forthright before. These women were pioneers, but the entire community was in tumult over the question of Zionism. Even liberal Zionists were disturbed by what they saw. And it was foolish to deny that Jews were important in American society; we made up a significant portion of the liberal establishment, from newspaper columnists to university presidents to the hedge fund managers and real estate magnates who paid for all the non-profits.

He has written for the Washington Post, Los Angeles Times, Huffington Post, the Guardian and Al Jazeera English and is currently pursuing a master’s degree in Public Policy at Harvard University’s Kennedy School of Government. “Nothing will change until we are capable of imagining a radically different future. By bringing together many of the clearest and most ethical thinkers about the Israeli–Palestinian conflict, this book gives us the intellectual tools we need to do just that. Courageous and exciting.” Naomi Klein, author of The Shock Doctrine To our parents, and the Palestinians and Israelis who deserve better First published 2012 by Saqi Books Copyright © Antony Loewenstein and Ahmed Moor Copyright for individual texts rests with the authors ISBN 978-0-86356-816-9 eISBN 978-0-86356-839-8 All rights reserved. No part of this book may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording or by any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the publisher.


pages: 366 words: 94,209

Throwing Rocks at the Google Bus: How Growth Became the Enemy of Prosperity by Douglas Rushkoff

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3D printing, Airbnb, algorithmic trading, Amazon Mechanical Turk, Andrew Keen, bank run, banking crisis, barriers to entry, bitcoin, blockchain, Burning Man, business process, buy low sell high, California gold rush, Capital in the Twenty-First Century by Thomas Piketty, carbon footprint, centralized clearinghouse, citizen journalism, clean water, cloud computing, collaborative economy, collective bargaining, colonial exploitation, Community Supported Agriculture, corporate personhood, crowdsourcing, cryptocurrency, disintermediation, diversified portfolio, Elon Musk, Erik Brynjolfsson, ethereum blockchain, fiat currency, Firefox, Flash crash, full employment, future of work, gig economy, Gini coefficient, global supply chain, global village, Google bus, Howard Rheingold, IBM and the Holocaust, impulse control, income inequality, index fund, iterative process, Jaron Lanier, Jeff Bezos, jimmy wales, job automation, Joseph Schumpeter, Kickstarter, loss aversion, Lyft, Mark Zuckerberg, market bubble, market fundamentalism, Marshall McLuhan, means of production, medical bankruptcy, minimum viable product, Naomi Klein, Network effects, new economy, Norbert Wiener, Oculus Rift, passive investing, payday loans, peer-to-peer lending, Peter Thiel, post-industrial society, profit motive, quantitative easing, race to the bottom, recommendation engine, reserve currency, RFID, Richard Stallman, ride hailing / ride sharing, Ronald Reagan, Satoshi Nakamoto, Second Machine Age, shareholder value, sharing economy, Silicon Valley, Snapchat, social graph, software patent, Steve Jobs, TaskRabbit, trade route, transportation-network company, Turing test, Uber and Lyft, Uber for X, unpaid internship, Y Combinator, young professional, Zipcar

Our real world of humans, soil, and aquifers replenish themselves more slowly than the impatience of capital can accommodate. “Housing starts” can accelerate only as fast as the market for new homes. When the marketplace isn’t being artificially goosed by speculators, humans just can’t keep up with the housing industry’s need for excuses to cut down more forests, irrigate more land, and construct more homes. Moreover, as Naomi Klein has more than demonstrated in her book This Changes Everything, climate change is a direct result of an expansionist economy: the physical environment can’t service the pace of capital while also sustaining human life.19 Economic philosopher John Stuart Mill identified this problem as far back as the 1800s. “The increase of wealth is not boundless,” he wrote.20 He believed that growth wasn’t a permanent feature of the economy because nothing can grow forever.

.: Belknap Press, 2014). 15. Robert Slater, Jack Welch and the GE Way (New York: McGraw-Hill, 1998). 16. Ben Steverman, “Manipulate Me: The Booming Business in Behavioral Finance,” bloomberg.com, April 7, 2014. 17. Morgan House, “5 Alan Greenspan Quotes That Make You Wonder,” fool.com, October 15, 2008. 18. Michael Lewis, The Big Short: Inside the Doomsday Machine (New York, London: W. W. Norton, 2011). 19. Naomi Klein, This Changes Everything: Capitalism vs. the Climate (New York: Simon and Schuster, 2014). 20. John Stuart Mill, Principles of Political Economy with Some of Their Applications to Social Philosophy (London: Longmans, Green and Co., 1909), IV.6.2. 21. Ibid., IV.6.7. 22. David Dayen, “America’s Ugly Economic Truth: Why Austerity Is Generating Another Slowdown,” salon.com, October 21, 2014. 23.

Nuclear War and Environmental Catastrophe by Noam Chomksy

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British Empire, cuban missile crisis, David Ricardo: comparative advantage, energy security, Howard Zinn, interchangeable parts, invisible hand, Malacca Straits, mutually assured destruction, Naomi Klein, Occupy movement, oil shale / tar sands, Ralph Nader, Ronald Reagan, South China Sea, The Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith, trade route, University of East Anglia, uranium enrichment, WikiLeaks

With the publication of 9/11 in November 2001, inarguably one of the most significant books on the subject, he became as widely read and as an essential a voice internationally as other political philosophers throughout history. That book, like the present volume, was composed from interviews. Chomsky has written and lectured widely on linguistics, philosophy, intellectual history, contemporary issues, international affairs, and US foreign policy. In 2010 Chomsky, Eduardo Galeano, Michael Hardt, Naomi Klein, and Vandana Shiva became signatories to United for Global Democracy, a manifesto created by the international Occupy movement. Laray Polk was born in Oklahoma in 1961 and currently lives in Dallas, Texas. She is a multimedia artist and writer. Her articles and investigative reports have appeared in the Dallas Morning News, D Magazine, and In These Times. As a 2009 grant recipient from the Investigative Fund at the Nation Institute, she produced stories on the political entanglements and compromised science behind the establishment of a radioactive waste disposal site in Texas, situated in close proximity to the Ogallala Aquifer.


pages: 741 words: 179,454

Extreme Money: Masters of the Universe and the Cult of Risk by Satyajit Das

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affirmative action, Albert Einstein, algorithmic trading, Andy Kessler, Asian financial crisis, asset allocation, asset-backed security, bank run, banking crisis, banks create money, Basel III, Benoit Mandelbrot, Berlin Wall, Bernie Madoff, Big bang: deregulation of the City of London, Black Swan, Bonfire of the Vanities, bonus culture, Bretton Woods, BRICs, British Empire, capital asset pricing model, Carmen Reinhart, carried interest, Celtic Tiger, clean water, cognitive dissonance, collapse of Lehman Brothers, collateralized debt obligation, corporate governance, credit crunch, Credit Default Swap, credit default swaps / collateralized debt obligations, Daniel Kahneman / Amos Tversky, debt deflation, Deng Xiaoping, deskilling, discrete time, diversification, diversified portfolio, Doomsday Clock, Emanuel Derman, en.wikipedia.org, Eugene Fama: efficient market hypothesis, eurozone crisis, Fall of the Berlin Wall, financial independence, financial innovation, fixed income, full employment, global reserve currency, Goldman Sachs: Vampire Squid, Gordon Gekko, greed is good, happiness index / gross national happiness, haute cuisine, high net worth, Hyman Minsky, index fund, interest rate swap, invention of the wheel, invisible hand, Isaac Newton, job automation, Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, joint-stock company, Joseph Schumpeter, Kenneth Rogoff, Kevin Kelly, labour market flexibility, laissez-faire capitalism, load shedding, locking in a profit, Long Term Capital Management, Louis Bachelier, margin call, market bubble, market fundamentalism, Marshall McLuhan, Martin Wolf, merger arbitrage, Mikhail Gorbachev, Milgram experiment, Mont Pelerin Society, moral hazard, mortgage debt, mortgage tax deduction, mutually assured destruction, Naomi Klein, Network effects, new economy, Nick Leeson, Nixon shock, Northern Rock, nuclear winter, oil shock, Own Your Own Home, pets.com, Plutocrats, plutocrats, Ponzi scheme, price anchoring, price stability, profit maximization, quantitative easing, quantitative trading / quantitative finance, Ralph Nader, RAND corporation, random walk, Ray Kurzweil, regulatory arbitrage, rent control, rent-seeking, reserve currency, Richard Feynman, Richard Feynman, Richard Thaler, risk-adjusted returns, risk/return, road to serfdom, Robert Shiller, Robert Shiller, Rod Stewart played at Stephen Schwarzman birthday party, rolodex, Ronald Reagan, Ronald Reagan: Tear down this wall, savings glut, shareholder value, Sharpe ratio, short selling, Silicon Valley, six sigma, Slavoj Žižek, South Sea Bubble, special economic zone, statistical model, Stephen Hawking, Steve Jobs, The Chicago School, The Great Moderation, the market place, the medium is the message, The Myth of the Rational Market, The Nature of the Firm, The Predators' Ball, The Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith, Thorstein Veblen, too big to fail, trickle-down economics, Turing test, Upton Sinclair, value at risk, Yogi Berra, zero-coupon bond

In good times, bankers are capitalists. During crises, bankers are socialists. In every crisis, policy makers argue that people’s life savings and pension entitlements are at risk if the system is not bailed out. No one asks who put them at risk in the first place. Bankers’ excuses are of someone having murdered their parents seeking clemency on the grounds that he is an orphan. The social activist Naomi Klein termed it disaster capitalism.15 Having unknowingly underwritten a system allowing banks to generate vast private profits, ordinary men and women were forced to bear the cost of bailing out banks. As his friend Dink tells author Joe Bageant: “Sounds like a piss-poor solution to me, cause they’re just throwing money we ain’t got at the big dogs who already got plenty. But hell what do I know?”16 On CBS’s 60 Minutes, Bernanke defended the policy: “I come from Main Street.

PBS Newshour “How big is too big to fail?” (15 December 2009) (www.pbs.org/newshour/bb/business/july-dec09/schultz_12-15.html). 13. Mervyn King, Governor of the Bank of England, Speech to the CBI Dinner (20 January 2009), East Midlands Conference Centre, Nottingham. 14. Senator Jim Bunning, Statement to the Senate Banking Committee on the Federal Reserve Monetary Policy Report (15 July 2008), Senate Banking Committee. 15. Naomi Klein (2008) The Shock Doctrine: The Rise of Disaster Capitalism, Picador, New York. 16. Joe Bageant (2007) Deer Hunting with Jesus: Despatches from America’s Class War, Scribe Publications, Melbourne: viii. 17. F. Scott Fitzgerald (1973) The Great Gatsby, Penguin Books, London: 186. 18. Quoted in Charles P. Kindelberger (1978) Manias, Panics and Crashes: A History of Financial Crisis, Basic Books, New York: 130. 19.

Henry Kaufman (2009) The Road to Financial Reformation: Warnings, Consequences, Reforms, John Wiley, New Jersey. John Kay (2004) The Truth About Markets: Why Some Nations Are Rich But Most Remain Poor, Penguin Books, London. John Kay (2009) The Long and the Short of It: Finance and Investment for Normally Intelligent People Who Are Not in the Industry, Erasmus, London. Charles P. Kindelberger (1978) Manias, Panics and Crashes: A History of Financial Crisis, Basic Books, New York. Naomi Klein (2008) The Shock Doctrine: The Rise of Disaster Capitalism, Picador, New York. Jonathan A. Knee (2007) The Accidental Investment Banker, John Wiley, Chichester. Richard C. Koo (2008) The Holy Grail of Macro Economics: Lessons from Japan’s Great Recession, John Wiley, Singapore. Jesse Kornbluth (1992) Highly Confident: The Crime and Punishment of Michael Milken, William Morrow & Co. Inc, New York.


