Google Earth

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pages: 519 words: 136,708

Vertical: The City From Satellites to Bunkers by Stephen Graham

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1960s counterculture, Berlin Wall, Buckminster Fuller, Chelsea Manning, Commodity Super-Cycle, deindustrialization, Edward Glaeser, Edward Snowden, energy security, Frank Gehry, ghettoisation, Google Earth, high net worth, housing crisis, Howard Zinn, illegal immigration, Indoor air pollution, Jane Jacobs, late capitalism, means of production, megacity, megastructure, mutually assured destruction, new economy, New Urbanism, nuclear winter, oil shale / tar sands, planetary scale, Plutocrats, plutocrats, post-industrial society, Project Plowshare, rent control, Richard Florida, Ronald Reagan, Skype, South China Sea, the built environment, The Death and Life of Great American Cities, trickle-down economics, urban decay, urban planning, urban renewal, urban sprawl, white flight, WikiLeaks

The system’s interface ‘provides the ability to come and go freely within a completely controlled universe’, media scholar Daniel Laforest emphasises, ‘while maintaining the sense of distance as a constant promise, a source of leisure, or even as an unexpected pleasure.’51 Despite its flexibility, the cultural and political biases of Google Earth are not hard to spot. Until recently, the system defaulted to a view that placed the US at the centre of the screen. The interface offers little evidence of the source or accuracy of the global surveillance that sustains Google Earth. The way Google Earth itself collects reams of data that is passed on to commercial information markets or security and surveillance services like the NSA is also carefully obscured. Many areas are also censored or offered at deliberately low resolution. Under US law, for example, Google must represent certain parts of Israel/Palestine at low resolution. States have also been found to doctor Google Earth images. Hawkish security commentators stress the usefulness of Google Earth to those planning terrorist attacks and are now urging that such censorship be extended.

., Disrupted Cities: When Infrastructure Fails, New York: Routledge, 2009. 43Robert David Onley, ‘Death from Above: The Weaponization of Space and the Threat to International Humanitarian Law’, Journal of Air Law and Commerce 78, 2013, p. 739. 44Ursula Heise, Sense of Place and Sense of Planet: The Environmental Imagination of the Global, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2008, p. 11. 45See Chris Tong, ‘Ecology without Scale: Unthinking the World Zoom,’ Animation 9:2, 2014, pp. 200–1. 46See Hito Steyerl, ‘In Free Fall: A Thought Experiment on Vertical Perspective’, E-Flux Journal 4, 2011, available at e-flux.com/journal. 47Mark Dorrian, ‘On Google Earth’, New Geographies 4, 2011, pp. 164–70. 48Daniel Laforest, ‘The Satellite, the Screen, and the City: On Google Earth and the Life Narrative’, International Journal of Cultural Studies, July 2014. 49Tong, ‘Ecology without Scale’. 50Leon Gurevitch, ‘Google Warming: Google Earth as Eco-machinima’, Convergence 20, 2014, p. 97. 51See Daniel Laforest, ‘The Satellite, the Screen, and the City: On Google Earth and the Life Narrative,’ International Journal of Cultural Studies, 2015, p. 6. 52Cited in Roger Stahl, ‘Becoming Bombs: 3D Animated Satellite Imagery and the Weaponization of the Civic Eye’, MediaTropes 2:2, 2010, p. 66. 53Michael Crutcher and Matthew Zook, ‘Placemarks and Waterlines: Racialized Cyberscapes in Post-Katrina Google Earth’, Geoforum 40:4, 2009, pp. 523–34. 54See Lisa Parks, ‘Digging into Google Earth: An Analysis of “Crisis in Darfur”’, Geoforum 40:4, 2009. pp. 535–45; Andrew Herscher ‘From Target to Witness: Architecture, Satellite Surveillance, Human Rights’, in Bechir Kenzari, ed., Architecture and Violence, Barcelona: Actar, 2010, pp. 127–48. 55James Walter, ‘Archimedean Witness: The Application of Remote Sensing as an Aid to Human Rights Prosecutions’, PhD thesis, Los Angeles, UCLA. 56Linda Quiquivix, ‘Art of War, Art of Resistance: Palestinian Counter-Cartography on Google Earth,’ Annals of the Association of American Geographers 104:3, 2014, pp. 444–59. 57Chris Perkins and Martin Dodge, ‘Satellite Imagery and the Spectacle of Secret Spaces’, Geoforum 40:4, 2009, pp. 546–60. 58This case is described in more detail in chapter 12. 59Michael; Byrne, ‘Google Earth and the Bahraini Uprising’, Motherboard, 17 February 2011, available at motherboard.vice.com/. 60Stahl, ‘Becoming Bombs’, p. 67. 61Brian Holmes, ‘Drifting through the Grid: Psychogeography and Imperial Infrastructure’, May 2003, available at springerin.at. 62Lars Lerup, ‘Vastlands Visited’, in Alan Berger, ed., Drosscape: Wasting Land in Urban America, New York: Princeton Architectural Press, 2006, p. 242. 63Lerup, ‘Vastlands Visited’, p. 243. 64Dorrian, ‘On Google Earth’, p. 169. 65Ibid. 66An example was Liverpool in 2006.

It is thus ‘closely related to the production and movements of contemporary urbanization.’48 The active shaping of this ‘virtual globe’ by the viewer is crucial, however. In contrast to media like aerial or satellite photographs, users of Google Earth are no longer simply passive viewers witnessing the world as a zoom shot. Instead, participants can actively customise their own experience of Google Earth by building their own interfaces and adding their own data and imagery.49 Indeed, the frame-by-frame animation of the Google Earth interface works to provide viewers and users with a virtual globe which they can manipulate to provide their own personal cinematic rendition of the planet that they can then view and manipulate in decidedly God-like ways. Media scholar Leon Gurevitch calls this the ‘divine manufacturer of the very [Google Earth] environments [viewers] wish to travel through’.50 The addition of street-level visuals through Google Street View grounds this virtual world with imagery of current and historical street scenes.


pages: 367 words: 99,765

Maphead: Charting the Wide, Weird World of Geography Wonks by Ken Jennings

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Asperger Syndrome, augmented reality, Bartolomé de las Casas, Berlin Wall, British Empire, clean water, David Brooks, don't be evil, dumpster diving, Eratosthenes, game design, Google Earth, helicopter parent, hive mind, index card, John Harrison: Longitude, John Snow's cholera map, Mercator projection, Mercator projection distort size, especially Greenland and Africa, Mikhail Gorbachev, New Journalism, openstreetmap, place-making, Ronald Reagan, Saturday Night Live, Skype, Stewart Brand, Tacoma Narrows Bridge, traveling salesman, urban planning

Two months later, when Google finally released Keyhole’s application for free as Google Earth, demand exploded. “We nearly took down Google a couple times,” laughs McClendon. “We actually had to turn off downloads of Google Earth because it was so popular. The first six days, it was nip and tuck.” When I met McClendon at the National Geographic Bee, he invited me to stop by his Mountain View, California, offices for “the nickel tour” if I was ever in the neighborhood. He was probably just being polite and had no way of knowing the level of my obsession with digital maps; I can spend days happily adrift over the pixelized Siberian taiga or gleefully rotating the 3-D buildings of the Manhattan skyline. During the first couple of months of Google Earth’s release, there were probably plenty of weekends when I spent more time on Google Earth than I did on our Earth.

The library of aerial photographs that coats Google Earth—taken from satellites, planes, hot-air balloons, even camera-equipped kites—is growing exponentially. “All the pictures that have ever been taken are less than what we’re going to have next year,” McClendon tells me.* The eventual goal is centimeter-per-pixel imagery for the entire globe: every square centimeter of the (real) Earth’s surface would be its own pixel on Google Earth, not unlike Lewis Carroll’s imaginary map. That goal is still more than twenty years away, McClendon guesses, since there are still places on Google Earth where the resolution is fifteen meters per pixel, more than a thousand times chunkier. And even once all three dimensions are sorted out, engineers must still grapple with the fourth dimension: time. Google Earth has assembled a library of historical photographs, so you can watch the years advance from orbit, but there’s the future to worry about as well—the Sisyphean task of keeping the map up to date.

Brian McClendon is a tall, soft-spoken man in his midforties, with a deeply creased brow that always makes him look a little more concerned than he actually is. Maybe it’s a sign of the unusual burden he carries as Google Earth’s head engineer. After all, I’ve never met anyone in charge of his own planet before. You may scoff that Google Earth isn’t a real planet, but consider: its architecture contains hundreds of terabytes of data. (A terabyte is equivalent to one thousand gigabytes; the entire text of every book in the Library of Congress could be stored in just twenty terabytes or so.) It’s a mammoth responsibility, surely more complex than being the person in charge of, say, some uninhabitable iceball like Uranus or Neptune. But rank does have its privileges: the center of Google Earth (that is, the exact center of the map when the application opens) is an apparently random apartment building in Lawrence, Kansas—a secret salute to McClendon, who grew up in that very building.


pages: 541 words: 109,698

Mining the Social Web: Finding Needles in the Social Haystack by Matthew A. Russell

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Climategate, cloud computing, crowdsourcing, en.wikipedia.org, fault tolerance, Firefox, full text search, Georg Cantor, Google Earth, information retrieval, Mark Zuckerberg, natural language processing, NP-complete, profit motive, Saturday Night Live, semantic web, Silicon Valley, slashdot, social graph, social web, statistical model, Steve Jobs, supply-chain management, text mining, traveling salesman, Turing test, web application

(A Data-Driven Game) example user object represented as JSON data, Souping Up the Machine with Basic Friend/Follower Metrics pretty-printing Twitter data as, Tinkering with Twitter’s API sample output from script converting mbox data to JSON, mbox: The Quick and Dirty on Unix Mailboxes script loading data into CouchDB, Bulk Loading Documents into CouchDB json package, Tinkering with Twitter’s API JVM (Java Virtual Machine), couchdb-lucene: Full-Text Indexing and More jwz threading, Threading Together Conversations K k-means clustering, k-means clustering keyword search capabilities in applications, couchdb-lucene: Full-Text Indexing and More KMeansClustering class, Mapping Your Professional Network with Google Earth, Mapping Your Professional Network with Google Earth feeding geocoordinates into, Mapping Your Professional Network with Google Earth getclusters method, Mapping Your Professional Network with Google Earth KML (Keyhole Markup Language), Plotting geo data via microform.at and Google Maps, Mapping Your Professional Network with Google Earth constructing to feed into Google Earth, Mapping Your Professional Network with Google Earth L Levenshtein distance, Common Similarity Metrics for Clustering lexical diversity, Frequency Analysis and Lexical Diversity likelihood ratio, How the Collocation Sausage Is Made: Contingency Tables and Scoring Functions LinkedIn, LinkedIn: Clustering Your Professional Network for Fun (and Profit?)

plotting data via microform.at and Google Maps, Plotting geo data via microform.at and Google Maps sample markup, Wikipedia Articles + Google Maps = Road Trip? geographically clustering LinkedIn network, Geographically Clustering Your Network, Closing Remarks, Mapping Your Professional Network with Google Earth, Mapping Your Professional Network with Google Earth, Mapping Your Professional Network with Dorling Cartograms mapping network with Dorling Cartograms, Mapping Your Professional Network with Dorling Cartograms mapping network with Google Earth, Mapping Your Professional Network with Google Earth, Mapping Your Professional Network with Google Earth geopy module, Mapping Your Professional Network with Google Earth getmail, Analyzing Your Own Mail Data GitHub repository, Or Not to Read This Book? Gmail, Buzz = Twitter + Blogs (???), Tapping into Your Gmail, Accessing Gmail with OAuth, Fetching and Parsing Email Messages, Fetching and Parsing Email Messages accessing using OAuth, Accessing Gmail with OAuth fetching and parsing email messages, Fetching and Parsing Email Messages, Fetching and Parsing Email Messages Google, Brief analysis of breadth-first techniques, Accessing Gmail with OAuth, Facebook: The All-in-One Wonder Social Graph API, Brief analysis of breadth-first techniques total monthly visits as of August 2010, Facebook: The All-in-One Wonder Xoauth implementation of OAuth, Accessing Gmail with OAuth Google App Engine (GAE), Tapping into Your Social Network Data Google Buzz, Google Buzz: TF-IDF, Cosine Similarity, and Collocations, Buzz = Twitter + Blogs (???)

, Closing Remarks, Motivation for Clustering, Motivation for Clustering, Motivation for Clustering, Motivation for Clustering, Clustering Contacts by Job Title, k-means clustering, Standardizing and Counting Job Titles, Standardizing and Counting Job Titles, Common Similarity Metrics for Clustering, Common Similarity Metrics for Clustering, A Greedy Approach to Clustering, Intelligent clustering enables compelling user experiences, Hierarchical and k-Means Clustering, k-means clustering, Fetching Extended Profile Information, Fetching Extended Profile Information, Fetching Extended Profile Information, Geographically Clustering Your Network, Closing Remarks, Mapping Your Professional Network with Google Earth, Mapping Your Professional Network with Google Earth, Mapping Your Professional Network with Dorling Cartograms clustering contacts by job title, Motivation for Clustering, Clustering Contacts by Job Title, k-means clustering, Standardizing and Counting Job Titles, Standardizing and Counting Job Titles, Common Similarity Metrics for Clustering, Common Similarity Metrics for Clustering, A Greedy Approach to Clustering, Intelligent clustering enables compelling user experiences, Hierarchical and k-Means Clustering, k-means clustering common similarity metrics for clustering, Common Similarity Metrics for Clustering, Common Similarity Metrics for Clustering hierarchical clustering, Hierarchical and k-Means Clustering k-means clustering, k-means clustering standardizing and counting job titles, Standardizing and Counting Job Titles, Standardizing and Counting Job Titles standardizing company names, Motivation for Clustering using greedy approach, A Greedy Approach to Clustering, Intelligent clustering enables compelling user experiences developer signup and getting API credentials, Fetching Extended Profile Information fetching extended profile information, Fetching Extended Profile Information, Fetching Extended Profile Information geographically clustering your network, Geographically Clustering Your Network, Closing Remarks, Mapping Your Professional Network with Google Earth, Mapping Your Professional Network with Google Earth, Mapping Your Professional Network with Dorling Cartograms mapping network with Dorling Cartograms, Mapping Your Professional Network with Dorling Cartograms mapping, using Google Earth, Mapping Your Professional Network with Google Earth, Mapping Your Professional Network with Google Earth job titles, problems with, Motivation for Clustering motivation for clustering data, Motivation for Clustering normalization of company suffixes from address book data, Motivation for Clustering linkedin module, Fetching Extended Profile Information Linux/Unix environment, Or Not to Read This Book?


pages: 903 words: 235,753

The Stack: On Software and Sovereignty by Benjamin H. Bratton

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1960s counterculture, 3D printing, 4chan, Ada Lovelace, additive manufacturing, airport security, Alan Turing: On Computable Numbers, with an Application to the Entscheidungsproblem, algorithmic trading, Amazon Mechanical Turk, Amazon Web Services, augmented reality, autonomous vehicles, Berlin Wall, bioinformatics, bitcoin, blockchain, Buckminster Fuller, Burning Man, call centre, carbon footprint, carbon-based life, Cass Sunstein, Celebration, Florida, charter city, clean water, cloud computing, connected car, corporate governance, crowdsourcing, cryptocurrency, dark matter, David Graeber, deglobalization, dematerialisation, disintermediation, distributed generation, don't be evil, Douglas Engelbart, Edward Snowden, Elon Musk, en.wikipedia.org, Eratosthenes, ethereum blockchain, facts on the ground, Flash crash, Frank Gehry, Frederick Winslow Taylor, future of work, Georg Cantor, gig economy, global supply chain, Google Earth, Google Glasses, Guggenheim Bilbao, High speed trading, Hyperloop, illegal immigration, industrial robot, information retrieval, intermodal, Internet of things, invisible hand, Jacob Appelbaum, Jaron Lanier, Jony Ive, Julian Assange, Khan Academy, linked data, Mark Zuckerberg, market fundamentalism, Marshall McLuhan, Masdar, McMansion, means of production, megacity, megastructure, Menlo Park, Minecraft, Monroe Doctrine, Network effects, new economy, offshore financial centre, oil shale / tar sands, packet switching, PageRank, pattern recognition, peak oil, performance metric, personalized medicine, Peter Thiel, phenotype, place-making, planetary scale, RAND corporation, recommendation engine, reserve currency, RFID, Sand Hill Road, self-driving car, semantic web, sharing economy, Silicon Valley, Silicon Valley ideology, Slavoj Žižek, smart cities, smart grid, smart meter, social graph, software studies, South China Sea, sovereign wealth fund, special economic zone, spectrum auction, Startup school, statistical arbitrage, Steve Jobs, Steven Levy, Stewart Brand, Stuxnet, Superbowl ad, supply-chain management, supply-chain management software, TaskRabbit, the built environment, The Chicago School, the scientific method, Torches of Freedom, transaction costs, Turing complete, Turing machine, Turing test, universal basic income, urban planning, Vernor Vinge, Washington Consensus, web application, WikiLeaks, working poor, Y Combinator

The utopian urbanism of this Pakistani state within a state may be based on an expansive geographical vision of Dar al-Islam, whereas the cosmopolitan logic of Google and Google Earth is a singular denuded space into which competing claims can be enveloped. The platform utopia of Google Earth's cosmographic capacities are instrumentalized by fundamentalist politico-theological geographies, such that one space can interweave through the other in the same projection. And again, their interweaving and interdependency produce the space of their encounter (once more, the lesson is less that jihad can fit within Google Earth but than Google Earth fits within jihad). The space of this interlacing of utopias is made and thereby entered into, not entered into and so made, or again, after Adorno, “but in that we travel there, the island of utopia rises out of the sea.”

As much as classified reconnaissance, simulation, and situational-awareness tools are war technologies for states, declassified tools can be for nonstate actors; and the trail of representation and counterrepresentation of contested space through these specific tools and specific events is knotted. For example, in Mumbai, Google Earth was a mechanism of the attack itself, but news agencies also mapped the attacks in near real time using Google Earth as part of their own coverage. In this awkward recursion, satellite views of the City layer serve as medium of violence by those who would enact it, witness it, report it, or defend against it, as Google Earth's cosmograms are deployed by politico-theological geographies that may appear at first to be outside its intended program.58 Here a proto-AR is not only the territorial index through which such projections play themselves out; it is, as much as the City that it maps, the very means to project their activist and in this case irredentist imagination.

In 1968 Apollo 8 astronaut William Anders took the famous “Earthrise” photograph, which would become among the most iconic and influential portraits of the whole planet Earth, and as for any island utopia, the totality of the singular figure of the Earth against a black abyss, here seen from specific external position on the moon, would invite projects of total design.37 This image map from the “outside” reframed the very figurability of territorial ground as such and suggested a single, absolute scale for Earthly culture and ecology and a single planetary “inside.”38 That figure inspired as well the popular ecology movement by providing it a self-evident domain to conserve, commune, or administer. Today, that same apparently same self-evident image of totality also serves as a graphical user interface to personal mapping applications that are based on satellite observations of all locations within the image-territory. Google Earth, for example, is a meta-interface into an archaeological view of the virtual frozen present of a planet comprehensively available to vision, but also largely devoid of animal bodies. It frames an Earth mostly deserted by humans who have left behind empty cities. For Google Earth, both the image and the interface promise an absolute frame; a metaframe of frames and their collaborative geopolitical ambition is derived from that promise. By zooming in and out across relative scales, the global image becomes a total site condition, one for which infrastructure-as-monument is apparently the most appropriate measure of intervention at any given resolution.39 However, the territorial politics of Google, as discussed in the Cloud chapter, resides less in what is seen than what is not seen, and in how the not-seen allows the seen to override other jurisdictional inscriptions and partitions. 19. 


pages: 254 words: 72,929

The Age of the Infovore: Succeeding in the Information Economy by Tyler Cowen

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Albert Einstein, Asperger Syndrome, Cass Sunstein, cognitive bias, David Brooks, en.wikipedia.org, endowment effect, Flynn Effect, framing effect, Google Earth, impulse control, informal economy, Isaac Newton, loss aversion, Marshall McLuhan, Naomi Klein, neurotypical, new economy, Nicholas Carr, pattern recognition, phenotype, placebo effect, Richard Thaler, Silicon Valley, the medium is the message, The Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith, theory of mind

North Korean military installations and some other bits aside, Google Earth creates a tile-by-tile mosaic of the entire planet. There is tilt, zoom, rotation, and 3-D portrayals of major cities, all organized by zip code, address, or latitude and longitude. The layers function tells you where the public parks are, where an earthquake is most likely to strike, whether political refugees are streaming into a region, and whether you can view an area through a live webcam. Rowdy British teens use Google Earth to find neighbors’ empty pools to crash and commandeer for parties. Or you can embed your favorite YouTube video inside a picture of almost anywhere on the planet—you can listen to blues while watching the Mississippi Delta—or you can tour Disney in three dimensions. When you get bored with Google Earth, move on to Google Sky. Delicious, which is now used by at least three million people, helps you create your own multidimensional website for indexing content on particular topics.

Sunstein, Nudge: Improving Decisions About Health, Wealth, and Happiness (New Haven: Yale University Press, 2008). For the Steve Hofstetter quotation, see “Thinking Man: Steve Hofstetter is Your Friend,” November 14, 2005, www.collegehumor.com/article:1632255. On “Facebook-like” services for the very young, see Camille Sweeney, “Twittering from the Cradle,” The New York Times, September 11, 2008. For sources on Google Earth, see the Google Earth blog, www.gearthblog.com/blog/archives/2007/10/new_youtube_layer_in_google_earth.html. On crashing pools, see James Sherwood, “Teens Use Technology to Party in Neighbors’ Pools,” June 18, 2008, www.reghardware.co.uk/2008/06/18/tech_aids_pool_crashing/. On the precise ordering of physical daily experience, see Monica Hesse, “Bytes of Life,” Washington Post, September 9, 2008. The interview with Kamran Nazeer is taken from the blog of Seth Roberts, www.blog.sethroberts.net/2008/04/05/interview-with-kamran-nazeer-part-1/.

These examples are interesting but focal points matter less today than in earlier times. It’s not that the number of focal points is going down but rather that we need such focal points less. If you are supposed to meet someone in New York City, well, just send them a text message to specify where. The new focal point is not about a place but rather the expectation that you know how to read and send text messages. You can now get Google Earth on your iPhone or, if you have the right software, ask your location-tracking iPhone “Where is the nearest Starbucks from where I am standing?” The voice recognition software will do the rest and explicit knowledge substitutes for implicit knowledge. Or you can go to a new website that takes two initial locations—you enter them—and the site chooses a convenient meeting point in between. It’s www.meetways.com, and if it is not famous that shows that these days focal points simply aren’t such a big problem in the first place.


pages: 538 words: 141,822

The Net Delusion: The Dark Side of Internet Freedom by Evgeny Morozov

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A Declaration of the Independence of Cyberspace, Ayatollah Khomeini, Berlin Wall, borderless world, Buckminster Fuller, Cass Sunstein, citizen journalism, cloud computing, cognitive dissonance, Columbine, computer age, conceptual framework, crowdsourcing, Dissolution of the Soviet Union, don't be evil, failed state, Fall of the Berlin Wall, Francis Fukuyama: the end of history, global village, Google Earth, illegal immigration, invention of radio, invention of the printing press, invisible hand, John von Neumann, Marshall McLuhan, Naomi Klein, Network effects, new economy, New Urbanism, pirate software, pre–internet, Productivity paradox, RAND corporation, Ronald Reagan, Ronald Reagan: Tear down this wall, Silicon Valley, Silicon Valley startup, Sinatra Doctrine, Skype, Slavoj Žižek, social graph, Steve Jobs, technoutopianism, The Wisdom of Crowds, urban planning, Washington Consensus, WikiLeaks, women in the workforce

(Judging by its nervous response to transnational information powerhouses like WikiLeaks, the U.S. government is increasingly concerned about its information sovereignty as well.) Given the amount of research and technology money coming out of America’s defense and intelligence communities, it’s hard to find a technology company that does not have a connection to the CIA or some other three-lettered agency. Even though Google does not publicize this widely, Keyhole, the predecessor to Google Earth, which Google bought in 2005, was funded through In-Q-Tel, which is the CIA’s for-profit investment arm. That Google Earth is somehow a CIAFUNDED vehicle for destroying the world is a recurring theme in rare comments given by those working in security agencies of other countries. Lt. Gen. Leonid Sazhin of the Russian Federal Security Service was not just speaking for Russia when he expressed his frustration in 2005: “Terrorists don’t need to reconnoitre their target.

New Internet services often open up new venues for contesting history. Nations are now arguing about whether Google Earth renders their borders in accordance with their wishes. Syria and Israel continue battling about how the contested Golan Heights territory should be listed in Facebook’s drop-down menus. Indian and Pakistan bloggers have been competing to mark parts of the contested territory of Kashmir as belonging to either of the two countries on Google Maps. The site had also been under attack for listing some Indian villages in the Arunachal Pradesh province, on the Indian-Chinese border, under Chinese names and as belonging to China. Cambodians, too, have been outraged by Google Earth’s decision to mark eleventh-century Preah Vihear temple, ownership of which was awarded to Cambodia in a 1962 court ruling, as part of Thailand.

Knowledge, Technology & Policy 22, no. 2 (2009): 95-107. Kenner, David. “Useless Democracy Promotion Efforts? There’s an App for That.” FP Passport, Foreign Policy, December 31, 2009. blog.foreignpolicy .com/posts/2009/12/31/useless_democracy_promotion_efforts_theres _an_app_for_that. Khouri, Rami G. “When Arabs Tweet.” International Herald Tribune, July 22, 2010. Kingsbury, P., and J. P. Jones III. “Walter Benjamin’s Dionysian Adventures on Google Earth.” Geoforum 40, no. 4 (2009): 502-513. Kirkpatrick, Marshall. “Jordan Says It Will Begin Censoring Websites.” Read-WriteWeb , January 14, 2010. www.readwriteweb.com/archives/jordan_to_censor_websites.php. Klang, M. “Civil Disobedience Online.” Journal of Information, Communication & Ethics in Society 2, no. 2 (2008): 2. Kleine, D., and T. Unwin. “Technological Revolution, Evolution and New Dependencies: What’s New About ict4d?”


pages: 258 words: 77,601

Everything Under the Sun: Toward a Brighter Future on a Small Blue Planet by Ian Hanington

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agricultural Revolution, Albert Einstein, Bretton Woods, carbon footprint, clean water, Climategate, Climatic Research Unit, energy security, Enrique Peñalosa, Exxon Valdez, Google Earth, happiness index / gross national happiness, Hedy Lamarr / George Antheil, hydraulic fracturing, oil shale / tar sands, stem cell, sustainable-tourism, the scientific method, University of East Anglia, urban planning, urban sprawl

The trouble with tar sands IF YOU WANT to be scared, you don’t need to watch a horror movie or read the latest Stephen King bestseller. Real terror can be found by simply firing up Google Earth, the computer program that allows users to look at satellite pictures of any place on the planet. By mousing over and zooming in, you can see what Alberta’s tar sands look like from space. It is not a pretty sight. In fact, it’s scary—and for good reason. A book by celebrated journalist Andrew Nikiforuk, Tar Sands: Dirty Oil and the Future of a Continent, explores what these grey spots on Google Earth mean to Canada’s environment and economy. It’s an important book, one that every Canadian should read to find out how the world’s largest energy project will affect us. The scale of the Alberta tar sands project is unprecedented in Canadian history.

Googling under water THANKS TO AN initiative by Google, along with National Geographic, the BBC, and scientists and other partners from around the world, we’re starting to learn more about what lies beneath the oceans. Google has added the world’s oceans to its extensive Earth mapping. In a phone conversation with David Suzuki Foundation staff, John Hanke, director of Google Earth and Google Maps, admitted, “We had really overlooked two-thirds of the planet.” Partly because of prodding from oceanographer Sylvia Earle, the company embarked on a massive project as part of Google Earth 5.0 to map the oceans using sonar imaging, high-resolution and 3-D photography, video, and a variety of other techniques and content. Although the emerging picture is sometimes bleak, there’s a positive side. “If we can just see enough soon enough to pull back and give these areas a chance to recover, that’s my greatest hope,” Earle told us.

Earle noted that we have explored only about 5 per cent of the ocean’s depths and protected less than 1 per cent, yet the oceans cover more than 70 per cent of the earth’s surface. The more we explore, the more fascinating things we find: strange and wonderful creatures, intricate corals, and ancient glass-sponge reefs. “Some of these treasures are being destroyed before we even know what’s there,” Earle said, adding that often as soon as people find out about an ocean resource, they exploit it. Part of the idea behind Ocean in Google Earth is to show people what we have and what we stand to lose if we don’t smarten up. “People will be aware of not only what’s there but what’s been lost,” Earle said. “People don’t seem to widely appreciate how important it is to protect the systems that give us life.” We can only hope this endeavour will lead to more concern for the state of the oceans and for the need to protect them. The glass-sponge reefs, for example, are being considered for formal protection, and public support could make the difference.


pages: 328 words: 100,381

Top Secret America: The Rise of the New American Security State by Dana Priest, William M. Arkin

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airport security, business intelligence, dark matter, friendly fire, Google Earth, hiring and firing, illegal immigration, immigration reform, index card, Julian Assange, profit motive, RAND corporation, Ronald Reagan, WikiLeaks

As all this was going on, dive teams and Coast Guard boats patrolled the Potomac and Anacostia rivers while, overhead, layers of aircraft capped the largest protective bubble in the world: Air Force F-22 Raptor fighters and Air National Guard RC-26 surveillance aircraft flew above Customs and Border Patrol Blackhawk helicopters, while even higher, surveillance drones relayed real-time, full-motion video back to the dozens of stationary and mobile command centers that were lashed up with the military’s many geospatial Google Earth–like data feeds. Every single one of these military and law enforcement units had multiple backups, even the Colorado-based Northern Command,1 which had been established to defend the United States within its own borders after the 2001 terrorist attacks. And just in case its own headquarters were attacked, Northern Command kept the famous Cheyenne Mountain underground bunker on standby. In Room 3102 in the underground warren, an electronic map of the United States indicated the locations of the military’s most secretive and lethal units, just in case they needed to deploy in a domestic emergency.

Its guardhouse is barely visible, but by looking carefully at the Federal Emergency Management Agency’s contracts for guard and facility maintenance services, Arkin had learned that the facility was quite large—90,000 square feet and under 75 acres, with a newly built helicopter pad, communications towers, and vent stacks. Olney, though, was far from the largest secret site. One source had told me that there was a lot of CIA activity in one particular rural northern Virginia community. On Google Earth, Arkin and I went through the secret locations in northern Virginia that were listed in his database. Within minutes we’d found what we were searching for: a massive complex on the top of a tree-covered mountain. It looked like it was undergoing construction, just as my source had claimed. I decided to take a look a few days later. Such expansion had become the unquestioned norm in the post-9/11 world.

Its job was to analyze satellite and other intelligence images, to map Earth’s geography, and, most important, to provide an up-to-the-minute visual picture for war planners and military commanders on the ground. Once named the Defense Mapping Agency, it had expanded as the geospatial intelligence service for the entire government, from the intelligence community to the EPA. It was the government’s own Google Earth. Across the street, in an understated chocolate-brown business complex, I scribbled down all the corporate names I found on little signs on the office doors. One of them was named Carahsoft, a firm we hadn’t yet run across. Subsequent digging revealed it to be a leading intelligence agency contractor specializing in mapping, speech analysis, and data harvesting. A giant in its field, its sign was so small I would have missed it if I had blinked at the wrong time.


pages: 322 words: 84,752

Pax Technica: How the Internet of Things May Set Us Free or Lock Us Up by Philip N. Howard

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Affordable Care Act / Obamacare, Berlin Wall, bitcoin, blood diamonds, Bretton Woods, Brian Krebs, British Empire, call centre, Chelsea Manning, citizen journalism, clean water, cloud computing, corporate social responsibility, crowdsourcing, Edward Snowden, en.wikipedia.org, failed state, Fall of the Berlin Wall, feminist movement, Filter Bubble, Firefox, Francis Fukuyama: the end of history, Google Earth, Howard Rheingold, income inequality, informal economy, Internet of things, Julian Assange, Kibera, Kickstarter, land reform, M-Pesa, Marshall McLuhan, megacity, Mikhail Gorbachev, mobile money, Mohammed Bouazizi, national security letter, Network effects, obamacare, Occupy movement, packet switching, pension reform, prediction markets, sentiment analysis, Silicon Valley, Skype, spectrum auction, statistical model, Stuxnet, trade route, uranium enrichment, WikiLeaks, zero day

Africa has the most to gain with good connectivity. Communities in failed states seem to beget the most creative digital alternatives in governance. It’s a battle worth fighting, and if we lose there, we all lose in many ways. Finally, some rationality has to come to the use of export controls and information sanctions. Export controls on information technologies tend to have mixed effects. Tunisians used Google Earth to map torture centers. Yet Syrians couldn’t use Google Earth until late into their civil war, because it wasn’t licensed for export.38 Once people in authoritarian regimes have widespread access to new media, it becomes tough to take the technologies away. Mubarak, having faced the digital dilemma, drove more people into the streets of Cairo when he disconnected the country’s internet access. When Erdoğan, the prime minister of Turkey, launched a campaign against Twitter use and access to Google, he drove millions of people to try Twitter for the first time, set up their own Tor servers, and learn about internet censorship.

“Carlos Slim,” Wikipedia, accessed June 28, 2014, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carlos_Slim; “Megahurts,” Economist, February 11, 2012, accessed September 30, 2014, http://www.economist.com/node/21547280. 34. “Light and Shady.” 35. http://www.fcc.gov/encyclopedia/universal-service. 36. “Www.africa.slow,” Economist, August 27, 2011, http://www. economist.com/node/21526937. 37. “Last Mile,” Wikipedia, accessed June 19, 2014, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Last_mile. 38. T. C. Sottek, “Google Now Offers Google Earth, Picasa, and Chrome in Syria,” Verge, May 24, 2012, accessed September 30, 2014, http://www.theverge.com/2012/5/24/3041459/google-earth-picasa-chrome-syria. 39. Monk School of Global Affairs, Internet Filtering in a Failed State: The Case of Netsweeper in Somalia (Toronto: University of Toronto, February 2014), accessed September 30, 2014, https://citizenlab.org/2014/02/internet-filtering-failed-state-case-netsweeper-somalia/; Monk School of Global Affairs, O Pakistan, We Stand on Guard for Thee: An Analysis of Canada-Based Netsweeper’s Role in Pakistan’s Censorship Regime (Toronto: University of Toronto, June 2014), accessed September 30, 2014, https://citizenlab.org/2013/06/o-pakistan/. 40.

In 2011, after that same earthquake in Sichuan, Georgetown professor Phillip Karber noticed that the hills in the affected region had collapsed in strange ways. China was sending radiation experts to the disaster zone. So he started investigating with a team of undergraduate students. After three years of work, the investigation exposed a network of underground tunnels used by China’s Second Artillery Corps. The students translated thousands of pages of documents, studied Google Earth, scanned Chinese blogs, read military journals, and groomed their own contacts in China for information, producing a revised estimate of the number of nuclear weapons operated by that country’s military. Their work was the largest body of public knowledge yet published on China’s nuclear arsenal. Experts in the United States have been estimating that the Chinese nuclear arsenal is relatively small, consisting of between eighty and four hundred warheads.


pages: 212 words: 49,544

WikiLeaks and the Age of Transparency by Micah L. Sifry

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1960s counterculture, Amazon Web Services, banking crisis, barriers to entry, Bernie Sanders, Buckminster Fuller, Chelsea Manning, citizen journalism, Climategate, crowdsourcing, Google Earth, Howard Rheingold, Internet Archive, Jacob Appelbaum, Julian Assange, Network effects, RAND corporation, school vouchers, Skype, social web, Stewart Brand, web application, WikiLeaks

SIFRY 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 195 January 4, 2008, http://whiteafrican.com/2008/01/04/its-not-about-usits-about-them. Ory Okolloh, “Update Jan 7,” KenyanPundit, January 7, 2008, www. kenyanpundit.com/2008/01/06/update-jan-7. Laura Smith-Spark, “Google Earth Turns Spotlight on Darfur,” BBC News, April 11, 2007, http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/africa/6543185.stm. Activists in Bahrain also used Google Earth to show their fellow citizens the palatial landholdings of the ruling family; the juxtaposition of these images against the more cramped residential spaces of working class Bahrainis helped drive turnout in the 2006 elections and swept a number of reformers into Parliament. William Wallis, “Google Earth spurs Bahraini equality drive,” Financial Times, November 24, 2006. Ory Okolloh, “Ushahidi.com,” KenyanPundit, January 9, 2008, www. kenyanpundit.com/2008/01/09/ushahidicom.

