haute cuisine

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pages: 401 words: 108,855

Cultureshock Paris by Cultureshock Staff

Anton Chekhov, clean water, haute couture, haute cuisine, Honoré de Balzac, indoor plumbing, Louis Pasteur, money market fund, QWERTY keyboard, Skype, telemarketer, urban renewal, young professional

STUDENTS AND RATP If you will be using the public transportation system regularly for school, investigate Imagine R, the RATP yearly pass for students that allows unlimited use of public transportation within Paris Zones 1 and 2 for a steeply discounted price. THE WORLD CAPITAL OF FOOD CHAPTER 6 ‘Eating in France is a ritual that can reach religious proportions.’ —David Applefield 186 CultureShock! Paris FRENCH CUISINE Parisians love their restaurants. They love to eat in this capital of haute cuisine, and when they’re not eating, they’re talking about where to eat next. While Paris itself is not known for a particular cuisine, the city has, luckily, taken to its heart all the finest regional cuisines of France; what is served in the finest restaurants is called haute cuisine or cuisine bourgeoise. Exploring the restaurants in Paris, each with its own approach to flavours and textures, will give you the unparalleled opportunity to participate in what is considered one of the world’s great art forms. With some 10,000 eating establishments in Paris, ranging from casual cafés to worldrenowned restaurants, dining within your budget is possible.

Paris were settled into faceless residential suburbs. Fifty years later, these suburbs are openly seething with unrest. Nonetheless, city life after the war began to shine. Intellectuals once again rose to the forefront—Jean-Paul Sartre, Simone de Beauvoir and Albert Camus frequented the cafés on the Left Bank, foreign writers again found Paris as their muse and the film industry gained prominence worldwide. Haute cuisine and haute couture rose to their greatest heights and Paris became a tourist Mecca once again. Not even the explosive student unrest of 1968 could dent the reputation of Paris; today Paris is the most visited city in the world. Indeed, over the next several decades of the Fifth Republic (1958– ), under presidents from both the Right and the Left, Paris continued to build, restore and modernise.

The old mansions are now occupied by embassies and offices, and the Palais de l’Elysée is the official residence of the president of France. Few of the old gems of apartments still exist, so when the corporate types go home for the evening, the side streets are left empty and dull. Contributing both to the commercialisation and elegance of this eastern edge is the Golden Triangle of the haute couture salons of famous French and international designers, high-class shops of other sorts and some of Paris’ finest purveyors of haute cuisine. Nonetheless, people live here and live very well. Around Place François-1er, tucked quietly toward the Seine and farther west at avenue George-V, graceful buildings house a privileged few—primarily older, wealthy Parisians. The apartments are large and comfortable, but rarely available. These areas are fairly quiet, with high-class traiteurs and a few services catering to the rather sedate population.


Lonely Planet Pocket Bruges & Brussels by Lonely Planet, Helena Smith

glass ceiling, haute cuisine, non-fiction novel, Skype

(Click here) In ’t Nieuwe Museum Back street joint serving eel, steaks and casseroles. (Click here) Christophe Flemish fare, including many varieties of steak. (Click here) Restobières Belgian-beer-themed food. (Click here) Best for Haute Cuisine, Brussels Café-Restaurant de l’Ogenblik Delightful old-town bistro. (Click here) La Maison du Cygne Fine dining on the Grand Place. (Click here) Stirwen Posh eating in the EU district. (Click here) Sea Grill The town’s best seafood in a fancy hotel restaurant. (Click here) L’Atelier Européen Secluded and smart restaurant for the Euro set. (Click here) Best for Haute Cuisine, Bruges De Karmeliet Complex and elegant food in a Michelin-starred restaurant. (Click here) Den Gouden Harynck Swish and sophisticated, in a gorgeous old building. (Click here) Best Ethnic Restaurants, Brussels Kokob Ethopian food served in a welcoming atmosphere.