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Never Let a Serious Crisis Go to Waste: How Neoliberalism Survived the Financial Meltdown by Philip Mirowski

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Andrei Shleifer, asset-backed security, bank run, barriers to entry, Basel III, Berlin Wall, Bernie Madoff, Bernie Sanders, Black Swan, blue-collar work, Bretton Woods, Brownian motion, capital controls, Carmen Reinhart, Cass Sunstein, central bank independence, cognitive dissonance, collapse of Lehman Brothers, collateralized debt obligation, complexity theory, constrained optimization, credit crunch, Credit Default Swap, credit default swaps / collateralized debt obligations, crony capitalism, dark matter, David Brooks, David Graeber, debt deflation, deindustrialization, Edward Glaeser, Eugene Fama: efficient market hypothesis, experimental economics, facts on the ground, Fall of the Berlin Wall, financial deregulation, financial innovation, Flash crash, full employment, George Akerlof, Goldman Sachs: Vampire Squid, Hernando de Soto, housing crisis, Hyman Minsky, illegal immigration, income inequality, incomplete markets, invisible hand, Jean Tirole, joint-stock company, Kenneth Rogoff, knowledge economy, l'esprit de l'escalier, labor-force participation, liquidity trap, loose coupling, manufacturing employment, market clearing, market design, market fundamentalism, Martin Wolf, Mont Pelerin Society, moral hazard, mortgage debt, Naomi Klein, Nash equilibrium, night-watchman state, Northern Rock, Occupy movement, offshore financial centre, oil shock, payday loans, Ponzi scheme, precariat, prediction markets, price mechanism, profit motive, quantitative easing, race to the bottom, random walk, rent-seeking, Richard Thaler, road to serfdom, Robert Shiller, Robert Shiller, Ronald Coase, Ronald Reagan, savings glut, school choice, sealed-bid auction, Silicon Valley, South Sea Bubble, Steven Levy, technoutopianism, The Chicago School, The Great Moderation, the map is not the territory, The Myth of the Rational Market, the scientific method, The Wisdom of Crowds, theory of mind, Thomas Kuhn: the structure of scientific revolutions, Thorstein Veblen, Tobin tax, too big to fail, transaction costs, War on Poverty, Washington Consensus, We are the 99%, working poor

The purpose of chapter 1 was to suggest that a few subsequent years’ experience has vexed and discomfited almost everyone involved, and that political progress demands that this calamity be better understood. It may be the case that even those who feel they have a good working knowledge of political theory need to revisit the entire question of neoliberalism, if only to better focus upon the incongruity of the neoliberals coming out of the crisis stronger than when they were paving the way for its onset. It is one thing to glibly appeal to a nefarious “Shock Doctrine” (see Naomi Klein), it is another to comprehend in detail how the reckoning was evaded: something here dubbed the “Shock Block Doctrine.” Neoliberalism is alive and well; those on the receiving end need to know why. Questions as to its existence, its efficacy, and its vulnerability to refutation lie at the heart of the concerns that motivate this chapter. Neoliberal initiatives and policies still carry the day, and more to the point, most people still understand their own straitened circumstances through the lens of what can only be regarded as neoliberal presumptions.

These suggest a degree of coherence and stability deriving from both continuity of intellectual tradition and persistence of community boundary work, the sum total of which is capable of supporting analytical generalizations about the movement. Clearly, neoliberals do not navigate with a fixed static Utopia as the astrolabe for all their political strivings. They could not, since they don’t even agree on such basic terms as “market” and “freedom” in all respects, as we shall observe below. One can even agree with Brenner et al. and Naomi Klein that crisis is the preferred field of action for neoliberals, since that offers more latitude for introduction of bold experimental ‘reforms’ that only precipitate further crises down the road.68 Nevertheless, Neoliberalism does not dissolve into a gormless empiricism or random pragmatism. There persists a certain logic to the way it approaches crises; and that is directly relevant to comprehending its unexpected strength in the current global crisis.

Latter-day followers of Galbraith bring various counterexamples to the table, such as the recent policy to suppress cigarette advertising in the United States, but to no avail.86 Curiously enough, given that it bulks so large in everyday life, the average person still ardently believes that all that expenditure and all that effort to manage their desires is essentially impotent, and by implication, wasted. Neoliberals, as one might expect, have come to concoct a much more plausible justification of the phenomenon. They have carefully read and absorbed their leftist critics, from Thorstein Veblen to Naomi Klein, and far from rejecting them outright, they openly use their ideas to render the process of persuasion both more unconscious and more effective.87 Neoliberals have pioneered the signal innovation of importing the double-truth character of their project into the everyday lives of the common man. The modern hidden persuaders have gladly nurtured the conviction of the average person that he is more clever than those who seek to manipulate him in order to render him all the more open to that manipulation; the set of techniques predicated on this inversion has been dubbed “murketing.”


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The Ascent of Money: A Financial History of the World by Niall Ferguson

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Admiral Zheng, Andrei Shleifer, Asian financial crisis, asset allocation, asset-backed security, Atahualpa, bank run, banking crisis, banks create money, Black Swan, Black-Scholes formula, Bonfire of the Vanities, Bretton Woods, BRICs, British Empire, capital asset pricing model, capital controls, Carmen Reinhart, Cass Sunstein, central bank independence, collateralized debt obligation, colonial exploitation, Corn Laws, corporate governance, credit crunch, Credit Default Swap, credit default swaps / collateralized debt obligations, currency manipulation / currency intervention, currency peg, Daniel Kahneman / Amos Tversky, deglobalization, diversification, diversified portfolio, double entry bookkeeping, Edmond Halley, Edward Glaeser, Edward Lloyd's coffeehouse, financial innovation, financial intermediation, fixed income, floating exchange rates, Fractional reserve banking, Francisco Pizarro, full employment, German hyperinflation, Hernando de Soto, high net worth, hindsight bias, Home mortgage interest deduction, Hyman Minsky, income inequality, interest rate swap, Isaac Newton, iterative process, joint-stock company, joint-stock limited liability company, Joseph Schumpeter, Kenneth Rogoff, knowledge economy, labour mobility, London Interbank Offered Rate, Long Term Capital Management, market bubble, market fundamentalism, means of production, Mikhail Gorbachev, money: store of value / unit of account / medium of exchange, moral hazard, mortgage debt, mortgage tax deduction, Naomi Klein, Nick Leeson, Northern Rock, pension reform, price anchoring, price stability, principal–agent problem, probability theory / Blaise Pascal / Pierre de Fermat, profit motive, quantitative hedge fund, RAND corporation, random walk, rent control, rent-seeking, reserve currency, Richard Thaler, Robert Shiller, Robert Shiller, Ronald Reagan, savings glut, seigniorage, short selling, Silicon Valley, South Sea Bubble, sovereign wealth fund, spice trade, structural adjustment programs, technology bubble, The Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith, The Wisdom of Crowds, Thomas Malthus, Thorstein Veblen, too big to fail, transaction costs, value at risk, Washington Consensus, Yom Kippur War

Yet it is far from clear that American legislators are ready to take on the liabilities implied by a further extension of public insurance. Total non-insured damages arising from hurricanes in 2005 are likely to end up costing the federal government at least $109 billion in post-disaster assistance and $8 billion in tax relief, nearly three times the estimated insurance losses.6 According to Naomi Klein, this is symptomatic of a dysfunctional ‘Disaster Capitalism Complex’, which generates private profits for some, but leaves taxpayers to foot the true costs of catastrophe.7 In the face of such ruinous bills, what is the right way to proceed? When insurance fails, is the only alternative, in effect, to nationalize all natural disasters - creating a huge open-ended liability for governments? Of course, life has always been dangerous.

Scruggs, ‘Hurricane Katrina: Issues and Observations’, American Enterprise Institute-Brookings Judicial Symposium, ‘Insurance and Risk Allocation in America: Economics, Law and Regulation’, Georgetown Law Center, 20-22 September 2006. 4 Details from http://www.usa.gov/Citizen/Topics/PublicSafety/Hurricane_Katrina_Recovery.shtml, http://katrina.louisiana.gov/index. html and http://www.ldi.state.la.us/HurricaneKatrina.htm. 5 Peter Lattman, ‘Plaintiffs Laywer Scruggs is Indicted on Bribery Charges’, Wall Street Journal, 29 November 2007; Ashby Jones and Paulo Prada, ‘Richard Scruggs Pleads Guilty’, ibid., 15 March 2008. 6 King, ‘Hurricane Katrina’, p. 4. 7 Naomi Klein, The Shock Doctrine: The Rise of Disaster Capitalism (New York, 2007). 8 http://www.nhc.noaa.gov/pastdec.shtml. 9 John Schwartz, ‘One Billion Dollars Later, New Orleans is Still at Risk’, New York Times, 17 August 2007. 10 Michael Lewis, ‘In Nature’s Casino’, New York Times Magazine, 26 August 2007. 11 National Safety Council, ‘What are the Odds of Dying?’: http:// www.nsc.org/lrs/statinfo/odds.htm.


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Bourgeois Dignity: Why Economics Can't Explain the Modern World by Deirdre N. McCloskey

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Admiral Zheng, agricultural Revolution, Albert Einstein, BRICs, British Empire, butterfly effect, Carmen Reinhart, clockwork universe, computer age, Corn Laws, dark matter, David Ricardo: comparative advantage, Donald Trump, Edward Lorenz: Chaos theory, European colonialism, experimental economics, financial innovation, Fractional reserve banking, full employment, George Akerlof, germ theory of disease, Gini coefficient, greed is good, Howard Zinn, income per capita, interchangeable parts, invention of agriculture, invention of air conditioning, invention of writing, invisible hand, Isaac Newton, James Watt: steam engine, John Maynard Keynes: technological unemployment, John Snow's cholera map, joint-stock company, Joseph Schumpeter, Kenneth Rogoff, knowledge economy, means of production, Naomi Klein, New Economic Geography, New Urbanism, purchasing power parity, rent-seeking, road to serfdom, Robert Gordon, Ronald Coase, Ronald Reagan, Scientific racism, Scramble for Africa, Shenzhen was a fishing village, Simon Kuznets, Slavoj Žižek, spinning jenny, Steven Pinker, The Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith, Thorstein Veblen, too big to fail, total factor productivity, transaction costs, tulip mania, union organizing, Upton Sinclair, urban renewal, V2 rocket, very high income, working poor, World Values Survey, Yogi Berra

Leavis, Karl Polanyi, Sartre, Simone de Beauvoir, Simone Weil, Dorothy Day, Woody Guthrie (whose singing made me for a while a Joan-Baez socialist: the leftish opponents of bourgeois dignity and liberty, alas, have all the best songs), Pete Seeger, (ditto), Lewis Mumford, Hannah Arendt, Herbert Marcuse, Maurice Merleau-Ponty, J. K. Galbraith, Louis Althusser, Allan Bloom, Frederic Jameson, Saul Bellow, Howard Zinn, Noam Chomsky, Paul 48 Ehrlich, Stuart Hall, George Steiner, Jacques Lacan, Stanley Hauerwas, Terry Eagleton, Alain Badiou, Slavoj Žižek, Charles Sellers, Barbara Ehrenreich, Nancy Folbre, and Naomi Klein. Few people have defended commerce from this magnificent flood of eloquence from the pens of left progressives and right reactionaries — jeremiads which indeed stretch from the Hebrew prophets through Plato and the Analects of Confucius and down to the present — except on the economist’s prudence-only grounds that after all a great deal of money is made there. After such grand prolixity in the prosecution of innovation and markets, I admire my restraint in offering in defense merely six volumes.

We agree that so sudden was the innovation that it permitted high income that led to a fall in birth rates, as for example in a once-impoverished and once-over-populated Italy. We agree that the poor of the world have been the largest beneficiaries of the escape from the Malthusian trap. We agree that trade unions and protectionism had nothing to do with the escape. We agree, in other words, on a great many historical findings from 1944 to the present that will strike the average enthusiast for Karl Polanyi or Louis Althusser or Naomi Klein, not to speak of Malthus and Marx, as bizarre and counterintuitive. What other historical scientists do not agree with, however, is Clark’s only distinctive argument, picked up by him recently from the writings of certain economic theorists, reviving in the style of Stephen Pinker a eugenic hypothesis — that English people became by virtue of the rate of breeding of their rich folk a race of Übermenchen living in anÜbergemeinschaft.