Okolloh’s blog became a hub of otherwise suppressed information, with Kenyan journalists and sources from 89 WIKILEAKS AND THE AGE OF TRANSPARENCY inside the divided political parties all sending her updates. “The disconnect between what I was hearing from my sources and what was happening in the media was very wide,” she recalls. Late the night of January 3, 2008, Okolloh posted another update on her blog, full of what she was hearing from all her sources. Two paragraphs stood out: Google Earth supposedly shows in great detail where the damage is being done on the ground. It occurs to me that it will be useful to keep a record of this, if one is thinking long-term. For the reconciliation process to occur at the local level the truth of what happened will first have to come out. Guys looking to do something—any techies out there willing to do a mashup of where the violence and destruction is occurring using Google Maps?


pages: 532 words: 139,706

Googled: The End of the World as We Know It by Ken Auletta

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23andMe, AltaVista, Anne Wojcicki, Apple's 1984 Super Bowl advert, bioinformatics, Burning Man, carbon footprint, citizen journalism, Clayton Christensen, cloud computing, Colonization of Mars, corporate social responsibility, death of newspapers, disintermediation, don't be evil, facts on the ground, Firefox, Frank Gehry, Google Earth, hypertext link, Innovator's Dilemma, Internet Archive, invention of the telephone, Jeff Bezos, jimmy wales, Kevin Kelly, knowledge worker, Long Term Capital Management, Mark Zuckerberg, Marshall McLuhan, Menlo Park, Network effects, new economy, Nicholas Carr, PageRank, Paul Buchheit, Peter Thiel, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Richard Feynman, Richard Feynman, Sand Hill Road, Saturday Night Live, semantic web, sharing economy, Silicon Valley, Skype, slashdot, social graph, spectrum auction, stealth mode startup, Stephen Hawking, Steve Ballmer, Steve Jobs, strikebreaker, telemarketer, the scientific method, The Wisdom of Crowds, Upton Sinclair, X Prize, yield management

By 2011, Web advertising in the United States was expected to climb to sixty billion dollars, or 13 percent of all ad dollars. This meant more dollars siphoned from traditional media, with the largest slice probably going to Google. And Google had started initiatives to sell advertising for television, radio, and newspapers, which could boost its market share. Google also introduced other services: Gmail, Google News, Google Earth, Google Maps, Google Video, Picasa for sharing digital photographs, Google Books to search every book ever published, Orkut, a social network site, or additional “cloud computing” applications such as Desktop or Docs. By 2008, Mel Karmazin was no longer alone in questioning Google’s intentions. Nor were those intentions obscure. In the disclosure documents it filed with the SEC in 2008, Google declared, “We began as a technology company, and have evolved into a software, technology, internet, advertising and media company all rolled into one.”

“Seventy percent of our effort goes to our core; our web search engine and our advertising network,” Brin wrote on behalf of himself and Page. He went on to say that it was desirable for Google to diversify and that is “why we allocate 20 percent for adjacent areas such as Gmail and Google Desktop Search. The remaining 10 percent is saved for anything else, giving us freedom to innovate.” The letter cited some new products Google invented or acquired: Google Maps, which allowed users to map directions; Google Earth, which provided satellite images of the earth’s nearly sixty million square miles, allowing users to zoom in to search teeming Calcutta streets or war-torn Baghdad; Google Scholar, which allowed researchers to access academic papers and research; Google Video, which allowed users to search television programs; and Gmail. Any media company paying attention saw that Google was not just a search engine.

They pledged to divert to this foundation one percent of Google’s profits, with three goals: to ascertain the quality of water and health care and other services country by country; to gather enough information to try to predict and prevent catastrophes, whether these be forces of nature or disease; and to make energy-renewable investments. Page and Brin sound more like social workers than hardheaded businessmen when they extol Google Earth as a vehicle to spot imminent disasters and offer to make “a gift” of this technology to disaster relief organizations. Google put up thirty million dollars to fund the X Prize Foundation’s Google Lunar X Prize, which would be awarded to the private team that designs the best robotic rover to traverse the moon’s surface and send high definition video images back to earth. Google also launched Google Health, an effort much like the one announced by Microsoft and by AOL cofounder Steve Case’s Revolution Health Group LLC.


pages: 552 words: 168,518

MacroWikinomics: Rebooting Business and the World by Don Tapscott, Anthony D. Williams

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accounting loophole / creative accounting, airport security, Andrew Keen, augmented reality, Ayatollah Khomeini, barriers to entry, bioinformatics, Bretton Woods, business climate, business process, car-free, carbon footprint, citizen journalism, Clayton Christensen, clean water, Climategate, Climatic Research Unit, cloud computing, collaborative editing, collapse of Lehman Brothers, collateralized debt obligation, colonial rule, corporate governance, corporate social responsibility, crowdsourcing, death of newspapers, demographic transition, distributed generation, don't be evil, en.wikipedia.org, energy security, energy transition, Exxon Valdez, failed state, fault tolerance, financial innovation, Galaxy Zoo, game design, global village, Google Earth, Hans Rosling, hive mind, Home mortgage interest deduction, interchangeable parts, Internet of things, invention of movable type, Isaac Newton, James Watt: steam engine, Jaron Lanier, jimmy wales, Joseph Schumpeter, Julian Assange, Kevin Kelly, knowledge economy, knowledge worker, Marshall McLuhan, medical bankruptcy, megacity, mortgage tax deduction, Netflix Prize, new economy, Nicholas Carr, oil shock, online collectivism, open borders, open economy, pattern recognition, peer-to-peer lending, personalized medicine, Ray Kurzweil, RFID, ride hailing / ride sharing, Ronald Reagan, scientific mainstream, shareholder value, Silicon Valley, Skype, smart grid, smart meter, social graph, social web, software patent, Steve Jobs, text mining, the scientific method, The Wisdom of Crowds, transaction costs, transfer pricing, University of East Anglia, urban sprawl, value at risk, WikiLeaks, X Prize, young professional, Zipcar

REVERSING THE TIDE OF DISRUPTIVE CLIMATE CHANGE: A NEW GLOBAL POWER EMERGES Greg Asner and Carlos Souza, two scientists at the forefront of forest science, are hoping to uncover the location and rates of deforestation around the world and link them to climate change. But instead of traversing through vast tracts of jungle in Indonesia or Brazil, they have been using a tool available to anyone with a PC and an Internet connection—Google Earth. The scientists are working with Google’s team to analyze satellite images that can shed light on the status of the world’s forests, without the need for expensive field studies.1 In fact, the idea over time is to gather together all of the earth’s raw satellite imagery data—petabytes of historical, present, and future data—and make it easily available through the Google Earth platform to anyone who cares to make use of it. The evidence accumulated to date is already helping scientists, governments, and conservationists to assess the scale of the deforestation problem on a global basis.

And thanks to the work of economists such as Nicholas Stern, we also know that protecting the world’s standing forests is one of the most cost-effective ways to cut carbon emissions and mitigate climate change.2 While free tools like Google Earth empower the world’s scientists and policy makers, they also make information that was once inaccessible and hard to understand available to the broader public. Indeed, by displaying that information in bold visual formats, these tools help communicate complex phenomena in a way that most laymen can easily grasp. Whether mapping the world’s oil spills, simulating the effects of sea-level rises, tracking mammals on the verge of extinction, or showing national per capita CO emissions, Google Earth, along with the data-crunching capabilities of Google’s server farms, provides an ideal platform on which to enhance our understanding of humanity’s impact on the biosphere.

Federal administrators are watching it too. They’ll be talking over the performance data at a management accountability meeting later in the day with Jeffrey Zients, the U.S. government’s new chief performance officer. Across town, the head of a D.C.-based government watchdog is preparing for her prime time media appearance by downloading exactly the same information. In the meantime she’s plotting trends on Google Earth and releasing new insights on her Twitter feed. Many employees find this new openness striking, even unnerving. And it’s true; the innovations Kundra is pursuing are genuinely remarkable at a time when most people associate government with waste, inefficiency, and graft. Where most governments build mainframes and buy expensive software, Kundra is encouraging federal agencies to use free Google services and open-source wikis for everything from word processing to performance measurement, to service improvement.


pages: 215 words: 55,212

The Mesh: Why the Future of Business Is Sharing by Lisa Gansky

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Airbnb, Amazon Mechanical Turk, Amazon Web Services, banking crisis, barriers to entry, carbon footprint, cloud computing, credit crunch, crowdsourcing, diversification, Firefox, Google Earth, Internet of things, Kickstarter, late fees, Network effects, new economy, peer-to-peer lending, recommendation engine, RFID, Richard Florida, Richard Thaler, ride hailing / ride sharing, sharing economy, Silicon Valley, smart grid, social web, software as a service, TaskRabbit, the built environment, walkable city, yield management, young professional, Zipcar

Google, the other Internet giant, also uses Mesh strategies with several of its products. Google Maps has become a crucial, widely used share platform for many businesses, consumers, and nonprofit organizations. The maps provide location data—such as directions to the nearest bike-sharing outlet—that are crucial to many Mesh businesses. Google Earth is another share platform, continually improved by users through network services. And information available on Google Earth is often the basis for coordinated real-time action in the physical world. Jane Goodall, for example, uses the platform with the company’s Android phone to monitor forests and wildlife. Information-enabled, user-influenced share platforms and community trust-building are core features of the Mesh. test-drive Mesh elements. Even without going Full Mesh, there are a number of ways for corporations to leverage physical assets—including the materials used in their products—as share platforms.

See Product design double bottom line of energy cooperatives government initiatives for green business practices and profits green criteria and purchasing decisions Mesh companies purchasing decisions, green drivers of recycling and reuse services sustainable design upcycling waste management, natural approach to Etsy Expedia Expensure Expert-advice sharing, Mesh companies for Facebook Firefox, community input First mover advantage Flash branding Flextronics, Mesh strategies Florida, Richard Folcia, Federico Food co-ops, Mesh companies Freepeats FreshlyBranded FriendlyFavor Friendster Full Mesh model Gardening, Mesh companies Geek Squad General Electric Get Satisfaction Global Green Godin, Seth Goodall, Jane GoodGuide Goods swaps, Mesh companies Google Google Earth Gordon, Chuck Green initiatives. See Environment management Green Note Griffith, Saul Groupon Hackerspaces Hagel, John Health and fitness, Mesh companies Heirloom design, versus disposable Hilton, Conrad Hobbies, Mesh companies Hollrr Home exchange Homeexchange.com Mesh companies partnership possibilities Home improvement, Mesh companies Home ownership, rejection of Homer, Chris Hub Huizenga, Wayne Humanitarian projects, Mesh companies Hybrid autos Income and profits double bottom line generation from the Mesh and ownership model partnership deals transaction fees Influencers Information revolution In Good Company Instructables Intellectual property, shared Internet companies, development, stages of Inventory, pick-and-pack facilities, use of iPod iTunes Jewelry rental, Mesh companies JGoods Johnson & Johnson Kashless Kennedy, Robert, Jr.


pages: 397 words: 110,130

Smarter Than You Think: How Technology Is Changing Our Minds for the Better by Clive Thompson

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3D printing, 4chan, A Declaration of the Independence of Cyberspace, augmented reality, barriers to entry, Benjamin Mako Hill, butterfly effect, citizen journalism, Claude Shannon: information theory, conceptual framework, corporate governance, crowdsourcing, Deng Xiaoping, discovery of penicillin, Douglas Engelbart, Edward Glaeser, en.wikipedia.org, experimental subject, Filter Bubble, Freestyle chess, Galaxy Zoo, Google Earth, Google Glasses, Henri Poincaré, hindsight bias, hive mind, Howard Rheingold, information retrieval, iterative process, jimmy wales, Kevin Kelly, Khan Academy, knowledge worker, Mark Zuckerberg, Marshall McLuhan, Menlo Park, Netflix Prize, Nicholas Carr, patent troll, pattern recognition, pre–internet, Richard Feynman, Richard Feynman, Ronald Coase, Ronald Reagan, sentiment analysis, Silicon Valley, Skype, Snapchat, Socratic dialogue, spaced repetition, telepresence, telepresence robot, The Nature of the Firm, the scientific method, The Wisdom of Crowds, theory of mind, transaction costs, Vannevar Bush, Watson beat the top human players on Jeopardy!, WikiLeaks, X Prize, éminence grise

Every time someone posts a link to a Web site, they’re giving Google information to analyze; each link is a tiny vote for the site’s relevance. Several other Google projects have leveraged different types of collective effort. When I visited the offices of Google Earth, its product manager, Peter Birch, booted up the software and zoomed in to Red Square in Moscow. As we approached street level, I could see hundreds of buildings appear, perfectly modeled in 3-D, including gorgeously rendered versions of St. Basil’s Cathedral, with its colorful, bulb-topped towers. Google didn’t design those buildings; fans of 3-D modeling did. Google simply made it easy to contribute, releasing free Building Maker software and an online tool for submitting your building for inclusion in Google Earth. If it’s accepted, Google includes your user name in the model, so people can know who made it and see all your other buildings, too.

Failed networks kill ideas, but successful ones trigger them. • • • As an example of this, consider what happened next to Ory Okolloh. During the upheaval after the rigged Kenyan election of 2007, she began tracking incidents of government violence. People called and e-mailed her tips, and she posted as many as she could. She wished she had a tool to do this automatically—to let anyone post an incident to a shared map. So she wrote about that: Google Earth supposedly shows in great detail where the damage is being done on the ground. It occurs to me that it will be useful to keep a record of this, if one is thinking long-term. For the reconciliation process to occur at the local level the truth of what happened will first have to come out. Guys looking to do something—any techies out there willing to do a mashup of where the violence and destruction is occurring using Google Maps?

If it’s accepted, Google includes your user name in the model, so people can know who made it and see all your other buildings, too. “Now we have an amazing amount of buildings all over the world,” Birch told me, hovering his mouse over different buildings to show who’d crafted them. “And who knows where these people are and where they live? But that’s the kind of cool thing about it. People are able to communicate through this tool, where they can share all this information.” Google Earth’s relative openness—and its value as a creative showcase for one’s 3-D-modeling skills—turned out to be a tempting invitation to contribute, even though Google is clearly a for-profit entity. (In 2013, Google launched an even faster way of generating buildings—by using satellite photo data—and retired the building-maker tool, though it kept many of the buildings created by contributors.) Still, because openness is most natural in amateur work, I suspect the leading edge of collective thinking—as with Wikipedia or Linux—will always emerge in the amateur world.


pages: 441 words: 136,954

That Used to Be Us by Thomas L. Friedman, Michael Mandelbaum

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3D printing, Affordable Care Act / Obamacare, Albert Einstein, Amazon Web Services, American Society of Civil Engineers: Report Card, Andy Kessler, Ayatollah Khomeini, bank run, barriers to entry, Berlin Wall, blue-collar work, Bretton Woods, business process, call centre, carbon footprint, Carmen Reinhart, Cass Sunstein, centre right, Climatic Research Unit, cloud computing, collective bargaining, corporate social responsibility, Credit Default Swap, crowdsourcing, delayed gratification, energy security, Fall of the Berlin Wall, fear of failure, full employment, Google Earth, illegal immigration, immigration reform, income inequality, job automation, Kenneth Rogoff, knowledge economy, Lean Startup, low skilled workers, Mark Zuckerberg, market design, more computing power than Apollo, Network effects, obamacare, oil shock, pension reform, Report Card for America’s Infrastructure, rising living standards, Ronald Reagan, Rosa Parks, Saturday Night Live, shareholder value, Silicon Valley, Silicon Valley startup, Skype, Steve Jobs, the scientific method, Thomas L Friedman, too big to fail, University of East Anglia, WikiLeaks

“Mahmood, who lives in a house with his parents, four siblings and their children,” the paper reported, “said he became even more frustrated when he looked up Bahrain on Google Earth and saw vast tracts of empty land, while tens of thousands of mainly poor Shiites were squashed together in small, dense areas. ‘We are 17 people crowded in one small house, like many people in the southern district,’ he said. ‘And you see on Google how many palaces there are and how the al-Khalifas [the Sunni ruling family] have the rest of the country to themselves.’ Bahraini activists have encouraged people to take a look at the country on Google Earth, and they have set up a special user group whose members have access to more than 40 images of royal palaces.” Nearly five years later, Google Earth images helped to fuel a revolution in Bahrain and other repressive Arab states. The first story tells us how fast and far the network of information technologies that are driving globalization has expanded, just in the last five years.

Friedman, Milton Froome, Nia Frugal Superpower, The (Mandelbaum) fuel cells Fung, Victor G Galileo Gallup polls Gates, Bill gay rights General Electric General Motors Georgetown University Georgia Gerencser, Mark Germany; Nazi; renewable energy in Gerry, Elbridge Gerrymandering (documentary) Gettysburg, battle of Gibbs, Robert GI Bill of Rights Gilbert and Sullivan Gingrich, Newt Gleason, Jackie Global Achievement Gap, The (Wagner) globalization; challenges of; climate change and; free-market economics and; jobs and; merger of IT revolution and; price pressures from Global Talent Index global warming, see climate change Godfather, The (movie) Goldie, Daniel Goldin, Claudia Goldman Sachs Gooding, Cuba, Jr. Google; Earth; Maps Gore, Al Government Accounting Office Graham, Lindsey Granholm, Jennifer Grant, Ulysses S. Grantham, Jeremy Gray, C. Boyden Great Depression Greatest Generation Great Recession Great Teachers and Leaders Act (Colorado; 2010) Greece Green, Harold H. Greenspan, Alan Greenville (South Carolina) Greer, Ken Grinnell College Grohl, Dave Gross, Bill gross domestic product (GDP) Gupta, Deepa Gutenberg printing press H Haiti Haizlip, Nagga Hamilton, Alexander H&R Block Hanushek, Eric A.


pages: 497 words: 144,283

Connectography: Mapping the Future of Global Civilization by Parag Khanna

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1919 Motor Transport Corps convoy, 2013 Report for America's Infrastructure - American Society of Civil Engineers - 19 March 2013, 3D printing, 9 dash line, additive manufacturing, Admiral Zheng, affirmative action, agricultural Revolution, Airbnb, Albert Einstein, amateurs talk tactics, professionals talk logistics, Amazon Mechanical Turk, Asian financial crisis, asset allocation, autonomous vehicles, banking crisis, Basel III, Berlin Wall, bitcoin, Black Swan, blockchain, borderless world, Boycotts of Israel, Branko Milanovic, BRICs, British Empire, business intelligence, call centre, capital controls, charter city, clean water, cloud computing, collateralized debt obligation, complexity theory, corporate governance, corporate social responsibility, credit crunch, crony capitalism, crowdsourcing, cryptocurrency, cuban missile crisis, data is the new oil, David Ricardo: comparative advantage, deglobalization, deindustrialization, dematerialisation, Deng Xiaoping, Detroit bankruptcy, diversification, Doha Development Round, edge city, Edward Snowden, Elon Musk, energy security, ethereum blockchain, European colonialism, eurozone crisis, failed state, Fall of the Berlin Wall, family office, Ferguson, Missouri, financial innovation, financial repression, forward guidance, global supply chain, global value chain, global village, Google Earth, Hernando de Soto, high net worth, Hyperloop, ice-free Arctic, if you build it, they will come, illegal immigration, income inequality, income per capita, industrial robot, informal economy, Infrastructure as a Service, interest rate swap, Internet of things, Isaac Newton, Jane Jacobs, Jaron Lanier, John von Neumann, Julian Assange, Just-in-time delivery, Kevin Kelly, Khyber Pass, Kibera, Kickstarter, labour market flexibility, labour mobility, LNG terminal, low cost carrier, manufacturing employment, mass affluent, megacity, Mercator projection, microcredit, mittelstand, Monroe Doctrine, mutually assured destruction, New Economic Geography, new economy, New Urbanism, offshore financial centre, oil rush, oil shale / tar sands, oil shock, openstreetmap, out of africa, Panamax, Peace of Westphalia, peak oil, Peter Thiel, Plutocrats, plutocrats, post-oil, post-Panamax, private military company, purchasing power parity, QWERTY keyboard, race to the bottom, Rana Plaza, rent-seeking, reserve currency, Robert Gordon, Robert Shiller, Robert Shiller, Ronald Coase, Scramble for Africa, Second Machine Age, sharing economy, Shenzhen was a fishing village, Silicon Valley, Silicon Valley startup, six sigma, Skype, smart cities, Smart Cities: Big Data, Civic Hackers, and the Quest for a New Utopia, South China Sea, South Sea Bubble, sovereign wealth fund, special economic zone, spice trade, Stuxnet, supply-chain management, sustainable-tourism, TaskRabbit, telepresence, the built environment, Tim Cook: Apple, trade route, transaction costs, UNCLOS, uranium enrichment, urban planning, urban sprawl, WikiLeaks, young professional, zero day

GLOBAÏA http://globaia.​org Globaïa designs and promotes visualizations and animations at the intersection of art and science to raise awareness about social and environmental challenges. GLOBAL SPATIAL DATA INFRASTRUCTURE ASSOCIATION http://www.​gsdi.​org/​SDILinks The Global Spatial Data Infrastructure Association provides global, regional, and national links to spatial data infrastructures. GOOGLE EARTH PLUG-IN https://www.​google.​com/​earth/​explore/​products/​plugin.​html The Google Earth Plug-In is a free JavaScript API that lets users embed Google Earth in their webpages in order to navigate geographic data on a 3-D globe as well as build sophisticated 3-D map applications. IMF DIRECTION OF TRADE STATISTICS http://data.​imf.​org The IMF’s Direction of Trade Statistics presents current figures on the value of merchandise exports and imports disaggregated according to a country’s primary trading partners.

Israel’s maps show its borders as legally codified, while its neighbors either don’t show Israel at all or label Palestine as “Occupied Territories.” In 2014, even the publisher HarperCollins released an edition of its Middle East Atlas that omitted Israel entirely to cater to the sensitivities of its Arab market. India and China continue to issue conflicting maps as to the precise location of their border in several different sectors where their armies continue to skirmish. Google Earth has heretofore made its maps outside national dictates, depicting disputed areas as such without taking sides. When it mistakenly ceded a disputed portion of the San Juan River to Costa Rica in 2010, however, Nicaragua almost declared war—on one of the only countries in the world that has no army! Amusingly, borders change so constantly that they are themselves the best reminder that there is nothing permanent about maps.


pages: 422 words: 113,525

Whole Earth Discipline: An Ecopragmatist Manifesto by Stewart Brand

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agricultural Revolution, back-to-the-land, biofilm, borderless world, Buckminster Fuller, business process, Cass Sunstein, clean water, Community Supported Agriculture, conceptual framework, Danny Hillis, dark matter, decarbonisation, demographic dividend, demographic transition, Elon Musk, Exxon Valdez, failed state, Geoffrey West, Santa Fe Institute, glass ceiling, Google Earth, Hans Rosling, Hernando de Soto, informal economy, interchangeable parts, invention of agriculture, invention of the steam engine, Jane Jacobs, jimmy wales, Kevin Kelly, Kibera, land tenure, M-Pesa, Marshall McLuhan, megacity, microbiome, New Urbanism, out of africa, Paul Graham, peak oil, Richard Florida, Ronald Reagan, Silicon Valley, smart grid, stem cell, Stewart Brand, The Fortune at the Bottom of the Pyramid, Thomas Malthus, University of East Anglia, uranium enrichment, urban renewal, Whole Earth Catalog, Whole Earth Review, working-age population, Y2K

Also, as oceanographer Sylvia Earle points out, the ocean “provides home for about 97 percent of life in the world, and maybe in the universe.” That life, most of it microbial, determines most of the Gaian balance of gases in the atmosphere. In 2009 the spectacular array of services from Google Earth was expanded to include Google Ocean. Besides displaying the best current data on the ocean bottom and on currents and temperature, it is adding Encyclopedia of Life material as it accumulates. Google Earth is being used to track the behavior of everything from polar ice to radio-tagged animals. Threatened habitat is monitored, and so are illegal logging and mining operations. In the United States, a Google Earth add-on called MapEcos flags all the industrial polluters, complete with detailed comparison with other offenders, and a service called Vulcan maps carbon dioxide emissions from fossil-fuel use.


pages: 379 words: 109,612

Is the Internet Changing the Way You Think?: The Net's Impact on Our Minds and Future by John Brockman

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A Declaration of the Independence of Cyberspace, Albert Einstein, AltaVista, Amazon Mechanical Turk, Asperger Syndrome, availability heuristic, Benoit Mandelbrot, biofilm, Black Swan, British Empire, conceptual framework, corporate governance, Danny Hillis, Douglas Engelbart, Emanuel Derman, epigenetics, Flynn Effect, Frank Gehry, Google Earth, hive mind, Howard Rheingold, index card, information retrieval, Internet Archive, invention of writing, Jane Jacobs, Jaron Lanier, Kevin Kelly, lone genius, loss aversion, mandelbrot fractal, Marshall McLuhan, Menlo Park, meta analysis, meta-analysis, New Journalism, Nicholas Carr, out of africa, Ponzi scheme, pre–internet, Richard Feynman, Richard Feynman, Rodney Brooks, Ronald Reagan, Schrödinger's Cat, Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence, SETI@home, Silicon Valley, Skype, slashdot, smart grid, social graph, social software, social web, Stephen Hawking, Steve Wozniak, Steven Pinker, Stewart Brand, Ted Nelson, telepresence, the medium is the message, the scientific method, The Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith, theory of mind, trade route, upwardly mobile, Vernor Vinge, Whole Earth Catalog, X Prize

Today that sounds absurdly modest. It’s hard to recapture how futuristic it was at the time. The post-Berners-Lee world of 2010, if we could have imagined it forty years ago, would have seemed shattering. Anybody with a cheap laptop computer and a Wi-Fi connection can enjoy the illusion of bouncing dizzily around the world in full color, from a beach webcam in Portugal to a chess match in Vladivostok, and Google Earth actually lets you fly the full length of the intervening landscape, as if on a magic carpet. You can drop in for a chat at a virtual pub in a virtual town whose geographical location is so irrelevant as to be literally nonexistent (and the content of whose LOL-punctuated conversation, alas, is likely to be of a driveling fatuity that insults the technology that mediates it). “Pearls before swine” overestimates the average chat room conversation, but it is the pearls of hardware and software that inspire me: the Internet itself and the World Wide Web, succinctly defined by Wikipedia as “a system of interlinked hypertext documents accessed via the Internet.”

To be contemporary means to perpetually come back to a present where we have never yet been. To be contemporary means to resist the homogenization of time, through ruptures and discontinuities. M is for Maps The Internet increased the presence of maps in my thinking. It’s become easier to make maps, to change them, and also to work on them collaboratively and collectively and share them (e.g., Google Maps and Google Earth). After the focus on social networks of the last couple of years, I have come to see the focus on location as a key dimension. N is for New geographies The Internet has fueled (and been fueled by) a relentless economic and cultural globalization, with all its positive and negative aspects. On the one hand, there is the danger of homogenizing forces, which is also at stake in the world of the arts.

It is a reasonable guess that GPS changes the way that taxi drivers’ brains weight memory versus processing; it seems like a reasonable guess that the Internet changes the way my brain does, too. Often the transformational role of the Internet is described in terms of memory—that is, in terms of the information the Internet stores. It’s easy to be awed by the sheer magnitude of data available on Wikipedia, Google Earth, or Project Gutenberg. But what makes these Websites transformative for me is not the data. Encyclopedias, maps, and books all existed long before their titles were dressed up in dots and slashes. What makes them transformative is their availability—the new processes by which that information can be accessed. The Enemy of Insight? Anthony Aguirre Associate professor of physics, University of California, Santa Cruz Recently I wanted to learn about twelfth-century China—not a deep or scholarly understanding, just enough to add a bit of not-wrong color to something I was writing.


pages: 233 words: 58,561

Sprint: How to Solve Big Problems and Test New Ideas in Just Five Days by Jake Knapp, John Zeratsky, Braden Kowitz

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23andMe, 3D printing, Airbnb, Anne Wojcicki, Google Earth, Google Hangouts, Google X / Alphabet X, self-driving car, side project, Silicon Valley, Wall-E

Where there were gaps between data points, she used her expertise in geology and math to figure out what was missing. As Tharp inked her map, she discovered something surprising. What had appeared to be isolated undersea mountains were in fact one long, interconnected chain of volcanic ranges and deep valleys. It jumped right out of her map: a thick, unbroken band stretching for thousands of miles. Today, you can easily see the Mid-Ocean Ridge (as it’s now known) using Google Earth. In the Atlantic Ocean the ridge shows up as a dark blue line snaking from the waters north of Greenland, through Iceland, and all the way into the South Atlantic. There, at tiny Bouvet Island, it connects with another jagged blue band and runs east toward the Indian Ocean. On and on it goes, one ridge connecting to another, from ocean to ocean, around the entire earth. Tharp was the first to see it.

., 169–70 finance experts, 34 Fitbit, 171 fitness training, automated, 171–74 FitStar sprint, 171–74, 189, 206 Flatiron Health sprint, 60–64, 76, 85, 88, 100–101, 153, 176, 224 Flickr, 143 focus, sprint process emphasis on, 32 Foundation Medicine sprint, 16, 176–77, 185 FoundationOne, 176 Freeman, James, 21–25, 30, 103 Gebbia, Joe, 210–11 genetic analysis, in cancer treatments, 176 George Mason University, 38 Getting Things Done (Allen), 108–9 Giarusso, Serah, 24, 103 Glitch (video game), 128–29, 143 Gmail, 2, 4 goals, ambitious, 229 goals, long-term, 55–57, 61, 67, 110, 138, 141, 147 dangerous assumptions and, 56–57 in Flatiron Health sprint, 62–63 Goldilocks quality, 170, 207 Gonzalez, Tony, 171–72 Google, 60 experimentation culture of, 1 self-driving car of, 16 Google Earth, 83 Google Forms, 121 Google Hangouts, 3 Google Search, 4 Google Ventures (GV), 4–6, 7, 12, 15, 16, 60, 85, 113, 130, 171, 176, 201, 231 Google X, 4 Grace, Merci, 130, 131, 143–44, 152, 156, 175, 216–17, 221, 222 Graco sprint, 27–28 Green, Bobby, 76, 85, 86 Grijalva, Dave, 171–74 Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone (Rowling), 196, 196n heat map, in deciding process, 131, 132–35 high stakes, as challenge, 26 honesty, in deciding process, 139–40 hotels, guest satisfaction and, 10, 56 Howard, Ron, 53 How Might We notes, 68, 73–82, 110 in Blue Bottle sprint, 73–74 challenges and, 77–78 in Flatiron Health sprint, 76–78 maps and, 81–82 organizing, 79–80 prioritizing, 80–81 target and, 87 HTML, 184 Hurley, Chad, 6 IdeaPaint, 44 IDEO, 73 illusion, 165–66 see also façades Incredibles, The (film), 149 Indian Ocean, 84 industrial companies, sprints and, 27–28 Ingram, Alex, 62, 76 interruptions, productivity and, 38–39 Interviewer, 188, 190, 204–5, 217, 225 tips for, 212–15 interviews, 196–200, 201–15 being a good host in, 212 broken questions in, 214–15 context questions in, 202, 205–6 curiosity mindset in, 215 debriefing in, 202, 209–10 detailed tasks in, 202, 208–9 as emotional roller coaster for sprint team, 197 feedback in, 207 in FitStar sprint, 197, 206 in FitStar test, 208 five-act structure of, 202 ideal number of customers for, 197–99 introducing prototypes in, 202, 206–7 in One Medical sprint, 199–200 open-ended vs. leading questions in, 212–13 power of, 210–11 schedule of, 199 in Slack sprint, 217 team observation of, see interviews, learning from thinking aloud in, 207–8 welcome in, 202, 204–5 “why” questions in, 199–200 interviews, learning from: in Blue Bottle sprint, 223–24 in Flatiron Health sprint, 224 group note-taking in, 219–21 importance of real-time team observation in, 202–4, 218–19 looking for patterns in, 222 in Savioke sprint, 223 in Slack sprint, 220–21, 223 sprint questions and, 222–23 Invite Media, 60 iPads, 171–73, 178, 189 as banned from sprint room, 41 JavaScript, 184 Keynote, 171, 173, 175, 176, 177, 178, 184–85, 186 Knapp, Jake, 24, 27–28, 30, 47, 48, 60, 62, 76, 77, 85, 107n, 109 Kowitz, Braden, 5, 22, 23–24, 30, 43, 60, 76, 156, 216 Kranz, Gene, 53, 55, 85 Lachapelle, Serge, 3 Lancelotta, Mary Pat, 176 Landauer, Thomas K., 198n laptops, as banned from sprint room, 41 Lau, Tessa, 11, 12, 178 lean development, 17 learning, see interviews, learning from Lightning Demos, 96–101, 110 Lord of the Rings, The (Tolkien), 59, 60 Lowe, David, 27 McKinsey & Company, 230 Makers, 187, 188 mapping the problem, 16, 59–67, 110, 230 in Blue Bottle sprint, 23–24, 65, 66 division of labor and, 101–2 experts and, 69–70, 76, 77 in Flatiron Health sprint, 62–63 How Might We notes and, 81–82, 85 in Savioke sprint, 10, 64–65, 66 steps in, 66 as story, 65–66 target and, 84, 85–86 Margolis, Michael, 5, 12, 60, 62, 201–2, 203, 204, 206, 208, 209, 212, 214, 216, 217 Maris, Bill, 4–5 markers, dry-erase, 75 marketing experts, 34 Maser, Mike, 171–73 “Mathematical Model of the Finding of Usability Problems, A” (Nielsen and Landauer), 198n mechanics, of product or service, 70–71 Medium, 6 Medium sprint, 224 Meehan, Bryan, 22 meetings, frustrations of, 127–28, 230 Microsoft Word, 186 Mid-Ocean Ridge, 83–84, 87 “Mind Reader, The” (Blue Bottle solution sketch), 104–6, 115 Mission Control, 53–54, 225 momentum, regaining, 26 Move Loot sprint, 113 movies, façades in, 165–66, 173 My Neighbor Totoro (film), 98 NASA, 54 Nest, 16 Newton, Alice, 195–96 Newton, Nigel, 195–96 New York Times, 15, 130, 152, 153, 188 Nielsen, Jakob, 197–98, 198n no-devices rule, 41, 110 Note-and-Vote, 146–47 note-taking: on interviews, 219–21 sketching and, 109, 110 see also How Might We notes Ocean’s Eleven (film), 29–30, 36, 37, 225 office supplies, for sprint rooms, 45 One Medical Group sprint, 180–82, 185–86, 199 opening scene, 188 OstrichCo, 139–40 paper, for sprint rooms, 44 paper coffee filters, 95–96 patterns, in customer reactions to prototypes, 222 permission, Facilitators and, 89 personal trainers, 171 phones, as banned from sprint room, 41 Photoshop, 184 Pitt, Brad, 29, 36 Pixar, 149 plate tectonics, 84 PlayStation, 178 Porter, Josh, 89 Post-It notes, see sticky notes PowerPoint, 184, 186 previous efforts, see existing solutions priorities, setting, 54–55 “Priority Inbox” project, 2–3 Procter & Gamble, 73 productivity, interruptions and, 38–39 progress, rapid, from sprint process, 31 prototype mindset, 168–69, 230 prototypes, prototyping, 16, 60, 183–90 actors and scripts in, 186 appearance of reality in, 169–70 Asset Collector in, 188 in Blue Bottle sprint, 25, 28, 104–6 Brochure Façades in, 185 Deciders and, 31, 32 deciding on, see deciding as disposable, 169 division of labor in, 183, 187 façades and, see façades Facilitator and, 187 in FitStar sprint, 189 focus on learning from, 169 in Foundation Medicine sprint, 185 Goldilocks quality in, 170 in Graco sprint, 27–28 Interviewer in, 188, 190 Makers in, 187 mindset and, 168–69 in One Medical sprint, 199 picking right tools for, 183–86 in Priority Inbox sprint, 3 Rumbles and, 143–47 in Savioke sprint, 9, 10, 11–12, 185 sketching and, 104–6 in SquidCo sprint, 30–31 Stitcher in, 183, 187, 189 storyboard scenes and, 188, 189–90 trial run in, 183, 189–90 universal application of, 169 using existing objects or spaces in, 186 Writer in, 187–88 questions: in interviews, 212–14 obvious, Facilitators and, 90 questions, finding answers to, 138, 141, 147 in Blue Bottle sprint, 23 in FitStar sprint, 171 in Flatiron Health sprint, 62–63, 88 in Foundation Medicine sprint, 176–77 in Graco sprint, 27–28 and learning from interviews, 222–23 in One Medical sprint, 180 role of sprints in, 15, 16–17, 67 in Savioke sprint, 9, 10, 178 in Slack sprint, 175, 216–17, 222–23 Starting at the End and, 55–58 surface and, 28 see also How Might We notes reaction, feedback vs., 169–70 Relay robot, 7, 14, 56 eyes of, 97–98 guest satisfaction and, 10 guests’ responses to, 13 “personality” of, 11, 13, 71, 178, 179 risk-taking, 156, 166 robot helpers, human interaction with, 8–9, 10 Rogers, Jan, 46–47 Rogers, Loran, 46, 48 rooms, for sprints, 41–45 Rumbles, 143–47, 223 in Blue Bottle sprint, 146 Deciders in, 145, 146 fake brands in, 145–46 Note-and-Vote in, 146–47 single-prototype vs., 145, 147 in Slack sprint, 144, 145 Savioke Labs sprint, 7–15, 26, 33, 64, 66, 71, 119, 145, 153, 157, 178–79, 185, 223 better guest experience as goal of, 56, 84 schedule, clearing space for sprints in, 10, 39, 40–41 screener surveys, in recruiting test customers, 119–21 Scribe, in speed critique, 135–36 Seattle, Wash., 229 Sharpies, 75n simplicity, in maps, 66 sketching, 16, 60, 102, 103–18 abstract ideas and, 106–7 in Blue Bottle sprint, 24, 103–4, 108, 113 Crazy 8s exercise in, 109, 111–13 in Move Loot sprint, 113 prototypes and, 104–6 of rough ideas, 109, 111 solution sketches in, see solution sketches taking notes in, 109, 110 as working alone together, 107–9 Slack sprint, 129–31, 143–44, 149–58, 175, 216, 217, 220–21, 222, 223 expansion into new markets as challenge for, 129–30 Smithsonian Institute, 228 snacks, for sprints, 45 solution sketches, 109, 114–18 anonymity of, 114–15 in Blue Bottle sprint, 116–17 deciding on, see deciding as explanatory, 114 importance of words in, 115 maybe-laters in, 142, 155 single-scene, 114, 117 in Slack sprint, 130 sticky notes and, 114 storyboard format in, 114, 116 titles for, 115 winners in, 141–42 speed critique: in deciding process, 131, 135–37 Scribe in, 135–36 sprints: checklists for, 232–49 clearing calendars for, 10, 39, 40–41 concept of, 3 daily schedule in, 39, 40–41, 90–91 deciding process in, see deciding façades in, see façades as five-day process, 5–6, 9, 16, 40–41 frequently asked questions about, 251–57 learning from, see interviews, learning from no-devices rule in, 41, 110 origin of, 2–5 prototypes in, see prototypes, prototyping questions to be answered in, see questions, finding answers to; tests, real-world risk-taking in, 166 Rumbles in, 143–47 setting priorities in, 54–55 storyboards in, see storyboarding time allocation in, 38–41 timers for, 46–48 uncovering dangerous assumptions through, 56–57 universal application of, 229–30 versatility of, 5–6, 229–30 wide application of, 5–6 working alone together in, 107–9 work rooms for, 41–45 Squarespace, 186 SquidCo sprint, 30–31, 32, 139 Starting at the End, 5, 53–58 in Apollo 13 rescue, 53–54 in Blue Bottle sprint, 55–56, 57 in Flatiron Health sprint, 62–63 long-term goals and, 55–57, 61, 62–63, 67 questions to be answered in, 55–58, 62–63, 67 in Savioke sprint, 56 setting priorities in, 54–55 startups, 231 sprints and, 4–5, 15–16, 27 Starwood, 9 sticky notes: poster-size, 43, 44 solution sketches and, 114 see also How Might We notes Stitcher, 187, 189 storyboarding, 125, 148–58 “artist” for, 151, 154–55, 156 assigning prototyping tasks from, 188, 189–90 in Blue Bottle sprint, 153, 157, 188 competitors’ products in, 154 copywriting in, 155–56 Decider in, 156 detail in, 156 in Flatiron Health sprint, 153 maybe-laters in, 155 opening scene in, 152–53 resisting new ideas in, 155 risk-taking in, 156 in Savioke sprint, 153, 157 in Slack sprint, 149–53, 156 solution sketches as, 114, 116 test-time limits and, 157 story-centered design, 5 strategy, 70 straw polls, 87–88 in deciding process, 131, 138–40 successes, flawed, 223–24 supervotes, 143, 144 in deciding process, 131, 140–42, 143 surface, as contact point between product and customer, 28 target, 82, 83–88 in Blue Bottle sprint, 84–85, 101 Decider and, 31, 32, 85–88 in Flatiron Health sprint, 85–87, 88 How Might We notes and, 87 key customers in, 85–86 key event in, 85–86 maps and, 84, 85–86 in Savioke sprint, 84 straw polls and, 87–88 Tcho, 97 team processes, 1 teams, 29–37, 218 in Blue Bottle sprint, 22–24, 33 challenges and, 68 choosing members of, 33, 34–36 Deciders in, see Deciders division of labor in, 101–2 experts and, see Ask the Experts Facilitators in, see Facilitators ideal size of, 33 interviews observed by, see interviews, learning from in Ocean’s Eleven, 29–30 in Savioke sprint, 9–11, 33 in SquidCo sprint, 30–31 troublemakers in, 35 tech/logistic experts, 34 “Tenacious Tour, The” (Slack solution sketch), 144, 175, 217, 220–21, 222 tests, real-world, 5, 16, 231 in Blue Bottle sprint, 25 competitors’ products in, 154 Deciders and, 31, 32 in FitStar sprint, 173–74 in Graco sprint, 27–28 interview in, see interviews recruiting customers for, 119–23, 197 in Savioke sprint, 10, 11–13, 15 time units in, 157 Tharp, Marie, 83–84 3D printing, 27, 185, 186 tight deadlines, 109 time, allocation of, for sprints, 38–41 timers, in deciding process, 136, 138 Time Timers, 46–48 Tolkien, J.