The cobblestones were laid in the 12th century, when it was used as a market­place; the names of the surrounding lanes still evoke herbs, cheese and poultry. In the 1960s these lanes were threatened with demolition, prompting proprietors to establish the ‘free commune’ of Ilôt Sacré. Top Sights Grand Place (Click here) Centre Belge de la Bande ­Dessinée (Click here) Best of Brussels Best for Haute Cuisine Café-Restaurant de l'Ogenblik (Click here) La Maison du Cygne (Click here) Sea Grill (Click here) Best Live Music Bars Le Cercle des Voyageurs (Click here) Le Fonograf (Click here) Music Village (Click here) Art Base (Click here) Best Cinemas Actor’s Studio (Click here) Cinéma Galeries (Click here) Getting There This central area is easily accessed via metro stations De Brouckère, Gare Centrale and Rogier, and premetro station Bourse.

But there are plenty of sights to entice visitors, notably the museums grouped around leafy Parc du Cinquantenaire. Some fine early 20th-century houses fringe Place Marie-­Louise and – of course – this is the heart of European politics, whether you see that as an enticement or an obstacle. Top Sights Parc du Cinquantenaire (Click here) Musées Royaux d’Art et d’Histoire (Click here) Best of Brussels Best for Haute Cuisine Stirwen (Click here) L’Atelier Européen (Click here) Best Green Spaces Parc du Cinquantenaire (Click here) Parc Léopold (Click here) Getting There The metro is the best option to reach this area. The closest stop for the museums is Mérode , while to explore the EU sights head to Schuman . For Sq Marie-Louise get off at Maelbeek . The Sights in a Day Have a stroll round Parc Léopold, and, if you’re interested in EU politics, drop into the EU Parliament (Click here) for their 10am tour.


Pocket Bruges & Brussels Travel Guide by Lonely Planet

glass ceiling, haute cuisine, Skype

Best for Belgian Food, Bruges Den Dyjver Excellent food cooked in Belgian beer. In ’t Nieuwe Museum Back-street joint serving eel, steaks and casseroles. Christophe Flemish fare, including many variations of steak. Restobières Belgian-beer-themed food. Best for Haute Cuisine, Brussels L'Ogenblik Delightful old-town bistro. La Maison du Cygne Fine dining on the Grand Place. Stirwen Posh eating in the EU district. Sea Grill The town's best seafood in a fancy hotel restaurant. L'Atelier Européen Secluded and smart restaurant for the Euro set. Best for Haute Cuisine, Bruges De Karmeliet Complex and elegant food in a Michelin-starred restaurant. Den Gouden Harynck Swish and sophisticated, in a gorgeous old building. Best Ethnic Restaurants Ryad Moroccan tagines, Indian curries and a Berber tea lounge in Bruges.

NEnjoy a leisurely supper and listen to some live piano at Le Cercle des Voyageurs – while you’re here, take a short detour to see the small but unmistakable Manneken Pis. Head to the Music Village for more live jazz, or order a half-and-half at Le Cirio. Return to the Grand Place at night, to see it in floodlit glory. 1 Top Sights Grand Place Centre Belge de la Bande Dessinée x Best of Brussels Best for Haute Cuisine L'Ogenblik La Maison du Cygne Sea Grill Best Live Music Bars Le Cercle des Voyageurs Music Village Art Base Best Cinemas Actor’s Studio Cinéma Galeries Getting There m Metro This central area is easily accessed via metro stations De Brouckère, Gare Centrale and Rogier. Premetro The premetro station Bourse is a couple of blocks northwest of the Grand Place. 1 Top SightsGrand Place The magnificent Grand Place is one of the world’s most unforgettable urban ensembles.

Either laze away some time in the park, or detour, via the star-shaped Berlaymont Building, to Square Marie-Louise, surrounded by tall and gracious apartment blocks, some from the art nouveau period. NThis is not the greatest area for a night out, but L’Atelier Europeén is a swish dinner stop. Otherwise, lively Place Jourdan offers great restaurants, bars, pizzas and a classic frites (chips) stand. 1 Top Sights Parc du Cinquantenaire Musée du Cinquantenaire x Best of Brussels Best for Haute Cuisine Stirwen L’Atelier Européen Best Green Spaces Parc du Cinquantenaire Parc Léopold Getting There m Metro The best option to reach this area is the metro. The closest stop for the museums is Mérode, while to explore the EU sights head to Schuman. For Sq Marie-Louise get off at Maelbeek. 1 Top SightsParc du Cinquantenaire For all the functionality of the EU district, the area retains graceful parks and squares, most notably the Parc du Cinquantenaire, flanking which are some stand-out museums showcasing everything from sarcophagi to Harley Davidsons.