Culture and Prosperity: The Truth About Markets - Why Some Nations Are Rich but Most Remain Poor by John Kay

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Albert Einstein, Asian financial crisis, Barry Marshall: ulcers, Berlin Wall, Big bang: deregulation of the City of London, California gold rush, complexity theory, computer age, constrained optimization, corporate governance, corporate social responsibility, correlation does not imply causation, Daniel Kahneman / Amos Tversky, David Ricardo: comparative advantage, Donald Trump, double entry bookkeeping, double helix, Edward Lloyd's coffeehouse, equity premium, Ernest Rutherford, European colonialism, experimental economics, Exxon Valdez, failed state, financial innovation, Francis Fukuyama: the end of history, George Akerlof, George Gilder, greed is good, haute couture, illegal immigration, income inequality, invention of the telephone, invention of the wheel, invisible hand, John Nash: game theory, John von Neumann, Kevin Kelly, knowledge economy, labour market flexibility, late capitalism, Long Term Capital Management, loss aversion, Mahatma Gandhi, market bubble, market clearing, market fundamentalism, means of production, Menlo Park, Mikhail Gorbachev, money: store of value / unit of account / medium of exchange, moral hazard, Naomi Klein, Nash equilibrium, new economy, oil shale / tar sands, oil shock, pets.com, popular electronics, price discrimination, price mechanism, prisoner's dilemma, profit maximization, purchasing power parity, QWERTY keyboard, Ralph Nader, RAND corporation, random walk, rent-seeking, risk tolerance, road to serfdom, Ronald Coase, Ronald Reagan, second-price auction, shareholder value, Silicon Valley, Simon Kuznets, South Sea Bubble, Steve Jobs, telemarketer, The Chicago School, The Death and Life of Great American Cities, The Market for Lemons, The Nature of the Firm, The Predators' Ball, The Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith, Thorstein Veblen, total factor productivity, transaction costs, tulip mania, urban decay, Washington Consensus, women in the workforce, yield curve, yield management

Lewis's industrial sector would need to develop many activities at once. Development required the simultaneous establishment of a shoe factory, a clothing factory, a bicycle factory. Shoe workers could use their income to buy clothes and bicycles, and bicycle workers would buy shoes. A planning agency could coordinate this simultaneous development. Fifty years later, anticapitalist journalist and author Naomi Klein visited a shoe factory in the Philippines. 11 She did not find it a pleasant experience, and no sensitive person from a rich state would. Most employees of the factory were young women, daughters of peasant families. They worked long hours under tight discipline for low wages, living in small dormitories shared by four or six people. They had been lured by bright lights, depressed by lack of opportunities in their remote villages, encouraged to send money back to support their families.

Its equipment regularly failed because of lack of maintenance and shortages of spare parts. Workers and managers stole from the plant. The Morogoro plant was designed like a modern Western shoe factory, with aluminium walls and no ventilation system, inappropriate for the Tanzanian climate. The Morogoro shoe factory never operated at more than 5% of capacity and never exported a single shoe. It closed in 1990. Naomi Klein did not need to go to the Philippines to see the unpleasantness of early-stage industrialization. She could have read accounts of conditions in English factories during the industrial revolution, or Korean economic development in the 1950s. What she saw Culture and Prosperity { 281} in the Philippines was Rostow's "takeoff" as it had been in England and Korea. It would be wonderful-and very profitable-if the technology, capital, and equipment used productively in rich states could be transferred to poor countries that have not simultaneously evolved a matching set of social, cultural, and political institutions.

The End of Power: From Boardrooms to Battlefields and Churches to States, Why Being in Charge Isn’t What It Used to Be by Moises Naim

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additive manufacturing, barriers to entry, Berlin Wall, bilateral investment treaty, business process, business process outsourcing, call centre, citizen journalism, Clayton Christensen, clean water, collapse of Lehman Brothers, collective bargaining, colonial rule, conceptual framework, corporate governance, crony capitalism, deskilling, disintermediation, don't be evil, failed state, Fall of the Berlin Wall, financial deregulation, Francis Fukuyama: the end of history, illegal immigration, immigration reform, income inequality, income per capita, intermodal, invisible hand, job-hopping, Joseph Schumpeter, Julian Assange, Kickstarter, Martin Wolf, megacity, Naomi Klein, Nate Silver, new economy, Northern Rock, Occupy movement, open borders, open economy, Peace of Westphalia, Plutocrats, plutocrats, price mechanism, price stability, private military company, profit maximization, Ronald Coase, Ronald Reagan, Silicon Valley, Skype, Steve Jobs, The Nature of the Firm, Thomas Malthus, too big to fail, trade route, transaction costs, Washington Consensus, WikiLeaks, World Values Survey

Despite fuzziness as to what exactly defines the elite (Wealth? Status measured some other way? Particular professions?), the notion of a resurgent elite further strengthening its hold on government is very much alive. In 2008, days after the massive US bank bailout was announced and a few short weeks after the collapse of Lehman Brothers and the rescue of the insurance giant American International Group (AIG), the critic Naomi Klein described the era as “a revolt of the elites . . . and an incredibly successful one.” She argued that both the long neglect of financial regulation and the 50 sudden bailout reflected elite control over policy. And she suggested that a common trend in the concentration of power linked together major countries with seemingly opposed political and economic systems. “I see a drift toward authoritarian capitalism that is shared in [the United States], Russia and China,” Klein told an audience in New York.

Mills, The Power Elite. 28. Eisenhower’s speech is available online at http://www.h-net.org/~hst306/documents/indust.html. 213 29. Domhoff, Who Rules America? Challenges to Corporate and Class Dominance. 30. Christopher Lasch, “The Revolt of the Elites: Have They Canceled Their Allegiance to America?” Harper’s, November 1994. 31. Klein’s talk is available online at http://fora.tv/2008/10/20/Naomi_Klein_and_Joseph_Stiglitz_on_Economic_Power#fullprogram. 32. Simon Johnson, “The Quiet Coup,” Atlantic, May 2009, http://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/2009/05/the-quietcoup/7364/. See also Johnson and Kwak, 13 Bankers. CHAPTER FOUR 1. Interview with Javier Solana, Washington, DC, May 2012. 2. Larkin, Collected Poems. 3. William Odom, “NATO’s Expansion: Why the Critics Are Wrong,” National Interest, Spring 1995, p. 44. 4.


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Collaborative Futures by Mike Linksvayer, Michael Mandiberg, Mushon Zer-Aviv

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4chan, Benjamin Mako Hill, British Empire, citizen journalism, cloud computing, collaborative economy, corporate governance, crowdsourcing, Debian, en.wikipedia.org, Firefox, informal economy, jimmy wales, Kickstarter, late capitalism, loose coupling, Marshall McLuhan, means of production, Naomi Klein, Network effects, optical character recognition, packet switching, postnationalism / post nation state, prediction markets, Richard Stallman, semantic web, Silicon Valley, slashdot, Slavoj Žižek, stealth mode startup, technoutopianism, the medium is the message, The Wisdom of Crowds, web application

<crisiscommons.org/about-us> Contesting the Shock Doctrines This type of external interest and action was previously reserved to human rights organization, media companies, governments and multinational corporations—all organizations that work in a pre y hierarchical and centralized manner. Now we see a new model emerge—a distributed networked collaboration of interested individuals contributing digital labor, not just money. The political vacuum presented by these natural or man made crises leave room for a strong active force that o en enforces a new political and economic reality. In her book titled The Shock Doctrine, author Naomi Klein describes how governments and businesses have exploited instances of political and economic instabilities in recent decades to dictate a neo-liberal agenda. In each case the interested powers were the first on the scene, imposing rigid rules of engagement and coordination, and justifying enforcement by the need to restore order. 101 In contrast, the activists are providing the tools and the know how for data production and aggregation.

Affluenza: When Too Much Is Never Enough by Clive Hamilton, Richard Denniss

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call centre, delayed gratification, experimental subject, full employment, impulse control, Mahatma Gandhi, McMansion, Naomi Klein, Own Your Own Home, Post-materialism, post-materialism, purchasing power parity, Thorstein Veblen, trickle-down economics, wage slave

Marketing goes much further than delivering a plethora of messages to assault our eyes and ears: it imbues almost everything and is impossible to escape. Indeed, Western culture can be described as a marketing culture and, as we will see, the advent of the marketing society is strongly correlated with the rise in depression, anxiety, obesity and a range of other disorders. The marketing culture is indispensable to the daily spread of affluenza. In her book No Logo, Naomi Klein describes the process whereby producers of consumer goods progressively offload all aspects of the actual manufacturing process by contracting out, especially to factories in the Third World. They concentrate their efforts on creating and sustaining the intangible features of consumer products that give them most of their value, that is, the brand. Marketing has become the foundation on which large corporations are now built.


pages: 184 words: 53,625

Future Perfect: The Case for Progress in a Networked Age by Steven Johnson

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airport security, algorithmic trading, banking crisis, barriers to entry, Bernie Sanders, call centre, Captain Sullenberger Hudson, Cass Sunstein, cognitive dissonance, credit crunch, crowdsourcing, dark matter, Dava Sobel, David Brooks, future of journalism, hive mind, Howard Rheingold, HyperCard, Jane Jacobs, John Gruber, John Harrison: Longitude, Kevin Kelly, Kickstarter, lone genius, Mark Zuckerberg, meta analysis, meta-analysis, Naomi Klein, Nate Silver, Occupy movement, packet switching, Peter Thiel, planetary scale, pre–internet, RAND corporation, risk tolerance, shareholder value, Silicon Valley, Silicon Valley startup, social graph, Steve Jobs, Steven Pinker, Stewart Brand, The Death and Life of Great American Cities, Tim Cook: Apple, urban planning, WikiLeaks, working poor, X Prize

I was describing them in the very last pages of my book Emergence, which celebrated the power of decentralized networks in many different fields, in nature and in culture: in the distributed intelligence of ant colonies, or city neighborhoods, in the neural networks of the human brain—and, increasingly, on the new platforms of the Internet and the World Wide Web. Emergence was not explicitly a political book, but I included the Seattle protests on the last pages as a nod toward a future in which social change would increasingly be shaped by these leaderless networks. I was not alone in sensing a meaningful connection between the Seattle protesters and the decentralized peer networks of the digital age. Writing in The Nation at the time, Naomi Klein had observed, “What emerged on the streets of Seattle and Washington was an activist model that mirrors the organic, interlinked pathways of the Internet.” It seemed clear to some of us at that early stage that the model of information sharing that the Internet had popularized was too potent and protean not to spawn offline organizational structures that emulated its core qualities. Seattle seemed just a preview of coming attractions; as the Internet grew to become the dominant communications medium of our age, social movements would increasingly look like the Internet, even when they were chanting slogans in the middle of a city park.

On Palestine by Noam Chomsky, Ilan Pappé, Frank Barat

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Boycotts of Israel, British Empire, cognitive dissonance, conceptual framework, David Brooks, facts on the ground, failed state, ghettoisation, Naomi Klein, Stephen Hawking

Reading and feeling enlightened by those books really played a big part in changing my vision of life and what it was supposed to mean. I started with reading Chomsky and slowly became very interested in anything that had to do with Israel/Palestine. Reading Edward Said, Mahmoud Darwish, Ghassan Kanafani, John Berger, Tanya Reinhart, Ilan Pappé, Norman Finkelstein, Noam Chomsky, Kurt Vonnegut, Arundhati Roy, Naomi Klein . . . all became part of my daily routine. Books changed me and I think that they are, more than anything else, one of the best tools we can use to learn, reflect on, and truly understand the world we are living in. They are a bridge between languages, continents, and people. A book will accompany you and will stay with you, it will mark you like nothing else. You will go back to it, quote it, argue about it.


pages: 314 words: 69,741

The Internet Is a Playground by David Thorne

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late fees, Naomi Klein, Silicon Valley, Steve Jobs

Recently, we have been planning an event in which we intend to hop nonstop from Adelaide to Sydney to raise not only awareness for the sport of hopping but also funds for a new charity we have set up called The Roz Knorr Hopping Foundation, which will provide poor people with no legs a single artificial leg and accompanying hopping instructional video inspiringly titled “Never Give Up Hop.” Regards, David From: Roz Knorr Date: Wednesday 14 October 2009 11:16 a.m. To: David Thorne Subject: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Adelaide loser You wouldn’t know the first thing about charity or giving back to the community. People from Adelaide don’t do anything for the underprivileged in society. Go read Naomi Klein’s 1999 book “No Logo” and join the ant-globalist movement & start defacing corporate posters in public places with political statements, or visit a sweat shop with 7 year olds in Mexico & blog about it. Until then you are just another selfish parasite taking from this planet. Watch your back. I leave for New York in my private plain this afternoon so I don’t have any time for anymore of your pathetic hick town nonsense.


pages: 306 words: 78,893

After the New Economy: The Binge . . . And the Hangover That Won't Go Away by Doug Henwood

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accounting loophole / creative accounting, affirmative action, Asian financial crisis, barriers to entry, borderless world, Branko Milanovic, Bretton Woods, capital controls, corporate governance, correlation coefficient, credit crunch, deindustrialization, dematerialisation, deskilling, ending welfare as we know it, feminist movement, full employment, gender pay gap, George Gilder, glass ceiling, Gordon Gekko, greed is good, half of the world's population has never made a phone call, income inequality, indoor plumbing, Internet Archive, job satisfaction, joint-stock company, Kevin Kelly, labor-force participation, liquidationism / Banker’s doctrine / the Treasury view, manufacturing employment, means of production, minimum wage unemployment, Naomi Klein, new economy, occupational segregation, pets.com, profit maximization, purchasing power parity, race to the bottom, Ralph Nader, Robert Gordon, Robert Shiller, Robert Shiller, Ronald Reagan, shareholder value, Silicon Valley, Simon Kuznets, statistical model, structural adjustment programs, Telecommunications Act of 1996, telemarketer, The Bell Curve by Richard Herrnstein and Charles Murray, The Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith, total factor productivity, union organizing, War on Poverty, women in the workforce, working poor, Y2K