pages: 666 words: 181,495

In the Plex: How Google Thinks, Works, and Shapes Our Lives by Steven Levy

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23andMe, AltaVista, Anne Wojcicki, Apple's 1984 Super Bowl advert, autonomous vehicles, book scanning, Brewster Kahle, Burning Man, business process, clean water, cloud computing, crowdsourcing, Dean Kamen, discounted cash flows, don't be evil, Douglas Engelbart, El Camino Real, fault tolerance, Firefox, Gerard Salton, Google bus, Google Chrome, Google Earth, Googley, HyperCard, hypertext link, IBM and the Holocaust, informal economy, information retrieval, Internet Archive, Jeff Bezos, Kevin Kelly, Mark Zuckerberg, Menlo Park, optical character recognition, PageRank, Paul Buchheit, Potemkin village, prediction markets, recommendation engine, risk tolerance, Sand Hill Road, Saturday Night Live, search inside the book, second-price auction, Silicon Valley, skunkworks, Skype, slashdot, social graph, social software, social web, spectrum auction, speech recognition, statistical model, Steve Ballmer, Steve Jobs, Steven Levy, Ted Nelson, telemarketer, trade route, traveling salesman, Vannevar Bush, web application, WikiLeaks, Y Combinator

He totally disrupted one meeting by zeroing in like a smart bomb on the lavish homes of every executive in the room. “We thought it was too fundamental to let somebody else control it,” says Eric Schmidt. So Google bought it, changed the business model from a $1,000-a-year subscription to free, and integrated it into its Google Maps application—and into its mirror world. By 2009, 300 million people routinely peered down on the earth from space via Google Earth. ▲ Google launched its Knol project in 2008, when the head of search engineering, Udi Manber, an aficionado of New Yorker–style cartoons, found unsatisfactory results for a query on that magazine’s wry artist Peter Arno. He began thinking of a project that would encourage people with expertise on a subject to create online encyclopedia-style articles on their specialties or just things they knew a lot about.

A group of seven or eight Googlers who regularly ate dinner together brainstormed on how they could help and returned to the office to start on a project inspired by the fire maps around San Diego during forest fire season. By the end of the next day, the Google team published a detailed interactive snowstorm map that aggregated information from dozens of different sources—things like news, weather reports, airport closures, and road status. It was wildly popular, and Google did a variation on other holidays. When a major earthquake hit China, the Googlers combined the system with Google Earth to bring in satellite images. Google provided the Chinese government information it had not gathered on its own. The government actually presented Google with an award for its efforts. By 2009, Google was the market leader in maps. But arguably the most important project at Google was the Pinyin Input Method Editor (IME), a system that sped up and streamlined the often awkward task of producing Chinese-language ideographs on a computer keyboard.

One product in particular, however, had already emerged as Google’s most troublesome, almost a symbol for the disconnect between Google’s goals and the now-global concerns regarding Google’s intrusiveness. That was Google Street View, an outgrowth of Google Maps. Its purpose was to show users what a location looked like as if they were teleported into the physical realm and plopped on the ground in front of the address they were searching for. The feature was of a piece with less commercial Google Earth additions such as Google Moon, Google Mars, and Google Sky. Unlike their earthbound counterparts, those couldn’t be easily monetized—when virtually navigating the moon and the constellations, one is unlikely to be directed to the nearest dry cleaning or fast-food establishment—but they did fit into Google’s bigger vision as the dominant repository of not just the world’s information but the universe’s.


pages: 677 words: 206,548

Future Crimes: Everything Is Connected, Everyone Is Vulnerable and What We Can Do About It by Marc Goodman

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23andMe, 3D printing, additive manufacturing, Affordable Care Act / Obamacare, Airbnb, airport security, Albert Einstein, algorithmic trading, artificial general intelligence, augmented reality, autonomous vehicles, Baxter: Rethink Robotics, Bill Joy: nanobots, bitcoin, Black Swan, blockchain, borderless world, Brian Krebs, business process, butterfly effect, call centre, Chelsea Manning, cloud computing, cognitive dissonance, computer vision, connected car, corporate governance, crowdsourcing, cryptocurrency, data acquisition, data is the new oil, Dean Kamen, disintermediation, don't be evil, double helix, Downton Abbey, Edward Snowden, Elon Musk, Erik Brynjolfsson, Filter Bubble, Firefox, Flash crash, future of work, game design, Google Chrome, Google Earth, Google Glasses, Gordon Gekko, high net worth, High speed trading, hive mind, Howard Rheingold, hypertext link, illegal immigration, impulse control, industrial robot, Internet of things, Jaron Lanier, Jeff Bezos, job automation, John Harrison: Longitude, Jony Ive, Julian Assange, Kevin Kelly, Khan Academy, Kickstarter, knowledge worker, Kuwabatake Sanjuro: assassination market, Law of Accelerating Returns, Lean Startup, license plate recognition, litecoin, M-Pesa, Mark Zuckerberg, Marshall McLuhan, Menlo Park, mobile money, more computing power than Apollo, move fast and break things, Nate Silver, national security letter, natural language processing, obamacare, Occupy movement, Oculus Rift, offshore financial centre, optical character recognition, pattern recognition, personalized medicine, Peter H. Diamandis: Planetary Resources, Peter Thiel, pre–internet, RAND corporation, ransomware, Ray Kurzweil, refrigerator car, RFID, ride hailing / ride sharing, Rodney Brooks, Satoshi Nakamoto, Second Machine Age, security theater, self-driving car, shareholder value, Silicon Valley, Silicon Valley startup, Skype, smart cities, smart grid, smart meter, Snapchat, social graph, software as a service, speech recognition, stealth mode startup, Stephen Hawking, Steve Jobs, Steve Wozniak, strong AI, Stuxnet, supply-chain management, technological singularity, telepresence, telepresence robot, Tesla Model S, The Wisdom of Crowds, Tim Cook: Apple, trade route, uranium enrichment, Wall-E, Watson beat the top human players on Jeopardy!, Wave and Pay, We are Anonymous. We are Legion, web application, WikiLeaks, Y Combinator, zero day

ISIS is tech savvy and in its latest recruitment videos even edited in scenes from the video game Grand Theft Auto V for effect. In its online video production, the reviled terror group offered new recruits the opportunity to “do the things you do in games, in real life on the battlefield … like attack a military convoy or kill police officers.” The video is plastered with the ISIS logo. Internet reconnaissance and research by terrorists are commonplace, and on more than one occasion officials have found Google Earth images of intended targets, including a 2007 planned attempt by terrorists to blow up fuel tanks at New York’s John F. Kennedy International Airport. Terrorists have been early adopters of technology, particularly in their use of data encryption to secure their communications. For instance, “Ramzi Yousef, the convicted mastermind of the first World Trade Center Bombing in 1993, used encrypted files to hide details of his plot to destroy 11 U.S. airliners.”

Over the years, Google has introduced dozens of products that make our lives simpler and more productive. When it launched Gmail in 2004, it offered an amazing one gigabyte of data, vastly outmatching the paltry two megabytes offered by the dominant player of the day, Microsoft’s Hotmail. As the young organization hit its stride, other fantastic products emerged, and eventually we were introduced to Google Calendar, Google Contacts, Google Maps, Google Earth, Google Voice, Google Docs, Google Street View, Google Translate, Google Drive, Google Photos (Picasa), Google Video (YouTube), Google Chrome, Google+, and Google Android, to name but a few. One by one, services such as phone calls, translation, maps, and word processing—services for which we would previously have paid hundreds of dollars (think Microsoft’s Office)—were now suddenly free. The most benevolent interpretation of this bounty would be that Google was merely providing products the public wanted, satisfying our ever-growing technological needs (and those of advertisers).

They had seen the future and leveraged modern information technologies every step of the way throughout their assault to locate additional victims and slaughter them. When the attackers set out to sea from Pakistan under cover of darkness, they wore night-vision goggles and navigated to Mumbai using GPS handsets. They carried BlackBerrys containing PDF files of the hotel floor plans and used Google Earth to explore 3-D models of target venues to determine optimal entry and exit points. During the melee, LeT assassins used satellite phones, GSM handsets, and Skype to coordinate with their Pakistan-based command center, which monitored broadcast news, the Internet, and social media to provide real-time tactical direction to its ground assault team. When a bystander tweeted a photograph of police commandos rappelling from a helicopter onto the roof of the besieged Jewish community building, the terrorist ops center intercepted the photograph, alerted its attackers, and directed them to a stairwell leading to the roof.


pages: 71 words: 14,237

21 Recipes for Mining Twitter by Matthew A. Russell

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en.wikipedia.org, Google Earth, natural language processing, NP-complete, social web, web application

Let's use the # screen_name => location map and geocode the locations. _, screen_name_to_location, _ = analyze_users_in_search_results(t, Q, 2) locations = screen_name_to_location.values() location2coords, location2description = geocode_locations(g, locations) Once you’ve successfully resolved location descriptions to geocoordinates, you can easily create a KML file and visualize the locations in Google Maps or Google Earth. 60 | The Recipes


pages: 228 words: 65,953

The Six-Figure Second Income by Lindahl, David; Rozek, Jonathan

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bounce rate, California gold rush, financial independence, Google Earth, new economy, speech recognition

One stayed with his wife and kids downstairs while the other ordered my friend upstairs to clean out the jewelry and other valuables. It turned out they were messing with the wrong guy, because my friend is a world-ranked expert in martial arts. He disarmed the attacker, who ran downstairs and out the door with his accomplice. Needless to say, my friend was rattled by the experience. Rather than complain or withdraw into a shell he decided to do something about it. As you may know, tools like Google Earth make it simple to find addresses, and other tools can scour motor vehicle registries and other sources to put together files the CIA would be proud of. That’s what his attackers must have done. Now, instead of wanting a high profile, my friend wanted the money but no longer the fame. Over a period of months he was able to assemble a group of people with different talents to erase much of the publicity and contact information on the Internet about him.

See also Videos eBay Echo-media.com Economy, as false barrier to success Edison, Thomas Editing content web sites Education/credentials Elance.com E-mail autoresponders commercial accounts contact information including cultivating customer relationships using effective e-mail systems encouraging product consumption through faxes instead of home accounts names of accounts nonbuyers providing insight through segmentation of distribution list selling customer contact list spam two-way communication through web forms as welcome guest, becoming a Escrow accounts Excuses, making Experts, quoting Facebook Fame Family/friends Fast-start guides Faxes Federal Trade Commission Ford, Henry Free content audios calendars consultations lead generation through lunch/dinner seminars membership site services newsletters online calculators PDFs posters special reports toll-free 24/7 recorded lines trial software t-shirts videos Free-standing inserts Friends/family Frontinus, Julius Sextus FTP (File Transfer Protocol) Tools Game changers Games Getting-started kits Giveaways. See Free content GoDaddy.com Godin, Seth Google article marketing recognition by blog directory eBay featured listings picked up by gimmick regulation by Google AdSense Google AdWords Google Analytics Googlebot Google Earth Google Insights for Search Google Keyword tool Google Trends Google Website Optimizer IP addresses blocked by local/geographic rankings by organic rankings by pay-per-click advertising with press releases picked up by web hosting by YouTube owned by Graphic designers. See Designers Guarantees Halbert, Gary Hobbyists Home-study courses HTML (hypertext markup language) editors Ideas/inventions.


pages: 268 words: 75,850

The Formula: How Algorithms Solve All Our Problems-And Create More by Luke Dormehl

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3D printing, algorithmic trading, Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic, augmented reality, big data - Walmart - Pop Tarts, call centre, Cass Sunstein, Clayton Christensen, computer age, death of newspapers, deferred acceptance, Edward Lorenz: Chaos theory, Erik Brynjolfsson, Filter Bubble, Flash crash, Florence Nightingale: pie chart, Frank Levy and Richard Murnane: The New Division of Labor, Google Earth, Google Glasses, High speed trading, Internet Archive, Isaac Newton, Jaron Lanier, Jeff Bezos, job automation, Kevin Kelly, Kodak vs Instagram, Marshall McLuhan, means of production, Nate Silver, natural language processing, Netflix Prize, pattern recognition, price discrimination, recommendation engine, Richard Thaler, Rosa Parks, self-driving car, sentiment analysis, Silicon Valley, Silicon Valley startup, Slavoj Žižek, social graph, speech recognition, Steve Jobs, Steven Levy, Steven Pinker, Stewart Brand, the scientific method, The Signal and the Noise by Nate Silver, upwardly mobile, Wall-E, Watson beat the top human players on Jeopardy!, Y Combinator

As New York town planner Lee Koppleman later recalled, “The old son of a gun . . . made sure that buses would never be able to use his goddamned parkways.”30 While the neo-libertarian Google might be a million miles from Moses’s attitudinal bias, it is difficult not to look at the company’s plans to use data-mining algorithms to personalize maps and see (perhaps unintentional) strains of the same stuffy conservatism. Over the past decade, Google Maps has become a ubiquitous part of many people’s lives, vital to how we move from one place to another on a daily basis. As journalist Tom Chivers wrote in the Daily Telegraph, “Of all of the search giant’s many tentacles reaching octopus-like into every area of our existence, Maps, together with its partner Google Earth and their various offspring, can probably claim to be the one that has changed our day-to-day life the most.”31 In 2011, while speaking to the website TechCrunch, Daniel Graf, the director of Google Maps for mobile, asked rhetorically, “If you look at a map and if I look at a map [my emphasis], should it always be the same for you and me? I’m not sure about that, because I go to different places than you do.”32 The result of this insight was that from 2013 onward, Google Maps began incorporating user information to direct users toward those places most likely to be home to like-minded individuals, or subjects that they have previously expressed an interest in.

(Winner) 134 Dodds, Peter 172–76 Dominguez, Jade 25 Dostoyevsky, Fyodor 118 Dourish, Paul 231 Dow Jones 219 drunk driving 142–44 Eagle, Nathan 85 Ecker, David 206–7, 219 eHarmony 71, 74–77, 88 see also Internet; love and sex; Warren, Neil Clark Eisenstein, Sergei 178 Electric Dreams 103 Ellul, Jacques 5, 56 EMD Serono 58 emotion sniffing 51–52 Emotional Optimisation 200–201 Enchanted Loom, The (Jastrow) 96 entertainment, see art and entertainment Epagogix 165–68, 170–72, 176, 179, 191, 203, 205 Eric Berne Memorial Scientific Award 23 Essay on the Moral Statistics of France (Guerry) 117 “Experimental Study of Inequality and Unpredictability in an Artificial Cultural Market” 173 Facebook 232, 241 and Facedeals 20 and facial recognition 215 how algorithms work with 2 jobs at 27 profiles, and people’s success 30–31 profiles, traits inferred from 37–38 Timeline feature on 38–39 and YouAreWhatYouLike 37 Facedeals 20 facial recognition and analysis 20, 33, 91, 146, 151, 193, 215 and Internet dating 78 Failing Law Schools (Tamanha) 216 Family Guy 196 Farewell to the Working Class (Gorz) 217–18 Fast Company 3, 35, 128, 220 on Amazon 44–5 Faster Than Thought (Bowden) 184 Faulkner, William 187 Feldman, Konrad 18–19 films, see art and entertainment Filter Bubble, The (Pariser) 47 Fincher, David 189 Find the Love of Your Life (Warren) 73 FindYourFaceMate 78 Fitbit 13 FitnessSingles 78 Flash Crash 219 flexitime 43 Food Stamp Act (US) 154–55 Ford, Henry 44 Foucault, Michel 101 Fourastie, Jean 219 Freud, Sigmund 11 Friedman, Milton 218 Galbraith, Robert 187 Gale, David 62–63, 66 Galton, Francis 31–32 gaming technology 32–33 Gass, John 148 Gates, Bill 182 Geek Logik (Sundem) 67–68 gender reassignment 26 GenePartner 77–78 Generation X (Coupland) 16 Gibson, William 194n Gild 25–26, 29–30 Gillespie, Tarleton 233 Gladwell, Malcolm 211 Goldman, William 161, 173 Good Morning America 67 Google 201–2 and auto-complete 225–27 claimed objectivity of 220–21 differentiated results from 46–48 dynamic-pricing patent granted to 50; see also differential pricing employment practices of 41–42 and facial recognition 215 Flu Trends algorithm of 238–39 how algorithms work with 2 and inadvertent racism 151 and Lake Wobegone Strategy 27–29 Levy’s study of 41 and news-outlet decline 225–27 People Analytics Group within 41–42; see also web analytics and self-driving cars 143, 213 Slate article on 41 and UAL 229 Google Earth 135 Google Glass 14, 26 Google Maps 16, 134–35 Google Street View 227 Google Translate 215, 221 Gorz, André 217 Gottschall, Jonathan 186 Gould, Stephen Jay 33–34 Graf, Daniel 135 graph theory 182 Grindr 89, 152 Guardian 84 Guattari, Félix 48, 54 Guerry, André-Michel 114–18 Gusfield, Joseph 142–43 Halfteck, Guy 32–34 Hansen, Mark 53 Hanson, Curtis 167 Heaven’s Gate 167 Henry VI (Shakespeare) 125–26 Her 103 Hitchcock, Alfred 17 Hogge, Becky 44 Holmes, Katie 68–69 Holmes, Oliver Wendell Jr. 158 Horkheimer, Max 179, 205 House of Cards 188–89 House of Commons, rebuilding of 45 How the Mind Works (Pinker) 80 Human Dynamics (at MIT) 85 Hume, David 199–200 Hunch 37, 234 Hunger Games, The 169 Hutcheson, Joseph C.

Programming Android by Zigurd Mednieks, Laird Dornin, G. Blake Meike, Masumi Nakamura

Amazon: amazon.comamazon.co.ukamazon.deamazon.fr

anti-pattern, business process, conceptual framework, create, read, update, delete, database schema, Debian, domain-specific language, en.wikipedia.org, fault tolerance, Google Earth, interchangeable parts, iterative process, loose coupling, MVC pattern, revision control, RFID, web application

If you click on either the GPX or KML tab, you will be able to load a GPX or KML file that describes a path, as shown in Figure 15-2. Here we’ve already loaded the file OR.kml, which is included on the website for this book. It traces a path near O’Reilly headquarters in Sebastopol, California. Figure 15-2. DDMS emulator with KML location updates You can create GPX tracks with many GPS navigation software tools, and KML tracks with Google Earth or many other navigation programs. The OR.kml file was generated by plotting a series of Google Earth placemarks and concatenating them together into a single file. Here’s an excerpt of OR.kml: <?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?> <kml xmlns="http://earth.google.com/kml/2.2"> <Document> <name>OR1.kml</name> <StyleMap id="msn_ylw-pushpin"> <Pair> <key>normal</key> <styleUrl>#sn_ylw-pushpin</styleUrl> </Pair> <Pair> <key>highlight</key> <styleUrl>#sh_ylw-pushpin</styleUrl> </Pair> </StyleMap> <Style id="sh_ylw-pushpin"> <IconStyle> <scale>1.3</scale> <Icon> <href>http://maps.google.com/mapfiles/kml/pushpin/ylw-pushpin.png</href> </Icon> <hotSpot x="20" y="2" xunits="pixels" yunits="pixels"/> </IconStyle> <ListStyle> </ListStyle> </Style> <Style id="sn_ylw-pushpin"> <IconStyle> <scale>1.1</scale> <Icon> <href>http://maps.google.com/mapfiles/kml/pushpin/ylw-pushpin.png</href> </Icon> <hotSpot x="20" y="2" xunits="pixels" yunits="pixels"/> </IconStyle> <ListStyle> </ListStyle> </Style> <Placemark> <name>OR1</name> <LookAt> <longitude>-122.7583711698369</longitude> <latitude>38.38922415809942</latitude> <altitude>0</altitude> <range>14591.7166300043</range> <tilt>0</tilt> <heading>0.04087372005871314</heading> <altitudeMode>relativeToGround</altitudeMode> </LookAt> <styleUrl>#msn_ylw-pushpin</styleUrl> <Point> <coordinates>-122.8239277647483,38.40273084940345,0</coordinates> </Point> </Placemark> <Placemark> <name>OR2</name> <LookAt> <longitude>-122.7677364592949</longitude> <latitude>38.3819544049429</latitude> <altitude>0</altitude> <range>11881.3330990845</range> <tilt>0</tilt> <heading>-8.006283077460853e-010</heading> <altitudeMode>relativeToGround</altitudeMode> </LookAt> <styleUrl>#msn_ylw-pushpin</styleUrl> <Point> <coordinates>-122.8064486052584,38.40786910573772,0</coordinates> </Point> </Placemark> <Placemark> <name>OR3</name> <LookAt> <longitude>-122.7677364592949</longitude> <latitude>38.3819544049429</latitude> <altitude>0</altitude> <range>11881.3330990845</range> <tilt>0</tilt> <heading>-8.006283077460853e-010</heading> <altitudeMode>relativeToGround</altitudeMode> </LookAt> <styleUrl>#msn_ylw-pushpin</styleUrl> <Point> <coordinates>-122.7911077944045,38.41500788727795,0</coordinates> </Point> </Placemark> ...