pages: 376 words: 110,321

Consider the Fork: A History of How We Cook and Eat by Bee Wilson

Albert Einstein, British Empire, Fellow of the Royal Society, haute cuisine, Kitchen Debate, lateral thinking, Louis Pasteur, refrigerator car, sexual politics, the scientific method, Upton Sinclair, Wall-E

It might be a trio of enameled pans stacked in a pot holder; or an orderly row of Le Creuset, arranged from small to large. The batterie de cuisine. was one of many new ideas to come out of the eighteenth century, era of enlightenment and revolution. The thinking behind the batterie was the exact opposite of the limitations of one-pot cooking. The idea—which still has fierce believers among the practitioners of haute cuisine—is this: every component of a meal requires its own special vessel. You cannot saute in a sloping-sided frying pan or fry in a straight-sided saute pan. You cannot poach turbot without a turbot kettle. You need the right tool for the job. In part, this reflects the new professionalism of cooking in the eighteenth century and the influence of France. At E. Dehillerin, the oldest surviving kitchen shop in Paris, you can still worship at the temple of copper cookware.

The Victorian copper batterie is in its way the high point of the long history of pots and pans. The combination of craftsmanship, the quality of the metal itself, a preparedness to tailor the equipment to the requirements of cooking, and the existence of wealthy kitchens equipped with the battalion of cooks needed to keep track of the various vessels, would never be equaled, unless in the twentieth-century kitchens of French haute cuisine. It is interesting, then, that despite their fabulously well-equipped kitchens, the Victorians have a reputation for having ruined British cooking, reducing everything to a mass of brown Windsor soup. Some historians have argued that this reputation is unjustified. But there is no getting away from the question of vegetables. Victorian and Regency recipes consistently tell us to boil vegetables for many times longer than we know they need.

By the eighteenth century, methods of making carbon steel had industrialized, and this marvelous substance was being used to make a range of increasingly specialized tools. The cutlery trade was no longer about making a daggerlike personal possession for a single individual. It was about making a range of knives for highly specific uses: filleting knives, paring knives, pastry knives, all from steel. These specialized knives were both cause and consequence of European ways of dining. It has often been observed that the French haute cuisine that dominated wealthy European tastes from the eighteenth century on was a cuisine of sauces: bechamel, velouté, espagnole, allemande (the four mother sauces of Carême, later revised as the five mother sauces of Escoffier, who ditched the allemande and added hollandaise and tomato sauce). True, but it was no less a cuisine of specialist knives and precision cutting. The French were not the first to use particular knives for particular tasks.


Fodor's Normandy, Brittany & the Best of the North With Paris by Fodor's

call centre, car-free, glass ceiling, happiness index / gross national happiness, haute couture, haute cuisine, Henri Poincaré, Kickstarter, Murano, Venice glass, Nelson Mandela, urban planning, young professional

But even though their seafood, free-range poultry, olives, and produce cry out to be gathered in a basket and cooked in their purest forms, you can also enjoy them as a simple visual feast. Over at flea and brocante (collectibles) markets, food plays second fiddle. With any luck, you’ll find a little 18th-century engraving that makes your heart go trottinant. Bistros and Brasseries The choice of restaurants in France is a feast in itself. Of course, at least once during your trip you’ll want to indulge in a luxurious meal at a great haute-cuisine restaurant—but there’s no need to get knee-deep in white truffles at Paris’s Alain Ducasse to savor the France the French eat. For you can discover the most delicious French-Women-Don’t-Get-Fat food with a quick visit to a city neighborhood bistro. History tells us that bistros served the world’s first fast food—after the fall of Napoléon, the Russian soldiers who occupied Paris were known to cry bistro (“quickly” in Russian) when ordering.