One of the cornerstones of New Paradigm thinking, and one that's survived the bust, is the curious doctrine that "brand equity"—the financial value that stock markets assign to names Hke Nike and Mickey Mouse—is a kind of capital, like a lathe or even a piece of software. It's easy to see how even privately held assets of that more conventional sort can contribute to social wealth; unless they belong to a bomb factory, their produce can make people better off (even if the profits they generate are appropriated by a handful of managers and shareholders). But a "brand," as Naomi Klein (1999, p. 22) put it in No Logo, is a kind of "collective hallucination." Branders put a positive spin on these mass delusions. Ad agency Young & Rubicam identified them as "the new reH-gion," a source of "meaning" (Tomkins 2001). Today's brand builders, said Y&R, "could be compared to the missionaries who spread Christianity and Islam around the world."The best brands offer a set of uncompromising belief; among those names, Y&R disclosed, are Calvin Klein, MTV, and Gatorade.


pages: 269 words: 77,042

Sex, Lies, and Pharmaceuticals: How Drug Companies Plan to Profit From Female Sexual Dysfunction by Ray Moynihan, Barbara Mintzes

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business intelligence, clean water, meta analysis, meta-analysis, Naomi Klein, New Journalism, placebo effect, profit motive, Ralph Nader

Bizarre as it may sound, the idea that a drug company would play a role in ‘disease development’ is backed up by observations from another industry insider, this one with expertise in the practice known as ‘condition branding’.2 The advertising expert Vince Parry famously revealed how drug companies are sometimes involved in ‘fostering the creation’ of medical disorders, giving a little known condition renewed attention, helping redefine or rename an old disease, or sometimes assisting in the creation of a whole new one. The branding expert has said that as part of his high-level work for drug companies he will sit down with medical experts to try to ‘create new ideas about illness and conditions’. As the Canadian writer Naomi Klein told us in her classic No Logo, corporations are no longer just selling products, they are selling brands, and brands are about lifestyles and concepts, not commodities.3 These revelations about drug company plans to accelerate the development of a disease, in order to test and sell drugs for it, herald the opening of a new chapter in the story of the modern medical marketplace, where the corporate sector now works together with leading medical experts to help tell us who’s sick and who’s in need of the industry’s latest cures.


pages: 373 words: 80,248

Empire of Illusion: The End of Literacy and the Triumph of Spectacle by Chris Hedges

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Albert Einstein, Ayatollah Khomeini, Cal Newport, clean water, collective bargaining, corporate governance, Credit Default Swap, haute couture, Honoré de Balzac, Howard Zinn, illegal immigration, income inequality, Joseph Schumpeter, Naomi Klein, offshore financial centre, Ralph Nader, Ronald Reagan, single-payer health, statistical model, uranium enrichment

Will we radically transform our system to one that protects the ordinary citizen and fosters the common good, that defies the corporate state, or will we employ the brutality and technology of our internal security and surveillance apparatus to crush all dissent? There were some who saw it coming. The political philosophers Sheldon S. Wolin, John Ralston Saul, and Andrew Bacevich, writers such as Noam Chomsky, Chalmers Johnson, David Korten, and Naomi Klein, and activists such as Bill McKibben, Wendell Berry, and Ralph Nader warned us about our march of folly. In the immediate years after the Second World War, a previous generation of social critics recognized the destructive potential of the rising corporate state. Books such as David Riesman’s The Lonely Crowd, C. Wright Mills’s The Power Elite, William H. White’s The Organization Man, Seymour Mellman’s The Permanent War Economy: American Capitalism in Decline, Daniel Boorstin’s The Image: A Guide to Pseudo-Events in America, and Reinhold Niebuhr’s The Irony of American History have proved to be prophetic.


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The Age of the Infovore: Succeeding in the Information Economy by Tyler Cowen

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Albert Einstein, Asperger Syndrome, Cass Sunstein, cognitive bias, David Brooks, en.wikipedia.org, endowment effect, Flynn Effect, framing effect, Google Earth, impulse control, informal economy, Isaac Newton, loss aversion, Marshall McLuhan, Naomi Klein, neurotypical, new economy, Nicholas Carr, pattern recognition, phenotype, placebo effect, Richard Thaler, Silicon Valley, the medium is the message, The Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith, theory of mind

The association of diversity with national boundaries or with regional geography is built into a great deal of the contemporary discussion of globalization, both among scholars and in the popular arena. If the nation of France becomes more like the nation of Germany, there is a presumption that “cultural diversity” has gone down. When people in Bangkok started wearing blue jeans and thus neglected native modes of dress, a wide array of commentators, from Naomi Klein to Benjamin Barber, suggest that such instances show a decline in cultural diversity. These writers asked how much one geographical region differs from another, and using that benchmark, they judged the progress of cultural diversity. But why should we focus on the form of diversity that lines up so closely with physical space, national boundaries, and “face time”? Many of the most important forms of human diversity, including neurodiversity, don’t line up with geography in any simple way.


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The Fair Trade Scandal: Marketing Poverty to Benefit the Rich by Ndongo Sylla

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British Empire, carbon footprint, corporate social responsibility, David Ricardo: comparative advantage, deglobalization, Doha Development Round, Food sovereignty, global value chain, illegal immigration, income inequality, income per capita, invisible hand, Joseph Schumpeter, labour mobility, land reform, market fundamentalism, means of production, Mont Pelerin Society, Naomi Klein, non-tariff barriers, offshore financial centre, open economy, Plutocrats, plutocrats, price mechanism, purchasing power parity, Ronald Reagan, Scientific racism, structural adjustment programs, The Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith, trade liberalization, transaction costs, transatlantic slave trade, trickle-down economics, Washington Consensus

As far as large distributors are concerned, the global giant Wal-Mart has also started providing FT products (see Box 3.3). How can labelling initiatives trade with actors whose economic, social and environmental practices are criticised worldwide? How can it be that they work hand in hand with actors often considered as responsible for the low remuneration received by producers and workers in the South and the North? Naomi Klein’s No Logo (2009) is without a doubt the best-known book among those that exposed these contradictions. In France, Christian Jacquiau’s investigation (2006) fits perfectly into this framework. Hence the hostile reception from the Fairtrade sphere. Fair Trade: a concept of variable geometry Looking at it closely, it is essentially the notion of Fair Trade as defined and implemented by FLO which is considered problematic by alterglobalist critics.


pages: 251 words: 76,868

How to Run the World: Charting a Course to the Next Renaissance by Parag Khanna

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Albert Einstein, Asian financial crisis, back-to-the-land, bank run, blood diamonds, borderless world, BRICs, British Empire, call centre, carbon footprint, charter city, clean water, cleantech, cloud computing, corporate governance, corporate social responsibility, Deng Xiaoping, Doha Development Round, don't be evil, double entry bookkeeping, energy security, European colonialism, facts on the ground, failed state, friendly fire, global village, Google Earth, high net worth, index fund, informal economy, invisible hand, labour mobility, laissez-faire capitalism, Masdar, megacity, microcredit, mutually assured destruction, Naomi Klein, New Urbanism, offshore financial centre, oil shock, open economy, out of africa, private military company, Productivity paradox, race to the bottom, RAND corporation, reserve currency, Silicon Valley, smart grid, South China Sea, sovereign wealth fund, special economic zone, sustainable-tourism, The Fortune at the Bottom of the Pyramid, The Wisdom of Crowds, too big to fail, trade liberalization, trickle-down economics, UNCLOS, uranium enrichment, Washington Consensus, X Prize

Global celebrities can do nothing more important than inspire their own kind in every country they can reach. The most important heroes are local ones. It’s cynical to claim that celebrities divert attention from those truly responsible for atrocities or poverty when they attempt to shine the spotlight on precisely those who are in charge—and it’s naïve to think those who are responsible on paper will act responsibly in practice. Author and activist Naomi Klein dismisses the “Bono-ization” of protest because it is less dangerous and less powerful than street protests. But the trouble with this logic is that the rich have never stormed their governments on behalf of the poor. That some intellectuals and politicians feel insecure about the prominence of celebrities pressuring them while educating the masses is deeply disturbing. They should instead be encouraging anyone with resources and influence to chip in, since they know how little they are doing themselves.


pages: 1,117 words: 305,620

Dirty Wars: The World Is a Battlefield by Jeremy Scahill

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air freight, anti-communist, blood diamonds, business climate, citizen journalism, colonial rule, crowdsourcing, Donald Trump, failed state, friendly fire, Google Hangouts, indoor plumbing, Islamic Golden Age, land reform, Mohammed Bouazizi, Naomi Klein, private military company, rolodex, Ronald Reagan, Saturday Night Live, WikiLeaks

Thanks also to my buddies Ali Gharib, Garrett Ordower, Hani Sabra and Dan Coughlin for always reminding me to not take life so seriously. Michael Ratner and Karen Ranucci have been so generous in their support and with their love for so many years. Thank you also to the great Michael Moore for giving me one of my first “real” jobs and for always supporting my work. Oliver Stone and John Cusack have offered support, encouragement and wisdom at key moments. My dear friend Naomi Klein has always been there for me through good times and bad. She and Avi Lewis are a great force for justice. Anamaria Segura and Phil Tisne have brightened my life. Muchas gracias also to Jorge and Clemencia Segura for all of their love and support. Wallace Segura is a scholar among scholars. Emma Kelton-Lewis and Daniel Avery have been tremendously generous in their personal support, as have Claire and Rennie Alba.

Allen, Principal,” Chertoff Group, accessed October 5, 2012, http://chertoffgroup.com/bios/charles-allen.php. 18 “happy to pull the trigger”: 9/11 Commission Report, p. 211. 18 September 4 meeting: Ibid., p. 213. 18 three years to implement: Ibid. 18 “‘broad covert action program’”: Ibid., p. 214. 18 “Only a crisis”: Milton Friedman, Capitalism and Freedom, 40th anniv. ed. (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2002), Preface, 1982, p. xiv. 18 mentored Rumsfeld: Naomi Klein, The Shock Doctrine: The Rise of Disaster Capitalism (New York: Picador, 2007), p. 14. 18 Cheney, sought his counsel: Nina Easton, “Why Is Dick Cheney Smiling?” Money.CNN.com, November 25, 2007. 19 “When that crisis occurs”: Friedman, Capitalism and Freedom, Preface, 1982, p. xiv. 19 “a new Pearl Harbor”: “Rebuilding America’s Defenses,” p. 51. 19 “duty to use his bully pulpit”: Feith, War and Decision, p. 51. 19 “all necessary and appropriate force”: Joint Resolution to Authorize the Use of United States Armed Forces Against Those Responsible for the Recent Attacks Launched Against the United States, Pub.

Paul Bremer III, “Crush Them; Let Us Wage Total War on Our Foes,” op-ed, Wall Street Journal, September 13, 2001. 110 “running the occupation”: Ambassador L. Paul Bremer III, with Malcolm McConnell, My Year in Iraq: The Struggle to Build a Future of Hope (New York: Threshold Editions, 2006), pp. 6–7. 111 “paramount authority figure”: Ibid., p. 2. 111 brainchild: Ibid., p. 37. Bremer describes Defense Secretary Rumsfeld as giving him his “marching orders” to proceed with de-Baathification, with Feith doing the groundwork. 111 “Order 1”: Naomi Klein, “Baghdad Year Zero,” Harper’s, September 2004. 111 “450,000 enemies”: David Rieff, “Blueprint for a Mess,” New York Times Magazine, November 2, 2003. 111 “We are going to fight them”: Transcript, Interview with L. Paul Bremer III, Breakfast with Frost, BBC, June 29, 2003, http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/programmes/breakfast_with_frost/3029904.stm. 111 “My fellow Americans”: Transcript, “Remarks by the President from the USS Abraham Lincoln,” May 1, 2003. 111 were killed: Ann Scott Tyson, “Anatomy of the Raid on Hussein’s Sons,” Christian Science Monitor, July 24, 2003. 111 “the phrase ‘guerrilla war’”: Transcript, “DoD News Briefing—Secretary Rumsfeld and Gen.