placing applications in, Placing an Application for Distribution in the Android Market, Getting Paid Android Menu Editor, Extensions Android NDK, The Android Native Development Kit (NDK) (see NDK) Android Package Builder, Extensions android package tree, The Android Libraries Android Pre Compiler, Extensions Android projects, Making an Android Project (see projects) Android Resource Editor, Extensions Android Resource Manager, Extensions Android SDK, Installing the Android SDK and Prerequisites, Configuring the ADT plug-in, Installing the Android SDK and Prerequisites, Configuring the ADT plug-in, The Android SDK, The Android SDK, The Android SDK, The Android SDK, Adding Build Targets to the SDK, Test Drive: Confirm That Your Installation Works, Troubleshooting SDK Problems: No Build Targets, Troubleshooting SDK Problems: No Build Targets, Components of the SDK, android, Other SDK Tools, android, Keeping Up-to-Date, Example Code, Organizing Java Source, Organizing Java Source, JNI, NDK, and SDK: A Sample App, JNI, NDK, and SDK: A Sample App about, The Android SDK adding build targets, Adding Build Targets to the SDK components supported, Components of the SDK, android confirming installation, Test Drive: Confirm That Your Installation Works, Troubleshooting SDK Problems: No Build Targets downloading package, The Android SDK example code, Example Code folders for tools, The Android SDK installing, Installing the Android SDK and Prerequisites, Configuring the ADT plug-in, The Android SDK keeping up-to-date, Keeping Up-to-Date organizing Java source, Organizing Java Source, Organizing Java Source prerequisites, Installing the Android SDK and Prerequisites, Configuring the ADT plug-in sample application, JNI, NDK, and SDK: A Sample App, JNI, NDK, and SDK: A Sample App tools supported, Other SDK Tools, android troubleshooting problems, Troubleshooting SDK Problems: No Build Targets Android Virtual Device, Making an Android Virtual Device (AVD) (see AVD) Android XML Resources Editor, Extensions android.app library, The Android Libraries android.content library, The Android Libraries android.database library, The Android Libraries android.graphics library, The Android Libraries android.telephony library, The Android Libraries android.text library, The Android Libraries android.view library, The Android Libraries, Assembling a Graphical Interface android.webkit library, The Android Libraries android.widget library, The Android Libraries android.widgets package, Extending Android classes android:alwaysRetainTaskState attribute, Other activity attributes affecting task behavior android:finishOnTaskLaunch attribute, Other activity attributes affecting task behavior android:launchMode attribute, Launch mode android:name attribute, Task affinity android:noHistory attribute, Other activity attributes affecting task behavior android:process attribute, Other activity attributes affecting task behavior android:taskAffinity attribute, Task affinity AndroidManifest.xml file, Application Manifests, Application Manifests, Initialization Parameters in AndroidManifest.xml, Initialization Parameters in AndroidManifest.xml about, Application Manifests declarations in, Application Manifests initialization parameters in, Initialization Parameters in AndroidManifest.xml, Initialization Parameters in AndroidManifest.xml android_native_app_glue module, Native Activities animation, Bling, Animation, Transition animation, Animation, Background animation, Background animation, Background animation, Background animation, Surface view animation background, Background animation, Background animation frame-by-frame, Background animation, Background animation OpenGL example, Bling surface view, Surface view animation transition, Animation, Transition animation tweened, Animation Animation class, Animation, Transition animation, Transition animation, Transition animation about, Animation AnimationListener interface, Transition animation applyTransformation method, Transition animation, Transition animation AnimationDrawable class, Animation, Background animation, Background animation about, Animation, Background animation start method, Background animation AnimationListener interface, Transition animation, Transition animation about, Transition animation onAnimationEnd method, Transition animation AnimationSet class, Transition animation anonymous classes, Using Anonymous Classes, Using Anonymous Classes Apache HttpCore project, The Android Libraries APIs (application programming interfaces), Other Android Components, Specifying API-Level Compatibility, Defining a Provider Public API, Defining the CONTENT_URI, Implementing the Provider API, The delete method, Sensors, Other Sensors, Near Field Communication (NFC), P2P Mode, Gesture Input, Gesture Input, Accessibility, Accessibility accessibility, Accessibility, Accessibility Android applications and, Other Android Components application distribution and, Specifying API-Level Compatibility external sensors, Sensors, Other Sensors gesture input, Gesture Input, Gesture Input Near Field Communication, Near Field Communication (NFC), P2P Mode SimpleFinchVideoContentProvider example, Defining a Provider Public API, Defining the CONTENT_URI, Implementing the Provider API, The delete method .apk files, Running and debugging Android apps, Packaging an Android Application: The .apk File, Uploading Applications in the Market, Extensions about, Running and debugging Android apps, Packaging an Android Application: The .apk File building, Extensions uploading, Uploading Applications in the Market apkbuilder application, Packaging an Android Application: The .apk File Application class, Application Manifests, Life Cycle Methods of the Application Class, Life Cycle Methods of the Application Class about, Application Manifests life cycle methods, Life Cycle Methods of the Application Class, Life Cycle Methods of the Application Class application development, Modular Programming in Java, Modular Programming in Java, Traditional Programming Models Compared to Android, Java Coding in Eclipse, Refactoring, Editing Java Code and Code Completion, Refactoring, Applying Static Analysis to Android Code, Applying Static Analysis to Android Code, The Android Libraries, Extending Android classes, Rolling Your Own Widgets, Bitmaps, Bling, OpenGL Graphics, The SQL Language, The SQL Language, Database Design for Android Applications, Basic Structure of the SimpleVideoDbHelper Class, Basic Structure of the SimpleVideoDbHelper Class, Basic Structure of the SimpleVideoDbHelper Class, Using the Database API: MJAndroid, Using the execSQL method (see also Android applications; skeleton applications) additional information, The Android Libraries applying static analysis, Applying Static Analysis to Android Code, Applying Static Analysis to Android Code content assist, Editing Java Code and Code Completion database design, Database Design for Android Applications, Basic Structure of the SimpleVideoDbHelper Class Design for Extension coding rule, Extending Android classes graphics effects, Bling, OpenGL Graphics Java coding in Eclipse, Java Coding in Eclipse, Refactoring MJAndroid application example, Using the Database API: MJAndroid, Using the execSQL method modular programming, Modular Programming in Java, Modular Programming in Java refactoring, Refactoring rolling your own widgets, Rolling Your Own Widgets, Bitmaps SimpleVideoDbHelper class example, Basic Structure of the SimpleVideoDbHelper Class, Basic Structure of the SimpleVideoDbHelper Class SQL and, The SQL Language traditional programming models, Traditional Programming Models Compared to Android application distribution, Application Signing, Using a self-signed certificate to sign an application, Using a self-signed certificate to sign an application, Placing an Application for Distribution in the Android Market, Getting Paid, Google Maps API Keys, Specifying API-Level Compatibility, Compatibility with Many Kinds of Screens application signing, Application Signing, Using a self-signed certificate to sign an application exporting Android applications, Using a self-signed certificate to sign an application Google Maps API keys, Google Maps API Keys placing in Android Market, Placing an Application for Distribution in the Android Market, Getting Paid screen compatibility and, Compatibility with Many Kinds of Screens specifying API-level compatibility, Specifying API-Level Compatibility application programming interfaces, Other Android Components (see APIs) application signing, Application Signing, Public Key Encryption and Cryptographic Signing, Public Key Encryption and Cryptographic Signing, How Signatures Protect Software Users, Publishers, and Secure Communications, Self-signed certificates for Android software, Self-signed certificates for Android software, Signing an Application, Using a self-signed certificate to sign an application about, Application Signing cryptographic, Public Key Encryption and Cryptographic Signing, Public Key Encryption and Cryptographic Signing process overview, Signing an Application, Using a self-signed certificate to sign an application protection and, How Signatures Protect Software Users, Publishers, and Secure Communications, Self-signed certificates for Android software self-signed certificates, Self-signed certificates for Android software application template, The Android Framework (see skeleton applications) applications, Making an Android Project (see Android applications) ArrayList class, Collection implementation types, The Android Libraries Arrays class, The Android Libraries artifacts, Builders and Artifacts, Organizing Java Source defined, Builders and Artifacts projects and, Organizing Java Source assignment operator (=), Object Creation associations, defined, Associations asynchronous I/O mechanisms, Summary of Benefits AsyncTask class, Extending Android classes, AsyncTask and the UI Thread, AsyncTask and the UI Thread, AsyncTask and the UI Thread, AsyncTask and the UI Thread, AsyncTask and the UI Thread, AsyncTask and the UI Thread, AsyncTask and the UI Thread, AsyncTask and the UI Thread doInBackground method, AsyncTask and the UI Thread onClickListener method, AsyncTask and the UI Thread onPostExecute method, AsyncTask and the UI Thread onPreExecute method, AsyncTask and the UI Thread onProgressUpdate method, AsyncTask and the UI Thread publishProgress method, AsyncTask and the UI Thread subclassing and, Extending Android classes UI thread and, AsyncTask and the UI Thread, AsyncTask and the UI Thread audio, Audio and Video, Audio Playback, AudioTrack audio playback, MediaPlayer audio playback, AudioTrack audio playback, Audio Recording, AudioRecorder audio recording, MediaRecorder audio recording, MediaRecorder audio recording, Intent audio recording, AudioRecorder audio recording Android supported formats, Audio and Video AudioRecorder recording, AudioRecorder audio recording AudioTrack playback, AudioTrack audio playback Intent recording, Intent audio recording MediaPlayer playback, MediaPlayer audio playback MediaRecorder recording, MediaRecorder audio recording, MediaRecorder audio recording playback methods, Audio Playback, AudioTrack audio playback recording methods, Audio Recording, AudioRecorder audio recording AudioRecorder class, AudioRecorder audio recording, AudioRecorder audio recording audio recording, AudioRecorder audio recording startRecording method, AudioRecorder audio recording AudioTrack class, AudioTrack audio playback, AudioTrack audio playback, AudioTrack audio playback, AudioTrack audio playback, AudioTrack audio playback audio playback, AudioTrack audio playback pause method, AudioTrack audio playback play method, AudioTrack audio playback release method, AudioTrack audio playback stop method, AudioTrack audio playback AUTHENTICATE_ACCOUNTS permission, Authentication authenticating contact data, Authentication, Authentication AUTOINCREMENT constraint, Database constraints, Declaring Column Specification Strings AVD (Android Virtual Device), Making an Android Virtual Device (AVD), Making an Android Virtual Device (AVD), Making an Android Virtual Device (AVD), Making an Android Virtual Device (AVD), Making an Android Virtual Device (AVD), Running a Program on an AVD, Android Virtual Devices about, Making an Android Virtual Device (AVD), Android Virtual Devices additional information, Making an Android Virtual Device (AVD) creating, Making an Android Virtual Device (AVD), Making an Android Virtual Device (AVD) running programs on, Running a Program on an AVD setting parameters, Making an Android Virtual Device (AVD) avdmgr tool, Eclipse and Android B background animation, Background animation, Background animation BaseAdapter class, Extending Android classes Beaulieu, Alan, Additional Database Concepts bin directory, Organizing Java Source binary data, File Management and Binary Data Bitmap class, Canvas Drawing, Bitmaps BitmapDrawable class, Bitmaps BLOB type (SQLite), SQLite types Bloch, Joshua, Interfaces, Java Serialization block, defined, Final and Static Declarations Bluetooth standard, Bluetooth, The Bluetooth Protocol Stack, Bluez: The Linux Bluetooth Implementation, Using Bluetooth in Android Applications, The BtConsoleActivity class, Bluetooth and related I/O classes about, Bluetooth Android applications and, Using Bluetooth in Android Applications, The BtConsoleActivity class Linux implementation, Bluez: The Linux Bluetooth Implementation protocol stack and, The Bluetooth Protocol Stack SPP support, Bluetooth and related I/O classes BluetoothAdapter class, Bluetooth and related I/O classes BluetoothDevice class, Bluetooth and related I/O classes BluetoothSocket class, Bluetooth and related I/O classes Bluez Bluetooth stack, Bluez: The Linux Bluetooth Implementation boolean type, Primitive Types, Conventions on the Native Method Side BroadcastReceiver class, Other Android Components, BroadcastReceiver, Application Manifests, The Activity Class and Well-Behaved Applications about, Other Android Components, BroadcastReceiver manifest files and, Application Manifests well-behaved applications and, The Activity Class and Well-Behaved Applications builders, defined, Builders and Artifacts Bundle class, Serialization, Java Serialization, Java Serialization, Fragment Life Cycle, Saving and restoring instance state fragment life cycle and, Fragment Life Cycle getSerializable method, Java Serialization putSerializable method, Java Serialization serialization and, Serialization, Saving and restoring instance state Button class, Putting It Together, Wiring Up the Controller, Rolling Your Own Widgets about, Putting It Together setOnClickListener method, Wiring Up the Controller widgets and, Rolling Your Own Widgets byte type, Primitive Types, Conventions on the Native Method Side C Callback interface (Drawable), Background animation Callback interface (SurfaceHolder), Surface view animation, Surface view animation, Surface view animation about, Surface view animation surfaceCreated method, Surface view animation surfaceDestroyed method, Surface view animation callbacks, defined, Overrides and callbacks, Overrides and callbacks Camera class, Transition animation, Transition animation, Transition animation about, Transition animation rotate method, Transition animation translate method, Transition animation CAMERA permission, Recording Audio and Video Canvas class, Canvas Drawing, Canvas Drawing, Drawing text, Drawing text, Drawing text, Drawing text, Drawing text, Matrix transformations, Matrix transformations, Matrix transformations, Matrix transformations, Matrix transformations, Matrix transformations, Matrix transformations, Matrix transformations, Matrix transformations, Matrix transformations, Matrix transformations, Matrix transformations, Matrix transformations about, Canvas Drawing concatMatrix method, Matrix transformations coordinate transformation, Matrix transformations drawCircle method, Canvas Drawing drawing text, Drawing text, Drawing text drawPosText method, Drawing text drawText method, Drawing text drawTextOnPath method, Drawing text getMatrix method, Matrix transformations restore method, Matrix transformations rotate method, Matrix transformations, Matrix transformations save method, Matrix transformations scale method, Matrix transformations, Matrix transformations setMatrix method, Matrix transformations skew method, Matrix transformations, Matrix transformations translate method, Matrix transformations canvas drawing, Canvas Drawing, Canvas Drawing, Drawing text, Drawing text, Matrix transformations, Matrix transformations about, Canvas Drawing, Canvas Drawing drawing text, Drawing text, Drawing text matrix transformations, Matrix transformations, Matrix transformations cascading methods, Object Creation Cell ID, Location-Based Services certificate authority, How Signatures Protect Software Users, Publishers, and Secure Communications, Self-signed certificates for Android software certificate fingerprint, Debug certificates certificates, Self-signed certificates for Android software, Debug certificates, Creating a self-signed certificate, Using a self-signed certificate to sign an application, Using a self-signed certificate to sign an application debug, Debug certificates self-signed, Self-signed certificates for Android software, Creating a self-signed certificate, Using a self-signed certificate to sign an application, Using a self-signed certificate to sign an application char type, Primitive Types, Drawing text, Conventions on the Native Method Side CHECK constraint, Database constraints class attribute, Creating a Fragment .class files, The Java compiler, Builders and Artifacts classes, Objects and Classes, Object Creation, Object Creation, The Object Class and Its Methods, Final and Static Declarations, Final and Static Declarations, Abstract Classes, Using Anonymous Classes, Using Anonymous Classes, Extending Android classes, Extending Android classes, Classes That Support Serialization (see also specific classes) about, Objects and Classes abstract, Abstract Classes anonymous, Using Anonymous Classes, Using Anonymous Classes extending, Extending Android classes, Extending Android classes final and static declarations, Final and Static Declarations, Final and Static Declarations object creation, Object Creation, Object Creation serialization support, Classes That Support Serialization clip rectangle, Canvas Drawing ClipDrawable class, Drawables Cloneable interface, The Object Class and Its Methods code signing, Application Signing (see application signing) Collection interface, Collection interface types Collections Library, Collection interface types, Java generics ColorFilter class, Shadows, Gradients, and Filters com.android.ide.eclipse.adt plug-in, Plug-ins com.android.ide.eclipse.ddms plug-in, Plug-ins Comparable interface, Interfaces, Interfaces about, Interfaces compareTo method, Interfaces composition, defined, Using polymorphism and composition, Using polymorphism and composition compound queries, Additional Database Concepts concurrent programming, Basic Multithreaded Concurrent Programming in Java, Concurrency in Android, Concurrency in Android, AsyncTask and the UI Thread, AsyncTask and the UI Thread, Threads in an Android Process Android libraries and, Concurrency in Android AsyncTask and UI thread, AsyncTask and the UI Thread, AsyncTask and the UI Thread multi-threaded, Basic Multithreaded Concurrent Programming in Java, Concurrency in Android threads in Android processes, Threads in an Android Process constructors, Object Creation, Creating a Fragment defined, Object Creation Fragment class and, Creating a Fragment contact data, Account Contacts, Account Contacts, Authentication, Authentication, Synchronization about, Account Contacts, Account Contacts authenticating, Authentication, Authentication synchronizing, Synchronization Contacts class, Account Contacts, Account Contacts additional information, Account Contacts querying, Account Contacts ContactsContract content provider, Account Contacts, Account Contacts container views, Assembling a Graphical Interface, Layout content assist, Editing Java Code and Code Completion content providers, Content Providers, Content Providers, Using a content provider, Using a content provider, Content providers and the Internet, Organizing Java Source, Understanding Content Providers, Declaring Column Specification Strings, Implementing a Content Provider, Implementing a Content Provider, Defining the CONTENT_URI, Defining the CONTENT_URI, Writing and Integrating a Content Provider, File Management and Binary Data, File Management and Binary Data, Android MVC and Content Observation, Android MVC and Content Observation, A Complete Content Provider: The SimpleFinchVideoContentProvider Code, Determining How Often to Notify Observers, Declaring Your Content Provider, Exploring Content Providers, Developing RESTful Android Applications, A “Network MVC”, Summary of Benefits, Code Example: Dynamically Listing and Caching YouTube Video Content, File Management: Storing Thumbnails, Audio and Video, Stored Media Content, Account Contacts, Account Contacts about, Content Providers, Content Providers activities and, Organizing Java Source binary data, File Management and Binary Data building, Understanding Content Providers, Declaring Column Specification Strings ContactsContract, Account Contacts, Account Contacts CONTENT_URI constant, Implementing a Content Provider, Defining the CONTENT_URI, Defining the CONTENT_URI declaring, Declaring Your Content Provider developing RESTful applications, Developing RESTful Android Applications file management, File Management and Binary Data implementing, Implementing a Content Provider MediaStore, Audio and Video, Stored Media Content MVC architecture and, Content providers and the Internet, Android MVC and Content Observation, Android MVC and Content Observation network MVC and, A “Network MVC”, Summary of Benefits REST and, Exploring Content Providers SimpleFinchVideoContentProvider example, A Complete Content Provider: The SimpleFinchVideoContentProvider Code, Determining How Often to Notify Observers usage considerations, Using a content provider, Using a content provider writing/integrating, Writing and Integrating a Content Provider YouTube video example, Code Example: Dynamically Listing and Caching YouTube Video Content, File Management: Storing Thumbnails content:// URI, File Management and Binary Data ContentObserver.onChange method, Android MVC and Content Observation ContentProvider class, Other Android Components, Content Providers, Content Providers, Content Providers, Content Providers, Content Providers, Application Manifests, Serialization, The Activity Class and Well-Behaved Applications, Implementing a Content Provider, Defining the CONTENT_URI, Defining the CONTENT_URI, Defining the CONTENT_URI, Defining the CONTENT_URI, Extending ContentProvider, Extending ContentProvider, Extending ContentProvider, Extending ContentProvider, Extending ContentProvider, Extending ContentProvider, Extending ContentProvider, Extending ContentProvider, Extending ContentProvider, File Management and Binary Data, Implementing the onCreate Method, Implementing the getType Method, Implementing the Provider API, Implementing the Provider API, Implementing the Provider API, Implementing the Provider API, Developing RESTful Android Applications, File Management: Storing Thumbnails about, Other Android Components, Content Providers delete method, Content Providers, Defining the CONTENT_URI, Extending ContentProvider, Implementing the Provider API extending, Implementing a Content Provider, Extending ContentProvider, Extending ContentProvider getType method, Extending ContentProvider, Implementing the getType Method insert method, Content Providers, Defining the CONTENT_URI, Extending ContentProvider, Extending ContentProvider, Implementing the Provider API manifest files and, Application Manifests onCreate method, Extending ContentProvider, Implementing the onCreate Method openFile method, File Management: Storing Thumbnails openStream method, File Management and Binary Data query method, Content Providers, Defining the CONTENT_URI, Extending ContentProvider, Implementing the Provider API RESTful applications and, Developing RESTful Android Applications serialization and, Serialization update method, Content Providers, Defining the CONTENT_URI, Extending ContentProvider, Implementing the Provider API well-behaved applications and, The Activity Class and Well-Behaved Applications ContentProviderOperation class, Account Contacts, Account Contacts about, Account Contacts newInsert method, Account Contacts ContentProviderOperation.Builder class, Account Contacts ContentResolver class, Using a content provider, Content providers and the Internet, Content providers and the Internet, File Management and Binary Data, File Management and Binary Data, Android MVC and Content Observation, Android MVC and Content Observation, A “Network MVC”, File Management: Storing Thumbnails about, Using a content provider delete method, Android MVC and Content Observation insert method, A “Network MVC” notifyChange method, Content providers and the Internet, Android MVC and Content Observation openInputStream method, File Management and Binary Data, File Management: Storing Thumbnails openOutputStream method, File Management and Binary Data registerContentObserver method, Content providers and the Internet ContentUris.withAppendedId method, The insert method ContentValues class, Using the insert method, YouTubeHandler, Stored Media Content about, Using the insert method creating, YouTubeHandler stored media content, Stored Media Content Context class, Static Application Resources and Context, Resources, Connecting to a Location Provider and Getting Location Updates, Sensors, Accessibility about, Static Application Resources and Context getResources method, Resources getSystemService method, Connecting to a Location Provider and Getting Location Updates, Sensors, Accessibility ContextMenu class, The Menu contextual menus, The Menu Controller component (MVC), The Controller, Wiring Up the Controller, Wiring Up the Controller, Listening to the Model, Listening to the Model, Listening for Touch Events, Listening for Touch Events, Listening for Key Events, Advanced Wiring: Focus and Threading, Advanced Wiring: Focus and Threading about, The Controller focus and threading, Advanced Wiring: Focus and Threading, Advanced Wiring: Focus and Threading listening for key events, Listening for Key Events listening for touch events, Listening for Touch Events, Listening for Touch Events listening to the Model, Listening to the Model, Listening to the Model wiring up, Wiring Up the Controller, Wiring Up the Controller cpufeatures module, Android-Provided Native Libraries Create New Android Virtual Device (AVD) dialog, Making an Android Virtual Device (AVD) CREATE TABLE statement (SQL), SQL Data Definition Commands CRUD methodology, Inserting data into the database Ctrl-F11, Fragment Life Cycle Ctrl-space bar, Editing Java Code and Code Completion curly braces {}, Final and Static Declarations Currency class, The Android Libraries Cursor interface, Using a content provider, The Android Database Classes, The Android Database Classes, The Android Database Classes, Database Queries and Reading Data from the Database, Android MVC and Content Observation, The query method, A “Network MVC”, Account Contacts, Account Contacts about, Using a content provider, The Android Database Classes account contacts example, Account Contacts, Account Contacts moveToFirst method, Database Queries and Reading Data from the Database moveToNext method, The Android Database Classes moveToPrevious method, The Android Database Classes registerContentObserver method, Android MVC and Content Observation requery method, A “Network MVC” setNotificationUri method, The query method CycleInterpolator class, Transition animation D D-pads, Listening for Touch Events, Advanced Wiring: Focus and Threading Dalvik Debug Monitor Server, The Dalvik Debug Monitor Server (DDMS) (see DDMS) dalvik package tree, The Android Libraries Dalvik virtual machines (VMs), The Dalvik Debug Monitor Server (DDMS), The Dalvik VM, Zygote: Forking a New Process about, The Dalvik Debug Monitor Server (DDMS) Android runtime environment, The Dalvik VM Zygote process and, Zygote: Forking a New Process data structures, synchronization and, Synchronization and Data Structures data types, Primitive Types, SQLite types, Communication, Identity, Sync, and Social Media, Account Contacts, Conventions on the Native Method Side contact data, Communication, Identity, Sync, and Social Media, Account Contacts Java supported, Primitive Types JNI calls and, Conventions on the Native Method Side SQLite supported, SQLite types database schemas, SQL Data Definition Commands, Database constraints defined, SQL Data Definition Commands foreign key constraints, Database constraints database triggers, Additional Database Concepts databases, Relational Database Overview (see relational databases) Date class, The Android Libraries DatePicker class, Rolling Your Own Widgets DateTime class, Creating a Fragment, Fragment Life Cycle, Fragment Transactions DDMS (Dalvik Debug Monitor Server), The Dalvik Debug Monitor Server (DDMS), The Dalvik Debug Monitor Server (DDMS), The DDMS, Using DDMS to update location, Using DDMS to update location, Conventions on the Native Method Side about, The Dalvik Debug Monitor Server (DDMS), The Dalvik Debug Monitor Server (DDMS), The DDMS Emulator Control pane, Using DDMS to update location JNI conventions, Conventions on the Native Method Side location updates, Using DDMS to update location debug certificate, Debug certificates debuggable attribute, Using a self-signed certificate to sign an application debugging, Running a Program on an Android Device, Running and debugging Android apps Android applications, Running and debugging Android apps Android devices, Running a Program on an Android Device DecelerateInterpolator class, Transition animation default constructors, Object Creation DELETE operation (REST), Content Providers DELETE statement (SQL), Extending ContentProvider dependency injection, Overrides and callbacks deserializing data, Serialization Design for Extension coding rule, Extending Android classes developing applications, Modular Programming in Java (see application development) .dex files, Builders and Artifacts Dictionary class, The Java Collections Framework, The Android Libraries distributing applications, Getting Your Application into Users’ Hands (see application distribution) double type, Primitive Types, Conventions on the Native Method Side Draw9patch drawing program, Draw9patch Drawable class, Canvas Drawing, Drawables, Drawables, Drawables, Drawables, Background animation about, Canvas Drawing, Drawables, Drawables Callback interface, Background animation usage considerations, Drawables wrappers supporting, Drawables drawable directory, Resources drawing graphics, Rolling Your Own Widgets, Layout, Arrangement, Canvas Drawing, Matrix transformations, Drawables, Drawables, Bitmaps, Bling, OpenGL Graphics, Bling, Shadows, Gradients, and Filters, Animation, Surface view animation, OpenGL Graphics, OpenGL Graphics animations, Animation, Surface view animation Bitmap class support, Bitmaps Canvas class support, Canvas Drawing, Matrix transformations Drawable class support, Drawables, Drawables graphics effects examples, Bling, OpenGL Graphics layout considerations, Layout, Arrangement OpenGL support, Bling, OpenGL Graphics, OpenGL Graphics rolling your own widgets, Rolling Your Own Widgets shadows, gradients, filters, Shadows, Gradients, and Filters DROP TABLE statement (SQL), SQL Data Definition Commands dynamic declarations, Final and Static Declarations E Eclipse IDE, The Eclipse Integrated Development Environment (IDE), The Eclipse Integrated Development Environment (IDE), The Eclipse Integrated Development Environment (IDE), The Eclipse Integrated Development Environment (IDE), The Eclipse Integrated Development Environment (IDE), The Eclipse Integrated Development Environment (IDE), Adding Build Targets to the SDK, Using the Install New Software Wizard to download and install the ADT plug-in, Keeping Eclipse and the ADT Plug-in Up-to-Date, Eclipse for Android Software Development, Eclipse Concepts and Terminology, Associations, Plug-ins, Eclipse’s Java Runtime Environment, Extensions, Extensions, Associations, Eclipse Views and Perspectives, The Problems View, The Package Explorer View, The Task List View, The Outline View, The Problems View, Java Coding in Eclipse, Refactoring, Eclipse and Android, Eclipse and Android, Eclipse and Android, Eclipse and Android, Eclipse and Android, Eclipse and Android, Static Analyzers, Limitations of Static Analysis, Eclipse Idiosyncrasies and Alternatives, Eclipse Idiosyncrasies and Alternatives, Visualizing the Activity Life Cycle, Visualizing the Activity Life Cycle (see also ADT Eclipse plug-in) about, The Eclipse Integrated Development Environment (IDE) additional information, Using the Install New Software Wizard to download and install the ADT plug-in, Eclipse for Android Software Development concepts and terminology, Eclipse Concepts and Terminology, Associations confirming installation, The Eclipse Integrated Development Environment (IDE) downloading, The Eclipse Integrated Development Environment (IDE) Extensions view, Extensions File Explorer view, Eclipse and Android Heap view, Eclipse and Android idiosyncrasies and alternatives, Eclipse Idiosyncrasies and Alternatives, Eclipse Idiosyncrasies and Alternatives installing, The Eclipse Integrated Development Environment (IDE) Java coding in, Java Coding in Eclipse, Refactoring JRE requirements, The Eclipse Integrated Development Environment (IDE), Eclipse’s Java Runtime Environment keeping up-to-date, Keeping Eclipse and the ADT Plug-in Up-to-Date Layout view, Eclipse and Android LogCat view, Eclipse and Android, Visualizing the Activity Life Cycle, Visualizing the Activity Life Cycle Outline view, The Outline View Package Explorer view, Associations, The Package Explorer View Pixel Perfect view, Eclipse and Android Plug-ins view, Plug-ins, Extensions Problems view, The Problems View SDK and AVD Manager support, Adding Build Targets to the SDK static analyzers, Static Analyzers, Limitations of Static Analysis Task List view, The Task List View Threads view, Eclipse and Android views and perspectives, Eclipse Views and Perspectives, The Problems View eclipse.ini file, Eclipse’s Java Runtime Environment EditText class, Overrides and callbacks, Wiring Up the Controller, Alternative Ways to Handle Events addTextChangedListener method, Overrides and callbacks handling events, Alternative Ways to Handle Events invalidate method, Wiring Up the Controller encapsulation, Access Modifiers and Encapsulation, Encapsulation, Getters and setters about, Encapsulation access modifiers and, Access Modifiers and Encapsulation getter and setter methods, Getters and setters encryption, public key, Public Key Encryption and Cryptographic Signing, Public Key Encryption and Cryptographic Signing Enumeration interface, The Java Collections Framework, The Android Libraries Equinox framework, Eclipse Concepts and Terminology event queues, The Controller events, Listening for Touch Events, Listening for Touch Events, Listening for Key Events, Alternative Ways to Handle Events alternative ways to handle, Alternative Ways to Handle Events listening for key events, Listening for Key Events listening for touch events, Listening for Touch Events, Listening for Touch Events Exception class, Exceptions exceptions, Exceptions, Exceptions, Exceptions (see also specific exceptions) .exit command (SQLite), Example Database Manipulation Using sqlite3 exporting Android applications, Using a self-signed certificate to sign an application extends keyword, Objects, Inheritance, and Polymorphism extensions, defined, Extensions, Extensions external sensors, Sensors (see sensors) Eyes-Free open source project, Accessibility F File Explorer view (Eclipse), Eclipse and Android file management, File Management and Binary Data, File Management: Storing Thumbnails FileHandler class, File Management: Storing Thumbnails filters (drawing graphics), Shadows, Gradients, and Filters final declarations, Final and Static Declarations final keyword, Final and Static Declarations FindBugs tool, Type Safety in Java, FindBugs, FindBugs, Applying Static Analysis to Android Code, Applying Static Analysis to Android Code about, FindBugs, FindBugs applying static analysis, Applying Static Analysis to Android Code, Applying Static Analysis to Android Code type safety in Java, Type Safety in Java float type, Primitive Types, Conventions on the Native Method Side focusable attribute, Advanced Wiring: Focus and Threading FOREIGN KEY constraint, Database constraints forking processes, Zygote: Forking a New Process Fragment class, Fragments and Multiplatform Support, Creating a Fragment, Creating a Fragment, Creating a Fragment, Fragment Life Cycle, Fragment Life Cycle, Fragment Life Cycle, Fragment Transactions, Fragment Transactions, Visualizing the Fragment Life Cycle, Visualizing the Fragment Life Cycle, Visualizing the Fragment Life Cycle, Visualizing the Fragment Life Cycle, Visualizing the Fragment Life Cycle, Visualizing the Fragment Life Cycle, Visualizing the Fragment Life Cycle, Visualizing the Fragment Life Cycle, Visualizing the Fragment Life Cycle, Visualizing the Fragment Life Cycle, Visualizing the Fragment Life Cycle about, Fragments and Multiplatform Support creating fragments, Creating a Fragment getArguments method, Fragment Transactions onActivityCreated method, Visualizing the Fragment Life Cycle onAttach method, Visualizing the Fragment Life Cycle onCreate method, Creating a Fragment, Fragment Life Cycle, Visualizing the Fragment Life Cycle onCreateView method, Creating a Fragment, Visualizing the Fragment Life Cycle onPause method, Fragment Life Cycle, Visualizing the Fragment Life Cycle onResume method, Visualizing the Fragment Life Cycle onSaveInstanceState method, Fragment Life Cycle, Visualizing the Fragment Life Cycle onStart method, Visualizing the Fragment Life Cycle onStop method, Visualizing the Fragment Life Cycle setArguments method, Fragment Transactions visualizing life cycles, Visualizing the Fragment Life Cycle, Visualizing the Fragment Life Cycle FragmentManager class, The Fragment Manager, The Fragment Manager about, The Fragment Manager findFragmentByTag method, The Fragment Manager fragments, Fragments and Multiplatform Support, Creating a Fragment, Creating a Fragment, Fragment Life Cycle, Fragment Life Cycle, The Fragment Manager, Fragment Transactions, Fragment Transactions, The Compatibility Package, Visualizing the Fragment Life Cycle, Visualizing the Fragment Life Cycle about, Fragments and Multiplatform Support Android Compatibility Package and, The Compatibility Package creating, Creating a Fragment, Creating a Fragment life cycles of, Fragment Life Cycle, Fragment Life Cycle, Visualizing the Fragment Life Cycle, Visualizing the Fragment Life Cycle manipulating, The Fragment Manager transactions involving, Fragment Transactions, Fragment Transactions frame-by-frame animation, Background animation, Background animation FrameLayout class, The Fragment Manager, Gesture Input framework applications, A Framework for a Well-Behaved Application (see skeleton applications) G garbage collection, Garbage Collection gen directory, Organizing Java Source generics, Java generics Gennick, Jonathan, Additional Database Concepts geo utility, Using geo to update location Gesture class, Gesture Input gesture input, Listening for Touch Events, Listening for Touch Events, Gesture Input about, Gesture Input listening for, Listening for Touch Events, Listening for Touch Events GestureLibraries class, Gesture Input, Gesture Input about, Gesture Input fromRawResource method, Gesture Input GestureLibrary class, Gesture Input GestureOverlayView class, Gesture Input, Gesture Input about, Gesture Input OnGesturePerformedListener interface, Gesture Input GesturePoint class, Gesture Input GestureStore class, Gesture Input GestureStroke class, Gesture Input GET operation (REST), Content Providers getter methods, Getters and setters Global Positioning System (GPS), Location-Based Services, The Manifest and Layout Files, Using geo to update location GLSurfaceView class, OpenGL Graphics, OpenGL Graphics, OpenGL Graphics, OpenGL Graphics about, OpenGL Graphics Renderer interface, OpenGL Graphics sizeChanged method, OpenGL Graphics surfaceCreated method, OpenGL Graphics Goetz, Brian, Thread Control with wait() and notify() Methods Google Checkout, Becoming an Official Android Developer, Getting Paid Google Earth, Using DDMS to update location Google I/O conference, Developing RESTful Android Applications Google Maps, Google Maps API Keys, Mapping, The Google Maps Activity, The MapView and MapActivity about, Mapping API keys, Google Maps API Keys MapView class and, The MapView and MapActivity starting, The Google Maps Activity GPS (Global Positioning System), Location-Based Services, The Manifest and Layout Files, Using geo to update location GPU (Graphics Processing Unit), OpenGL Graphics gradients (drawing graphics), Shadows, Gradients, and Filters Graphics Processing Unit (GPU), OpenGL Graphics graphics, drawing, Rolling Your Own Widgets (see drawing graphics) gravity, Gravity GUI framework, Drawing 2D and 3D Graphics (see Android GUI framework) gyroscopes, Gyroscope H Handler class, Threads in an Android Process, Advanced Wiring: Focus and Threading about, Advanced Wiring: Focus and Threading Looper class and, Threads in an Android Process HashMap class, Collection implementation types, The Android Libraries, Using the insert method, The SimpleFinchVideoContentProvider Class and Instance Variables about, Collection implementation types Android libraries and, The Android Libraries ContentProvider class and, The SimpleFinchVideoContentProvider Class and Instance Variables ContentValues class and, Using the insert method HashSet class, Collection implementation types Hashtable class, The Java Collections Framework, The Android Libraries hcidump utility, Using Bluetooth in Android Applications Heap view (Eclipse), Eclipse and Android .help command (SQLite), Example Database Manipulation Using sqlite3 Hibernate framework, Serialization Hierarchy Viewer tool, Hierarchy Viewer HttpEntity interface, RESTfulContentProvider: A REST helper I ia32-libs package, The Android SDK iBATIS framework, Serialization IllegalStateException, AsyncTask and the UI Thread, Fragment Transactions, Measurement inheritance, Objects and Classes, Objects, Inheritance, and Polymorphism, Interfaces interfaces and, Interfaces Java support, Objects, Inheritance, and Polymorphism Java types and, Objects and Classes inner joins, Additional Database Concepts InputStream class, Bluetooth-specific protocols and adopted protocols INSERT statement (SQL), SQL Data Manipulation Commands, Inserting data into the database Install New Software Wizard, Using the Install New Software Wizard to download and install the ADT plug-in instance variables, The SimpleFinchVideoContentProvider Class and Instance Variables, The SimpleFinchVideoContentProvider Class and Instance Variables int type, Primitive Types, Conventions on the Native Method Side INTEGER type (SQLite), SQLite types, Declaring Column Specification Strings IntelliJ IDEA, Installing the Android SDK and Prerequisites Intent class, Activities, Intents, and Tasks, Launch mode, Modifying task behavior with intent flags, Modifying task behavior with intent flags, Modifying task behavior with intent flags, Modifying task behavior with intent flags, Modifying task behavior with intent flags, Modifying task behavior with intent flags, Modifying task behavior with intent flags, Modifying task behavior with intent flags, Modifying task behavior with intent flags, Modifying task behavior with intent flags, Modifying task behavior with intent flags, Modifying task behavior with intent flags, Modifying task behavior with intent flags, Modifying task behavior with intent flags, Modifying task behavior with intent flags, Modifying task behavior with intent flags, Intent audio recording, Intent video recording, The Google Maps Activity about, Activities, Intents, and Tasks android:launchMode attribute and, Launch mode audio recording, Intent audio recording FLAG_ACTIVITY_BROUGHT_TO_FRONT constant, Modifying task behavior with intent flags FLAG_ACTIVITY_CLEAR_TASK constant, Modifying task behavior with intent flags FLAG_ACTIVITY_CLEAR_TOP constant, Modifying task behavior with intent flags FLAG_ACTIVITY_CLEAR_WHEN_TASK_RESET constant, Modifying task behavior with intent flags FLAG_ACTIVITY_EXCLUDE_FROM_RECENTS constant, Modifying task behavior with intent flags FLAG_ACTIVITY_FORWARD_RESULT constant, Modifying task behavior with intent flags FLAG_ACTIVITY_LAUNCHED_FROM_HISTORY constant, Modifying task behavior with intent flags FLAG_ACTIVITY_MULTIPLE_TASK constant, Modifying task behavior with intent flags FLAG_ACTIVITY_NEW_TASK constant, Modifying task behavior with intent flags FLAG_ACTIVITY_NO_ANIMATION constant, Modifying task behavior with intent flags FLAG_ACTIVITY_NO_HISTORY constant, Modifying task behavior with intent flags FLAG_ACTIVITY_NO_USER_ACTION constant, Modifying task behavior with intent flags FLAG_ACTIVITY_PREVIOUS_IS_TOP constant, Modifying task behavior with intent flags FLAG_ACTIVITY_REORDER_TO_FRONT constant, Modifying task behavior with intent flags setting flags, Modifying task behavior with intent flags, Modifying task behavior with intent flags starting Google Maps, The Google Maps Activity video recording, Intent video recording interfaces, Interfaces, Interfaces, Interfaces, Interfaces (see also specific interfaces) about, Interfaces, Interfaces additional information, Interfaces Interpolator class, Transition animation IOException, Writing to a Tag ISO (International Organization for Standardization), Relational Database Overview Iterator interface, Collection interface types, The Android Libraries, The Android Libraries J Java Collections Framework, The Java Collections Framework, Collection interface types, The Android Libraries about, The Java Collections Framework collection interface types, Collection interface types java.util package and, The Android Libraries Java Collections Library, The Android Libraries Java compiler, The Java compiler, Organizing Java Source Java Cryptography Architecture, Debug certificates Java Development Kit, The Java Development Kit (JDK) (see JDK) .java files, organizing, Organizing Java Source, Organizing Java Source Java language, Java for Android, The Java Type System, Primitive Types, Objects and Classes, Object Creation, Object Creation, The Object Class and Its Methods, The Object Class and Its Methods, Objects, Inheritance, and Polymorphism, Objects, Inheritance, and Polymorphism, Objects, Inheritance, and Polymorphism, Final and Static Declarations, Final and Static Declarations, Final and Static Declarations, Abstract Classes, Interfaces, Interfaces, Exceptions, Exceptions, Java generics, Garbage Collection, Type Safety in Java, Getters and setters, Using Anonymous Classes, Using Anonymous Classes, Modular Programming in Java, Modular Programming in Java, Basic Multithreaded Concurrent Programming in Java, Synchronization and Thread Safety, Synchronization and Thread Safety, Thread Control with wait() and notify() Methods, Synchronization and Data Structures, Java Coding in Eclipse, Refactoring, Java Serialization abstract classes, Abstract Classes additional information, Java for Android anonymous classes, Using Anonymous Classes, Using Anonymous Classes coding in Eclipse, Java Coding in Eclipse, Refactoring exceptions support, Exceptions, Exceptions final and static declarations, Final and Static Declarations, Final and Static Declarations garbage collection, Garbage Collection generics, Java generics inheritance support, Objects, Inheritance, and Polymorphism interface support, Interfaces, Interfaces modular programming in, Modular Programming in Java, Modular Programming in Java multi-threaded concurrent programming, Basic Multithreaded Concurrent Programming in Java Object class and its methods, The Object Class and Its Methods, The Object Class and Its Methods object creation, Object Creation, Object Creation objects and classes, Objects and Classes passing parameters by value, Final and Static Declarations polymorphism support, Objects, Inheritance, and Polymorphism, Objects, Inheritance, and Polymorphism primitive types, Primitive Types serialization support, Java Serialization synchronization and data structures, Synchronization and Data Structures synchronization and thread safety, Synchronization and Thread Safety, Synchronization and Thread Safety thread control, Thread Control with wait() and notify() Methods type system, The Java Type System, Type Safety in Java, Getters and setters Java Native Interface, The Android Native Development Kit (NDK) (see JNI) Java packages, Java Packages, Java Packages, The Android Libraries, The Android Libraries (see also specific packages) about, The Android Libraries namespaces and, Java Packages scope and, Java Packages Java Runtime Environment (JRE), The Java Development Kit (JDK), The Eclipse Integrated Development Environment (IDE), Eclipse’s Java Runtime Environment about, The Java Development Kit (JDK) Eclipse requirements, The Eclipse Integrated Development Environment (IDE), Eclipse’s Java Runtime Environment Java Virtual Machine (JVM), The Dalvik Debug Monitor Server (DDMS), Traditional Programming Models Compared to Android DDMS support, The Dalvik Debug Monitor Server (DDMS) process overview, Traditional Programming Models Compared to Android java.awt package, The Android Libraries java.io package, Bluetooth-specific protocols and adopted protocols java.lang package, Java Packages, The Android Libraries java.rmi package, The Android Libraries java.util package, The Java Collections Framework, Java Packages, The Android Libraries java.util.concurrent package, Thread Control with wait() and notify() Methods javac command, The Java Development Kit (JDK) javax package, The Android Libraries javax.sound package, The Android Libraries javax.swing package, The Android Libraries JDK (Java Development Kit), The Java Development Kit (JDK), The Java Development Kit (JDK), The Java Development Kit (JDK), Keeping the JDK Up-to-Date confirming installation, The Java Development Kit (JDK) downloading, The Java Development Kit (JDK) installing, The Java Development Kit (JDK) keeping up-to-date, Keeping the JDK Up-to-Date JNI (Java Native Interface), The Android Native Development Kit (NDK), The Android Native Development Kit (NDK), Native Methods and JNI Calls, JNI, NDK, and SDK: A Sample App, JNI, NDK, and SDK: A Sample App about, The Android Native Development Kit (NDK) additional information, The Android Native Development Kit (NDK) conventions for method calls, Native Methods and JNI Calls sample application, JNI, NDK, and SDK: A Sample App, JNI, NDK, and SDK: A Sample App JRE (Java Runtime Environment), The Java Development Kit (JDK), The Eclipse Integrated Development Environment (IDE), Eclipse’s Java Runtime Environment about, The Java Development Kit (JDK) Eclipse requirements, The Eclipse Integrated Development Environment (IDE), Eclipse’s Java Runtime Environment JVM (Java Virtual Machine), The Dalvik Debug Monitor Server (DDMS), Traditional Programming Models Compared to Android DDMS support, The Dalvik Debug Monitor Server (DDMS) process overview, Traditional Programming Models Compared to Android K keycodes, KeyEvent class, Controlling the Map with the Keypad KeyEvent class, Listening for Key Events, Alternative Ways to Handle Events, Advanced Wiring: Focus and Threading, Controlling the Map with the Keypad focus and threading, Advanced Wiring: Focus and Threading getRepeatCount method, Listening for Key Events handling events, Alternative Ways to Handle Events keycodes, Controlling the Map with the Keypad KeyHandler.handleKey method, Using Anonymous Classes keystore, Debug certificates, Creating a self-signed certificate, Using a self-signed certificate to sign an application about, Debug certificates, Using a self-signed certificate to sign an application remembering password, Creating a self-signed certificate keystrokes, Listening for Key Events, Controlling the Map with the Keypad controlling map with, Controlling the Map with the Keypad listening for, Listening for Key Events keytool command, keytool, Debug certificates, Creating a self-signed certificate, Google Maps API Keys about, keytool creating private keys, Creating a self-signed certificate list option, Debug certificates, Google Maps API Keys L layout directory, Resources layout process, Layout, Layout, Measurement, Measurement, Arrangement about, Layout, Layout arrangement phase, Arrangement measurement phase, Measurement, Measurement Layout view (Eclipse), Eclipse and Android Layoutopt static analyzer, Layoutopt LBS (location-based services), Location and Mapping, Location-Based Services, Location-Based Services, Location-Based Services about, Location and Mapping Cell ID, Location-Based Services GPS, Location-Based Services triangulation, Location-Based Services libraries, Android, The Android Libraries (see Android libraries) life cycles, Component Life Cycles, The Activity Life Cycle, Serialization, Serialization and the Application Life Cycle, Creating a Fragment, Fragment Life Cycle, Fragment Life Cycle, Visualizing the Activity Life Cycle, Minor life cycle methods of the Activity class, Memory recovery and life cycles, Memory recovery and life cycles, Configuration changes and the activity life cycle, Configuration changes and the activity life cycle, Visualizing the Fragment Life Cycle, The Activity Class and Well-Behaved Applications, The Activity Life Cycle and the User Experience, The Activity Life Cycle and the User Experience, Life Cycle Methods of the Application Class, Life Cycle Methods of the Application Class Activity class and, Visualizing the Activity Life Cycle, Minor life cycle methods of the Activity class Android components, Component Life Cycles, The Activity Life Cycle Application class and, Life Cycle Methods of the Application Class, Life Cycle Methods of the Application Class configuration changes and, Configuration changes and the activity life cycle, Configuration changes and the activity life cycle fragment, Creating a Fragment, Fragment Life Cycle, Fragment Life Cycle Fragment class and, Visualizing the Fragment Life Cycle managing, Serialization memory recovery and, Memory recovery and life cycles, Memory recovery and life cycles serialization and, Serialization and the Application Life Cycle user experience and, The Activity Life Cycle and the User Experience well-behaved applications and, The Activity Class and Well-Behaved Applications, The Activity Life Cycle and the User Experience light sensors, Other Sensors LIKE keyword, Example Database Manipulation Using sqlite3 linear acceleration, Linear acceleration LinearGradient class, Shadows, Gradients, and Filters LinearInterpolator class, Transition animation LinearLayout class, Assembling a Graphical Interface, Fragments and Multiplatform Support, Layout, Measurement, Measurement, Measurement about, Assembling a Graphical Interface, Fragments and Multiplatform Support, Layout measurement process, Measurement onMeasure method, Measurement setGravity method, Measurement LinkedList class, Collection implementation types Linux environment, The Java Development Kit (JDK), The Eclipse Integrated Development Environment (IDE), The Android SDK, The Android SDK, Running a Program on an Android Device, Sandboxing: Processes and Users, Bluez: The Linux Bluetooth Implementation, Using Bluetooth in Android Applications, Setting Up the NDK Environment Bluetooth implementation, Bluez: The Linux Bluetooth Implementation hcidump utility, Using Bluetooth in Android Applications installing Android SDK, The Android SDK, The Android SDK installing Eclipse, The Eclipse Integrated Development Environment (IDE) installing JDK, The Java Development Kit (JDK) NDK requirements, Setting Up the NDK Environment running programs on Android devices, Running a Program on an Android Device sandboxing and, Sandboxing: Processes and Users List interface, Collection interface types, The Android Libraries ListView class, Fragments and Multiplatform Support, Android MVC and Content Observation, Android MVC and Content Observation, Account Contacts about, Fragments and Multiplatform Support account contacts example, Account Contacts notifications and, Android MVC and Content Observation setAdapter method, Android MVC and Content Observation location and mapping, Location and Mapping, Location-Based Services, Mapping, Mapping, The MapView and MapActivity, The MapView and MapActivity, MapView and MyLocationOverlay Initialization, MapView and MyLocationOverlay Initialization, MapView and MyLocationOverlay Initialization, MapView and MyLocationOverlay Initialization, Pausing and Resuming a MapActivity, Controlling the Map with Menu Buttons, Controlling the Map with Menu Buttons, Controlling the Map with the Keypad, Location Without Maps, Using DDMS to update location about, Mapping accessing without maps, Location Without Maps, Using DDMS to update location controlling with keypad, Controlling the Map with the Keypad controlling with menu buttons, Controlling the Map with Menu Buttons, Controlling the Map with Menu Buttons Google Maps, Mapping location-based services, Location-Based Services MapActivity class, The MapView and MapActivity, Pausing and Resuming a MapActivity MapView class, The MapView and MapActivity, MapView and MyLocationOverlay Initialization mobile phones and, Location and Mapping MyLocationOverlay class, MapView and MyLocationOverlay Initialization, MapView and MyLocationOverlay Initialization zooming in, MapView and MyLocationOverlay Initialization location-based services, Location and Mapping (see LBS) LocationListener interface, Connecting to a Location Provider and Getting Location Updates LocationManager class, Connecting to a Location Provider and Getting Location Updates, Connecting to a Location Provider and Getting Location Updates getLastKnownLocation method, Connecting to a Location Provider and Getting Location Updates requestLocationUpdates method, Connecting to a Location Provider and Getting Location Updates LocationProvider class, Connecting to a Location Provider and Getting Location Updates, Using geo to update location LogCat view (Eclipse), Eclipse and Android, Visualizing the Activity Life Cycle, Visualizing the Activity Life Cycle long type, Primitive Types, Conventions on the Native Method Side Looper class, Threads in an Android Process ls command, The SQL Language M Macintosh environment, The Java Development Kit (JDK), The Android SDK, Running a Program on an Android Device, Setting Up the NDK Environment installing Android SDK, The Android SDK installing JDK, The Java Development Kit (JDK) NDK requirements, Setting Up the NDK Environment running programs on Android devices, Running a Program on an Android Device magnetic sensors, Other Sensors manifest files, The Android Manifest Editor, Application Manifests, Initialization Parameters in AndroidManifest.xml, The Manifest and Layout Files, Authentication about, The Android Manifest Editor AndroidManifest.xml, Application Manifests, Initialization Parameters in AndroidManifest.xml authentication example, Authentication location without maps example, The Manifest and Layout Files Map interface, Collection interface types, The Android Libraries MapActivity class, Assembling a Graphical Interface, The MapView and MapActivity, MapView and MyLocationOverlay Initialization, Pausing and Resuming a MapActivity, Pausing and Resuming a MapActivity about, The MapView and MapActivity graphical interfaces and, Assembling a Graphical Interface isRouteDisplayed method, MapView and MyLocationOverlay Initialization onPause method, Pausing and Resuming a MapActivity onResume method, Pausing and Resuming a MapActivity MapController class, MapView and MyLocationOverlay Initialization, MapView and MyLocationOverlay Initialization, MapView and MyLocationOverlay Initialization, MapView and MyLocationOverlay Initialization, MapView and MyLocationOverlay Initialization, MapView and MyLocationOverlay Initialization, MapView and MyLocationOverlay Initialization about, MapView and MyLocationOverlay Initialization, MapView and MyLocationOverlay Initialization setZoom method, MapView and MyLocationOverlay Initialization zoomIn method, MapView and MyLocationOverlay Initialization zoomInFixing method, MapView and MyLocationOverlay Initialization zoomOut method, MapView and MyLocationOverlay Initialization zoomToSpan method, MapView and MyLocationOverlay Initialization mapping, Location and Mapping (see location and mapping) MapView class, The MapView and MapActivity, The MapView and MapActivity, Working with MapViews, MapView and MyLocationOverlay Initialization, MapView and MyLocationOverlay Initialization, MapView and MyLocationOverlay Initialization, MapView and MyLocationOverlay Initialization, MapView and MyLocationOverlay Initialization, MapView and MyLocationOverlay Initialization, MapView and MyLocationOverlay Initialization about, The MapView and MapActivity initializing, MapView and MyLocationOverlay Initialization, MapView and MyLocationOverlay Initialization prerequisites, The MapView and MapActivity setClickable attribute, MapView and MyLocationOverlay Initialization setEnabled attribute, MapView and MyLocationOverlay Initialization setSatellite attribute, MapView and MyLocationOverlay Initialization setStreetView attribute, MapView and MyLocationOverlay Initialization setTraffic attribute, MapView and MyLocationOverlay Initialization usage suggestions, Working with MapViews marshaling data, Serialization MaskFilter class, Shadows, Gradients, and Filters Matrix class, Matrix transformations, Transition animation, Transition animation Canvas class and, Matrix transformations postTranslate method, Transition animation preTranslate method, Transition animation MeasureSpec class, Measurement, Measurement, Measurement, Measurement, Measurement AT_MOST constant, Measurement EXACTLY constant, Measurement getMode method, Measurement getSize method, Measurement UNSPECIFIED constant, Measurement Media Store content provider, Audio and Video MediaPlayer class, Playing Audio and Video, Playing Audio and Video, Playing Audio and Video, Playing Audio and Video, Playing Audio and Video, Playing Audio and Video, Playing Audio and Video, Playing Audio and Video, MediaPlayer audio playback, MediaPlayer audio playback, MediaPlayer audio playback, MediaPlayer audio playback, MediaPlayer audio playback, MediaPlayer audio playback, Video Playback additional information, Playing Audio and Video audio playback, MediaPlayer audio playback create method, Playing Audio and Video getCurrentPosition method, MediaPlayer audio playback life cycle states, Playing Audio and Video pause method, Playing Audio and Video prepare method, Playing Audio and Video, MediaPlayer audio playback release method, Playing Audio and Video reset method, MediaPlayer audio playback setDataSource method, MediaPlayer audio playback start method, Playing Audio and Video, MediaPlayer audio playback stop method, Playing Audio and Video video playback, Video Playback MediaRecorder class, Recording Audio and Video, Recording Audio and Video, MediaRecorder audio recording, MediaRecorder audio recording, MediaRecorder audio recording, MediaRecorder audio recording, MediaRecorder audio recording, MediaRecorder audio recording, MediaRecorder audio recording, MediaRecorder video recording audio recording, MediaRecorder audio recording, MediaRecorder audio recording life cycle states, Recording Audio and Video permissions supported, Recording Audio and Video prepare method, MediaRecorder audio recording release method, MediaRecorder audio recording reset method, MediaRecorder audio recording start method, MediaRecorder audio recording stop method, MediaRecorder audio recording video recording, MediaRecorder video recording MediaStore content provider, Stored Media Content memory recovery and life cycles, Memory recovery and life cycles, Memory recovery and life cycles Menu interface, Controlling the Map with Menu Buttons, Controlling the Map with Menu Buttons add method, Controlling the Map with Menu Buttons NONE constant, Controlling the Map with Menu Buttons MenuItem interface, Controlling the Map with Menu Buttons menus, The Menu, The Menu, Controlling the Map with Menu Buttons, Controlling the Map with Menu Buttons, Controlling the Map with Menu Buttons controlling maps with, Controlling the Map with Menu Buttons, Controlling the Map with Menu Buttons implementing, The Menu, The Menu types of, Controlling the Map with Menu Buttons merchant accounts, Getting Paid methods, Object Creation, Final and Static Declarations, Final and Static Declarations, Exceptions, Getters and setters, Native Methods and JNI Calls cascading, Object Creation final and static declarations, Final and Static Declarations, Final and Static Declarations getters and setters, Getters and setters JNI conventions, Native Methods and JNI Calls throwing exceptions, Exceptions MJAndroid sample application, Android and Social Networking, Android and Social Networking, The Source Folder (src), Loading and Starting the Application, Database Queries and Reading Data from the Database, Using the query method, Database Queries and Reading Data from the Database, Using the query method, Modifying the Database, Using the execSQL method, The MapView and MapActivity, MapView and MyLocationOverlay Initialization, The MapView and MapActivity, MapView and MyLocationOverlay Initialization, MapView and MyLocationOverlay Initialization, Pausing and Resuming a MapActivity, Controlling the Map with Menu Buttons, Controlling the Map with Menu Buttons, Controlling the Map with the Keypad about, Android and Social Networking, Android and Social Networking controlling map with keypad, Controlling the Map with the Keypad controlling map with menu buttons, Controlling the Map with Menu Buttons, Controlling the Map with Menu Buttons database queries, Database Queries and Reading Data from the Database, Using the query method loading and starting, Loading and Starting the Application MapActivity class, The MapView and MapActivity, Pausing and Resuming a MapActivity MapView class, The MapView and MapActivity, MapView and MyLocationOverlay Initialization modifying database, Modifying the Database, Using the execSQL method MyLocationOverlay class, MapView and MyLocationOverlay Initialization, MapView and MyLocationOverlay Initialization reading data from database, Database Queries and Reading Data from the Database, Using the query method source folder, The Source Folder (src) Model component (MVC), The Model, Listening to the Model, Listening to the Model Model-View-Controller architecture, Content providers and the Internet (see MVC architecture) modular programming, Modular Programming in Java, Modular Programming in Java Monkey test automation tool, Monkey MotionEvent class, Putting It Together, Listening for Touch Events, Listening for Touch Events, Listening for Touch Events, Listening for Touch Events, Advanced Wiring: Focus and Threading, Native Activities ACTION_MOVE constant, Listening for Touch Events creating, Putting It Together focus and threading, Advanced Wiring: Focus and Threading getHistoricalX method, Listening for Touch Events getHistoricalY method, Listening for Touch Events getHistorySize method, Listening for Touch Events native activities and, Native Activities multimedia, Audio and Video, Playing Audio and Video, Recording Audio and Video, Intent video recording, Stored Media Content audio and video formats, Audio and Video playing audio and video, Playing Audio and Video recording audio and video, Recording Audio and Video, Intent video recording stored content, Stored Media Content MVC (Model-View-Controller) architecture, Content providers and the Internet, Threads in an Android Process, Android GUI Architecture, Putting It Together, The Model, The View, The Controller, Putting It Together, Putting It Together, Wiring Up the Controller, Advanced Wiring: Focus and Threading, Listening to the Model, Listening to the Model, Rolling Your Own Widgets, Canvas Drawing, SQL and the Database-Centric Data Model for Android Applications, SQL and the Database-Centric Data Model for Android Applications, SQL and the Database-Centric Data Model for Android Applications, Android MVC and Content Observation, Android MVC and Content Observation, A “Network MVC”, Summary of Benefits additional information, SQL and the Database-Centric Data Model for Android Applications Android GUI and, Android GUI Architecture, Putting It Together content providers and, Content providers and the Internet, Android MVC and Content Observation, Android MVC and Content Observation Controller component, The Controller, Wiring Up the Controller, Advanced Wiring: Focus and Threading essential design rules, Canvas Drawing Model component, The Model, Listening to the Model, Listening to the Model RESTful applications and, A “Network MVC”, Summary of Benefits SQL support, SQL and the Database-Centric Data Model for Android Applications, SQL and the Database-Centric Data Model for Android Applications threads in Android process and, Threads in an Android Process tying concepts together, Putting It Together, Putting It Together View component, The View, Rolling Your Own Widgets MyLocationOverlay class, Assembling a Graphical Interface, MapView and MyLocationOverlay Initialization, MapView and MyLocationOverlay Initialization, MapView and MyLocationOverlay Initialization, MapView and MyLocationOverlay Initialization getMyLocation method, MapView and MyLocationOverlay Initialization graphical interfaces and, Assembling a Graphical Interface initializing, MapView and MyLocationOverlay Initialization, MapView and MyLocationOverlay Initialization runOnFirstFix method, MapView and MyLocationOverlay Initialization N namespaces, Java packages and, Java Packages Native Development Kit, The Android Native Development Kit (NDK) (see NDK) native keyword, Conventions on the Java Side NativeActivity class, Native Activities, Native Activities NDEF (NFC Data Exchange Format), Near Field Communication (NFC) Ndef.writeNdefMessage method, Writing to a Tag NdefMessage class, Reading a Tag, Writing to a Tag NdefRecord class, Reading a Tag, Reading a Tag, Reading a Tag, Reading a Tag, Reading a Tag, Reading a Tag, Writing to a Tag reading tags, Reading a Tag, Reading a Tag RTD_SMART_POSTER constant, Reading a Tag RTD_TEXT constant, Reading a Tag RTD_URI constant, Reading a Tag TNF_ABSOLUTE_URI constant, Reading a Tag writing tags, Writing to a Tag NDK (Native Development Kit), The Android Native Development Kit (NDK), The Android NDK, Setting Up the NDK Environment, Compiling with the NDK, JNI, NDK, and SDK: A Sample App, JNI, NDK, and SDK: A Sample App, Android-Provided Native Libraries, Building Your Own Custom Library Modules, Native Activities, Native Activities about, The Android Native Development Kit (NDK), The Android NDK building custom library modules, Building Your Own Custom Library Modules compiling with, Compiling with the NDK native activities, Native Activities, Native Activities native libraries, Android-Provided Native Libraries sample application, JNI, NDK, and SDK: A Sample App, JNI, NDK, and SDK: A Sample App setting up environment, Setting Up the NDK Environment Near Field Communication, Near Field Communication (NFC) (see NFC) NetworkException, Exceptions New Android Project dialog, Making an Android Project New Android Project Wizard, Making an Android Virtual Device (AVD) new keyword, Object Creation NFC (Near Field Communication), Near Field Communication (NFC), Reading a Tag, Reading a Tag, Writing to a Tag, P2P Mode about, Near Field Communication (NFC) P2P mode, P2P Mode reading tags, Reading a Tag, Reading a Tag writing tags, Writing to a Tag NFC Data Exchange Format (NDEF), Near Field Communication (NFC) NfcAdapter class, Reading a Tag, Reading a Tag, Reading a Tag, Reading a Tag, Reading a Tag, Reading a Tag, Reading a Tag, Reading a Tag, Reading a Tag, P2P Mode, P2P Mode, P2P Mode ACTION_NDEF_DISCOVERED constant, Reading a Tag ACTION_TAG_DISCOVERED constant, Reading a Tag ACTION_TECH_DISCOVERED constant, Reading a Tag disableForegroundDispatch method, Reading a Tag, P2P Mode enableForegroundDispatch method, Reading a Tag, Reading a Tag, P2P Mode enableForegroundNdefPush method, P2P Mode EXTRA_ID constant, Reading a Tag EXTRA_NDEF_MESSAGES constant, Reading a Tag getDefaultAdapter method, Reading a Tag 9 patch (Android resource), Draw9patch, Drawables NIST (National Institute of Standards and Technology), Relational Database Overview no-arg constructors, Object Creation NOT NULL constraint, Database constraints O Object class, The Object Class and Its Methods, The Object Class and Its Methods, The Object Class and Its Methods, The Object Class and Its Methods, The Object Class and Its Methods, The Object Class and Its Methods, The Object Class and Its Methods, The Object Class and Its Methods, The Object Class and Its Methods, Thread Control with wait() and notify() Methods, Thread Control with wait() and notify() Methods, The Android Libraries about, The Object Class and Its Methods clone method, The Object Class and Its Methods equals method, The Object Class and Its Methods finalize method, The Object Class and Its Methods hashCode method, The Object Class and Its Methods java.lang package and, The Android Libraries notify method, The Object Class and Its Methods, Thread Control with wait() and notify() Methods notifyAll method, The Object Class and Its Methods toString method, The Object Class and Its Methods wait method, The Object Class and Its Methods, Thread Control with wait() and notify() Methods object-relational mapping (ORM), Serialization, Database Queries and Reading Data from the Database ObjectInputStream class, Java Serialization ObjectOutputStream class, Java Serialization objects, Objects and Classes, Object Creation, Object Creation about, Objects and Classes creating, Object Creation, Object Creation OnClickListener.onClick method, Wiring Up the Controller OnCreateContextMenuListener interface, The Menu, Fragments and Multiplatform Support OnFocusChangeListener interface, Advanced Wiring: Focus and Threading OnGesturePerformedListener interface, Gesture Input OnKeyListener interface, Using Anonymous Classes, Alternative Ways to Handle Events, Alternative Ways to Handle Events, The Menu handling events, Using Anonymous Classes, Alternative Ways to Handle Events onKey method, Alternative Ways to Handle Events troubleshooting, The Menu OnTouchListener interface, Listening for Touch Events, Alternative Ways to Handle Events handling events, Alternative Ways to Handle Events onTouch method, Listening for Touch Events Open With command, Associations OpenGL, The Android Libraries, Bling, OpenGL Graphics, OpenGL Graphics, OpenGL Graphics about, OpenGL Graphics animation example, Bling graphics support, OpenGL Graphics, OpenGL Graphics javax package support, The Android Libraries org.apache.http package tree, The Android Libraries org.json package, The Android Libraries org.w3c.dom package, The Android Libraries org.xml.sax package, The Android Libraries org.xmlpull package, The Android Libraries ORM (object-relational mapping), Serialization, Database Queries and Reading Data from the Database OSGi bundles, Eclipse Concepts and Terminology, Plug-ins OutOfMemoryException, Exceptions OutputStream class, File Management and Binary Data, Bluetooth-specific protocols and adopted protocols overrides, defined, Overrides and callbacks, Overrides and callbacks P P2P (peer-to-peer) communication, P2P Mode packaging Android applications, Packaging an Android Application: The .apk File Paint class, Canvas Drawing, Shadows, Gradients, and Filters, Shadows, Gradients, and Filters about, Canvas Drawing attributes of, Shadows, Gradients, and Filters setShadowLayer method, Shadows, Gradients, and Filters PAN (personal area network), The Bluetooth Protocol Stack parameters, Final and Static Declarations, Initialization Parameters in AndroidManifest.xml, Initialization Parameters in AndroidManifest.xml AndroidManifest.xml file, Initialization Parameters in AndroidManifest.xml, Initialization Parameters in AndroidManifest.xml passing by value, Final and Static Declarations Parcelable interface, Parcelable, Parcelable, Parcelable, Classes That Support Serialization, Saving and restoring instance state serialization support, Parcelable, Parcelable, Classes That Support Serialization, Saving and restoring instance state writeToParcel method, Parcelable password, remembering for keystore, Creating a self-signed certificate PATH environment variable, The Java Development Kit (JDK), The Android SDK PathEffect class, Shadows, Gradients, and Filters peer-to-peer (P2P) communication, P2P Mode PendingIntent class, Reading a Tag percent sign (%), Example Database Manipulation Using sqlite3 period (.), Example Database Manipulation Using sqlite3 permissions, Recording Audio and Video, The Manifest and Layout Files, Account Contacts, Authentication, Synchronization account contacts, Account Contacts authentication, Authentication GPS location providers, The Manifest and Layout Files MediaRecorder class, Recording Audio and Video synchronization, Synchronization persistence, applications and, Serialization, SQL and the Database-Centric Data Model for Android Applications personal area network (PAN), The Bluetooth Protocol Stack phone coordinate systems, Position, Accelerometer, Gyroscope, Rotation vector, Linear acceleration, Gravity about, Position accelerometers, Accelerometer gravity, Gravity gyroscopes, Gyroscope linear acceleration, Linear acceleration rotation vector, Rotation vector piconet, The Bluetooth Protocol Stack pipe character (|), Example Database Manipulation Using sqlite3 Pixel Perfect view (Eclipse), Eclipse and Android playback, Playing Audio and Video, Audio Playback, Video Playback audio methods, Audio Playback life cycle states, Playing Audio and Video video methods, Video Playback plug-ins, Plug-ins, Plug-ins, Extensions, Extensions (see also ADT Eclipse plug-in) defined, Plug-ins extensions and, Extensions, Extensions polymorphism, Objects, Inheritance, and Polymorphism, Objects, Inheritance, and Polymorphism, Using polymorphism and composition, Using polymorphism and composition porting software to Android, On Porting Software to Android POST operation (REST), Content Providers Prediction class, Gesture Input Preferences dialog, Configuring the ADT plug-in, Troubleshooting SDK Problems: No Build Targets preorder traversal, The View pressure sensors, Other Sensors PRIMARY KEY constraint, Database constraints, Declaring Column Specification Strings primitive types, defined, Primitive Types private keys, Creating a self-signed certificate, Creating a self-signed certificate, Don’t lose it!