pages: 281 words: 95,852

The Googlization of Everything: by Siva Vaidhyanathan

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1960s counterculture, AltaVista, barriers to entry, Berlin Wall, borderless world, Burning Man, Cass Sunstein, choice architecture, cloud computing, computer age, corporate social responsibility, correlation does not imply causation, data acquisition, death of newspapers, don't be evil, Firefox, Francis Fukuyama: the end of history, full text search, global village, Google Earth, Howard Rheingold, informal economy, information retrieval, Joseph Schumpeter, Kevin Kelly, knowledge worker, libertarian paternalism, market fundamentalism, Marshall McLuhan, means of production, Mikhail Gorbachev, Naomi Klein, Network effects, new economy, Nicholas Carr, PageRank, pirate software, Ray Kurzweil, Richard Thaler, Ronald Reagan, side project, Silicon Valley, Silicon Valley ideology, single-payer health, Skype, social web, Steven Levy, Stewart Brand, technoutopianism, The Nature of the Firm, The Structural Transformation of the Public Sphere, Thorstein Veblen, urban decay, web application

The texts, signs, and messages that flow through global communications networks do not carry a clear and unambiguous celebration of ideas and ideologies we might lazily label Western, such as consumerism, individualism, and secularism.61 These commercial pipelines may instead carry texts that overtly criticize 110 TH E G OOGL IZATION OF US and threaten the tenets of global capitalism, such as albums by the leftist rock band Rage against the Machine, films by Michael Moore, and books by Naomi Klein. Time Warner does not care if the data inscribed on the compact discs it sells simulates the voice of Madonna or of Ali Farka Touré. What flows from North to South does not matter as much as how it flows, how much revenue the flows generate, and who uses and reuses them. In this way, the Googlization of us has profound consequences. It’s not so much the ubiquity of Google’s brand that is troubling, dangerous, or even interesting: it’s that Google’s defaults and ways of doing spread and structure ways of seeking, finding, exploring, buying, and presenting that influence (though they do not control) habits of thought and action.


pages: 372 words: 107,587

The End of Growth: Adapting to Our New Economic Reality by Richard Heinberg

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3D printing, agricultural Revolution, back-to-the-land, banking crisis, banks create money, Bretton Woods, carbon footprint, Carmen Reinhart, clean water, cloud computing, collateralized debt obligation, credit crunch, Credit Default Swap, credit default swaps / collateralized debt obligations, currency manipulation / currency intervention, currency peg, David Graeber, David Ricardo: comparative advantage, dematerialisation, demographic dividend, Deng Xiaoping, Elliott wave, en.wikipedia.org, energy transition, falling living standards, financial deregulation, financial innovation, Fractional reserve banking, full employment, Gini coefficient, global village, happiness index / gross national happiness, I think there is a world market for maybe five computers, income inequality, invisible hand, Isaac Newton, Kenneth Rogoff, late fees, money: store of value / unit of account / medium of exchange, mortgage debt, naked short selling, Naomi Klein, Negawatt, new economy, Nixon shock, offshore financial centre, oil shale / tar sands, oil shock, peak oil, Ponzi scheme, post-oil, price stability, private military company, quantitative easing, reserve currency, ride hailing / ride sharing, Ronald Reagan, short selling, special drawing rights, The Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith, Thomas Malthus, Thorstein Veblen, too big to fail, trade liberalization, tulip mania, working poor

The end of growth will no doubt alter the prospects of both rich and poor, in both absolute and relative terms. Those with privilege will no doubt struggle to maintain it, while the poor, driven to desperation by generally worsening economic conditions, may in increasing numbers of instances organize or even revolt in order to increase their share of a shrinking pie. In her 2008 book The Shock Doctrine: The Rise of Disaster Capitalism, Canadian anti-globalization author and activist Naomi Klein argued that modern neo-liberal capitalism thrives on disasters, in that politicians and corporate leaders take advantage of natural calamities and wars to ram though programs for privatization, free trade, and slashed social spending — programs that are inherently unpopular and would have little chance of adoption in ordinary times.51 Klein’s thesis seems confirmed in the present instance: the end of growth is presenting societies with an ongoing economic crisis, and we have already seen how, in the US, well-heeled investors and executives have benefited from government bailouts while millions of workers have lost jobs and homes.


pages: 325 words: 99,983

Globish: How the English Language Became the World's Language by Robert McCrum

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Alistair Cooke, anti-communist, Berlin Wall, British Empire, call centre, colonial rule, credit crunch, cuban missile crisis, Deng Xiaoping, Etonian, failed state, Fall of the Berlin Wall, Francis Fukuyama: the end of history, invention of movable type, invention of writing, invisible hand, Isaac Newton, jimmy wales, knowledge economy, Livingstone, I presume, Martin Wolf, Naomi Klein, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Republic of Letters, Ronald Reagan, Scramble for Africa, Silicon Valley, Steven Pinker, The Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith, Thomas L Friedman, trade route, transatlantic slave trade, transcontinental railway, upwardly mobile

. —, Reappraisals: Reflections on the Forgotten Twentieth Century (London, 2008). Fred Kaplan, Lincoln: The Biography of a Writer (New York, 2008). Thomas Keneally, Lincoln (London, 2003). Frank Kermode, The Age of Shakespeare (London, 2004). Parag Khanna, The Second World: Empires and Influence in the New Global Order (London, 2008). Mark Kishlansky, A Monarchy Transformed: Britain 1603–1714 (London, 1996). Naomi Klein, The Shock Doctrine: The Rise of Disaster Capitalism (London, 2007). James Kynge, China Shakes the World (London, 2006). Mark Leonard, What Does China Think? (London, 2008). Seth Lerer, Inventing English: A Portable History of the Language (New York, 2007). John Lukacs, Five Days in London (New Haven, 2001). —, Five Days in London: May 1940 (New Haven, 2001). Robert McCrum, William Cran and Robert MacNeil, The Story of English (London, 1986).


pages: 364 words: 99,613

Servant Economy: Where America's Elite Is Sending the Middle Class by Jeff Faux

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back-to-the-land, Bernie Sanders, Black Swan, Bretton Woods, BRICs, British Empire, call centre, centre right, cognitive dissonance, collateralized debt obligation, collective bargaining, Credit Default Swap, credit default swaps / collateralized debt obligations, crony capitalism, currency manipulation / currency intervention, David Brooks, David Ricardo: comparative advantage, falling living standards, financial deregulation, financial innovation, full employment, hiring and firing, Howard Zinn, Hyman Minsky, illegal immigration, indoor plumbing, informal economy, invisible hand, John Maynard Keynes: Economic Possibilities for our Grandchildren, lake wobegon effect, Long Term Capital Management, market fundamentalism, Martin Wolf, McMansion, medical malpractice, mortgage debt, Naomi Klein, new economy, oil shock, Plutocrats, plutocrats, price mechanism, price stability, private military company, Ralph Nader, reserve currency, rising living standards, Robert Shiller, Robert Shiller, rolodex, Ronald Reagan, school vouchers, Silicon Valley, single-payer health, South China Sea, statistical model, Steve Jobs, Thomas L Friedman, Thorstein Veblen, too big to fail, trade route, Triangle Shirtwaist Factory, union organizing, upwardly mobile, urban renewal, War on Poverty, We are the 99%, working poor, Yogi Berra, Yom Kippur War

This son told him to double the feed, so that at least some food would spill over to the smaller pigs. That, the farmer knew, would be too expensive. So he asked the advice of his daughter, who had not gone to college. She replied, “Get the pigs out of the trough.” If you are an American, your future depends on us doing just that. Notes 1. Martin Fackler, “Japan Goes from Dynamic to Disheartened,” New York Times, October 17, 2010. 2. Naomi Klein, “Capitalism vs. the Climate,” Nation, November 28, 2011. 3. “Bank Bailouts Supporter Palin Criticizes TARP as ‘Crony Capitalism,’ ‘Slush Fund . . . Just As We Had Been Warned About,’ ” Media Matters, February 6, 2010, http://mediamatters.org/mmtv/201002060024. 4. John Nichols, “Rick Perry’s Attack on Democracy,” Nation, October 10, 2011, http://www.thenation.com/article/163548/rick-perrys-attack-democracy. 5.


pages: 349 words: 114,038

Culture & Empire: Digital Revolution by Pieter Hintjens

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4chan, airport security, anti-communist, anti-pattern, barriers to entry, Bill Duvall, bitcoin, blockchain, business climate, business intelligence, business process, Chelsea Manning, clean water, congestion charging, Corn Laws, correlation does not imply causation, cryptocurrency, Debian, Edward Snowden, failed state, financial independence, Firefox, full text search, German hyperinflation, global village, GnuPG, Google Chrome, greed is good, Hernando de Soto, hiring and firing, informal economy, invisible hand, James Watt: steam engine, Jeff Rulifson, Julian Assange, Kickstarter, M-Pesa, mutually assured destruction, Naomi Klein, national security letter, new economy, New Urbanism, Occupy movement, offshore financial centre, packet switching, patent troll, peak oil, pre–internet, private military company, race to the bottom, rent-seeking, reserve currency, RFC: Request For Comment, Richard Feynman, Richard Feynman, Richard Stallman, Satoshi Nakamoto, security theater, Skype, slashdot, software patent, spectrum auction, Steve Crocker, Steve Jobs, Steven Pinker, Stuxnet, The Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith, The Wisdom of Crowds, trade route, transaction costs, union organizing, web application, WikiLeaks, Y2K, zero day, Zipf's Law

The common view was that banks were invulnerable. After all, they were among the wealthiest institutions on the planet. They were literally "where the money was." How can a bank's share price go down? Later, as bank after bank failed and had to be rescued by the taxpayer, the general public was shocked. The only possible cause must have been corruption and fraud. For sure, corruption and fraud were present. As Naomi Klein lucidly explained in her 2007 book "The Shock Doctrine", any crisis is an opportunity for the mega-bandits to move in and empty the coffers. It's certain that some groups knew that banks would collapse and bet heavily on that. The crisis was long in the making. It was fully predictable; indeed, it was inevitable. Here's why. Let's rewind 30 years and see how the banks work. We're in 1980, and banks are the shining cornerstones of modern society.


pages: 357 words: 99,684

Why It's Still Kicking Off Everywhere: The New Global Revolutions by Paul Mason

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back-to-the-land, balance sheet recession, bank run, banking crisis, Berlin Wall, capital controls, centre right, citizen journalism, collapse of Lehman Brothers, collective bargaining, credit crunch, Credit Default Swap, currency manipulation / currency intervention, currency peg, eurozone crisis, Fall of the Berlin Wall, floating exchange rates, Francis Fukuyama: the end of history, full employment, ghettoisation, illegal immigration, informal economy, land tenure, low skilled workers, means of production, megacity, Mohammed Bouazizi, Naomi Klein, Network effects, New Journalism, Occupy movement, price stability, quantitative easing, race to the bottom, rising living standards, short selling, Slavoj Žižek, Stewart Brand, strikebreaker, union organizing, We are the 99%, Whole Earth Catalog, WikiLeaks, Winter of Discontent, women in the workforce, working poor, working-age population, young professional

Here was the hard core of the student protest movement: dedicated eco-warriors, veterans of suicidal sit-downs in front of tanks in Gaza, the demobbed Clown Army and, as my host put it, ‘the Situationist Taliban’. Did they know this had all been done before? They had a vague idea. I watched their eyes widen—sixty of them, cross-legged on the Jane Austen–era floorboards—as I explained the debates between Proudhon, Blanqui, Marx and Garibaldi in the years before 1871, scarcely needing to draw out the parallels with Climate Camp, the Black Bloc, Naomi Klein and the Zapatistas. Afterwards, a few of us wedged ourselves into the nearby Museum Tavern, where Marx had been a regular. There was @spitzenprodukte and @benvickers_, both art activists; @dougald—the inventor of the term ‘collapsonomics’; @digitalmaverick, a schoolteacher and ‘moodle evangelist’; and Tim, who’d dedicated his life to fighting for human rights in the Niger Delta. The discussion buzzed: is it the technology, the economics, the mass psychology or just the zeitgeist that’s caused this global explosion of revolt?


pages: 265 words: 15,515

Nomad Citizenship: Free-Market Communism and the Slow-Motion General Strike by Eugene W. Holland

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capital controls, cognitive dissonance, Colonization of Mars, complexity theory, deskilling, Firefox, Frederick Winslow Taylor, full employment, informal economy, invisible hand, Jane Jacobs, means of production, microcredit, money: store of value / unit of account / medium of exchange, Naomi Klein, New Urbanism, peak oil, price mechanism, Richard Stallman, Ronald Coase, slashdot, The Death and Life of Great American Cities, The Wisdom of Crowds, transaction costs, Upton Sinclair, urban renewal, wage slave, working poor

A host of oftentimes brutal laws designed to undermine whatever resistance people maintained against the demands of wage labor accompanied the dispossession of peasants’ rights, even before capitalism had become a significant economic force.68 Once capitalism has become a significant economic force, subordination to capital by political or blatantly military means tends to get displaced or remain in effect in the economically underdeveloped regions of the globe, whereas subordination by economic means tends to prevail in the over­ developed regions. With the new, neoliberal economic order, however, as both Naomi Klein and David Harvey have shown,69 forms of so-called primitive accumulation reappear in even the most overdeveloped econo­ mies—so that in the United States, for example, a regime of expanded ac­ cumulation by economic means alternates with a regime of accumulation by blatantly military means, as we saw in chapter 2. In any case, the key effect of the enforced destitution characteristic of so-called primitive accumulation in any of its forms is to render laborers more and more completely dependent on capital for their very survival.


pages: 379 words: 108,129

An Optimist's Tour of the Future by Mark Stevenson

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23andMe, Albert Einstein, Andy Kessler, augmented reality, bank run, carbon footprint, carbon-based life, clean water, computer age, decarbonisation, double helix, Douglas Hofstadter, Elon Musk, flex fuel, Gödel, Escher, Bach, Hans Rosling, Internet of things, invention of agriculture, Isaac Newton, Jeff Bezos, Kevin Kelly, Law of Accelerating Returns, life extension, Louis Pasteur, mutually assured destruction, Naomi Klein, packet switching, peak oil, pre–internet, Ray Kurzweil, Richard Feynman, Richard Feynman, Rodney Brooks, self-driving car, Silicon Valley, smart cities, stem cell, Stephen Hawking, Steven Pinker, Stewart Brand, strong AI, the scientific method, Wall-E, X Prize

The catalogue of injustice, violence, prejudice and inequality that still besets us? I could fill this book again if I did. But as far as books go, that market is pretty much covered. In The Rational Optimist, Matt Ridley recalls browsing the current affairs section of an airport bookshop and, despite volumes on offer from authors as diverse a Noam Chomsky, Barbara Ehrenreich, Al Franken, Al Gore, John Gray, Naomi Klein, George Monbiot and Michael Moore, not seeing a single optimistic volume. ‘All argued to a greater or lesser degree that (a) the world is a terrible place (b) it’s getting worse (c) it’s mostly the fault of commerce and (d) a turning point has been reached,’ he lamented. I think Ridley is being a bit harsh on those books. I interpret them as heartfelt calls to action: dire warnings followed by suggestions about what to do to make things better.


pages: 561 words: 87,892

Losing Control: The Emerging Threats to Western Prosperity by Stephen D. King

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Admiral Zheng, asset-backed security, barriers to entry, Berlin Wall, Bernie Madoff, Bretton Woods, BRICs, British Empire, capital controls, Celtic Tiger, central bank independence, collateralized debt obligation, corporate governance, credit crunch, crony capitalism, currency manipulation / currency intervention, currency peg, David Ricardo: comparative advantage, demographic dividend, demographic transition, Deng Xiaoping, Diane Coyle, Fall of the Berlin Wall, financial deregulation, financial innovation, Francis Fukuyama: the end of history, full employment, George Akerlof, German hyperinflation, Gini coefficient, hiring and firing, income inequality, income per capita, inflation targeting, invisible hand, Isaac Newton, knowledge economy, labour market flexibility, labour mobility, low skilled workers, market clearing, Martin Wolf, Mexican peso crisis / tequila crisis, Naomi Klein, new economy, Ponzi scheme, price mechanism, price stability, purchasing power parity, rent-seeking, reserve currency, rising living standards, Ronald Reagan, savings glut, Silicon Valley, Simon Kuznets, sovereign wealth fund, spice trade, statistical model, technology bubble, The Great Moderation, The Market for Lemons, The Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith, Thomas Malthus, trade route, transaction costs, Washington Consensus, women in the workforce, working-age population, Y2K, Yom Kippur War

The range of arguments is vast. Supporters of globalization include Martin Wolf with his Why Globalization Works (Yale University Press, New Haven, 2004) and Thomas Friedman’s The World is Flat: A Brief History of the 21st Century (Farrar, Strauss, Giroux, New York, 2005). Its detractors – using varying arguments – include Joseph Stiglitz (Globalization and its Discontents [Penguin, London, 2003]), Naomi Klein (No Logo [Fourth Estate, New York, 1999]) and Noreena Hertz (The Silent Takeover [The Free Press, New York, 2002]). My sense, however, is that many of these books are written as if the West is still pulling the strings – either governments or corporations. This book suggests otherwise. CHAPTER 1: WIMBLEDON, THE OLYMPICS AND SCARCITY 1. Source: Washington Post, 23 January 2007. 2. Given on 6 December 2006, the full speech is available at http://www.hm-treasury gov.uk/prebud_pbr06_speech.htm.


pages: 209 words: 89,619

The Precariat: The New Dangerous Class by Guy Standing

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8-hour work day, banking crisis, barriers to entry, Bertrand Russell: In Praise of Idleness, call centre, Cass Sunstein, centre right, collective bargaining, corporate governance, crony capitalism, deindustrialization, deskilling, fear of failure, full employment, hiring and firing, Honoré de Balzac, housing crisis, illegal immigration, immigration reform, income inequality, labour market flexibility, labour mobility, land reform, libertarian paternalism, low skilled workers, lump of labour, marginal employment, Mark Zuckerberg, means of production, mini-job, moral hazard, Naomi Klein, nudge unit, pensions crisis, placebo effect, post-industrial society, precariat, presumed consent, quantitative easing, remote working, rent-seeking, Richard Thaler, rising living standards, Ronald Coase, Ronald Reagan, science of happiness, shareholder value, Silicon Valley, The Market for Lemons, The Nature of the Firm, The Spirit Level, Tobin tax, transaction costs, universal basic income, unpaid internship, winner-take-all economy, working poor, working-age population, young professional

Instead he backed the International Monetary Fund, which had been a primary culprit in its hubris, bailed out the banks and appointed Larry Summers as his principal economic adviser, the man who devised the policy responsible for the sub-prime housing crisis. Obama never tried to reach out to the precariat, even though many in it had been hopeful that he would do so. The social democratic imagination could not empathise with real predicaments. In the United States and elsewhere, anger grew at some of the corrupt aspects of the globalisation era. Recall the systemic use of subsidies. Naomi Klein among others has called the globalisation era ‘crony capitalism’, revealing itself not as a huge ‘free market’ but as a system in which politicians hand over public wealth to private players in exchange for political support. Ironically, far-right groups captured the anti-corporatist backlash. If the state has been captured by cronyism, why should anyone support a ‘strong state’? Old-style social democrats are unable to respond with conviction because they accepted the neo-liberal construction and did nothing to support the precariat that grew in its shadow.


pages: 285 words: 86,174

Twilight of the Elites: America After Meritocracy by Chris Hayes

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affirmative action, Affordable Care Act / Obamacare, asset-backed security, barriers to entry, Berlin Wall, Bernie Madoff, carried interest, Climategate, Climatic Research Unit, collapse of Lehman Brothers, collective bargaining, Credit Default Swap, dark matter, David Brooks, David Graeber, deindustrialization, Fall of the Berlin Wall, financial deregulation, fixed income, full employment, George Akerlof, hiring and firing, income inequality, Jane Jacobs, jimmy wales, Julian Assange, Mark Zuckerberg, mass affluent, means of production, meta analysis, meta-analysis, moral hazard, Naomi Klein, Nate Silver, peak oil, Plutocrats, plutocrats, Ponzi scheme, Ralph Waldo Emerson, rolodex, The Spirit Level, too big to fail, University of East Anglia, We are the 99%, WikiLeaks, women in the workforce

.… Even those of us who considered ourselves pessimists were basically optimists: we thought that bullish investors might face a rude awakening, but that it would all have a happy ending.” But the experience of the fail decade has made Krugman profoundly skeptical of elite opinion and what he derisively calls Very Serious People. He now approvingly cites such insurrectionist heroes as the radical author Naomi Klein, something that would have been unthinkable a decade before. The insurrectionists not only think there is something fundamentally broken about our current institutions and the social order they hold up, but they believe the only way to hold our present elites accountable is to force them to forfeit their authority. Insurrectionists see the plummeting of trust in public institutions as a good thing if it can act as a spur for needed upheaval and change.


pages: 283 words: 85,824

The People's Platform: Taking Back Power and Culture in the Digital Age by Astra Taylor

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A Declaration of the Independence of Cyberspace, Andrew Keen, barriers to entry, Berlin Wall, big-box store, Brewster Kahle, citizen journalism, cloud computing, collateralized debt obligation, Community Supported Agriculture, conceptual framework, corporate social responsibility, cross-subsidies, crowdsourcing, David Brooks, digital Maoism, disintermediation, don't be evil, Donald Trump, Edward Snowden, Fall of the Berlin Wall, Filter Bubble, future of journalism, George Gilder, Google Chrome, Google Glasses, hive mind, income inequality, informal economy, Internet Archive, Internet of things, invisible hand, Jane Jacobs, Jaron Lanier, Jeff Bezos, job automation, Julian Assange, Kevin Kelly, Kickstarter, knowledge worker, Mark Zuckerberg, means of production, Naomi Klein, Narrative Science, Network effects, new economy, New Journalism, New Urbanism, Nicholas Carr, oil rush, Peter Thiel, Plutocrats, plutocrats, pre–internet, profit motive, recommendation engine, Richard Florida, Richard Stallman, self-driving car, shareholder value, sharing economy, Silicon Valley, Silicon Valley ideology, slashdot, Slavoj Žižek, Snapchat, social graph, Steve Jobs, Stewart Brand, technoutopianism, trade route, Whole Earth Catalog, WikiLeaks, winner-take-all economy, Works Progress Administration, young professional

Whenever artists sign on with brands, their creativity and creditability are grafted on to the good or service being plugged. The aim is to bypass or short-circuit viewer defenses by intimately associating with creative elements that people find appealing—to “engage target consumers in captive locations for extended periods of time through the power of emotional connections,” as the CEO of a leading media research firm put it. Given our populist sensibilities, advertisements, as writers Thomas Frank and Naomi Klein have observed, can no longer just tell us what to buy. Instead they offer us what appear to be gifts—like Wolf’s artist profiles—while slyly taking something—our attention or “mindshare”—in return. In this context it’s common for companies to fancy themselves patrons—modern-day Medicis, they’ve been called—giving needy creators a boost. But there are limits to what they’re willing to support.


pages: 504 words: 147,660

In the Realm of Hungry Ghosts: Close Encounters With Addiction by Gabor Mate, Peter A. Levine

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Albert Einstein, Anton Chekhov, corporate governance, epigenetics, ghettoisation, impulse control, meta analysis, meta-analysis, Naomi Klein, phenotype, placebo effect, Yogi Berra

[In the Realm of Hungry Ghosts] reads not only as a lively textbook analysis of the physiological and psychological causes of drug addiction, but also as an investigation into his heart and mind.” The Globe and Mail “Gabor Maté’s connections—between the intensely personal and the global, the spiritual and the medical, the psychological and the political—are bold, wise and deeply moral. He is a healer to be cherished and this exciting book arrives at just the right time.” Naomi Klein, author of No Logo and The Shock Doctrine “It seems odd to use the word ‘beautiful’ to describe a book that focuses frequently, in graphic, unrelenting detail, on the lives of some of the most hopeless outcasts of our society: the hard-core street addicts with whom Dr. Gabor Maté works. Yet that’s the word that came repeatedly to mind as I read In the Realm of Hungry Ghosts. It’s not only the grace of Maté’s writing, though that’s certainly a great part of it.


pages: 538 words: 141,822

The Net Delusion: The Dark Side of Internet Freedom by Evgeny Morozov

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A Declaration of the Independence of Cyberspace, Ayatollah Khomeini, Berlin Wall, borderless world, Buckminster Fuller, Cass Sunstein, citizen journalism, cloud computing, cognitive dissonance, Columbine, computer age, conceptual framework, crowdsourcing, Dissolution of the Soviet Union, don't be evil, failed state, Fall of the Berlin Wall, Francis Fukuyama: the end of history, global village, Google Earth, illegal immigration, invention of radio, invention of the printing press, invisible hand, John von Neumann, Marshall McLuhan, Naomi Klein, Network effects, new economy, New Urbanism, pirate software, pre–internet, Productivity paradox, RAND corporation, Ronald Reagan, Ronald Reagan: Tear down this wall, Silicon Valley, Silicon Valley startup, Sinatra Doctrine, Skype, Slavoj Žižek, social graph, Steve Jobs, technoutopianism, The Wisdom of Crowds, urban planning, Washington Consensus, WikiLeaks, women in the workforce