pages: 281 words: 95,852

The Googlization of Everything: by Siva Vaidhyanathan

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1960s counterculture, AltaVista, barriers to entry, Berlin Wall, borderless world, Burning Man, Cass Sunstein, choice architecture, cloud computing, computer age, corporate social responsibility, correlation does not imply causation, data acquisition, death of newspapers, don't be evil, Firefox, Francis Fukuyama: the end of history, full text search, global village, Google Earth, Howard Rheingold, informal economy, information retrieval, Joseph Schumpeter, Kevin Kelly, knowledge worker, libertarian paternalism, market fundamentalism, Marshall McLuhan, means of production, Mikhail Gorbachev, Naomi Klein, Network effects, new economy, Nicholas Carr, PageRank, pirate software, Ray Kurzweil, Richard Thaler, Ronald Reagan, side project, Silicon Valley, Silicon Valley ideology, single-payer health, Skype, social web, Steven Levy, Stewart Brand, technoutopianism, The Nature of the Firm, The Structural Transformation of the Public Sphere, Thorstein Veblen, urban decay, web application

On top of all that, since its beginning in 2004, its Google Books project has scanned millions and millions of volumes and has made many of them available online at no cost, simultaneously appropriating the functions of libraries on the one hand and the rights of publishers on the other. In 2007 Google announced plans for a mobile-phone operating system and attempted, but failed, to change the ways that the United States government allocates radio bandwidth to mobile companies in an attempt to open up competition and improve service.11 And since 2005 the company has been Googlizing the real world through Google Maps, Street View, and Google Earth, a service that allows users to manipulate satellite images to explore the Earth from above. Only one company does all that, so it does not even need a label beyond its increasingly pervasive brand name. This diversity of enterprises has confused and confounded other firms that compete with Google. Because no other company, not even Microsoft, competes in more than a handful of these areas, it’s also hard for regulators to get a sense of Google’s market power.

See Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) filters, 7, 175–76, 178–79, 182 financial status, Google’s, 17–18, 229n14; and earnings from advertising, 27, 229n14 Finland, 142 Firefox, 17, 29, 30 Fleetwood Mac, 113 Flickr, 82 foreign markets, Google’s share in, 25, 132–33, 141–45, 229n14 forgetting, of information, 174, 176–79 260 IND EX Foucault, Michel, 111, 112 founders, Google’s, 67, 156, 186–87, 202 France, 14, 25, 47, 115, 130, 142, 146, 153 Frankel, Max, 56 free market, 45, 46 free rider problem, 30–36, 166 free speech, 109, 110; in China, 120, 130, 131 free trade, 109 Froomkin, Michael, 245n54 Gandy, Oscar, 236n20 gang-related online video, 110 Ganley, Paul, 168, 169, 172 Gaukroger, Stephen, 149 Germany, 14, 25, 47, 65–66, 102, 108, 112, 113, 121, 122, 123, 130, 134, 142, 153 global civil society, 135, 138, 140, 141, 145, 148, 243–44n48 globalization, 108–10, 111, 146 Gmail, 3, 16, 19, 67, 86, 90, 129, 143, 183; Chinese dissidents’ use of, 116, 118; Iranian dissidents’ use of, 116; students’ use of, 197 “God,” search results for, 63–64 Google bombing (search-engine optimization), 66 Google Books: and antitrust laws, 153, 162; authors’ response to, 152, 153, 154, 156, 161, 162, 163, 173, 202; Chinese response to, 153; copyright issues raised by, 10, 155, 159–61, 163, 166–71, 172; European response to, 153; and fair use, 153, 160–61, 162, 165–66, 168–70, 172; fourfactor analysis of, 169; initial project of, 156–60; legal actions resulting from, 48, 154, 156, 160–62, 165–66, 168; libraries’ participation in, 17, 23, 152–53, 155, 158–60, 162–66, 169, 171, 186, 202, 203; and misapplication of Web standards to books, 152, 167, 171; noncommercial service preferable to, 169, 171–72; and out-of-print books, 153, 154, 156, 161–62, 171; and partner program, 157, 159; and privatization of knowledge, 152, 153, 155, 164–65; and public domain, 157, 158, 159; and public failure, 44, 155; public project preferred to, 203–4; publishers’ response to, 11, 17, 48, 152–54, 156–63, 165–68, 170–73, 202; and registered users, 183; and rights registry, 161, 162; and royalty payments, 161, 172, 173; universities’ participation in, 150–53, 155, 158, 162–65, 169, 171–72, 186 Google Checkout, 16 Google Docs, 24, 29 Google Earth, 17 Google headquarters, 49, 72, 187 Google Maps, 106, 107, 117 Googlemobiles, 98, 104–5 Google News, 32–35, 44, 78, 79, 148 Google Scholar, 186, 190–94 Google Street View, 17, 48, 98–108, 111, 237nn24,32 Google Voice, 16 Google Web Search. See search engine, Google; search results, Google Gorbachev, Mikhail, 122–23 GoTo (search engine), 27 Graham, Christopher, 106 Granovetter, Mark, 231n33 Great Britain.


pages: 299 words: 91,839

What Would Google Do? by Jeff Jarvis

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23andMe, Amazon Mechanical Turk, Amazon Web Services, Anne Wojcicki, barriers to entry, Berlin Wall, business process, call centre, cashless society, citizen journalism, clean water, connected car, credit crunch, crowdsourcing, death of newspapers, disintermediation, diversified portfolio, don't be evil, fear of failure, Firefox, future of journalism, Google Earth, Googley, Howard Rheingold, informal economy, inventory management, Jeff Bezos, jimmy wales, Kevin Kelly, Mark Zuckerberg, moral hazard, Network effects, new economy, Nicholas Carr, PageRank, peer-to-peer lending, post scarcity, prediction markets, pre–internet, Ronald Coase, search inside the book, Silicon Valley, Skype, social graph, social software, social web, spectrum auction, speech recognition, Steve Jobs, the medium is the message, The Nature of the Firm, the payments system, The Wisdom of Crowds, transaction costs, web of trust, Y Combinator, Zipcar

I’d start a company that does nothing but help market homes in the open internet, creating listings on craigslist, taking pictures and making videos, making web pages for the homes, making sure those pages show up in searches, even buying ads on Google. Thanks to Google, you can do this on your own with links to as many photos as you want (free on Google Picasa); video tours (free on YouTube and easily shot with a $100 Flip Video camera); maps to area attractions (free with Google Maps); an aerial view (thanks to Google Earth); and lists and reviews of local restaurants (thanks to Yelp, also on Google Maps). Home sellers can add links to their own favorite hangouts and best grocery stores and add tips about where the kids can play. You can sell not just the property but the experience, the lifestyle, the community. It won’t be long before you can introduce buyers to our neighbors, linking to their blogs or Facebook pages.

Apple, like Google, keeps its focus unrelentingly on the user, the customer—us—and not on itself and its industry. And I’ll add that, of course, both companies make the best products. They are fanatical about quality. But Tobaccowala said that what makes these two companies most alike is that—like any great brand—they answer one strong desire: “People want to be like God.” Google search grants omniscience and Google Earth, with its heavenly perch, gives us God’s worldview. Apple packages the world inside objects of Zen beauty. Both, Tobaccowala said, “give me Godlike power.” WWGD? indeed. Generation G Google is changing our societies, our lives, our relationships, our worldviews, probably even our brains in ways we can only begin to calculate. Start with our relationships. I believe young people today—Generation Google—will have an evolving understanding and experience of friendship as the internet will not let them lose touch with the people in their lives.


pages: 313 words: 84,312

We-Think: Mass Innovation, Not Mass Production by Charles Leadbeater

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1960s counterculture, Andrew Keen, barriers to entry, bioinformatics, c2.com, call centre, citizen journalism, clean water, cloud computing, complexity theory, congestion charging, death of newspapers, Debian, digital Maoism, double helix, Edward Lloyd's coffeehouse, frictionless, frictionless market, future of work, game design, Google Earth, Google X / Alphabet X, Hacker Ethic, Hernando de Soto, hive mind, Howard Rheingold, interchangeable parts, Isaac Newton, James Watt: steam engine, Jane Jacobs, Jaron Lanier, Jean Tirole, jimmy wales, John von Neumann, Kevin Kelly, knowledge economy, knowledge worker, lone genius, M-Pesa, Mark Zuckerberg, Marshall McLuhan, Menlo Park, microcredit, new economy, Nicholas Carr, online collectivism, planetary scale, post scarcity, Richard Stallman, Silicon Valley, slashdot, social web, software patent, Steven Levy, Stewart Brand, supply-chain management, The Death and Life of Great American Cities, the market place, The Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith, The Wisdom of Crowds, Thomas Kuhn: the structure of scientific revolutions, Whole Earth Catalog, Zipcar

The core will come from trusted sources of high-quality data, provided by the founding institutions: the Field Museum of Natural History at Harvard University, three other leading US institutions and a consortium of the world’s 10 largest natural-history libraries, including London’s Natural History Museum and the Botanical Gardens at Kew. The EOL will also include user-generated content filtered by a three-step process of quality control. Only material that meets the gold standard will be visible on the site to everyone. The EOL plans to engage citizen scientists with tools developed with Google Earth to allow people to log observations of specimens. Science in future will not be solely a collaboration among scientists across disciplines and time zones. More sciences will acquire a following of citizen scientists who will work alongside the professionals. Astronomy is a prime example. Like most sciences, astronomy started with amateurs. When Copernicus moved the sun to the centre of the universe he was only a part-time astronomer.