To understand modern authoritarianism (and, some would argue, modern capitalism as well), we need insights from both thinkers. The rigidity of thought suggested by the Orwell-Huxley coordinate system leads many an otherwise shrewd observer to overlook the Huxleyan elements in dictatorships and, as disturbingly, the Orwellian elements in democracies. This is why it has become so easy to miss the fact that, as the writer Naomi Klein puts it, “China is becoming more like [the West] in very visible ways (Starbucks, Hooters, cellphones that are cooler than ours), and [the West is] becoming more like China in less visible ones (torture, warrantless wiretapping, indefinite detention, though not nearly on the Chinese scale).” It seems fairly noncontroversial that most modern dictators would prefer a Huxleyan world to an Orwellian one, if only because controlling people through entertainment is cheaper and doesn’t involve as much brutality.


pages: 462 words: 150,129

The Rational Optimist: How Prosperity Evolves by Matt Ridley

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23andMe, agricultural Revolution, air freight, back-to-the-land, banking crisis, barriers to entry, Bernie Madoff, British Empire, call centre, carbon footprint, charter city, clean water, cloud computing, cognitive dissonance, collateralized debt obligation, colonial exploitation, colonial rule, Corn Laws, credit crunch, David Ricardo: comparative advantage, decarbonisation, dematerialisation, demographic dividend, demographic transition, double entry bookkeeping, Edward Glaeser, en.wikipedia.org, everywhere but in the productivity statistics, falling living standards, feminist movement, financial innovation, Flynn Effect, food miles, Gordon Gekko, greed is good, Hans Rosling, happiness index / gross national happiness, haute cuisine, Hernando de Soto, income inequality, income per capita, Indoor air pollution, informal economy, invention of agriculture, invisible hand, James Hargreaves, James Watt: steam engine, Jane Jacobs, John Nash: game theory, joint-stock limited liability company, Joseph Schumpeter, Kevin Kelly, knowledge worker, Kula ring, Mark Zuckerberg, meta analysis, meta-analysis, mutually assured destruction, Naomi Klein, Northern Rock, nuclear winter, oil shale / tar sands, out of africa, packet switching, patent troll, Pax Mongolica, Peter Thiel, phenotype, Plutocrats, plutocrats, Ponzi scheme, Productivity paradox, profit motive, purchasing power parity, race to the bottom, Ray Kurzweil, rent-seeking, rising living standards, Silicon Valley, spice trade, spinning jenny, stem cell, Steve Jobs, Steven Pinker, Stewart Brand, supervolcano, technological singularity, The Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith, Thorstein Veblen, trade route, transaction costs, ultimatum game, upwardly mobile, urban sprawl, Vernor Vinge, wage slave, working poor, working-age population, Y2K, Yogi Berra

The generation that has experienced more peace, freedom, leisure time, education, medicine, travel, movies, mobile phones and massages than any generation in history is lapping up gloom at every opportunity. In an airport bookshop recently, I paused at the Current Affairs section and looked down the shelves. There were books by Noam Chomsky, Barbara Ehrenreich, Al Franken, Al Gore, John Gray, Naomi Klein, George Monbiot and Michael Moore, which all argued to a greater or lesser degree that (a) the world is a terrible place; (b) it’s getting worse; (c) it’s mostly the fault of commerce; and (d) a turning point has been reached. I did not see a single optimistic book. Even the good news is presented as bad news. Reactionaries and radicals agree that ‘excessive choice’ is an acute and present danger – that it is corrupting, corroding and confusing to encounter ten thousand products in the supermarket, each reminding you of your limited budget and of the impossibility of ever satisfying your demands.


pages: 532 words: 155,470

One Less Car: Bicycling and the Politics of Automobility by Zack Furness, Zachary Mooradian Furness

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active transport: walking or cycling, affirmative action, American Society of Civil Engineers: Report Card, back-to-the-land, Build a better mousetrap, Burning Man, car-free, carbon footprint, clean water, colonial rule, conceptual framework, dumpster diving, Enrique Peñalosa, European colonialism, feminist movement, ghettoisation, Golden Gate Park, interchangeable parts, intermodal, Internet Archive, Jane Jacobs, market fundamentalism, means of production, Naomi Klein, New Urbanism, peak oil, place-making, post scarcity, race to the bottom, Ralph Nader, ride hailing / ride sharing, Ronald Reagan, Silicon Valley, sustainable-tourism, the built environment, The Death and Life of Great American Cities, Thomas L Friedman, Thorstein Veblen, urban planning, Whole Earth Catalog, Whole Earth Review, working poor, Yom Kippur War

For more on the histories, theories, prospects, and limitations of “culture jamming,” see Mark Dery, Culture Jamming: Hacking, Slashing and Sniping in the Empire of Signs (Westfield, nJ: Open Magazine pamphlet Series, 1993); lisa prothers, “Culture Jamming with pedro Carvajal,” Bad Subjects, no. 37 (1998); Kalle lasn, Culture Jamming: The Uncooling of America, 1st ed. (new york: Eagle Brook, 1999); naomi Klein, No Logo: Taking Aim at the Brand Bullies (new york: picador, 2000), esp. 279–310; Duncombe, “Stepping Off the Sidewalk”; andrew Boyd and Stephen Duncombe, “The Manufacture of Dissent: What the left Can learn from las vegas,” Journal of Aesthetics and Protest 1, no. 3 (2004): 34–47; Christine Harold, “pranking rhetoric: ‘Culture Jamming’ as Media activism,” Critical Studies in Media Communication 21, no. 3 (2004): 189–212; Jo littler, “Beyond the Boycott,” Cultural Studies 19, no. 2 (2005): 227–252; vince Carducci, “Culture Jamming: a Sociological perspective,” Journal of Consumer Culture 6, no. 1 (2006): 116–138; M.


pages: 497 words: 123,718

A Game as Old as Empire: The Secret World of Economic Hit Men and the Web of Global Corruption by Steven Hiatt; John Perkins

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airline deregulation, Andrei Shleifer, Asian financial crisis, Berlin Wall, big-box store, Bretton Woods, British Empire, capital controls, centre right, clean water, colonial rule, corporate governance, corporate personhood, deglobalization, deindustrialization, Doha Development Round, energy security, European colonialism, financial deregulation, financial independence, full employment, global village, high net worth, land reform, large denomination, Long Term Capital Management, Mexican peso crisis / tequila crisis, Mikhail Gorbachev, moral hazard, Naomi Klein, new economy, North Sea oil, offshore financial centre, oil shock, Ponzi scheme, race to the bottom, reserve currency, Ronald Reagan, Scramble for Africa, statistical model, structural adjustment programs, too big to fail, trade liberalization, transatlantic slave trade, transfer pricing, union organizing, Washington Consensus, working-age population, Yom Kippur War

But, as Antonia Juhasz points out in “Global Uprising: The Web of Resistance,” the world’s peoples seem to be deciding that the struggle to create a democratic alternative to corporate globalization is preferable to living perpetually in the shadow of empire. Notes 1. Niall Ferguson, “Welcome the New Imperialism,” Guardian, October 31, 2001. 2. Stephen Kinzer, All the Shah’s Men: An American Coup and the Roots of Middle East Terror (New York: Wiley, 2003), p. 209. 3. John Perkins, Confessions of an Economic Hit Man (San Francisco: Berrett-Koehler, 2004), pp. 14-15. 4. Naomi Klein, “Not Neo-Con, Just Plain Greed,” Globe and Mail (Toronto), December 20, 2003. 5. 2006 World Data Sheet (Washington, D.C.: Population Reference Bureau, 2006). 6. Ha-Joon Chang, Kicking Away the Ladder: How the Economic and Intellectual Histories of Capitalism Have Been Re-Written to Justify Neo-Liberal Capitalism (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2002). 7. See www.ghanaweb.com/GhanaHomePage/NewsArchive/printnews.php?


pages: 545 words: 137,789

How Markets Fail: The Logic of Economic Calamities by John Cassidy

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Albert Einstein, Andrei Shleifer, anti-communist, asset allocation, asset-backed security, availability heuristic, bank run, banking crisis, Benoit Mandelbrot, Berlin Wall, Bernie Madoff, Black-Scholes formula, Bretton Woods, British Empire, capital asset pricing model, centralized clearinghouse, collateralized debt obligation, Columbine, conceptual framework, Corn Laws, correlation coefficient, credit crunch, Credit Default Swap, credit default swaps / collateralized debt obligations, crony capitalism, Daniel Kahneman / Amos Tversky, debt deflation, diversification, Elliott wave, Eugene Fama: efficient market hypothesis, financial deregulation, financial innovation, Financial Instability Hypothesis, financial intermediation, full employment, George Akerlof, global supply chain, Haight Ashbury, hiring and firing, Hyman Minsky, income per capita, incomplete markets, index fund, invisible hand, John Nash: game theory, John von Neumann, Joseph Schumpeter, laissez-faire capitalism, liquidity trap, London Interbank Offered Rate, Long Term Capital Management, Louis Bachelier, mandelbrot fractal, margin call, market bubble, market clearing, mental accounting, Mikhail Gorbachev, Mont Pelerin Society, moral hazard, mortgage debt, Naomi Klein, Network effects, Nick Leeson, Northern Rock, paradox of thrift, Ponzi scheme, price discrimination, price stability, principal–agent problem, profit maximization, quantitative trading / quantitative finance, race to the bottom, Ralph Nader, RAND corporation, random walk, Renaissance Technologies, rent control, Richard Thaler, risk tolerance, risk-adjusted returns, road to serfdom, Robert Shiller, Robert Shiller, Ronald Coase, Ronald Reagan, shareholder value, short selling, Silicon Valley, South Sea Bubble, sovereign wealth fund, statistical model, technology bubble, The Chicago School, The Great Moderation, The Market for Lemons, The Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith, too big to fail, transaction costs, unorthodox policies, value at risk, Vanguard fund

.”: Milton and Rose Friedman, Free to Choose (New York: Avon Books, 1971), 195. 80 “If one storekeeper . . .”: Ibid., 212. 80 “The consumer is protected . . .”: Ibid., 215. 81 “if we continue to grant . . .”: Ibid., xx. 81 “The two ideas . . .”: Ibid., 297. 81 “Reagan was especially . . .”: Martin Anderson, Revolution (San Diego: Harcourt, 1988), 172. 82 “due almost entirely . . .”: Naomi Klein, The Shock Doctrine: The Rise of Disaster Capitalism (New York: Metropolitan Books, 2007), 591. 83 “From 1973 to 1995 . . .”: Friedman, Two Lucky People, 408. 83 “What’s the single most important . . .”: Quoted in Daniel Yergin amd Joseph Stanislaw, Commanding Heights (New York: Simon & Schuster, 1998), 150–51. 7. THE COIN-TOSSING VIEW OF FINANCE 88 Bachelier’s theory of speculation: See Peter L.


pages: 513 words: 141,963

Chasing the Scream: The First and Last Days of the War on Drugs by Johann Hari

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Airbnb, centre right, failed state, glass ceiling, illegal immigration, McJob, Naomi Klein, placebo effect, profit motive, RAND corporation, Ronald Reagan, science of happiness, Steven Pinker, traveling salesman, War on Poverty

If you spot any, please e-mail me at chasingthescream@gmail.com and I will post them on the website and have them corrected in any future editions. On the first of each month, for a year after this book is published, I will post questions from readers and go through them, and I will go through any requests for corrections and lay out my thinking on whether they are correct. To save the best for last—I am especially indebted to Elton John, David Furnish, and Andrew Sullivan, the fairy godfathers of gays everywhere; Jemima Khan, Naomi Klein, and Eve Ensler, the fairy godmothers of lefties everywhere; and Barbara Bateman, my own personal fairy godmother. I couldn’t have done this without you. Notes Any quote not listed here was said directly to the author and can be heard on the book’s website: www.chasingthescream.com/audio Introduction 1 This has been independently verified by the publisher of this book through contact with my ex-boyfriend and through the public writings of my relative. 2 This account of my own drug use has been independently verified by the publisher of this book with the doctor who treated me all through this period and after. 3 Shortly before this, I was involved in a journalistic controversy.


pages: 409 words: 138,088

Moondust: In Search of the Men Who Fell to Earth by Andrew Smith

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British Empire, Buckminster Fuller, cuban missile crisis, full employment, game design, Haight Ashbury, Jeff Bezos, Mars Rover, Marshall McLuhan, Mikhail Gorbachev, Naomi Klein, nuclear winter, pensions crisis, Ronald Reagan, V2 rocket

There was all that ‘We came in peace for all mankind’ stuff, but they literally were part of the military-industrial complex – it was the same companies designing and making the military hardware and all that. If you were an antiwar hippy protester, they looked like the same group of people.” So I seemed to have happened upon a space Country Joe McDonald, who went on to tell me about the Foundation’s recent “Return to the Moon” conference and their sophisticated “jujitsu” lobbying model (an idea I first heard being used by environmental groups in Naomi Klein’s antiglobalization tract No Logo); about being part of MirCorp, the private, Amsterdam-based company partly run by people who’d marched against the war in their youth, which actually managed to lease the Mir space station from the Russian government for a brief period, only to be brutally “taken out” by the dark forces of the space establishment; about testifying before Congress and meeting high-level Russian officials in Moscow; about the various flashpoints within the organization, and all in a language that I understood.