WikiHistory counter.li.org/ english.ohmynews.com/ www.fark.com www.ige.com www.plastic.com portal.eatonweb.com www.slashdot.org www.technorati.com/about www.worldofwarcraft.com INDEX 42 Entertainment 10, 11 A ABC 173 academia, academics 6, 27, 48, 59 Acquisti, Alessandro 210 Adam, James 95 adaptation 109, 110, 121 advertising 104, 105, 129, 173, 180, 219 Aegwynn US Alliance server 99 Afghanistan 237 Africa broadband connections 189 mobile phones 185, 207 science 196 use of Wikipedia 18 Aids 193, 206, 237 al-Qaeda 237 Alka-Seltzer 105 Allen, Paul 46 Altair BASIC 46 Amadeu, Sérgio 202 amateurism 105 Amazon 86 America Speaks 184 American Chemical Society 159 anarchy cultural 5 Wikipedia 16 Anderson, Chris: The Long Tail 216 Apache program 68 Apple 42, 103, 104, 135, 182 iPhone 134 iPods 46 Arendt, Hannah 174, 176 Argentina 203 Arrayo, Gloria 186 Arseblog 29, 30 Arsenal Football Club 29, 30 Arsenal.com 29 arXiv 160 Asia access to the web 5, 190 attitude to open-source 203 and democracy 189 mobile phones 166, 185 and open-source design communities 166–7 Ask a Ninja 57, 219 assembly line 93, 130 assets 224 astronomy 155, 162–3 authority 110, 115, 233 authorship and folk culture 57, 58 and mapping of the human genome 62 Azerbaijan 190 B bacteria, custom-made 164 Baker, Steve 148 Banco do Brazil 201 Bangladesh 205–6 banking 115, 205–6 Barber, Benjamin: Strong Democracy 174 Barbie, Klaus 17 Barbie dolls 17 Barefoot College 205 barefoot thinking 205–6 Barthes, Roland 45 Batchelor, Charles 95 Bath University 137 BBC 4, 17, 127, 142 news website 15 beach, public 49, 50, 51 Beach, The (think-tank) xi Bebo 34, 85, 86 Bedell, Geraldine x, xii–xiii Beekeepers 11, 15 Benkler, Yochai 174 The Wealth of Networks 194 Berger, Jorn 33 Bermuda principles 160 Billimoria, Jeroo 206 BioBrick Foundation 164 biology 163 open-source 165 synthetic 164–5 BioMedCentral 159 biotechnology 154, 163–4, 196–7, 199 black fever (visceral leishmaniasis) 200 Blackburn Rovers Football Club 29 Blades, Joan 188 Blizzard Entertainment 100 Bloc 8406 191 Blogger.com 33 blogs, blogging 1, 3, 20, 29–35, 57, 59, 74, 75, 78, 86, 115, 159, 170, 171, 176, 179, 181–2, 183, 191, 192, 214, 219, 229 BMW 140 Bohr, Neils 93 bookshops 2 Boulton, Matthew 54–5 Bowyer, Adrian 139, 140, 232 Boyd, Danah 213, 214 Bradley, Bill 180 Brand, Stewart 39–40, 43, 63 brands 104, 109 Brazil 201–2 Brenner, Sydney 62–5, 70, 77, 118, 231 Brief History of Time, A (Hawking) 163 Brindley, Lynne 141, 142, 144–5 British Library, London 141, 142, 144, 145 British Medical Journal 159 British National Party 169 Brooks, Fred 77–8 Brooks Hall, San Francisco 38 BT 112 bugs, software 70, 72, 165 bulletin boards 34, 40, 68, 77 Burma 190, 191 Bush, President George W. 18, 33–4, 180, 183 business services 130, 132, 166 C C. elegans (Caenorhabditis elegans) 62–5 Cambia 197 Cambridge University Press 159 camcorders 11 Campbell, Anne 176 Cancer Genome Atlas 160 capital 224 capitalism 224 commune 121, 125 managerial 24 modern 91, 121 social dimension of 90 Carlson, Rob 164 Carnegie Mellon University 210 cars manufacture 135–6 sharing 153 CBS 173 Center for Bits and Atoms, MIT 139 CERN (European Organization for Nuclear Research) 30–31, 159 Chan, Timothy 106, 107 chat rooms 165 Chavez, President Hugo 203 Cheney, Dick 180 Chevrolet 105 Chicago: Full Circle council project 184 China based on privileged access to information 236 creative and cultural sectors 129–30 hackers 234 Internet connection 190, 204 makes available genetic data 199 motor-cycle production 136–7 online games market 106 open-access scientific data 159–60 open-source designs 141 politics 171, 192 power struggle in 235 spending on R & D 96, 159 web censorship 190–91 Chinese Communist Party 171, 235 Chongquing, China 136 Cisco 190 Citibank 207 Citizendium 14 climate change 170, 239 Clinton, Bill 174, 188 Clinton, Senator Hillary 181, 182, 183 CNN 15 co-operatives 121, 122, 123, 188 co-ordination 109, 110–11 coffee houses, London 95 Coke 109–10, 239 Cold War 169, 235 Coles, Polly xiii collaboration 9, 22, 31, 32, 36, 67, 79–80, 81, 82 collaborative innovation 65, 70, 75 and commerce 227 computer game 99, 100 Cornish tin-mining 55 and healthcare 150 and the library of the future 145 new technologies for 227–8 open 126, 128 peer 239 public services 145, 146, 152, 153 scientific 154, 155–6 We-Think 21, 23, 24, 146 Collis, Charles 134 Columbia University 212 commerce 25, 38, 48, 52, 57, 98, 227 commons 49, 50, 51–3, 79, 80, 124, 191, 226 communes 39–40, 46, 90, 121, 122, 128 communication(s) 130, 168, 174, 206, 239 mobile 186 Communism, collapse of 6 communities collaborative 117 and commerce 48 and commons 52 conversational 63 Cornish tin-mining 55 creative 70, 95 diverse 79–80 egalitarian 27, 48, 59, 63, 64 hacker 232 healthcare 151, 152 independence of 23 of innovation 54 libertarian, voluntaristic 45 Linux 65, 227 and loss of market for local newspapers 3 meritocratic 63 open-source 45, 68, 75, 80, 83, 95–6, 102, 109, 110, 111 open-source design 166–7 of scientists 53, 228 self-governing 59, 79, 80, 97, 104, 232 sharing and developing ideas 25 web 21, 23 worm-genome researchers 62–5 community councils 77, 80, 82 Community Memory project 42–3 companies computer-games 128 employee-owned 121, 122 shareholder-owned 122, 123, 125 see also corporations; organisations computer games 60, 127, 218 children and 147 created by groups on the web 7, 23, 87 modularity 78 multi-player 7, 204 success of World of Warcraft 98–9 tools for creating content 74 and We-Think 23 computer-aided design 134 computers democratising how information is accessed 139 distrust of 39 Goa School Computers Project 200–201 laptop 5, 36, 82, 155 mini- 135 personal 39, 46, 203 punch-cards 38 and science 154, 155 viruses 3, 4 connect 67, 75–9 Connectiva 201 consumer spending 131 consumers 98–108 consumer innovators 101–3 consumption constraints 25–6 engaging 89 fans 103–4 freedom 218 and innovation risk 100–101 participant 98–108 urban 124 contribute 67, 70, 71, 72, 73, 74–5 conversation 53, 54, 63, 69, 77, 93, 95, 113, 118, 174 Copernicus, Nicolaus 162 copyright 124, 157, 196 core 66, 67, 68–9, 70 Cornell University 233 ‘Cornish’ engines 55–6, 136, 229 Cornish tin-mining industry 54–6, 63, 125, 136 corporations centralisation of power 110 closed 128 and collaborative approaches to work 109 the cost of corporate efficiency 89–90 difficulty in making money from the web 7 hierarchies 88, 110 industrial-era 88 leadership 115, 117–19 loss of stability 122 restructuring and downsizing 88–9 see also companies; organisations counter-culture (1960s) 6, 27, 39, 45, 46, 59 Counts, David 183 Craigslist 3, 40, 118, 128, 218 Creative Commons 124 creative sector 129–30 creativity 1–2, 3, 5, 6, 9, 67, 82–3 collaborative 7, 20, 58, 86, 154 collective 39, 57–8 consumers 89 corporate 91–2 emergence of 93, 96 enabled by the web 1–2, 3, 5, 19, 26, 218–21, 222, 227 freedom to create 218–21 and interaction 119 and open innovation 93 origin of 112–13 social 5, 7, 58, 59, 82, 83, 86 tools for 218, 219 Crick, Francis 52, 62, 76 crime 153, 169, 183 criminality 1, 3 crowds 23, 61, 70, 72, 77 Crowdspirit 134 cultural élite 2 cultural sector 129–30 culture academic 38 anti-industrial 27, 28 basis of 4 collaborative 135 consumerist 172 corrosion of 4 cultural anarchy 5 folk 6, 27, 56–9, 220, 226 hippie 38 individual participation 6 political 171 popular 102 post-industrial 27, 28 pre-industrial 27, 28 We-Think 28, 59, 62, 169, 194, 230, 232–3, 238 Web 2.0 45 web-inflected 27 Western 239 wiki 14 work 114 YouTube cultural revolution 3 Cunningham, Ward 35–6 cyber cafés 107, 190, 192, 201, 204 Cyworld 34, 85, 86 D Dali, Salvador 105 Darby, Newman 102 Darpa 164 David, Paul 53 de Soto, Hernando 224–5 The Mystery of Capital 224 de Vellis, Phil 182 Dean, Howard 176–7, 178, 180, 185 Dean Corps 177 Debian 66 Debord, Guy 45, 46 decentralisation 7, 13, 39, 46, 59, 78, 226, 232 decision-making 78, 82, 84, 115, 173, 174 del.i.cious 86 democracy 1, 3, 5, 6, 7, 16, 24, 170–74, 175, 176–92 basis of 174 conversational democracy at a national level 184 ‘craftsmen of democracy’ 174 Dean campaign 178 democratic advances 184 depends on public sovereignty 172 formal 195 geek 65 Homebrew 176 public debate 170, 171 and We-Think 170, 221, 239 Department for International Development (DFID) 207 Descartes, René 19–20 design 166 modular 136–7 open-source 133–5, 140, 141, 162–3, 166–7 developing world Fab Labs in 166 government attitudes to the Internet 190 impact of the web on 166 mobile phones 185–6 and open-access publishing 166 and open-source design communities 166–7 and open-source software 200–203 research and development 196 and We-Think’s style of organisation 204 diabetes 150 Digg 33 discussion forums 77 diversity 9, 23, 72, 76, 77, 79–80, 112, 121 division of labour 111 DNA description of the double helix (Watson and Crick) 52, 62, 76 DNA-sequencing 164–5 Dobson, John 102, 162–3 Doritos 105 dot.com boom 106 Dupral 68 Dyson (household-goods company) 134 Dyson, Freeman 163, 164 E E-Lagda.com 186 Eaton, Brigitte 33 Eatonweb 33 eBay 40, 44, 102, 128, 152, 165, 216–18, 221, 229, 235 Ebola virus 165 Eccles, Nigel xi economies of scale 137 economy digital 124, 131, 216 gift 91, 226 global 192 global knowledge 239 of ideas 6 individual participation 6 industrial 122 market 91, 221 a mass innovation economy 7 networked 227 of things 6 UK 129, 130 and We-Think 129 Edison, Thomas 72, 93, 95 EditMe 36 education 130, 146–50, 167, 183, 194, 239 among the poorest people in the world 2, 193 civic 174 a more convivial system 44 Edwards, John 181 efficiency 109, 110 Einstein, Albert: theory of relativity 52 elderly, care of 170 Electronic Arts 105, 106, 128, 177 Electronic Frontier Foundation 40 electronics 93, 135 Eli Lilly (drugs company) 77 Ellis, Mark: The Coffee House: a social history 95 enclosures 124 Encyclopaedia Britannica, The 15–18, 126 encyclopaedias 1, 4, 7, 12–19, 21, 23, 36, 53, 60, 61, 79, 161, 231 Encyclopedia of Life (EOL) 161, 226 Endy, Drew 164, 165 energy 166, 232, 238 Engelbart, Doug 38–9, 59 engineering 133, 166 Environmental Protection Agency 152 epic poems 58, 60 equality 2, 24, 192–7, 198, 199–208 eScholarship repository, University of California 160 Estonia 184, 234 Estrada, President Joseph 186 ETA (Basque terrorist group) 187 European Union (EU) 130 Evans, Lilly x Evolt 68, 108 F Fab Labs 139, 166, 232 fabricators 139 Facebook 2, 34–5, 53, 142, 152, 191, 193, 210 factories 7, 8, 24 families, and education 147 Fanton, Jonathan 161 Fark 33 Feinstein, Diane 176 Felsenstein, Lee 42, 43, 44 fertilisers 123 Field Museum of Natural History, Harvard University 161 file-sharing 51, 58, 135, 144, 233 film 2, 3, 4, 47, 86, 129, 216, 218, 220–21 film industry 56 filters, collaborative 36, 86 financial services 130, 132 Financial Times 118 First International Computer (FIC), Inc. 136, 141 flash mobbing 10, 11 Flickr 34, 85, 86, 210, 218–19 Food and Drug Administration (US) 92 Ford, Henry 24, 93, 96 Fortune 500 company list 122 Frank, Ze (Hosea Jan Frank) 57, 219 freedom 1, 2, 6, 24, 208, 209, 210–21, 226 French, Gordon 41, 42 friendly societies 188 Friends Reunited 34 friendship 5, 233 combinatorial 95 Friendster 34, 35 fundamentalists 232 G Gaia Online 35 Galileo Galilei 154 gambling 169 GarageBand software 57, 135, 148 Gates, Bill 46, 47, 51, 227 Gates Foundation 160 geeks 27, 29–36, 37, 38, 48, 59, 65, 179 gene-sequencing machines, automated 64 genetic engineering 164, 196–7, 235 Georgia: ’colour revolution’ 187 Gershenfeld, Neil 139–40, 166, 232 GetFrank 108 Ghana, Fab Lab in 139 Gil, Gilberto 202 Gjertsen, Lasse 56, 218 Gland Pharma 200 global warming 238 globalisation 202, 228, 239 Gloriad 155 GM 135 Goa School Computers Project 200–201 Goffman, Erving 103–4 Goldcorp Inc. 132–3, 153 Golden Toad 40 GoLoco scheme 153 Google x, 1, 29, 32, 33, 47, 66, 97, 104, 113–14, 128, 141, 142, 144, 212 Google Earth 161 Gore, Al 64 governments in developing countries 190 difficulty in controlling the web 7 GPS systems 11 Grameen Bank 205–6, 208 ‘grey’ sciences 163 grid computing 155 Gross, Ralph 210 group-think 23, 210–11 groups 230–31 of clever people with the same outlook and skills 72 decision-making 78 diverse 72, 80, 231 and tools 76–7 Guthrie, Woody 58 H Habermas, Jurgen 174 hackers 48, 74, 104, 140, 232, 234 Hale, Victoria 199 Halo 2 science fiction computer game 8 Hamilton, Alexander 17–18 Hampton, Keith 183–4 Hanson, Matt xi health 130, 132, 146, 150–52, 167, 183, 239 Heisenberg, Werner 93 Henry, Thierry 29 Hewlett Packard 47 hierarchies 88, 110, 115 hippies 27, 48, 59, 61 HIV 193 Homebrew Computer Club 42, 46–7, 51, 227 Homebrew Mobile Phone Club 136 Homer Iliad 58 Odyssey 58 Homer-Dixon, Thomas: The Upside of Down 238–9 Hubble, Edwin 162 Human Genome Project 62, 64, 78, 155, 160, 161, 226 human rights 206 Hurricane Katrina 184 Hyde, Lewis: The Gift 226 hypertext 35, 39 I I Love Bees game 8, 10–12, 15–16, 19, 20, 69, 231 IBM 47, 66, 97 System/360 computer 77 idea-sharing 37, 94, 237, 239 as the biggest change the web will bring about 6 with colleagues 27 and consumer innovators 103 dual character of 226 gamers 106 Laboratory of Molecular Biology 63 through websites and bulletin boards 68 tools 222 We-Think-style approach to 97 and the web’s underlying culture 7 ideas combining 77 and creative thinking 87 from creative conversations 93, 95 gifts of 226 growth of 222, 239 and the new breed of leaders 117–18 ratifying 84 separating good from bad 84, 86 testing 74 the web’s growing domination 1 identity sense of 229 thieves 213–14 Illich, Ivan 43–5, 48 Deschooling Society 43, 44, 150 Disabling Professions 43 The Limits to Medicine 43, 152 Tools for Conviviality 44 independence 9, 72, 231 India Barefoot College 205 creative and cultural sectors 129–30 Fab Lab in 139 Internet connection 190, 204 mobile phones 207 and One World Health 200 spending on R & D 96 telephone service for street children 206 individuality 210, 211, 215, 216, 233 industrialisation 48, 150, 188 information barriers falling fast 2 computers democratise how it is accessed 139 effect of We-Think 129 large quantities on the web 31–2 libraries 141, 142, 143, 145 looking for 8 privileged access to 236 sharing 94, 136 the web’s growing domination 1 Wikipedia 19 Innocentive 77 innovation 5, 6, 91–3, 94, 95–8, 109 among the poorest people in the world 2 biological 194 collaborative 65, 70, 75, 90, 119, 146, 195 collective 170, 238 and competition/co-operation mix 137 Cornish mine engines 54–6 corporate 89, 109, 110 and creative conversations 93, 95 creative interaction with customers 113 cumulative 125, 238 decentralised 78 and distributed testing 74 and diverse thinking 79 and education 147 independent but interconnected 78 and interaction 119 and Linux 66 local 139 a mass innovation economy 7 medical 194 open 93, 96–7, 125, 195 in open-source communities 95–6 and patents 124 pipeline model 92, 93, 97 R & D 92, 96 risks of 100–101 social 170, 238 successful 69 user-driven 101 and We-Think 89, 93, 95, 125, 126 the web 2, 5, 7, 225 Institute for One World Health 199–200 Institute for Politics, Democracy & the Internet (IPDI) 179 Institute of Fiscal Studies 131 institutions convivial 44 industrial-era 234 and knowledge 103 and professionals 3, 5 public 142, 145 Instructables site 134 Intel 97 intellectual property 75, 122, 124, 125, 234 law 124–5 intelligence, collective bloggers 33 getting the mix right 23 Google’s search system 32 I Love Bees and Wikipedia examples 8, 10–19 milked by Google 47 the need to collaborate 32 self-organisation of 8 and social-networking sites 35 the web’s potential 3, 5 International Polar Year (IPY) 156, 226 Internet broadband connection 178, 189, 192 combined with personal computers (mid-1990s) 39 cyber cafés 107, 190, 192, 201, 204 Dean campaign 177 in developing countries 190 draws young people into politics 179, 180 an early demonstration (1968) 38 and Linux 66 news source 178–9 open-source software 68 openness 233 and political funding 180 pro-am astronomers 163 used by groups with a grievance 168 in Vietnam 189–90, 191 investment 119, 121, 133, 135 Iran 190, 191 Iraq war 18, 134, 191 Israel 18 Ito, Joi 99 J Japan politics 171 technology 171 JBoss 68 Jefferson, Richard 197, 199 Jodrell Bank Observatory, Macclesfield, Cheshire 162 JotSpot 36 journalism 3, 74, 115, 170–71 Junker, Margrethe 206 K Kampala, Uganda 206 Kazaa music file-sharing system 144 Keen, Andrew 208 The Cult of the Amateur 208 Kelly, Kevin 211 Kennedy, John F. 176 Kenya 207 Kepler, Johannes 162 Kerry, John 180 Khun, Thomas 69 knowledge access to 194, 196 agricultural 194 barriers falling fast 2 collaborative approach to 14, 69 encyclopaedia 79 expanding 94 gifts of 226 individual donation of 25 and institutions 103 and networking 193 and pro-ams 103 professional, authoritative sources of 222 sharing 27, 44, 63, 70, 199 spread by the web 2, 3 Wikipedia 16, 18, 19, 195 Korean War 203 Kotecki, James (’EmergencyCheese’) 182 Kraus, Joe 36 Kravitz, Ben 13 Kuresi, John 95 Kyrgyzstan: ’colour revolution’ 187 L Laboratory of Molecular Biology, Cambridge 62–3, 77 labour movement 188 language 52–3 Lanier, Jaron 16, 210–11, 213 laptop computers 5, 36, 82, 155 lateral thinking 113 leadership 89, 115, 116, 117–19 Lean, Joel 55 Lean’s Engine Reporter 55, 63, 77 Lee, Tim Berners 30–31 Lego: Mindstorms products 97, 104, 140 Lewandowska, Marysia 220, 221 libraries 2, 141–2, 143, 144–5, 227 life-insurance industry (US) 123 limited liability 121 Linked.In 35 Linux 65–6, 68, 70, 74, 80, 85, 86, 97, 98, 126, 127, 128, 136, 201, 203, 227 Lipson Community College, Plymouth 148 literacy 194 media 236 Lloyd, Edward 95 SMS messaging (texting)"/>London coffee houses 95 terrorist bombings (July 2005) 17 Lott, Trent 181–2 Lula da Silva, President Luiz Inacio 201 M M-PESA 207, 208 MacArthur Foundation 161 McCain, John 180 MacDonald’s 239 McGonigal, Jane 11, 69 McHenry, Robert 17 McKewan, Rob 132–3, 153 McLuhan, Marshall: Understanding the Media 45 Madrid bombings (March 2004) 186–7 Make magazine 165 management authoritative style of 117 and creative conversation 118 hierarchies 110 manufacturing 130, 132, 133–7, 138, 139–41, 166, 232 niche 139 Marcuse, Herbert 43 Marin 101 Mark, Paul xi market research 101 market(s) 77, 90, 93, 102, 123, 216, 226–7 Marsburg virus 165 Marx, Karl 224 mass production 7, 8, 24, 56, 96, 227, 232, 238 Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) 139, 164, 233 Matsushita 135 media 129, 130, 156, 172, 173, 182, 211 literacy 236 Meetup 179, 185 Menlo Park laboratory, New Jersey 95 Merholz, Peter 33 meritocracy 16, 63 Microsoft 46, 47, 51, 56, 75, 109–10, 126, 127, 144, 202, 203, 204, 239 Office 201 Windows 200 Windows XP 66 Middle East 170, 189, 190, 192 Milovich, Dimitry 102 ‘minihompy’ (mini homepage) 204 Minnesota Mining and Materials 121 mobile phones 5 in Africa 185, 207 in Asia 166, 185 camera phones 74, 115, 210 children and 147 in developing-world markets 207–8 with digital cameras 36 flash mobs 10 I Love Bees 11 in India 207 open-source 136, 203 politics 185–9 SMS messaging (texting) 101–2, 185, 187, 214, 215 mobs 23, 61 flash 10, 11 modularity 77, 84 Moore, Fred 41–2, 43, 46, 47, 59, 227 More, Thomas: Utopia 208 Morris, Dick 174 Morris, Robert Tappan 233 Mosaic 33 motivation 109–12, 148 Mount Wilson Observatory, California 162 mountain bikes 101 MoveOn 188–9 Mowbray, Miranda xi music 1, 3, 4, 47, 51, 52, 57, 102, 135, 144, 218, 219, 221 publishing 130 social networking test 212–13 mutual societies 90, 121 MySpace 34, 44, 57, 85, 86, 152, 187, 193, 214, 219 MySQL 68 N National Football League (US) 105 National Health Service (NHS) 150, 151 National Public Radio (NPR) 188 Natural History Museum, London 161 Nature magazine 17 NBC 173 neo-Nazis 168 Netflix 216, 218 Netherlands 238 networking by geeks 27 post-industrial networks 27 social 2–7, 20, 23, 34–5, 36, 53, 57, 86, 95, 147, 149, 153, 159, 171, 183–4, 187, 193, 208, 210, 212, 213–15, 230, 233 New Economy 40 New Orleans 184 New York Magazine 214 New York Review of Books 164 New York Stock Exchange 95 New York Times 15, 182, 191 New Yorker magazine 149 Newmark, Craig 118 news services 60, 61, 171, 173, 178–9 newspapers 2, 3, 30, 32, 34, 171, 172, 173 Newton, Sir Isaac 25, 154 niche markets 216 Nixon, Richard 176 NLS (Online System) 39 Nokia 97, 104, 119, 140 non-profits 123 Nooteboom, Bart 74 Noronha, Alwyn 200–201 Norris, Pippa 189 North Africa, and democracy 189 Nosamo 35, 186 Noyes, Dorothy 58 Nupedia 13, 14 Nussbaum, Emily 214–15 O Obama, Barack 181, 191 Ofcom (Office of Communications) 31 OhmyNews 34, 87, 204, 231 oil companies 115 Oldenburg, Henry 25, 53–4, 156 Ollila, Jorma 119 Online System (NLS) 39 Open Architecture Network (OAN) 133–4 Open Net Initiative 190 Open Office programme 201 Open Prosthetics 134 Open Source Foundation 97 OpenMoko project 136 OpenWiki 36 O’Reilly, Tim 31 organisation commons as a system of organisation 51 pre-industrial ideas of 27, 48 social 20, 64, 165 We-Think’s organisational recipe 21 collaboration 21, 23 participation 21, 23 recognition 21 Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) 196 organisations civic 189 open/collaborative vs. closed/hierarchical models 89, 126, 127, 128 public 152 successful 228 see also companies; corporations Orwell, George: 1984 182 Ostrom, Elinor 51–2, 80 ownership 6, 119, 120, 121–6, 127, 128, 225 Oxford University 234 P paedophiles 3, 168, 213–14 Page, Scott xi, 72 Pakistan 237 Palace of Fine Arts, San Francisco 40 parallel universes 7 participation 23, 216, 223, 230, 232 consumers 98, 100 public services 145, 146, 150, 152, 153 a We-Think ingredient 21, 24 Partido Populaire (PP) (Spain) 187 patents 55, 56, 92, 97, 102, 124, 154, 196, 197, 199 Paul, Ron 185 Pawson, Dave x–xi Pax, Salam 57 peasants 27, 48, 59 peer recognition 54, 106, 111, 156, 228–9 peer review 53, 54, 156, 165, 236 peer-to-peer activity 53–4, 135, 148, 151 People’s Computer Company 41 People’s Democratic Party (Vietnam) 191 performance art/artists 2, 10 performance management 110 Perl 68 Peruvian Congress 202 Pew Internet & American Life 31, 179 pharmaceutical industry 92–3, 195–6, 197, 199, 200 Phelps, Edmund 114–15, 220 Philippines: mobile phones 185–6 Philips, Weston 105 photographs, sharing of 34, 75, 86, 218–19 Pitas.com 33 Plastic 33 Playahead 35 podcasts 142 Poland 220–21 polar research 156 politics bloggers able to act as public watchdog 181–2, 183 decline in political engagement 171–2 democratic 173 donations 179 funding 180–81 and journalism 170–71 and mobile phones 185–9 online 183 the online political class 179 and online social networks 35, 86 political advocates of the web 173–4 racist groups on the web 169 and television 173, 183 ultra-local 183, 184 US presidential elections 173, 179 videos 182 the web enters mainstream politics 176 young people drawn into politics by the Internet 179 Popper, Karl 155 Popular Science magazine 102 pornography 169, 214 Post-it notes 121 Potter, Seb 108–9 Powell, Debbie ix power and networking 193 technological 236 of the We-Think culture 230 of the web 24–5, 185, 233 PowerPoint presentations 140, 142, 219 privacy 210, 211 private property 224, 225 Procter and Gamble (P & G) 96–7, 98 productivity 112, 119, 121, 151, 227, 232 agricultural 124 professionals, and institutions 3, 5 property rights 224 public administration 130 Public Broadcasting Service 188 Public Intellectual Property Research for Agriculture initiative 199 Public Library of Science 159 public services 132, 141–2, 143, 144–53, 183 public spending 146 publishing 130, 166 science 156–7, 159–60 Putnam, Robert 173, 184 Python 68 Q quantum mechanics 93 ‘quick-web’ 35 R racism 169, 181–2 radio 173, 176 RapRep (Rapid Replicator) machines 137, 138, 139, 140, 141, 232 Rawls, John: A Theory of Justice 194 Raymond, Eric 64 recognition 21, 223 peer 54, 106, 111, 156 record industry 56, 102 recycling 111 Red Hat 66, 227 Red Lake, Ontario 132, 133 research 166 market 101 pharmaceutical 195–6 research and development (R & D) 92, 96, 119, 196 scientific 154–7, 159–65 retailing 130, 132 Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil 201 Roh Moo-hyun, President of South Korea 35, 186 Roosevelt, Franklin 176 Roy, Bunker 205 Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, Surrey 161 Royal Society 54 Philosophical Transactions 25, 156 Ryze.com 34 S Sacca, Chris 113, 114 Safaricom 207 St Louis world fair (1904) 75–6 Samsung xi, 203 Sanger, Larry 13, 14, 16 Sanger Centre, Cambridge 155 Sao Paolo, Brazil 201 SARS virus 165 Sass, Larry 139 satellite phones 11 Saudi Arabia 190 scanners 11 Schumacher, E.


pages: 369 words: 94,588

The Enigma of Capital: And the Crises of Capitalism by David Harvey

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accounting loophole / creative accounting, anti-communist, Asian financial crisis, bank run, banking crisis, Bernie Madoff, Big bang: deregulation of the City of London, Bretton Woods, British Empire, business climate, call centre, capital controls, credit crunch, Credit Default Swap, David Ricardo: comparative advantage, deindustrialization, Deng Xiaoping, deskilling, equal pay for equal work, European colonialism, failed state, financial innovation, Frank Gehry, full employment, global reserve currency, Google Earth, Guggenheim Bilbao, illegal immigration, indoor plumbing, interest rate swap, invention of the steam engine, Jane Jacobs, joint-stock company, Joseph Schumpeter, Just-in-time delivery, land reform, liquidity trap, Long Term Capital Management, market bubble, means of production, megacity, microcredit, moral hazard, mortgage debt, new economy, New Urbanism, Northern Rock, oil shale / tar sands, peak oil, place-making, Ponzi scheme, precariat, reserve currency, Ronald Reagan, sharing economy, Silicon Valley, special drawing rights, special economic zone, statistical arbitrage, structural adjustment programs, the built environment, the market place, The Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith, Thomas L Friedman, Thomas Malthus, Thorstein Veblen, too big to fail, trickle-down economics, urban renewal, urban sprawl, white flight, women in the workforce

There thus emerges a joint imperative within the state– corporate nexus constituted within capitalism, to fund the technologies and organisational forms that assure the continued dominance of space and spatial movement by state and capital. Hence the British Royal Society’s competition in the eighteenth century to construct a chronometer that could work on the high seas and so pinpoint locations accurately. In the early years, maps were guarded as state secrets and kept under lock and key. Now, of course, we have satellites, GPS systems and Google Earth to guide us, though this does not prevent the US from buying up all the satellite images of Afghanistan to protect its military interests. Drones flying over Afghanistan fire missiles on command from a base in Colorado. Computerised orders from Wall Street are executed in London and received instantaneously in Zurich and Singapore. This penchant for the domination of space goes far deeper than mere economic rationality.

.: The World is Flat 132 futures, energy 24 futures markets 21 Certificates of Deposit 262 currency 24 Eurodollars 262 Treasury instruments 262 G G7/G8/G20 51, 200 Galileo Galilei 89 Gates, Bill 98, 173, 221 Gates foundation 44 gays, and colonisation of urban neighbourhoods 247, 248 GDP growth (1950–2030) 27 Gehry, Frank 203 Geithner, Tim 11 gender issues 104, 151 General Motors 5 General Motors Acceptance Corporation 23 genetic engineering 84, 98 genetic modification 186 genetically modified organisms (GMOs) 186 gentrification 131, 256, 257 geographical determinism 210 geopolitics 209, 210, 213, 256 Germany acceptance of state interventions 199–200 cross-border leasing 142–3 an export-dominated economy 6 falling exports 141 invasion of US auto market 15 Nazi expansionism 209 neoliberal orthodoxies 141 Turkish immigrants 14 Weimar inflation 141 Glass-Steagall act (1933) 20 Global Crossing 100 global warming 73, 77, 121, 122, 187 globalisation 157 Glyn, Andrew et al: ‘British Capitalism, Workers and the Profits Squeeze’ 65 Goethe, Johann Wolfgang von 156 gold reserves 108, 112, 116 Goldman Sachs 5, 11, 20, 163, 173, 219 Google Earth 156 Gould, Stephen Jay 98, 130 governance 151, 197, 198, 199, 201, 208, 220 governmentality 134 GPS systems 156 Gramsci, Antonio 257 Grandin, Greg: Fordlandia 188, 189 grassroots organisations (GROS) 254 Great Depression (1920s) 46, 170 ‘Great Leap Forward’ 137, 138, 250 ‘Great Society’ anti-poverty programmes 32 Greater London Council 197 Greece sovereign debt 222 student unrest in 38 ‘green communes’ 130 Green Party (Germany) 256 ‘green revolution’ 185–6 Greenspan, Alan 44 Greider, William: Secrets of the Temple 54 growth balanced 71 compound 27, 28, 48, 50, 54, 70, 75, 78, 86 economic 70–71, 83, 138 negative 6 stop in 45 Guggenheim Museu, Bilbao 203 Gulf States collapse of oil-revenue based building boom 38 oil production 6 surplus petrodollars 19, 28 Gulf wars 210 gun trade 44 H habitat loss 74, 251 Haiti, and remittances 38 Hanseatic League 163 Harrison, John 91 Harrod, Roy 70–71 Harvey, David: A Brief History of Neoliberalism 130 Harvey, William vii Haushofer, Karl 209 Haussmann, Baron 49, 167–8, 169, 171, 176 Hawken, Paul: Blessed Unrest 133 Hayek, Friedrich 233 health care 28–9, 59, 63, 220, 221, 224 reneging on obligations 49 Health Care Bill 220 hedge funds 8, 21, 49, 261 managers 44 hedging 24, 36 Hegel, Georg Wilhelm Friedrich 133 hegemony 35–6, 212, 213, 216 Heidegger, Martin 234 Helú, Carlos Slim 29 heterogeneity 214 Hitler, Adolf 141 HIV/AIDS pandemic 1 Holloway, John: Change the World without Taking Power 133 homogeneity 214 Hong Kong excessive urban development 8 rise of (1970s) 35 sweatshops 16 horizontal networking 254 household debt 17 housing 146–7, 149, 150, 221, 224 asset value crisis 1, 174 foreclosure crises 1–2, 166 mortgage finance 170 values 1–2 HSBC 20, 163 Hubbert, M.


pages: 389 words: 108,344

Kill Chain: The Rise of the High-Tech Assassins by Andrew Cockburn

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airport security, anti-communist, Edward Snowden, friendly fire, Google Earth, license plate recognition, RAND corporation, risk/return, Ronald Reagan, Silicon Valley, South China Sea, too big to fail

This time lapse is why drone takeoffs and landings must be handled by a separate team of pilots stationed close to the runway so that they can see the planes they are flying in real time. Potential targets on the ground are aware of the delay: Yemeni members of al-Qaeda reported in 2011 that when they hear a drone overhead, they move around as much as possible. Nor do the pictures themselves necessarily always bear close resemblance to the world as the rest of us see it and sometimes are “no better than looking at Google Earth through a straw,” as one veteran remarked of the plane’s “spotter TV” feature. Thus for most of the time the convoy was under watch, the sensor could only focus on two of the three vehicles at a time. If the operator zoomed out even slightly, the already imperfect resolution was lost. Imagery became even less precise if there was dust in the air, if the drone was too high, at dusk or dawn (when both infrared and daylight-use electro-optical cameras lose efficiency), or when the sensor operator could not focus properly.

Officially, Gorgon Stare generated “motion video,” which turned out to be just 2 frames a second (as opposed to “full-motion video” at 24 frames a second). While it was possible to make out cars and other vehicles, it was impossible to distinguish “dismounts” (people) from bushes. One of the test team’s briefing slides that I looked at compared aerial pictures of an air base. One was a Gorgon Stare infrared “full image.” In other words, it showed the widest area of which it was capable. The other came from Google Earth, the free online service available to all. They were identical, revealing buildings and roads, and airfield runways, but nothing smaller and more detailed. Another slide showed a “subview,” a sample of what troops in the field would get if they were to make a request to the drone overhead. It was just possible to make out the cars. People were another matter, merely the faintest of blobs and certainly indistinguishable from bushes.

The Data Revolution: Big Data, Open Data, Data Infrastructures and Their Consequences by Rob Kitchin

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business intelligence, business process, cellular automata, Celtic Tiger, cloud computing, collateralized debt obligation, conceptual framework, congestion charging, corporate governance, correlation does not imply causation, crowdsourcing, discrete time, George Gilder, Google Earth, Infrastructure as a Service, Internet Archive, Internet of things, invisible hand, knowledge economy, late capitalism, linked data, Masdar, means of production, Nate Silver, natural language processing, openstreetmap, pattern recognition, platform as a service, recommendation engine, RFID, semantic web, sentiment analysis, slashdot, smart cities, Smart Cities: Big Data, Civic Hackers, and the Quest for a New Utopia, smart grid, smart meter, software as a service, statistical model, supply-chain management, the scientific method, The Signal and the Noise by Nate Silver, transaction costs

Resolution and Indexicality In addition to data exhaustivity, big data are becoming much more fine-grained in their resolution, together with a move towards strong indexicality (unique labelling and identification) (Dodge and Kitchin 2005). An example of enhanced resolution are remote sensing images. In the late 1980s, the highest resolution images of the Earth’s surface available to most non-government researchers were those taken by Landsat satellites, where each pixel relates to a 30 × 30 metre parcel of land. Much of the imagery now available on Google Earth has a resolution of 2.5 × 2.5 metres, enabling much more detail to be viewed and analysed. Similarly, with respect to the output of census data, the resolution of the tertiary data has increased in many jurisdictions. In the Irish case, until recently census data were published for electoral divisions (ED) (3,409 areas with an average population of c.1,350, with the population per ED being much higher in cities and towns and lower in rural areas).

Crovitz, L.G. (2012) ‘Obama’s “Big Data” Victory’, Wall Street Journal, 18 November, http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424127887323353204578126671124151266.html (last accessed 19 November 2012). Crowley, U. (2009) ‘Genealogy method’, in R. Kitchin and N. Thrift (eds), International Encyclopedia of Human Geography, vol. 4. Elsevier, Oxford, pp. 341–4. Crutcher, M. and Zook, M. (2009) ‘Placemarks and waterlines: racialized cyberscapes in postKatrina Google Earth’, Geoforum, 40(4): 523–34. Cukier, K. (2010) ‘Data, data everywhere’, The Economist, 25 February, http://www.economist.com/node/15557443 (last accessed 12 November 2012). Culler, J. (2010) ‘The closeness of close reading’, ADE Bulletin, 149: 20–25. Curry, M.R. (1997) ‘The digital individual and the private realm’, Annals of the Association of American Geographers, 87: 681–99. Curry, M.R., Philips, D.J. and Regan, P.M. (2004) ‘Emergency response systems and the creeping legibility of people and places’, The Information Society, 20: 357–69.


pages: 631 words: 171,391

One Minute to Midnight: Kennedy, Khrushchev and Castro on the Brink of Nuclear War by Michael Dobbs

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air freight, Berlin Wall, cuban missile crisis, desegregation, Dissolution of the Soviet Union, Doomsday Clock, global village, Google Earth, kremlinology, Marshall McLuhan, Mikhail Gorbachev, mutually assured destruction, profit motive, Ralph Waldo Emerson, RAND corporation, stakhanovite

After reeling through more than a hundred cans of film, and tens of thousands of images, I feel enormously fortunate to have found some previously unpublished photographs of the Bejucal facility taken by U.S. reconnaissance planes in October 1962. Several frames included shots of the special vans used to transport nuclear warheads around Cuba, proof that I had found the right place. I was able to combine these photographs with contemporary images from Google Earth to find the precise location of the nuclear storage site. A final example: uncovering the details of the U-2 flight over Chukotka, also on Black Saturday. Standard academic accounts of the missile crisis usually mention this incident only in passing. The U.S. Air Force has failed to declassify a single piece of information about the flight by Captain Charles F. Maultsby, other than a unit history with the bizarre claim that his mission was "100 percent successful."

Unpublished MS by Del Pino. 101 "Our greatest problem": Notes on meeting between Castro and Cuban military chiefs, October 24, 1962, released by the Cuban government, Documentos de los Archivos Cubanos, Havana 2002. 102 This stretch of coastline: Szulc, 474–6. 102 A thirty-minute drive: Author's visit to Tarará beach and SAM site, March 2006. Both the SAM site and the antimissile site are still visible on Google Earth at 23 09 28.08 N, 82 13 38.87 W. 103 As he drove back to Havana: Acosta, 165. For Castro's thoughts, see Blight et al., Cuba on the Brink, 211. Photographs of Castro's visit to the AA unit are available on Cuban Web sites. 103 "Fidel gets his kicks": Franqui, 189. 104 A few months earlier: Estimate by Soviet defense minister Malinovsky; Blight and Welch, On the Brink, 327. 104 The Marine regiment selected: Marine Corps records, October 1962, JFKARC. 104 "Where are we gonna go?"

., Gribkov et al., U Kraya Yadernoi Bezdni, 209; Gribkov and Smith, Operation ANADYR, 46. In the latter, Gribkov incorrectly states that the Luna warheads were stored at Bejucal. According to Beloborodov, who was directly responsible for them, they were stored in Managua. The coordinates of the Bejucal bunker are 22 56 18 N, 82 22 39 W. The outlines of the bunker and circular road are still visible on Google Earth. The headquarters facility was half a mile south of the bunker, on the northeastern outskirts of Bejucal. The coordinates of the Managua complex (three bunkers) are 22 58 00 N, 82 18 38W. 175 "The experts kept saying":Author's interview with Dino Brugioni, May 2007. 176 "a double security fence": Joint Evaluation of Soviet Missile Threat in Cuba, October 19, 1962, CREST; Lundahl briefing of JFK, October 22, 1962. 176 The molasses factory: Brugioni, Eyeball to Eyeball, 542.


pages: 797 words: 227,399

Robotics Revolution and Conflict in the 21st Century by P. W. Singer

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agricultural Revolution, Albert Einstein, Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic, Atahualpa, barriers to entry, Berlin Wall, Bill Joy: nanobots, blue-collar work, borderless world, clean water, Craig Reynolds: boids flock, cuban missile crisis, en.wikipedia.org, Ernest Rutherford, failed state, Fall of the Berlin Wall, Firefox, Francisco Pizarro, Frank Gehry, friendly fire, game design, George Gilder, Google Earth, Grace Hopper, I think there is a world market for maybe five computers, if you build it, they will come, illegal immigration, industrial robot, interchangeable parts, invention of gunpowder, invention of movable type, invention of the steam engine, Isaac Newton, Jacques de Vaucanson, job automation, Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, Law of Accelerating Returns, Mars Rover, Menlo Park, New Urbanism, pattern recognition, private military company, RAND corporation, Ray Kurzweil, RFID, robot derives from the Czech word robota Czech, meaning slave, Rodney Brooks, Ronald Reagan, Schrödinger's Cat, Silicon Valley, speech recognition, Stephen Hawking, strong AI, technological singularity, The Coming Technological Singularity, The Wisdom of Crowds, Turing test, Vernor Vinge, Wall-E, Yogi Berra

The sum total of al-Qaeda’s financial resources is thought to be roughly what the U.S. military spends in one hour in Iraq. But in 2006, when its forces wanted to target a British army base outside Basra in Iraq, al-Qaeda didn’t have to invent rockets that go into space or build expensive reconnaissance satellites that could take photos of the Earth. Instead, its operatives went onto the Internet (which al-Qaeda also didn’t have to pay to develop) and downloaded images of the base from Google Earth. The footage was so detailed that they were able to sight their mortars to target the soft-skinned tents in the base, rather than harder-to-damage buildings. THE PERILS OF A BAD HAIR DAY When we think of the terrorist risks that emanate from unmanned systems, robotics expert Robert Finkelstein advises that we shouldn’t just look at organizations like al-Qaeda. “They can make a lone actor like Timothy McVeigh even more scary.”

Akin to the massive virtual worlds in such venues as Second Life, a usable cityscape would be built of any urban battle zone, detailed down to the blueprints and individual occupants of each building. A fleet of unmanned robotic sensors and systems (ranging from spy satellites to tiny insect UAVs peering into buildings) would continually update the virtual version of the city with real-world footage and information. Imagine the video game Sim City crossed with Google Earth. It would give soldiers the ability to zoom into any neighborhood or even individual structure to see what is going on in real time. According to one report, “You have continuous coverage, around corners and through walls. You would never, for example, lose those mortar bombers who got out of their car and ran away.” By sending in robots that navigate the new urban battlefield, DARPA is hoping to completely rewrite the script of Black Hawk Down.

Singer, July 7, 2006. 270 “an ideal platform” USAF Scientific Advisory Board, Air Defense Against Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) (2006). 270 costs only $1,000 http://diydrones.com, accessed April 28, 2008. See also “Build Your Own War Bot,” at http://howto.wired.com/wiki/Build_Your_Own_War_Bot, accessed March 20, 2008. 271 The footage was so detailed Thomas Claburn, “Terrorists Take Over Google Earth,” Information-Week , January 17, 2007, http://www.informationweek.com/showArticle.jhtml;jsessionid=CYKV3P1NN DZPWQSNDLPSKHoCJUNN2JVN?articleID = 1 96901827. 271 “They can make a lone actor” Robert Finkelstein, interview, Peter W. Singer, July 7, 2006. 271 “a few amateurs” Ibid. 271 “One bright but embittered loner” Joel Garreau, Radical Evolution: The Promise and Peril of Enhancing Our Minds, Our Bodies—and What It Means to Be Human (New York: Doubleday, 2005), 139. 271 “The obligation of subjects” Christopher Coker, Humane Warfare (London, New York: Routledge, 2001), 18.


pages: 717 words: 150,288

Cities Under Siege: The New Military Urbanism by Stephen Graham

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airport security, anti-communist, autonomous vehicles, Berlin Wall, call centre, carbon footprint, clean water, congestion charging, credit crunch, DARPA: Urban Challenge, defense in depth, deindustrialization, edge city, energy security, European colonialism, failed state, Food sovereignty, Gini coefficient, global supply chain, Google Earth, illegal immigration, income inequality, knowledge economy, late capitalism, loose coupling, market fundamentalism, McMansion, megacity, mutually assured destruction, Naomi Klein, New Urbanism, offshore financial centre, pattern recognition, peak oil, planetary scale, private military company, RAND corporation, RFID, Richard Florida, Scramble for Africa, Silicon Valley, smart transportation, surplus humans, The Bell Curve by Richard Herrnstein and Charles Murray, urban decay, urban planning, urban renewal, urban sprawl, Washington Consensus, white flight

The global circulation of the tourist-style digital images of the Abu Ghraib torturers, for example, provided not only a massive boost to the war’s opponents but also iconic images of torture to activists and investigators who had suspected widespread brutality within the US system of incarceration without trial. Efforts by US military information-operations campaigns to buy up relevant satellite imaging during the invasions of Iraq and Afghanistan have not kept Google Earth, for instance, from being widely used by antiwar activists and Iraqi insurgents alike. And while digital video cameras have been used to sustain cheap cable TV channels offering demonized depictions of the dangers lurking in city cores, those very same technologies enabled bystanders to reveal the regular killings of Iraqi civilians by the private military corporation Blackwater. SECURITY SURGE A fourth new component of contemporary urbanism is that as the everyday spaces and systems of urban everyday life are colonized by militarized control technologies, and as notions of policing and war, domestic and foreign, peace and war become less distinct, there emerges a massive boom in a convergent industrial complex encompassing security, surveillance, military technology, prisons, corrections, and electronic entertainment.

., 334 Gaza, xxiv, 113, 143, 145, 171, 177, 227, 233, 247–48, 257, 262, 284, 294, 361; as lab for urban control, 240–41, 243–44, 250, 287; population, 286 n.83; simulated, 193; strangulation of, 286–90 Gelinas, Nicole, 25, 48 General Dynamics, 247 General Motors, 317–19, 333 Genoa, 22, 121 Gentry, John, 176–77 Gerber, Tony, 190 n.22 Geyer, Michael, 60 Giddens, Anthony, The Nation-State and Violence,11 n.36 Gilbert, David, 11 n.38 Gillem, Mark, 212 Gilman, Nils, 272 n.27, 274 Gilroy, Paul, 56 n.86, 81, 83 Gini coefficient, 7–8 Giroux, Henry, 7 n.21, 25 n.108, 74, 113 n.97, 368 n.57 Gitlin, Todd, 306 Giuliani, Rudolph, 47–48 Glenn, Russell, 187 n.14, 195 n.36, 196 n.41, 198 n.47 Global Guerillas, 269 n.18, 270 n.21 globalization, 9, 132, 264, 273, 297, 353, 379–80, 383 global warming. See climate change Glosson, Buster, 280 Glover, Ross, 56 n.87 Golan, Gan, 27 n.111, 123 Goldberg, Bernel, 252 n.97, 253 Goldenberg, Suzanne, 112 n.86 Goldman, Laura, 258 n.119 González, Roberto, 33 Google Earth, 73 Goonewardena, Kanishka, xix n.12, xxiii n.20, xxix n.31, xxviii n.28, 11 n.39&42, 15 n.62, 36 n.1&5, 39 n.16, 79,84–86, 378 n.76, 379 Gordon, Gerald, 257 Gorman, Ellen, 314 n.56 Gorman, Siobhan, 20 n.83 Goyette, Carmen, 214 GPS, xxv, 63, 65, 68, gg,157, 177, 271, 309, 316, 327, 332, 362–64, 367–68, 376, 378 Graham, Stephen, xxii n.18, 13 n.50&53, 14 n.56, 23 n.98&99, 25 n.106, 58 n.94&95, 84 n.95, 92 n.19, 93 n.26, 112 n.91, 121 n.121, 135 n.164, 143 n.195, 226 n.1, 265 n.8, 284 n.77, 384 n.96 Gramsci, 61 Graves-Buckingham, A.


pages: 655 words: 141,257

Programming Android: Java Programming for the New Generation of Mobile Devices by Zigurd Mednieks, Laird Dornin, G. Blake Meike, Masumi Nakamura

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anti-pattern, business process, conceptual framework, create, read, update, delete, database schema, Debian, domain-specific language, en.wikipedia.org, fault tolerance, Google Earth, interchangeable parts, iterative process, loose coupling, MVC pattern, revision control, RFID, web application

If you click on either the GPX or KML tab, you will be able to load a GPX or KML file that describes a path, as shown in Figure 16-2. Here we’ve already loaded the file OR.kml, which is included on the website for this book. It traces a path near O’Reilly headquarters in Sebastopol, California. Figure 16-2. DDMS emulator with KML location updates You can create GPX tracks with many GPS navigation software tools, and KML tracks with Google Earth or many other navigation programs. The OR.kml file was generated by plotting a series of Google Earth placemarks and concatenating them together into a single file. Here’s an excerpt of OR.kml: <?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?> <kml xmlns="http://earth.google.com/kml/2.2"> <Document> <name>OR1.kml</name> <StyleMap id="msn_ylw-pushpin"> <Pair> <key>normal</key> <styleUrl>#sn_ylw-pushpin</styleUrl> </Pair> <Pair> <key>highlight</key> <styleUrl>#sh_ylw-pushpin</styleUrl> </Pair> </StyleMap> <Style id="sh_ylw-pushpin"> <IconStyle> <scale>1.3</scale> <Icon> <href>http://maps.google.com/mapfiles/kml/pushpin/ylw-pushpin.png</href> </Icon> <hotSpot x="20" y="2" xunits="pixels" yunits="pixels"/> </IconStyle> <ListStyle> </ListStyle> </Style> <Style id="sn_ylw-pushpin"> <IconStyle> <scale>1.1</scale> <Icon> <href>http://maps.google.com/mapfiles/kml/pushpin/ylw-pushpin.png</href> </Icon> <hotSpot x="20" y="2" xunits="pixels" yunits="pixels"/> </IconStyle> <ListStyle> </ListStyle> </Style> <Placemark> <name>OR1</name> <LookAt> <longitude>-122.7583711698369</longitude> <latitude>38.38922415809942</latitude> <altitude>0</altitude> <range>14591.7166300043</range> <tilt>0</tilt> <heading>0.04087372005871314</heading> <altitudeMode>relativeToGround</altitudeMode> </LookAt> <styleUrl>#msn_ylw-pushpin</styleUrl> <Point> <coordinates>-122.8239277647483,38.40273084940345,0</coordinates> </Point> </Placemark> <Placemark> <name>OR2</name> <LookAt> <longitude>-122.7677364592949</longitude> <latitude>38.3819544049429</latitude> <altitude>0</altitude> <range>11881.3330990845</range> <tilt>0</tilt> <heading>-8.006283077460853e-010</heading> <altitudeMode>relativeToGround</altitudeMode> </LookAt> <styleUrl>#msn_ylw-pushpin</styleUrl> <Point> <coordinates>-122.8064486052584,38.40786910573772,0</coordinates> </Point> </Placemark> <Placemark> <name>OR3</name> <LookAt> <longitude>-122.7677364592949</longitude> <latitude>38.3819544049429</latitude> <altitude>0</altitude> <range>11881.3330990845</range> <tilt>0</tilt> <heading>-8.006283077460853e-010</heading> <altitudeMode>relativeToGround</altitudeMode> </LookAt> <styleUrl>#msn_ylw-pushpin</styleUrl> <Point> <coordinates>-122.7911077944045,38.41500788727795,0</coordinates> </Point> </Placemark> ...


pages: 525 words: 116,295

The New Digital Age: Transforming Nations, Businesses, and Our Lives by Eric Schmidt, Jared Cohen

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3D printing, access to a mobile phone, additive manufacturing, airport security, Amazon Mechanical Turk, Amazon Web Services, anti-communist, augmented reality, Ayatollah Khomeini, barriers to entry, bitcoin, borderless world, call centre, Chelsea Manning, citizen journalism, clean water, cloud computing, crowdsourcing, data acquisition, Dean Kamen, Elon Musk, failed state, fear of failure, Filter Bubble, Google Earth, Google Glasses, hive mind, income inequality, information trail, invention of the printing press, job automation, Julian Assange, Khan Academy, Kickstarter, knowledge economy, Law of Accelerating Returns, market fundamentalism, means of production, mobile money, mutually assured destruction, Naomi Klein, offshore financial centre, peer-to-peer lending, personalized medicine, Peter Singer: altruism, Ray Kurzweil, RFID, self-driving car, sentiment analysis, Silicon Valley, Skype, Snapchat, social graph, speech recognition, Steve Jobs, Steven Pinker, Stewart Brand, Stuxnet, The Wisdom of Crowds, upwardly mobile, Whole Earth Catalog, WikiLeaks, young professional, zero day

But when Navy SEAL Team Six raided his home, they seized his devices, getting not just the world’s most wanted man but also critical information about everyone he had been in contact with. The more likely terrorist scenario continuing into the new digital age will resemble the Mumbai attacks in 2008, when ten masked men held the city hostage in a three-day siege in which 174 people were killed and more than 300 wounded. The gunmen relied on basic consumer technologies—BlackBerrys, Google Earth and VoIP—to coordinate and conduct the attacks, communicating at a command center in Pakistan with leaders who watched live coverage of the events on satellite television and monitored the news to provide real-time tactical direction. Technology made these attacks much more deadly than they could have been otherwise, but once the last (and only surviving) gunman was captured, the information he and, critically, the leftover devices of his comrades, provided allowed investigators to follow an electronic trail to significant people and places in Pakistan that might not have otherwise been known for months, if ever.

., 2012, 4.1 elections, Venezuela electricity Emergency Information Service empathy encryption, 2.1, 2.2, 2.3, 4.1 Ennahda party entertainment Equatorial Guinea Ericsson, 3.1, 3.2 Eritrea Estonia, 3.1, 6.1 Ethiopia Etisalat Etisalat Misr European Commission European Union, 2.1, 3.1, 4.1 evolution, 3.1, con.1 exiles expectations gap explosive-ordnance-disposal (EOD) robots extortionists Facebook, itr.1, 2.1, 2.2, 2.3, 2.4, 2.5, 2.6, 3.1, 3.2, 3.3, 4.1, 5.1, 5.2, 6.1, 6.2 data safeguarded by facial-recognition software, 2.1, 2.2, 6.1, con.1 failed states FARC Farmer, Paul FBI, 2.1, 5.1 Ferrari, Bruno fiber-optic cables, itr.1, 3.1, 4.1, 4.2 filtering, 2.1, 3.1 financial blockades fingerprinting Finland Fixing Failed States (Lockhart and Ghani), 7.1n Flame virus, 3.1, 3.2 Food and Drug Administration food prices foreign aid forgetfulness Forum on China-Africa Cooperation (FOCAC) Foster-Miller 4G, 7.1, 7.2 France, 6.1, 7.1, nts.1 Freakonomics (Levitt and Dubner), 2.1 Fred freedom of assembly free expression free information French Data Network Fukushima nuclear crisis, n gacaca, 249–50 Gadhafi, Muammar, 4.1, 4.2, 7.1 Gallic Wars “Gangnam Style,” 24n Gates, Robert Gaza General Motors genocide virtual genome sequencing geography Georgia (country) Georgia (state) Germany gesture-recognition technology Ghana Ghani, Ashraf, n GiveWell globalization, 1.1, 3.1 Global System for Mobile Communications (GSM) Goldsmith, Jack, n Google, itr.1, 2.1, 3.1, 3.2, 3.3n, 163, 5.1, 7.1 Chinese cyber attacks on, itr.1, 3.1, 3.2 data safeguarded by driverless cars of Project Glass in tweet-by-phone service of Google App Engine Google Earth Google Ideas Google Map Maker Google Maps, 6.1, nts.1 Google+ Google Voice GPS, 6.1, 6.2, 6.3 GPS data Great Firewall of China, 3.1, 3.2 GreatNonprofits Green Revolution GuideStar hackers, 2.1, 2.2, 5.1, 5.2, 6.1 Hackers’ Conference, n hacktivists Hague, 6.1, 7.1, 7.2 haircuts Haiti, itr.1, 7.1, 7.2, 7.3 Haiti After the Earthquake (Farmer), 7.1 Hama, Syria Hamas, 5.1, 5.2, 6.1 Han Chinese handheld mobile devices Hanseatic League haptic technology, 1.1, 2.1n, 203–4 harassment, 6.1, 6.2 hard-drive crashes hawala, 69 Hayden, Michael V.


pages: 537 words: 149,628

Ghost Fleet: A Novel of the Next World War by P. W. Singer, August Cole

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3D printing, Admiral Zheng, augmented reality, British Empire, energy security, Firefox, glass ceiling, global reserve currency, Google Earth, Google Glasses, IFF: identification friend or foe, Just-in-time delivery, Maui Hawaii, new economy, RAND corporation, reserve currency, RFID, Silicon Valley, Silicon Valley startup, South China Sea, sovereign wealth fund, stealth mode startup, trade route, Wall-E, We are Anonymous. We are Legion, zero day

,” Intercepts (blog), Defense News, January 31, 2013, accessed August 24, 2014, http://intercepts.defensenews.com/2013/01/is-chinas-j-31-fighter-going-navy-all-the-way/. 326 Garmin AeroScreen: “Avionics and Safety,” Garmin, accessed August 24, 2014, http://www.garmin.com/en-US/explore/intheair; fictional electronic system. 326 the F-15C: “F-15 Eagle Fact Sheet,” U.S. Air Force, March 14, 2005, accessed August 24, 2014, http://www.af.mil/AboutUs/FactSheets/Display/tabid/224/Article/104501/f-15-eagle.aspx. 327 the aircraft equivalent of the Ghost Fleet: Mark Wilson, “Google Earth’s View of the Boneyard, Where Planes Go to Die,” Gizmodo (blog), February 23, 2010, accessed August 24, 2014, http://gizmodo.com/5478203/google-earths-view-of-the-boneyard-where-planes-go-to-die. 327 Roscoe’s jet: Jon Harper, “Air Force to Eliminate Nearly 500 Aircraft in 25 States, D.C., and Overseas,” Stars and Stripes, March 11, 2014, accessed August 24, 2014, http://www.stripes.com/news/air-force-to-eliminate-nearly-500-aircraft-in-25-states-d-c-and-overseas-1.272304. 327 desert-worn KC-135s: “KC-135 Stratotanker,” U.S.


pages: 153 words: 52,175

Bit Literacy: Productivity in the Age of Information and E-mail Overload by Mark Hurst

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en.wikipedia.org, Firefox, Google Earth, mail merge, pre–internet, profit motive, social software, software patent, web application

Children may be the most affected of all. How will it change their experience of childhood to know that they are being tracked, to the meter, every waking minute? GPS data isn’t the only trail of bits that people will generate in the physical world. Satellite cameras are getting more and more accurate, and any moment you walk outside, you (or your car) could be photographed for the next update of Google Earth. (Knowing this, some companies and activists have cleverly painted enormous logos and slogans on roofs and other flat expanses visible to satellites.) Cameras will be nearly ubiquitous on street level, too, at least in urban areas. Corporations, police, even friends with “life recorders” will capture the actions and utterances of everyone in sight, whether they like it or not. Tracking data will increase in the online world, too.


pages: 181 words: 62,775

Half Empty by David Rakoff

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airport security, Buckminster Fuller, dark matter, double helix, Google Earth, phenotype, RFID, urban planning, urban renewal, wage slave, Wall-E, Y2K

With the railroads, the trickle of settlers coming by wagon train was suddenly upgraded to a flood of terrifyingly efficient westward expansion. Manifest destiny was transformed from the merely notional into reality at a speed never known theretofore. Just ask the Indians. Scrub plain stretches in all directions to the suede-brown hills in the distance. Even seen from above, the satellite images on Google Earth reveal an expanse as beige and unvaried as a slice of bologna. One has a sense of how delayed the gratification of congress must have been for the Central and Union Pacific teams. No doubt, they must have had each other in their sights for weeks before they could consider the job done. Then again, the sight of anyone new, even if only in the distance, must have been a welcome tonic after months of laying track out in the middle of nowhere.


pages: 202 words: 59,883

Age of Context: Mobile, Sensors, Data and the Future of Privacy by Robert Scoble, Shel Israel

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Albert Einstein, Apple II, augmented reality, call centre, Chelsea Manning, cloud computing, connected car, Edward Snowden, Elon Musk, factory automation, Filter Bubble, Google Earth, Google Glasses, Internet of things, job automation, Kickstarter, Mars Rover, Menlo Park, New Urbanism, PageRank, pattern recognition, RFID, ride hailing / ride sharing, Saturday Night Live, self-driving car, sensor fusion, Silicon Valley, Skype, smart grid, social graph, speech recognition, Steve Jobs, Steve Wozniak, Steven Levy, Tesla Model S, Tim Cook: Apple, urban planning, Zipcar

By the time Graf talked with us in September 2012, the company had gathered geographically relevant data in 30 countries over seven years and had added such exotic places as the Galapagos Islands, where Darwin once explored. In most places, company employees drive around in specially equipped cars with “tons of sensors” that analyze everything from road width, direction street signs, localized spellings, etc. Then Google takes a look at the same streets and neighborhoods via satellite, which it makes available via Google Earth. In the case of the Galapagos, Google sent in their Street View team, despite the fact that there are no streets on the pristine Pacific island. They reduced the technology contained in the usual cars to be small enough to fit in 40-pound backpacks so the team could carry them around the island. The project would not have been possible without tiny sensors, which also helped the team observe under water.

The Orbital Perspective: Lessons in Seeing the Big Picture From a Journey of 71 Million Miles by Astronaut Ron Garan, Muhammad Yunus

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Airbnb, barriers to entry, book scanning, Buckminster Fuller, clean water, corporate social responsibility, crowdsourcing, global village, Google Earth, Indoor air pollution, jimmy wales, optical character recognition, ride hailing / ride sharing, shareholder value, Silicon Valley, Skype, smart transportation, Stephen Hawking, transaction costs, Turing test, Uber for X, web of trust

Land of a Thousand Hills In space, I was hit with the sobering contradiction between the beauty of Earth and the unfortunate realities of life, such as conflict that exists on our beautiful planet. But understanding this contradiction does not require a spacewalk or even a trip to space. The overview effect is, in some sense, available to us all. We’ve had pictures of Earth from space for decades, and today we even have tools such as Google Earth, which enables anyone with access to make a virtual trip around the world and then zoom in to any detailed portion of it. And elevated empathy is likewise accessible to anyone who reads the newspaper or has firsthand knowledge of local problems and allows himself or herself to feel some connection with those problems. I’ve seen this contradiction between global beauty and earthbound conflict from space, but I’ve also been confronted with it on the ground.


pages: 186 words: 49,595

Revolution in the Age of Social Media: The Egyptian Popular Insurrection and the Internet by Linda Herrera

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citizen journalism, crowdsourcing, Google Earth, informal economy, Julian Assange, knowledge economy, minimum wage unemployment, Mohammed Bouazizi, Occupy movement, RAND corporation, Rosa Parks, Silicon Valley, Skype, Slavoj Žižek, WikiLeaks

Ross—who served as a member of the Technology, Media and Telecommunications Policy Committee of Obama’s presidential campaign in 2009 before heading the newly created Office of the Senior Advisor for Innovation and Technology (SAIT)—enthusiastically worked with Cohen to bring companies from Silicon Valley—Google, Facebook, Twitter, and YouTube, to name a few—to Washington, DC to sit at the table of high politics. As Morozov comments in his book The Net Delusion: Given the amount of research and technology money coming out of America’s defense and intelligence communities, it’s hard to find a technology company that does not have a connection to the CIA or some other three-lettered agency. Even though Google does not publicize it widely, Keyhole, the predecessor to Google Earth, which Google bought in 2005, was funded through In-Q-Tel, which is the CIA’s for-profit investment arm. On January 21, 2010, Secretary of State Hillary Clinton delivered what would become an iconic speech on internet freedom. The speech reiterated the US commitment to working with cyberactivists in closed societies to find ways around their governments’ blocks and censorship. Clinton made numerous references to the two main strategic regions for US foreign policy: the Middle East and North Africa, and Asia and the Pacific.

Animals by Emma Jane Unsworth

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call centre, dark matter, fear of failure, Google Earth, rolodex, unpaid internship

There were never any bathrooms in these little supermarkets. Could I feasibly get outside and find somewhere discreet? The last time I’d vomited was before Jim had left. He had a late flight so I’d stayed at his, drinking wine on my own and playing Portal 2 on his PS3. At 2 a.m. I was starving and there was nothing in so I staggered to McDonald’s in St Ann’s Square in his canvas espadrilles (did they ever record for Google Earth at night, or was that just during the day? Mortification). I bought too much food and ate it walking back, and then – schoolgirl error – got in bed too soon. The internal tide turned and I knew there was only one way it was going to go. Just thinking about that night made vomiting inevitable so I paid quickly and left the shop. Around the corner I leaned against a wall and dropped my bags. The glass bottles rang against each other.


pages: 266 words: 80,018

The Snowden Files: The Inside Story of the World's Most Wanted Man by Luke Harding

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affirmative action, airport security, Anton Chekhov, Apple's 1984 Super Bowl advert, Berlin Wall, Chelsea Manning, don't be evil, Edward Snowden, Etonian, Firefox, Google Earth, Jacob Appelbaum, job-hopping, Julian Assange, Khan Academy, kremlinology, Mark Zuckerberg, Maui Hawaii, national security letter, pre–internet, Ralph Waldo Emerson, rolodex, Silicon Valley, Skype, social graph, Steve Jobs, web application, WikiLeaks

In the debate over who ruled the internet, the NSA provided a dismaying answer: ‘We do.’ The slides, given to Poitras and published by Der Spiegel magazine, show that the NSA had developed techniques to hack into iPhones. The agency assigned specialised teams to work on other smartphones too, such as Android. It targeted BlackBerry, previously regarded as the impregnable device of choice for White House aides. The NSA can hoover up photos and voicemail. It can hack Facebook, Google Earth and Yahoo Messenger. Particularly useful is geo-data, which locates where a target has been and when. The agency collects billions of records a day showing the location of mobile phone users across the world. It sifts them – using powerful analytics – to discover ‘co-travellers’. These are previously unknown associates of a target. Another secret program had a logo that owed a debt to the classic 1970s Pink Floyd album Dark Side of the Moon.


pages: 233 words: 73,772

The Secret World of Oil by Ken Silverstein

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business intelligence, clean water, corporate governance, Donald Trump, energy security, Exxon Valdez, failed state, Google Earth, offshore financial centre, oil shock, paper trading, rolodex, Ronald Reagan, WikiLeaks, Yom Kippur War

Doubt, self-reflection, and guilt were little known to them, and hence they censored themselves less than most people do, even when speaking to a journalist. Since striking oil near the town of Jennings in 1901, the industry has transformed and defined the state. During the following century, it drilled 220,000 wells, built six hundred oil-producing fields, and constructed (with massive help from the state) eight thousand miles of access canals and pipelines, most of it running through wetlands. Look at South Louisiana with Google Earth and you’ll see a coastal landscape punch-holed by drilling operations and cut to ribbons by support infrastructure. The industry’s historic operations are a major reason why Louisiana’s coastal wetlands are disappearing at the rate of about twenty-five to thirty-five square miles per year, one of the fastest rates in the world.5 The canals and pipelines eliminated the natural wetlands barrier, and sucking oil and gas out of the marshes caused the land to literally cave in and disappear.


pages: 246 words: 71,594

Talk to the Tail: Adventures in Cat Ownership and Beyond by Tom Cox

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call centre, Google Earth, Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall

As he lumbered across Daniel’s laminate floor, he had a look of a cat wearing a big ginger jumper. In certain more unfeeling human circles, the flesh around his arms might have been described as ‘bingo wings’. But he retained the slowness of a big cat. In the time since then, Daniel has kept me up to date on his progress. Though he’s lost more weight, he’s still big enough to be seen from space. That is to say: when Daniel logged onto Google Earth to look at a picture of his house, he noticed a large ginger spillage in the corner of the driveway clearly visible as Samson. As winter comes on, Samson spends most of his time curled up in Rosie’s dog bed, but he’s also prone to wander off for periods of a day or two, then return, covered in mud or oil, to calmly inquire about that evening’s menu. Daniel’s theory is that he has a special passion for exploring garden sheds, but when their owners come to close them, he doesn’t have the speed or ingenuity to remove himself from them that other cats might, though always seems to land on his feet – even if this is rarely in a literal sense.

Raw Data Is an Oxymoron by Lisa Gitelman

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collateralized debt obligation, computer age, continuous integration, crowdsourcing, Drosophila, Edmond Halley, Filter Bubble, Firefox, Google Earth, Howard Rheingold, index card, informal economy, Isaac Newton, Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, knowledge worker, Louis Daguerre, Menlo Park, optical character recognition, RFID, Richard Thaler, Silicon Valley, social graph, software studies, statistical model, Stephen Hawking, Steven Pinker, text mining, time value of money, trade route, Turing machine, urban renewal, Vannevar Bush

Playing along, the organization began to field calls from children interested in Santa’s whereabouts, and eventually to issue brief broadcast “updates” of Santa’s location, claiming to use NORAD’s “satellites, high-powered radars, and jetfighters” to track Santa’s journey. The radio broadcasts continued until 1997, when the Santa Tracker moved to the Internet. In 2007, Google partnered with NORAD on the endeavor, creating 2D Google maps and 3D Google Earth images based on NORAD’s tracking data. In 2011 the Santa Tracking program drew on over 1,000 U.S. and Canadian military volunteers to field over 100,000 phone calls and emails; the Apple/Android SantaTracker smartphone app was downloaded 1.4 million times, while the NORAD Santa Tracker Web site received 2.2 million hits. (Image: Bob Haynes) —Lisa Lynch Color Plates 6 Rumsfeld, Ford, and Cheney (1974)  Missing minutes of secret audio recording and other intrigues and malfeasance revealed during the Watergate scandal in the United States led to pressure for greater openness.


pages: 251 words: 76,868

How to Run the World: Charting a Course to the Next Renaissance by Parag Khanna

Amazon: amazon.comamazon.co.ukamazon.deamazon.fr

Albert Einstein, Asian financial crisis, back-to-the-land, bank run, blood diamonds, borderless world, BRICs, British Empire, call centre, carbon footprint, charter city, clean water, cleantech, cloud computing, corporate governance, corporate social responsibility, Deng Xiaoping, Doha Development Round, don't be evil, double entry bookkeeping, energy security, European colonialism, facts on the ground, failed state, friendly fire, global village, Google Earth, high net worth, index fund, informal economy, invisible hand, labour mobility, laissez-faire capitalism, Masdar, megacity, microcredit, mutually assured destruction, Naomi Klein, New Urbanism, offshore financial centre, oil shock, open economy, out of africa, private military company, Productivity paradox, race to the bottom, RAND corporation, reserve currency, Silicon Valley, smart grid, South China Sea, sovereign wealth fund, special economic zone, sustainable-tourism, The Fortune at the Bottom of the Pyramid, The Wisdom of Crowds, too big to fail, trade liberalization, trickle-down economics, UNCLOS, uranium enrichment, Washington Consensus, X Prize

When the American Forest and Paper Association and other industry groups countered with their own voluntary and more lax codes, NGO pressure through the Rainforest Action Network forced Georgia-Pacific, International Paper, and retailers such as Home Depot to drop the ruse and elevate to the FSC standards. To protect their brand, Office Depot and Staples have ended their relationship with Asian Pulp and Paper, whose practices plundered the Indonesian rain forest. The Marine Stewardship Council plays a similar role for fisheries, 70 percent of which are being harvested to below replacement levels, using the power of its labels to certify seafood producers. It even uses real-time Google Earth maps on its website to track and promote sustainable fisheries and their techniques. In Alaska, the privatization of fisheries incentivized fishermen to catch halibut only when prices are high, saving the fish from overexploitation. For both forests and fisheries, a sense of local ownership is the key to building community-level sustainability. Protecting natural habitats can go hand in hand with tourism.


pages: 1,318 words: 403,894

Reamde: A Novel by Neal Stephenson

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air freight, airport security, crowdsourcing, Google Earth, industrial robot, informal economy, large denomination, megacity, new economy, pattern recognition, Ponzi scheme, pre–internet, ransomware, side project, Skype, slashdot, South China Sea, the built environment, the scientific method, young professional

Gaffers showing the inordinate good cheer of those who, ten years ago, had accepted the fact that they could die any day now. A few younger clients, and some gentlemen in bib overalls, fixated on laptops. Richard made himself comfortable in a booth, ordered two eggs over easy with bacon and whole wheat toast, and pulled his own laptop out of his bag. The opening screen of T’Rain was a frank rip-off of what you saw when you booted up Google Earth. Richard felt no guilt about this, since he had heard that Google Earth, in turn, was based on an idea from some old science-fiction novel. The planet T’Rain hung in space before a backdrop of stars. The stars’ positions were randomly generated, a fact that drove Pluto crazy. Anyway, the planet then began to rotate and draw closer as Richard’s POV plunged down through the atmosphere, which sported realistic cloud formations. The shapes of continents and islands began to take on three-dimensionality.

The Canadian border had become in her mind something like the end of the world, a sheer, straight cliff descending straight into the pit of Abaddon; as they crept asymptotically closer to it, the scene must become more and more apocalyptic and the people who chose to live there correspondingly strange. Which was, of course, utterly ridiculous, since what actually lay on the other side of that imaginary line was British Columbia, a prosperous and well-regulated place of socialized medicine, bilingual signage, and Mounties. And yet the line was there, drawn on all the maps. Or rather, it was the upper edge of all the maps, with nothing shown beyond it. Since people—at least, before Google Earth came along—could not actually hover miles above the ground and see the world as birds and gods did, they had to make do with maps, which substituted for actually seeing things; and, in that way, the imaginary figments of surveyors and the conventions of cartographers could become every bit as real as rocks and rivers. Perhaps even more so, since you could look at the map any time you wanted, whereas going to look at the physical border involved a lot of effort.

John Eaton and Hugh Matheson helped fill out the picture of British Columbia by cheerfully supplying background information about cat-skiing resorts and mining operations, respectively. Having put the reputations of the above people in play, I must reiterate that there are places in the book where I may have misinterpreted their advice, or simply chosen to ignore it for storytelling reasons, and so none of them should be blamed for any defects. Somewhat in the same vein, a word about geography: the advent of Google Earth makes it easy to call up high-resolution maps of any place on the planet and compare them against the descriptions in a work of fiction. Anyone who attempts this with Reamde open on their lap is wasting his or her time. There is an Abandon Mountain in northern Idaho, and something that goes by the local and informal name of American Falls, but I have taken vast liberties with their descriptions here.


pages: 326 words: 29,543

The Docks by Bill Sharpsteen

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affirmative action, anti-communist, big-box store, collective bargaining, Google Earth, intermodal, inventory management, jitney, Just-in-time delivery, new economy, Panamax, place-making, Port of Oakland, post-Panamax, RAND corporation, refrigerator car, strikebreaker, women in the workforce

(While everyone I talked to is convinced that photography suggests behavior that warrants closer inspection, according to security expert Bruce Schneier, the idea that terrorists first photograph their intended target is “nonsense.” Of all the recent major attacks, as well as the less publicized ones, he writes, “Real terrorists╯.╯.╯. don’t seem to photograph anything.” As Wiedenhoeft concedes, terrorists can go to Google Earth to get all the views they need.) The Coast Guard also relies on its auxiliary, a nationwide volunteer band of thirty-one thousand civilians who, for the price of a tank of gas for their boats, work with the Coast Guard in nonmilitary and non– law enforcement activities such as search and rescue operations and, of course, patrolling the waters for “suspicious activity.” In addition to roving human eyes, the port has also installed 350 cameras throughout the facility, some of which feature military-grade night vision and heat detection and are powerful enough to make out details on Catalina Island, more than 20 miles away.


pages: 350 words: 107,834

Halting State by Charles Stross

Amazon: amazon.comamazon.co.ukamazon.deamazon.fr

augmented reality, call centre, forensic accounting, game design, Google Earth, hiring and firing, illegal immigration, impulse control, indoor plumbing, invention of the steam engine, Necker cube, Potemkin village, RFID, Schrödinger's Cat, Vernor Vinge, zero day

He plants himself in the other office chair and turns the laptop sitting on his side of the desk to face you. “You might find this interesting.” “Uh, what?” He’s grinning. “I logged in before I got here.” He points to a big aerial photograph of a city, something like a spy satellite image. “While I was stuck on the bus, I wrote a plug-in to map the IP addresses of the auction site users into an overlay for Google Earth. I figured that being able to visualize where they were would be…well. It’s not guaranteed accurate—they could be tunnelling in from elsewhere, or covering their trail in some other way—but what I found was interesting.” He flicks a couple of commands at the air, and the pointer tracks across the screen as the image zooms in until you’re looking at a gleaming metal building that looks like a gigantic wood-louse.


pages: 372 words: 101,174

How to Create a Mind: The Secret of Human Thought Revealed by Ray Kurzweil

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Alan Turing: On Computable Numbers, with an Application to the Entscheidungsproblem, Albert Einstein, Albert Michelson, anesthesia awareness, anthropic principle, brain emulation, cellular automata, Claude Shannon: information theory, cloud computing, computer age, Dean Kamen, discovery of DNA, double helix, en.wikipedia.org, epigenetics, George Gilder, Google Earth, Isaac Newton, iterative process, Jacquard loom, Jacquard loom, John von Neumann, Law of Accelerating Returns, linear programming, Loebner Prize, mandelbrot fractal, Norbert Wiener, optical character recognition, pattern recognition, Peter Thiel, Ralph Waldo Emerson, random walk, Ray Kurzweil, reversible computing, self-driving car, speech recognition, Steven Pinker, strong AI, the scientific method, theory of mind, Turing complete, Turing machine, Turing test, Wall-E, Watson beat the top human players on Jeopardy!, X Prize

We will need detailed data on actual brains to create biologically based simulations. Markram’s team is collecting its own data. There are large-scale projects to gather this type of data and make it generally available to scientists. For example, Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory in New York has collected 500 terabytes of data by scanning a mammal brain (a mouse), which they made available in June 2012. Their project allows a user to explore a brain similarly to the way Google Earth allows one to explore the surface of the planet. You can move around the entire brain and zoom in to see individual neurons and their connections. You can highlight a single connection and then follow its path through the brain. Sixteen sections of the National Institutes of Health have gotten together and sponsored a major initiative called the Human Connectome Project with $38.5 million of funding.7 Led by Washington University in St.


pages: 355 words: 106,952

Visit Sunny Chernobyl: And Other Adventures in the World's Most Polluted Places by Andrew Blackwell

Amazon: amazon.comamazon.co.ukamazon.deamazon.fr

carbon footprint, clean water, Google Earth, gravity well, oil rush, oil shale / tar sands, place-making, ride hailing / ride sharing, sensible shoes, Silicon Valley, special economic zone, the scientific method, young professional

More than you see in your own back alley. Every minute on the water, every thirty seconds, a bottle, a bucket, a piece of tarp, a sprinkle of confetti, multiplied by the countless square mileage of the Gyre. And yet if you looked across the surface of the ocean, it was unremarkable. Would-be debunkers need not resort to pointing out, as they do, that you can’t find an image of the Garbage Patch on Google Earth. They should point out that you can’t find images of the Garbage Patch anywhere. This is because it isn’t a visual problem, and this conflict between the reality of the problem and its nonvisual nature is at the root of the plastic island misconception. A metaphor is needed, a compelling image to suggest the scale and mass of the problem. So let us explode the plastic island once and for all, and call it a galaxy.


pages: 342 words: 94,762

Wait: The Art and Science of Delay by Frank Partnoy

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algorithmic trading, Atul Gawande, Bernie Madoff, Black Swan, blood diamonds, Cass Sunstein, Checklist Manifesto, cognitive bias, collapse of Lehman Brothers, collateralized debt obligation, corporate governance, Daniel Kahneman / Amos Tversky, delayed gratification, Flash crash, Frederick Winslow Taylor, George Akerlof, Google Earth, Hernando de Soto, High speed trading, impulse control, income inequality, Isaac Newton, Long Term Capital Management, Menlo Park, mental accounting, meta analysis, meta-analysis, Nick Leeson, paper trading, Paul Graham, payday loans, Ralph Nader, Richard Thaler, risk tolerance, Robert Shiller, Robert Shiller, Ronald Reagan, Saturday Night Live, six sigma, Spread Networks laid a new fibre optics cable between New York and Chicago, statistical model, Steve Jobs, The Market for Lemons, the scientific method, The Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith, upwardly mobile, Walter Mischel