pages: 468 words: 123,823

A People's History of Poverty in America by Stephen Pimpare

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affirmative action, British Empire, car-free, clean water, cognitive dissonance, Columbine, Daniel Kahneman / Amos Tversky, deindustrialization, delayed gratification, dumpster diving, East Village, Frederick Winslow Taylor, George Gilder, hiring and firing, Howard Zinn, illegal immigration, impulse control, income inequality, index card, Jane Jacobs, low skilled workers, Mahatma Gandhi, meta analysis, meta-analysis, Naomi Klein, New Urbanism, payday loans, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Ronald Reagan, The Bell Curve by Richard Herrnstein and Charles Murray, The Death and Life of Great American Cities, The Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith, Thomas Malthus, union organizing, urban renewal, War on Poverty, white flight, working poor, Works Progress Administration

Efforts to control and marginalize the poor and working-class majority seem to be necessary concomitants to an upward redistribution of wealth. Nash, “Poverty and Politics in Early American History,” in Down and Out in Early America, ed. Billy G. Smith (University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press, 2004), 36–37, fn 107; Stephen Pimpare, The New Victorians: Poverty, Politics, and Propaganda in Two Gilded Ages (New York: The New Press, 2004). See also Naomi Klein, The Shock Doctrine: The Rise of Disaster Capitalism (New York: Metropolitan Books, 2007). 4 Robert E. Cray Jr., Paupers and Poor Relief in New York City and Its Rural Environs, 1700–1830 (Philadelphia: Temple University Press, 1988), 78. 5 Although states in the Midwest had pension and other relief programs for the blind in the late nineteenth century, and by 1919 fourteen states had some such provision (the first was in 1866 in the city of New York), by 1920 Colorado was the best place to be if you were blind, since the greatest number of its blind residents received some form of state relief.

The Great Turning: From Empire to Earth Community by David C. Korten

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Albert Einstein, banks create money, big-box store, Bretton Woods, British Empire, clean water, colonial rule, Community Supported Agriculture, death of newspapers, declining real wages, European colonialism, Francisco Pizarro, full employment, George Gilder, global supply chain, global village, Hernando de Soto, Howard Zinn, informal economy, invisible hand, joint-stock company, land reform, market bubble, market fundamentalism, Monroe Doctrine, Naomi Klein, neoliberal agenda, new economy, peak oil, planetary scale, Plutocrats, plutocrats, Ronald Reagan, Rosa Parks, South Sea Bubble, stem cell, structural adjustment programs, The Chicago School, trade route, Washington Consensus, World Values Survey

Stephen Baker and Manjeet Kripalani, “Sofware: Will Outsourcing Hurt America’s Supremacy?” Business Week, March 1, 2004, 84–94. 43. “Inside the New China,” Fortune, October 4, 2004, 92. 44. Engario and Roberts, “China Price.” 45. Argentina: Hope in Hard Times was produced by Mark Dworkin and Melissa Young. For information see http://www.movingimages.org/ page22.html. The Take was produced by Avi Lewis and Naomi Klein. See http:// www.nfb.ca/ webextension/thetake/. Chapter 4: The Opportunity 1. As quoted by Philip H. Duran, “Eight Indigenous Prophecies,” http://home.earthlink.net/ ~phil-duran/prophecies.htm. 2. Thomas Berry, The Great Work (New York: Bell Tower, 1999), 201. 3. This characterization of the organizer cells is from John Feltwell, The Natural History of Butterflies (New York: Facts on File, 1986), 23. 4.


pages: 1,327 words: 360,897

Demanding the Impossible: A History of Anarchism by Peter Marshall

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agricultural Revolution, anti-communist, Bertrand Russell: In Praise of Idleness, clean water, collective bargaining, colonial rule, David Graeber, feminist movement, garden city movement, hive mind, Howard Zinn, invisible hand, laissez-faire capitalism, land reform, land tenure, Lao Tzu, Machinery of Freedom by David Friedman, Mahatma Gandhi, means of production, Naomi Klein, open borders, Plutocrats, plutocrats, post scarcity, profit motive, Ralph Waldo Emerson, road to serfdom, Ronald Reagan, the market place, union organizing, wage slave, washing machines reduced drudgery

The activists are anti-capital, anti-neoliberalism and anti-war; they are for human rights, biological and cultural diversity and the free movement of ideas and peoples across borders. They have no parties, no leaders and no centralized bureaucracy. Using the latest information technology, they organize and co-ordinate campaigns of direct action and civil disobedience across the globe. There can be no doubt that as a decentralized, leaderless network of self-organizing and autonomous groups, the international Global Justice Movement is very anarchistic. As Naomi Klein has observed, there is a general consensus that ‘building community-based decision-making power — whether through unions, neighbourhoods, farms, villages, anarchist collectives or aboriginal self-government — is essential to countering the might of the multinational corporations’.68 Anarchists have been involved in the World Social Forums, first held in Porto Alegre in Brazil in 2001, with the slogan ‘Another World is Possible’, and in the first European Social Forum in Florence in 2002, which defined itself as ‘Against the War, Against Racism, Against Neo-liberalism’.

See also his Fragments of an Anarchist Anthropology (Chicago: Prickly Paradigm Press, 2004) 64 See Benjamin Franks, Rebel Alliances: The Means and Ends of Contemporary British Anarchisms (Edinburgh: AK Press, 2006); Zerzan, Running on Emptiness, op. cit., p. 162 65 Gilles Deleuze and Felix Guattari, A Thousand Plateaus: Capitalism and Schizophrenia, trans. Brian Massumi (Continuum, 1999), p. 74 66 See Erlich, ‘How to Get from Here to There: Building Revolutionary Transfer Culture’, Reinventing Anarchy, Again, op. cit., p. 352 67 See Séan M. Sheehan, Anarchism (Reaktion, 2003), pp. 7–12, 150 68 Naomi Klein, ‘Does Protest Need a Vision?’, New Statesman (3 July 2000) 69 In Bill Weinberg, Homage to Chiapas (Verso, 2002), p. 198. See also Subcomandante Insurgente Marcos, Ya Basta! Ten Years of the Zapatista Uprising, ed. Ziga Vodovnik (Edinburgh: AK Press, 2004) 70 In Subcomandante Marcos, Our Word Is Our Weapon, ed. Juan Ponce de León (New York: Seven Stories Press, 2002) SELECT BIBLIOGRAPHY This select bibliography consists mainly of the works consulted, as a definitive bibliography of anarchism would run to several volumes.


pages: 859 words: 204,092

When China Rules the World: The End of the Western World and the Rise of the Middle Kingdom by Martin Jacques

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Admiral Zheng, Asian financial crisis, Berlin Wall, Bretton Woods, BRICs, British Empire, credit crunch, Dava Sobel, deindustrialization, Deng Xiaoping, deskilling, discovery of the americas, Doha Development Round, energy security, European colonialism, failed state, Fall of the Berlin Wall, Francis Fukuyama: the end of history, global reserve currency, global supply chain, illegal immigration, income per capita, invention of gunpowder, James Watt: steam engine, joint-stock company, Kenneth Rogoff, land reform, land tenure, Malacca Straits, Martin Wolf, Naomi Klein, new economy, New Urbanism, open economy, pension reform, price stability, purchasing power parity, reserve currency, rising living standards, Ronald Reagan, Scramble for Africa, Silicon Valley, South China Sea, sovereign wealth fund, special drawing rights, special economic zone, spinning jenny, Spread Networks laid a new fibre optics cable between New York and Chicago, the scientific method, Thomas L Friedman, trade liberalization, urban planning, Washington Consensus, Xiaogang Anhui farmers

Hughes and Gudrun Wacker, eds, China and the Internet: Politics of the Digital Leapforward (London: Routledge, 2003), Chapter 3; and Wang Xiaodong, ‘Chinese Nationalism under the Shadow of Globalisation’, lecture at the London School of Economics and Political Science, 7 February 2005. 83 . Interview with Yu Zengke, Beijing, 22 May 2006. 84 . Zheng Yongnian, Will China Become Democratic?, pp. 198-9, 212. 85 . www.china.org.cn/english/2005/Oct/145718.htm (accessed 15/6/08). 86 . Zheng Yongnian, Will China Become Democratic?, pp. 126-7. 87 . ‘Tiananmen Recedes in Hong Kong’, International Herald Tribune, 5 June 2008. 88 . Naomi Klein, ‘Police State 2.0’, Guardian, 3 June 2008. 89 . Edward Wong, ‘A Bid to Help Poor Rural China Catch Up’, International Herald Tribune, 13 October, 2008; ‘On Solid Ground’, South China Morning Post, 23 February, 2008. 90 . Zheng Yongnian, Will China Become Democratic?, p. 256. 91 . Howard W. French, ‘Letter from China’, International Herald Tribune, 15 June 2006. 92 . Zheng Yongnian, Will China Become Democratic?


pages: 684 words: 173,622

Going Clear: Scientology, Hollywood, and the Prison of Belief by Lawrence Wright

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Albert Einstein, call centre, Columbine, Naomi Klein, Ponzi scheme, profit motive, Ronald Reagan, We are Anonymous. We are Legion, WikiLeaks

The methods that Cameron used to erase his patients’ memories certainly meet the definition of torture. Electroshock therapy was administered to break the “patterns” of personality; up to 360 shocks were administered in a single month in order to make the subject hyper-suggestible. On top of that, powerful drugs—uppers, downers, and hallucinogens—were fed to the incapacitated patients to increase their disorientation. According to author Naomi Klein, who wrote about these experiments in The Shock Doctrine, when Cameron finally believed he had achieved the desired blank slate, he placed the patients in isolation and played tape-recorded messages of positive reinforcement, such as “You are a good mother and wife and people enjoy your company.” Some patients were put into an insulin coma to keep them from resisting; in that state they were forced to listen to such mantras up to twenty hours a day.


pages: 708 words: 176,708

The WikiLeaks Files: The World According to US Empire by Wikileaks

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affirmative action, anti-communist, banking crisis, battle of ideas, Boycotts of Israel, Bretton Woods, British Empire, capital controls, central bank independence, Chelsea Manning, colonial exploitation, colonial rule, corporate social responsibility, credit crunch, cuban missile crisis, Deng Xiaoping, Edward Snowden, energy security, energy transition, European colonialism, eurozone crisis, experimental subject, F. W. de Klerk, facts on the ground, failed state, financial innovation, Food sovereignty, Francis Fukuyama: the end of history, full employment, future of journalism, high net worth, invisible hand, Julian Assange, Mikhail Gorbachev, millennium bug, Mohammed Bouazizi, Monroe Doctrine, Naomi Klein, Northern Rock, RAND corporation, Ronald Reagan, Silicon Valley, South China Sea, statistical model, structural adjustment programs, too big to fail, trade liberalization, trade route, UNCLOS, UNCLOS, uranium enrichment, Washington Consensus, WikiLeaks, éminence grise

An example of the type of torture that was deliberately overlooked included the case of a prisoner, said to have committed suicide, who had bruises and burns all over his body, and visible injuries to his head, arms, torso, leg, and neck: http://wardiaries.wikileaks.org/id/5D554D29-AA6A-1679-3B0EDB9A4357473F/. 40“Afghan War Diary, 2004–2010,” July 25, 2010, at wikileaks.org. 41http://wardiaries.wikileaks.org/id/080e0000011e1f38da79160d271 eb9ae. 42https://www.wikileaks.org/afg/event/2007/08/AFG20070816n891.html. 43https://www.wikileaks.org/afg/event/2007/03/AFG20070321n586.html. 44In fact, the cable shows that the US military suppressed the killings—which were subsequently exposed by human rights organizations—instead clinically recording an IED attack and escape: https://www.wikileaks.org/afg/event/2007/03/AFG20070304n586.html. 45Naomi Klein, “Iraq is not America’s to sell,” Guardian, November 7, 2003. 46Ahmed Janabi, “Iraqi Unemployment Reaches 70%,” Al Jazeera, August 1, 2004. 47George Packer, The Assassin’s Gate (New York: Farrar, Straus & Giroux, 2006), pp. 66–8, 77–97. 48Aram Roston, The Man Who Pushed America to War: The Extraordinary Life, Adventures, and Obsessions of Ahmad Chalabi (New York: Nation Books, 2009), p. 222. 49Eric Herring and Glen Rangwala, Iraq in Fragments: The Occupation and Its Legacy (London: Hurst, 2006), pp. 16, 53, 126; Faleh A.