Experts like Steven Johnson worry that companies today are giving up long-term innovation to get short-term efficiency. Even companies with innovative cultures are restricting the freedom they once gave employees. Google had one-upped Minnesota Mining’s 15 percent free time policy with its own 20 percent “innovation time off” program, which was the source of as many as half of its newly launched products in a given year, including Gmail, Google News, and Google Earth.29 But in late 2011 Google abandoned that program (though it continues to fund new ideas through a cutting-edge research arm). Other companies, such as Hewlett-Packard, have imposed limits on their free time policies. Johnson says, “Part of the secret to having great ideas lies in creating a working environment where those fragments are nurtured and sustained over time. This obviously poses some difficulty in modern work environments, with deadlines and quarterly reports and annual job reviews.”30 Not many CEOs appreciate learning that an employee has a hunch about a product that will not generate profits, if at all, for more than a decade.


pages: 304 words: 88,773

The Ghost Map: A Street, an Epidemic and the Hidden Power of Urban Networks. by Steven Johnson

Amazon: amazon.comamazon.co.ukamazon.deamazon.fr

call centre, clean water, correlation does not imply causation, Dean Kamen, double helix, edge city, germ theory of disease, Google Earth, Jane Jacobs, John Nash: game theory, John Snow's cholera map, lone genius, Louis Pasteur, megacity, mutually assured destruction, New Urbanism, nuclear winter, pattern recognition, peak oil, side project, Steven Pinker, Stewart Brand, The Death and Life of Great American Cities, the scientific method, trade route, unbiased observer, working poor

The bird’s-eye view remains as essential as it was back in 1854. When the next great epidemic does come, maps will be as crucial as vaccines in our fight against the disease. But again, the scale of the observation will have broadened considerably: from a neighborhood to an entire planet. The influence of the Broad Street maps extends beyond the realm of disease. The Web is teeming with new forms of amateur cartography, thanks to services like Google Earth and Yahoo! Maps. Where Snow inscribed the location of pumps and cholera fatalities over the street grid, today’s mapmakers record a different kind of data: good public schools, Chinese takeout places, playgrounds, gay-friendly bars, open houses. All the local knowledge that so often remains trapped in the minds of neighborhood residents can now be translated into map form and shared with the rest of the world.


pages: 402 words: 98,760

Deep Sea and Foreign Going by Rose George

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Admiral Zheng, air freight, Albert Einstein, bank run, cable laying ship, Captain Sullenberger Hudson, Costa Concordia, Edward Lloyd's coffeehouse, Exxon Valdez, failed state, Filipino sailors, global supply chain, Google Earth, intermodal, London Whale, Malacca Straits, Panamax, pattern recognition, profit maximization, Skype, trade route, UNCLOS, UNCLOS, urban planning

When pirates came shopping as usual for khat, they were turned away. Other villages and towns in Somalia have also banished pirates. But still pirates have no difficulty finding refuge. Perhaps they are good for business. Dr Anja Shortland of Brunel University wanted to answer this question by measuring normal economic indicators, but on the ground, research in Somalia is difficult. Instead, she used Google Earth, studying satellite images of areas where pirates were known to operate. She was looking for evidence of construction and electricity as indicators of prosperity and progress. Shortland compared images from 2005 to those from 2009. None of the notorious pirate towns – Eyl, Hobyo – had enough light to show up, then or now. They had the darkness of unelectrified poor places. Then Shortland looked at walls.


pages: 380 words: 104,841

The Human Age: The World Shaped by Us by Diane Ackerman

Amazon: amazon.comamazon.co.ukamazon.deamazon.fr

23andMe, 3D printing, additive manufacturing, airport security, Albert Einstein, augmented reality, back-to-the-land, carbon footprint, clean water, dark matter, dematerialisation, double helix, Drosophila, epigenetics, Google Earth, Google Glasses, haute cuisine, Internet of things, Loebner Prize, Louis Pasteur, Masdar, megacity, microbiome, nuclear winter, personalized medicine, phenotype, Ray Kurzweil, refrigerator car, Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence, SETI@home, skunkworks, Skype, stem cell, Stewart Brand, the High Line, theory of mind, urban planning, urban renewal, Whole Earth Catalog

Darting around the world to view postage-stamp-size versions of wild animals that are oblivious to the video camera is the ultimate cinema verité, and an odd shrinking and flattening of the animals, all of whom seem smaller than you. Yet I rely on virtual nature to observe animals I may never see in the wild. When I do, abracadabra, a computer mouse becomes a magic wand and there is an orphan wombat being fed by wildlife rescuers in Australia. Or from 308 photos of cattle posted on Google Earth I learn that herds tend to face either north or south, regardless of weather conditions, probably because they’re able to perceive magnetic fields, which helps them navigate, however short the distance. Virtual nature offers views and insights that might otherwise escape us. It also helps to satisfy a longing so essential to our well-being that we feel compelled to tune in, and we find it hypnotic.


pages: 330 words: 88,445

The Rise of Superman: Decoding the Science of Ultimate Human Performance by Steven Kotler

Amazon: amazon.comamazon.co.ukamazon.deamazon.fr

Albert Einstein, Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic, Clayton Christensen, data acquisition, delayed gratification, deliberate practice, fear of failure, Google Earth, haute couture, impulse control, Isaac Newton, Jeff Bezos, jimmy wales, Kevin Kelly, Lao Tzu, life extension, Maui Hawaii, pattern recognition, Ray Kurzweil, risk tolerance, rolodex, Silicon Valley, Steve Jobs, Walter Mischel, X Prize

And for those of us who want to take advantage of this fact, yet have no interest in action and adventure sports? Simple: Seek out complexity, especially in nature. Go stare at the night sky. Walk in the woods. If you can’t find big nature, contemplate the small. The reasons there are so many clichés about universes inside of dewdrops is because there are universes inside of dewdrops. No dew to contemplate? Use technology to induce awe: surf your city with Google Earth or go see an IMAX movie. Next, up novelty and unpredictability. Normally, we go out of our way to avoid both. We rely on old habits, we cherish our routines. And why not? Automatic pilot is efficient. Routines save the brain energy and who hasn’t driven to work without remembering the trip? Yet vary the route next time. Brush your teeth with the wrong hand. These against-the-grain tricks increase novelty and unpredictability, demanding focus and pattern recognition, and both are the real goal.


pages: 296 words: 86,610

The Bitcoin Guidebook: How to Obtain, Invest, and Spend the World's First Decentralized Cryptocurrency by Ian Demartino

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3D printing, AltaVista, altcoin, bitcoin, blockchain, buy low sell high, capital controls, cloud computing, corporate governance, crowdsourcing, cryptocurrency, distributed ledger, Edward Snowden, Elon Musk, ethereum blockchain, fiat currency, Firefox, forensic accounting, global village, GnuPG, Google Earth, Haight Ashbury, Jacob Appelbaum, Kevin Kelly, Kickstarter, litecoin, M-Pesa, Marshall McLuhan, Oculus Rift, peer-to-peer lending, Ponzi scheme, prediction markets, ransomware, Satoshi Nakamoto, self-driving car, Skype, smart contracts, Steven Levy, the medium is the message, underbanked, WikiLeaks, Zimmermann PGP

Two years seems like an almost unfathomable amount of time for the people entrenched in it. I preach a bit more patience but the point remains: a lot will be determined by then. Predicting anything is tough with a new technology, because the changes are amplified drastically when the in-hindsight obvious uses are in place. Imagine trying to predict AltaVista, Geocities, and ICQ before web browsers existed, then imagine trying to predict Facebook, Reddit, and Google Earth in 2000 when AltaVista, Geocities, and ICQ were still Internet mainstays. Given that I will likely be wrong at least as often as I am right, what kind of services do I see evolving in a cryptocurrency wonderland? Amazing ones. Altcoins are currently plagued by speculative investing. This drives everything in the space. If the price goes down, the community demands that the developers announce something.


pages: 433 words: 106,048

The End of Illness by David B. Agus M. D.

Amazon: amazon.comamazon.co.ukamazon.deamazon.fr

Danny Hillis, discovery of penicillin, double helix, epigenetics, germ theory of disease, Google Earth, impulse control, information retrieval, meta analysis, meta-analysis, microbiome, Murray Gell-Mann, pattern recognition, personalized medicine, randomized controlled trial, risk tolerance, Steve Jobs, the scientific method

., the dots and flecks) are, but we can identify many thousands of them as known proteins, and we now have genes associated with them. Often that means we know something about their function, such as a protein that aids in the metabolism of caffeine, or where the proteins are created in the body (e.g., the stomach), and so on. A good analogy to use in understanding the power of this technology is to think of Google Earth on steroids. We can zoom in on a single dot, identify that dot as a protein found in cold-water fish, and infer that the person could have eaten salmon or halibut for lunch. Of course, we would want to make more useful and insightful conclusions, such as whether a certain protein points to something abnormal going on in the body, or a strange pattern of proteins that forecasts disease. And that’s exactly what this technology promises to achieve as our understanding of proteins—and our library of knowledge in the database—grows bigger.


pages: 473 words: 154,182

Moby-Duck: The True Story of 28,800 Bath Toys Lost at Sea and of the Beachcombers, Oceanographers, Environmentalists, and Fools, Including the Author, Who Went in Search of Them by Donovan Hohn

Amazon: amazon.comamazon.co.ukamazon.deamazon.fr

carbon footprint, clean water, collective bargaining, dark matter, Deng Xiaoping, Exxon Valdez, Filipino sailors, Google Earth, illegal immigration, indoor plumbing, intermodal, Isaac Newton, means of production, microbiome, Panamax, post-Panamax, profit motive, Skype, statistical model, Thorstein Veblen, traveling salesman

The Coast Pilot is the navigator’s most trusted guide to America’s territorial waters, which radiate from the land like a blue nimbus two hundred miles thick. Anyone worried that the Image has vanquished the Word can seek solace in its pages. All nine volumes are marvelous documents, each paragraph distilling centuries of firsthand observations made by both sailors and scientists. They are like literary atlases, those nine volumes, literary Google Earths, translating the great big mysterious world into detailed descriptive prose. In addition to harbors and landings and facilities and interesting geographic features, the Coast Pilot alerts mariners to assorted perils of the sea, and if Chris Pallister or I had brought along volume 9, and if we’d turned to chapter 4, page 197, we would have come upon a note warning us about the perilous “tide rips with steep, short choppy seas . . . 3 to 5 miles S of Gore Point.”


pages: 549 words: 116,200

With a Little Help by Cory Doctorow

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autonomous vehicles, big-box store, Burning Man, call centre, carbon footprint, death of newspapers, don't be evil, game design, Google Earth, high net worth, margin call, offshore financial centre, packet switching, Ponzi scheme, rolodex, Sand Hill Road, sensible shoes, skunkworks, Skype, traffic fines, traveling salesman, Turing test, urban planning, Y2K

"We're giving you a couple of days off," he said. 758 Greg felt a cold premonition that sank all the way to his balls. "Why?" Had he done something wrong? Was he going to jail? 759 "It's Maya." The man turned him around, met his eyes with his bottomless basset-hound gaze. "It's Maya. Killed herself. In Guatemala. I'm sorry, Greg." 760 Greg seemed to hurtle away from himself, to a place miles above, a Google Earth view of the Googleplex, looking down on himself and the rumpled man as a pair of dots, two pixels, tiny and insignificant. He willed himself to tear at his hair, to drop to his knees and weep. 761 From a long way away, he heard himself say, "I don't need any time off. I'm OK." 762 From a long way away, he heard the rumpled man insist. 763 But one-pixel Greg wouldn't be turned aside. The argument persisted for a long time, and then the two pixels moved into Building 49 and the door swung shut behind them. -- 764 Afterword: 765 This one came as a commission from Radar magazine -- now defunct, a casualty of the 2008 crash, but in 2007, this was the most widely circulated "lifestyle" magazine in the US.


pages: 421 words: 120,332

The World in 2050: Four Forces Shaping Civilization's Northern Future by Laurence C. Smith

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Bretton Woods, BRICs, clean water, Climategate, colonial rule, deglobalization, demographic transition, Deng Xiaoping, energy security, flex fuel, global supply chain, Google Earth, guest worker program, Hans Island, hydrogen economy, ice-free Arctic, informal economy, invention of agriculture, invisible hand, land tenure, Martin Wolf, megacity, Mikhail Gorbachev, New Urbanism, oil shale / tar sands, oil shock, peak oil, purchasing power parity, Ronald Reagan, Ronald Reagan: Tear down this wall, side project, Silicon Valley, smart grid, sovereign wealth fund, special economic zone, The Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith, Thomas Malthus, trade liberalization, trade route, UNCLOS, UNCLOS, urban planning, Washington Consensus, Y2K

Since then, we have been pumping seven trillion gallons of cold, clear water out of the Ogallala Aquifer to irrigate circular center-pivot fields of wheat, cotton, corn, and sorghum across the Great Plains. This soon transformed over one hundred million acres of highly marginal land—much of it abandoned after the 1937 Dust Bowl—into one of the world’s most productive agricultural regions. From your airplane window or a Web-browser view from Google Earth, you can see for yourself the green circles stamped out across the Texas and Oklahoma panhandles through eastern Colorado, New Mexico, and Wyoming; and running north through Kansas and Nebraska all the way to southern South Dakota. Those verdant, neatly aligned disks are the telltale fingerprints of the Ogallala Aquifer. Zoom in with your Web browser and you’ll see many of the disks are brown.


pages: 320 words: 87,853

The Black Box Society: The Secret Algorithms That Control Money and Information by Frank Pasquale

Amazon: amazon.comamazon.co.ukamazon.deamazon.fr

Affordable Care Act / Obamacare, algorithmic trading, Amazon Mechanical Turk, asset-backed security, Atul Gawande, bank run, barriers to entry, Berlin Wall, Bernie Madoff, Black Swan, bonus culture, Brian Krebs, call centre, Capital in the Twenty-First Century by Thomas Piketty, Chelsea Manning, cloud computing, collateralized debt obligation, corporate governance, Credit Default Swap, credit default swaps / collateralized debt obligations, crowdsourcing, cryptocurrency, Debian, don't be evil, Edward Snowden, en.wikipedia.org, Fall of the Berlin Wall, Filter Bubble, financial innovation, Flash crash, full employment, Goldman Sachs: Vampire Squid, Google Earth, Hernando de Soto, High speed trading, hiring and firing, housing crisis, informal economy, information retrieval, interest rate swap, Internet of things, invisible hand, Jaron Lanier, Jeff Bezos, job automation, Julian Assange, Kevin Kelly, knowledge worker, Kodak vs Instagram, kremlinology, late fees, London Interbank Offered Rate, London Whale, Mark Zuckerberg, mobile money, moral hazard, new economy, Nicholas Carr, offshore financial centre, PageRank, pattern recognition, precariat, profit maximization, profit motive, quantitative easing, race to the bottom, recommendation engine, regulatory arbitrage, risk-adjusted returns, search engine result page, shareholder value, Silicon Valley, Snapchat, Spread Networks laid a new fibre optics cable between New York and Chicago, statistical arbitrage, statistical model, Steven Levy, the scientific method, too big to fail, transaction costs, two-sided market, universal basic income, Upton Sinclair, value at risk, WikiLeaks

The Center for Investigative Reporting notes that “since so many states are unlikely to be struck by terrorists, fusion centers have had to expand their intelligence mission to cover all crimes and potential hazards, partly to convince local legislators they’re worth financing with taxpayer money into the future.”160 Pork-barrel politics trumps sensible security policy. When the Alabama Department of Homeland Security started working on a Virtual Alabama database collaboration with Google Earth, for example, local police departments weren’t very supportive.161 Surveillance researcher Torin Monahan says that the problem was solved when “DHS promised to include a GIS [geospatial information system] overlay for all registered sex offenders in the state, showing exactly where each of them are supposed to be residing.”162 What began as a national homeland security project expanded into state law enforcement.


pages: 432 words: 124,635

Happy City: Transforming Our Lives Through Urban Design by Charles Montgomery

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2013 Report for America's Infrastructure - American Society of Civil Engineers - 19 March 2013, agricultural Revolution, American Society of Civil Engineers: Report Card, Bernie Madoff, British Empire, Buckminster Fuller, car-free, carbon footprint, centre right, City Beautiful movement, clean water, congestion charging, correlation does not imply causation, East Village, edge city, energy security, Enrique Peñalosa, experimental subject, Frank Gehry, Google Earth, happiness index / gross national happiness, Home mortgage interest deduction, housing crisis, income inequality, income per capita, invisible hand, Jane Jacobs, license plate recognition, McMansion, means of production, megacity, Menlo Park, meta analysis, meta-analysis, mortgage tax deduction, New Urbanism, peak oil, Ponzi scheme, rent control, ride hailing / ride sharing, risk tolerance, science of happiness, Seaside, Florida, Silicon Valley, the built environment, The Death and Life of Great American Cities, the High Line, The Spirit Level, The Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith, trade route, transit-oriented development, upwardly mobile, urban planning, urban sprawl, wage slave, white flight, World Values Survey, Zipcar

The architecture firm partly responsible for the High Line, Diller Scofidio + Renfro, demonstrated this again a few dozen blocks north, in their renovation of Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts, where they created a green hillside by adding a new restaurant building to the Lincoln campus. A sloping, off-kilter roof (hyperbolic paraboloid is the technical name for the form) planted with green grass rears up from the plaza, inviting passersby to collapse on its vertical meadow. Zoom in on Google Earth, and you’ll see students from the nearby Juilliard School splayed messily across the lawn. New research takes the proximity argument further. Extreme intimacy—not just looking at nature, but actually touching or working with plants and dirt—is good for us in ways we never imagined. Biologists have found that the bacteria found naturally in soil boosts seratonin and reduces anxiety in lab mice, and they suspect that it has the same effect when breathed in or ingested by humans.


pages: 492 words: 153,565

Countdown to Zero Day: Stuxnet and the Launch of the World's First Digital Weapon by Kim Zetter

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Ayatollah Khomeini, Brian Krebs, crowdsourcing, data acquisition, Doomsday Clock, Edward Snowden, facts on the ground, Firefox, friendly fire, Google Earth, information retrieval, Julian Assange, Loma Prieta earthquake, Maui Hawaii, pre–internet, RAND corporation, Silicon Valley, skunkworks, smart grid, smart meter, South China Sea, Stuxnet, uranium enrichment, Vladimir Vetrov: Farewell Dossier, WikiLeaks, Y2K, zero day

About two months after the press conference, armed with the details from Jafarzadeh and extensive additional research, Hinderstein logged into their account at Digital Globe, one of two commercial providers of satellite images in the United States, to scour the archive for available images.8 Today, satellites have imaged nearly every part of the Earth, with most pictures available to anyone via Google Earth. But in 2002, the only way to find images in Digital Globe’s archive was if someone had already commissioned the company to photograph a site, or if Digital Globe had taken images of a location on its own initiative, such as Niagara Falls or the Grand Canyon—images the company knew would sell well. To commission an image that wasn’t in the archive cost about $10,000, but once an image existed, it became available for others to purchase at one-third the price.


pages: 366 words: 123,151

The Routes of Man: How Roads Are Changing the World and the Way We Live Today by Ted Conover

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airport security, Atahualpa, carbon footprint, Deng Xiaoping, East Village, financial independence, Google Earth, megacity, mutually assured destruction, New Urbanism, nuclear winter, Ronald Reagan, transatlantic slave trade, transatlantic slave trade, urban planning, urban renewal

“They’re selling poison, rat poison,” she explained between hoots of laughter. “Those dead rats just show it works. It’s advertising.” After my interview with the chief, in the same taxi back to Bill’s, we found ourselves in the same kind of jam. This time my way of coping, as the sides of trucks and buses replaced the view of shanties and billboards, was to imagine an aerial perspective of the mess, à la Google Earth. From above, I could see that the battle for the median strip was in a way a version of the volume control engineered in places like New York’s Tappan Zee Bridge. On the Tappan Zee, custom vehicles known as “zipper machines” move a line of concrete dividers from one side of the roadway to the other depending on which direction has the heaviest traffic; similar systems are in place in Honolulu, Dallas, Philadelphia, San Francisco (though the dividers on the Golden Gate Bridge are plastic, not concrete), Ontario, and Auckland, New Zealand.


pages: 587 words: 117,894

Cybersecurity: What Everyone Needs to Know by P. W. Singer, Allan Friedman

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4chan, A Declaration of the Independence of Cyberspace, Apple's 1984 Super Bowl advert, barriers to entry, Berlin Wall, bitcoin, blood diamonds, borderless world, Brian Krebs, business continuity plan, Chelsea Manning, cloud computing, crowdsourcing, cuban missile crisis, data acquisition, Edward Snowden, energy security, failed state, Fall of the Berlin Wall, fault tolerance, global supply chain, Google Earth, Internet of things, invention of the telegraph, Julian Assange, Khan Academy, M-Pesa, mutually assured destruction, Network effects, packet switching, Peace of Westphalia, pre–internet, profit motive, RAND corporation, ransomware, RFC: Request For Comment, risk tolerance, rolodex, Silicon Valley, Skype, smart grid, Steve Jobs, Stuxnet, uranium enrichment, We are Anonymous. We are Legion, web application, WikiLeaks, zero day

The transfer of knowledge is not just about the “how” of a terror attack, but also the “who” and the “where” on the targeting side. Groups use cyberspace as a low-cost, low-risk venue to gather intelligence in ways they could only dream about a generation ago. For example, no terrorist group has the financial resources to afford a spy satellite to scope out targets with pinpoint precision, let alone the capability to build and launch one into space. Yet Google Earth worked just as effectively for Lashkar-e-Taiba, a Pakistan-based terror group, when it was planning the 2008 Mumbai attacks. As in other areas of cybersecurity, we have to be aware of our own habits and uses of the Internet and how such bad actors might take advantage. In 2007, US soldiers took smartphone photos of a group of new US Army helicopters parked at a base in Iraq and then uploaded them to the Internet.


pages: 422 words: 131,666

Life Inc.: How the World Became a Corporation and How to Take It Back by Douglas Rushkoff

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affirmative action, Amazon Mechanical Turk, banks create money, big-box store, Bretton Woods, car-free, colonial exploitation, Community Supported Agriculture, complexity theory, computer age, corporate governance, credit crunch, currency manipulation / currency intervention, David Ricardo: comparative advantage, death of newspapers, don't be evil, Donald Trump, double entry bookkeeping, easy for humans, difficult for computers, financial innovation, Firefox, full employment, global village, Google Earth, greed is good, Howard Rheingold, income per capita, invention of the printing press, invisible hand, Jane Jacobs, John Nash: game theory, joint-stock company, Kevin Kelly, laissez-faire capitalism, loss aversion, market bubble, market design, Marshall McLuhan, Milgram experiment, moral hazard, mutually assured destruction, Naomi Klein, new economy, New Urbanism, Norbert Wiener, peak oil, place-making, placebo effect, Ponzi scheme, price mechanism, price stability, principal–agent problem, private military company, profit maximization, profit motive, race to the bottom, RAND corporation, rent-seeking, RFID, road to serfdom, Ronald Reagan, short selling, Silicon Valley, Simon Kuznets, social software, Steve Jobs, Telecommunications Act of 1996, telemarketer, The Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith, Thomas L Friedman, too big to fail, trade route, trickle-down economics, union organizing, urban decay, urban planning, urban renewal, Vannevar Bush, Victor Gruen, white flight, working poor, Works Progress Administration, Y2K, young professional

The monarchy’s slow but eventually wholehearted acceptance of cause-and-effect logic and scientific observation might have been great for curbing magical thinking and superstitious activity, but it could just as easily be abused to categorize foreign peoples the way a biologist might categorize any “inferior” species, and foreign places as wilds to conquer. Royals went map crazy. Cartography was as much the rage in the Renaissance as MapQuest and Google Earth are today. Nearly every ship had a cartographer aboard to map new regions of the world and, of course, label them as belonging to whichever kingdom had chartered the voyage. Mapping a territory meant documenting one’s control of it—whatever the reality might have been on the ground. Eventually, the mapmaking fetish turned inward as well, as monarchs attempted to map the entirety of Europe and determine who owned exactly what.


pages: 795 words: 212,447

Dead or Alive by Tom Clancy, Grant (CON) Blackwood

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affirmative action, air freight, airport security, Bay Area Rapid Transit, Benoit Mandelbrot, defense in depth, failed state, friendly fire, Google Earth, Panamax, post-Panamax, Skype, uranium enrichment, urban sprawl

Otherwise confidential information such as arrest reports and investigatory case files were stored in unsecured servers without so much as a firewall or password between them and government website portals. And such was the case with Libya. Within four hours of getting the go-ahead from Hendley, Jack and Gavin had PLOWSHARE chewing on gigabytes of data from both open-source and government databases. Two hours after that, PLOWSHARE regurgitated the information onto Gavin’s hacked copy of Google Earth Pro. Jack called Hendley, Granger, Rounds, and the Caruso brothers into the dimmed conference room. The PLOWSHARE-ENHANCED satellite view of tripoli was overlaid with crisscrossing multicolored lines, clusters, and squares. Jack stood by the LCD screen with remote in hand; Biery sat in the back against the wall, his laptop open on his legs. “Looks like a Jackson Pollock painting,” Brian observed.

HBase: The Definitive Guide by Lars George

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Amazon Web Services, bioinformatics, create, read, update, delete, Debian, distributed revision control, domain-specific language, en.wikipedia.org, fault tolerance, Firefox, Google Earth, place-making, revision control, smart grid, web application

The actual Bigtable has been in production at Google since at least 2005, and it has been in use for a variety of different use cases, from batch-oriented processing to real-time data-serving. The stored data varies from very small (like URLs) to quite large (e.g., web pages and satellite imagery) and yet successfully provides a flexible, high-performance solution for many well-known Google products, such as Google Earth, Google Reader, Google Finance, and Google Analytics. * * * [22] You will see in Column Families that the qualifier also may be left unset. [23] Although HBase does not support online region merging, there are tools to do this offline. See Merging Regions. [24] For more information on Apache ZooKeeper, please refer to the official project website. HBase: The Hadoop Database Having looked at the Bigtable architecture, we could simply state that HBase is a faithful, open source implementation of Google’s Bigtable.


pages: 1,088 words: 228,743

Expected Returns: An Investor's Guide to Harvesting Market Rewards by Antti Ilmanen

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Andrei Shleifer, asset allocation, asset-backed security, availability heuristic, backtesting, balance sheet recession, bank run, banking crisis, barriers to entry, Bernie Madoff, Black Swan, Bretton Woods, buy low sell high, capital asset pricing model, capital controls, Carmen Reinhart, central bank independence, collateralized debt obligation, commodity trading advisor, corporate governance, credit crunch, Credit Default Swap, credit default swaps / collateralized debt obligations, debt deflation, deglobalization, delta neutral, demand response, discounted cash flows, disintermediation, diversification, diversified portfolio, dividend-yielding stocks, equity premium, Eugene Fama: efficient market hypothesis, fiat currency, financial deregulation, financial innovation, financial intermediation, fixed income, Flash crash, framing effect, frictionless, frictionless market, George Akerlof, global reserve currency, Google Earth, high net worth, hindsight bias, Hyman Minsky, implied volatility, income inequality, incomplete markets, index fund, inflation targeting, interest rate swap, invisible hand, Kenneth Rogoff, laissez-faire capitalism, law of one price, Long Term Capital Management, loss aversion, margin call, market bubble, market clearing, market friction, market fundamentalism, market microstructure, mental accounting, merger arbitrage, mittelstand, moral hazard, New Journalism, oil shock, p-value, passive investing, performance metric, Ponzi scheme, prediction markets, price anchoring, price stability, principal–agent problem, private sector deleveraging, purchasing power parity, quantitative easing, quantitative trading / quantitative finance, random walk, reserve currency, Richard Thaler, risk tolerance, risk-adjusted returns, risk/return, riskless arbitrage, Robert Shiller, Robert Shiller, savings glut, Sharpe ratio, short selling, sovereign wealth fund, statistical arbitrage, statistical model, stochastic volatility, systematic trading, The Great Moderation, The Myth of the Rational Market, too big to fail, transaction costs, tulip mania, value at risk, volatility arbitrage, volatility smile, working-age population, Y2K, yield curve, zero-coupon bond

To me, ’tis mighty clear This wonder of an elephant Is very like a spear.” How can investors deal with the complexity of multiple inputs and perspectives, let alone with the even more bewildering assortment of novel investment products on offer? This book provides a map to investors, giving a bird’s eye view over a rugged terrain and occasionally zooming in to interesting locations (12 case studies), not unlike Google Earth™. I hope my two visual aids—the elephant and the cube—will help readers keep the forest in sight among the many trees along the way. Next, Sections 1.1–1.4 give an overview on the four perspectives on “feeling the elephant” (i.e., on considerations for judging expected returns). These themes will be expanded on through the book. 1.1 HISTORICAL PERFORMANCE Historical average returns are a common starting point for judging expected returns.


pages: 641 words: 182,927

In Pursuit of Privilege: A History of New York City's Upper Class and the Making of a Metropolis by Clifton Hood

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affirmative action, British Empire, David Brooks, death of newspapers, deindustrialization, family office, Golden Gate Park, Google Earth, jitney, new economy, New Urbanism, Plutocrats, plutocrats, Ray Oldenburg, ride hailing / ride sharing, Scientific racism, Steven Levy, The Great Good Place, Thorstein Veblen, trade route, urban planning, We are the 99%, white flight

., December 19, 2012; Author’s visits and photographs of houses on Onondaga Street and Ridge Street, Rye, N.Y., December 19, 2012; G. M. Hopkins Company, Atlas of Westchester County, New York, vol. 1 (Philadelphia: Hopkins, 1929), sheet 36; Sanborn Map Company, Insurance Maps of Scarsdale, NY (New York: Sanborn Map, 1921), sheets 100 and 108; Digital Sanborn Maps, 1867–1970, Summit, N.J., July 1929–January 1950, sheet 37, accessed October 21, 2012, http://sanborn.umi.com/nj/5634; and Google Earth views of sites on Onondaga Street, Ridge Street, and Evergreen Avenue, Rye, N.Y., and Morris Lane, Scarsdale, N.Y., June 28, 2013. 122. Margaret Culkin Banning, Country Club People (New York: Doran, 1923), 9, 56. 123. New York Times, March 10, 1929, August 7, 1931, August 12, 1932, June 20, 1935, May 18, 1936, May 3, July 21, and December 18, 1941, July 22 and 31, 1946, July 11, 1948; Rye Chronicle, December 29, 1944, January 5 and 13, 1945; Radcliffe, Simply Barbara Bush, 89–92; Herbert S.

Atlas Obscura: An Explorer's Guide to the World's Hidden Wonders by Joshua Foer, Dylan Thuras, Ella Morton

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anti-communist, Berlin Wall, British Empire, Buckminster Fuller, centre right, colonial rule, Colonization of Mars, cosmic microwave background, cuban missile crisis, dark matter, double helix, East Village, Exxon Valdez, Fall of the Berlin Wall, Frank Gehry, germ theory of disease, Golden Gate Park, Google Earth, Haight Ashbury, horn antenna, Ignaz Semmelweis: hand washing, index card, Jacques de Vaucanson, Kowloon Walled City, Louis Pasteur, Mahatma Gandhi, mutually assured destruction, phenotype, Pluto: dwarf planet, Ronald Reagan, Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence, trade route, transatlantic slave trade, transcontinental railway, Tunguska event, urban sprawl, Vesna Vulović, wikimedia commons, working poor

The Badlands Guardian MEDICINE HAT Gaze out of an airplane window above the Badlands east of Medicine Hat, and a Native American chief will stare back at you. Over millennia, erosion and weathering fashioned the rocky terrain into the shape of a human head, complete with feathered headdress. A gas well and road leading down from the chief’s ear resemble earphones. An Australian woman going by the name of “supergranny” discovered the head on Google Earth in 2006. Following a naming competition, the 820 × 740-foot (250 × 225.5 m) figure came to be known as the Badlands Guardian. (Rejected monikers include Space Face, Chief Bleeding Ear, The Listening Rock, Jolly Rocker, and Pod God.) The Badlands Guardian is an example of pareidolia, the phenomenon of an overactive imagination perceiving recognizable shapes in ambiguous stimuli. Faces, particularly religious ones, are frequently found in inanimate objects—the Virgin Mary has appeared, among other places, in a grilled cheese sandwich, on an expressway underpass, and in a pile of chocolate drippings at a California candy factory.

Southeast Asia on a Shoestring Travel Guide by Lonely Planet

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active transport: walking or cycling, airport security, Alfred Russel Wallace, anti-communist, British Empire, call centre, car-free, carbon footprint, clean water, clockwatching, colonial rule, Google Earth, haute cuisine, indoor plumbing, large denomination, low cost carrier, Mason jar, megacity, Skype, South China Sea, spice trade, superstar cities, sustainable-tourism, trade route, urban sprawl, women in the workforce

Over the generations, descendants from China, Malaysia, Indonesia and India joined their cooking pots into a communal conversation, importing, creating and tweaking dishes from their homelands. Now there’s a wealth of edible options: steaming plates of chilli crab, nasi biryani and char kway teow to name just a few. Rarely is there a dish that is a pure breed but rather each boasts a hybrid ingredient that makes it uniquely Singaporean. AUN KOH / LONELY PLANET IMAGES © Temburong (Brunei) 14 From a low-flying Twin Otter turboprop (or on Google Earth), Brunei’s Temburong District looks like all of Borneo once did: an unbroken carpet of primary rainforest unblemished by roads or logging gashes. On the ground, most of the sultanate’s eastern sliver is off-limits except to scientists, but you can experience the primeval jungle at Ulu Temburong National Park (Click here). The only way in is an exciting longboat ride. Once there you can climb into the jungle canopy and have wild fish nibble your feet in a cool stream.

The larger, western part of the country contains the main towns: Bandar Seri Begawan (BSB); the oil town of Seria; and the commercial town of Kuala Belait. The eastern slice of the country, the hilly, mostly forested Temburong District, is much less developed. Away from the coast, Brunei is mainly jungle, with about 75% of the country still covered by virtually untouched forests. As you can see if you fly over the sultanate (or connect to Google Earth), clear cutting, ‘selective’ logging, road building and palm oil plantations – the most serious threats to Borneo’s incredibly rich ecosystems – stop dead at the sultanate’s borders. Brunei has several forest reserves as well as one national park, the superb Ulu Temburong National Park, a 500-sq-km swathe of protected primary rainforest. SURVIVAL GUIDE Directory A–Z Accommodation Accommodation in Brunei is significantly more expensive than in neighbouring Malaysia, but a handful of excellent budget options make shoestring travel possible.


pages: 1,016 words: 283,960

Aftermath: Following the Bloodshed of America's Wars in the Muslim World by Nir Rosen

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Ayatollah Khomeini, failed state, glass ceiling, Google Earth, unemployed young men, urban sprawl, éminence grise

The Mahdi Army kills mujahideen and lets the Americans arrest them. Christians have been neutral, not with the occupier, so they have been spared. Shiites are not apostates; their leaders are. Clerics have agreed that the Shiite clerics are infidels, the people are deviants. Hizballah is a Shiite apostate party. The Shiites hate Sunnis.” Another time when I visited Abu Ghassan in his home, Abu Anas was there. They were looking at Google Earth on the laptop while listening to a CD of Salafi chanting called Commanders of the Jihad. They showed me another CD, a tribute to Salih Ablawi, known as Abu Jaafar, who had died with Zarqawi in Iraq. He was from Ayn al-Hilweh too, and Abu Ghassan had a collection of his speeches and pictures from Iraq on his laptop. A large picture of Abu Jaafar was on a banner above one of the main streets in the camp.


pages: 1,773 words: 486,685

Global Crisis: War, Climate Change and Catastrophe in the Seventeenth Century by Geoffrey Parker

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agricultural Revolution, British Empire, Climatic Research Unit, colonial rule, currency manipulation / currency intervention, Defenestration of Prague, Edmond Halley, en.wikipedia.org, European colonialism, failed state, Fellow of the Royal Society, financial independence, friendly fire, Google Earth, Isaac Newton, Joseph Schumpeter, Khyber Pass, Mercator projection, moral hazard, mortgage debt, Peace of Westphalia, Peter Thiel, Republic of Letters, South China Sea, the market place, trade route, transatlantic slave trade, transatlantic slave trade, unemployed young men, University of East Anglia, World Values Survey

Above all, each year he prepared a summary of the detailed accounts of public income and expenditure that he had laboriously prepared, and presented it to the king, specially written in a small book by a noted calligrapher and handsomely bound in red leather, so that Louis could carry it around with him at all times.41 Vauban bombarded the king with more ambitious statistics, but unlike Colbert, who almost always stayed at court and acquired most of his information indirectly, Vauban moved around almost ceaselessly to see things for himself, and he often presented his findings to Louis XIV in visual form. Thus after overseeing in person the construction or reconstruction of France's frontier fortresses, Vauban created a scale model of each one so that the king could visualize the defences of his kingdom without leaving his palace – an early form of ‘Google Earth’. By 1700 almost 150 models existed, mostly on the same large scale of 1/600, with miniature walls, churches, houses and trees recreated in wood, silk, paper and sand. During a siege, the daily updates received from his field commanders could be reproduced on the model, allowing the king to micromanage operations via a stream of detailed instructions. It would be hard to find a better example of both the advantages and the perils of ‘seeing like a state’.