Nancy’s Art Nouveau: The Art Nouveau capital of France as well as home to Place Stanislas—the most beautiful royal square in Europe—make the hub city of Lorraine an art lover’s paradise. Joan of Arc Country: If you’re a fan of Jeanne d’Arc, then a pilgrimage to her birthplace in Domrémy-la-Pucelle is a must. Strasbourg, Capital of Alsace: The symbolic capital of Europe is a cosmopolitan French city rivaled only by Paris in its medieval charms, history, and haute cuisine. Getting Oriented Bordered by Germany, Alsace-Lorraine has often changed hands between the two countries in the last 350 years. This back-and-forth has left a mark—you’ll find that Germanic half-timber houses sometimes clash with a very French café scene. Art also pays homage to both nations, as you can see in the museums of Strasbourg, Alsace’s main hub. Eastward lies Lorraine, birthplace of Joan of Arc (and the famous quiche).

The handsome neo-Gothic church of St-Paul and the pseudo-Renaissance Palais de l’Université (University Palace), constructed between 1875 and 1885, also bear the German stamp. Heavy turn-of-the-20th-century houses, some reflecting the whimsical curves of the Art Nouveau style, frame Allée de la Robertsau, a tree-lined boulevard that would not look out of place in Berlin. Where to Eat in Strasbourg Au Crocodile. $$$$ | FRENCH | As one of the temples of Alsatian-French haute cuisine, this has the expected grand salon— renovated in 2009, and still asparkle with skylights and a spectacular 19th-century mural showing the strasbourgeoisie at a country fair—an exhaustive wine list, and some of the most dazzling dishes around, courtesy of new chef Philippe Bohrer, who formerly worked privately for French presidents Giscard d’Estaing and François Mitterand. Fittingly at a restaurant founded in the early 1800s, you get a real taste of the-way-Alsace-was here, but given a nouvelle spin.


Fodor's Dordogne & the Best of Southwest France With Paris by Fodor's Travel Publications Inc.

call centre, glass ceiling, happiness index / gross national happiness, haute couture, haute cuisine, Murano, Venice glass, Nelson Mandela, urban planning, young professional

But even though their seafood, free-range poultry, olives, and produce cry out to be gathered in a basket and cooked in their purest forms, you can also enjoy them as a simple visual feast. Over at flea and brocante (collectibles) markets, food plays second fiddle. With any luck, you’ll find a little 18th-century engraving that makes your heart go trottinant. BISTROS AND BRASSERIES The choice of restaurants in France is a feast in itself. Of course, at least once during your trip you’ll want to indulge in a luxurious meal at a great haute-cuisine restaurant—but there’s no need to get knee-deep in white truffles at Paris’s Alain Ducasse to savor the France the French eat. For you can discover the most delicious French-Women-Don’t-Get-Fat food with a quick visit to a city neighborhood bistro. History tells us that bistros served the world’s first fast food—after the fall of Napoléon, the Russian soldiers who occupied Paris were known to cry bistro (“quickly” in Russian) when ordering.

This most romantic and quiet of Paris gardens, enclosed within the former home of Cardinal Richelieu (1585–1642), is an ideal spot to while away an afternoon. Do like the locals and cuddle with your sweetheart on a bench under the trees, soak up the sunshine beside the fountain, or browse the 400-year-old arcades, now home to chic boutiques and quirky shops. One of the city’s oldest restaurants is here, the haute-cuisine jewel box Le Grand Véfour, where brass plaques recall regulars like Napoléon and Victor Hugo. Built in 1629, the palais became royal when Richelieu bequeathed it to Louis XIII. Other famous residents include Jean Cocteau and Colette, who wrote of her pleasurable “country” view of the province à Paris. Today, the garden often plays host to giant-size temporary art installations sponsored by another tenant, the Ministry of Culture.

. | 8 rue de Vaugirard,St-Germain-des-Prés | 01–43–26–36–36 | www.laferrandaise.com | AE, MC, V | Closed Sun. and 3 wks in Aug. No lunch Sat. | Station: Odéon, RER: Luxembourg . Le Comptoir du Relais Saint-Germain. $$$ | BISTRO | Run by legendary bistro chef Yves Camdeborde, this tiny Art Deco hotel restaurant is booked up several months in advance for the single dinner sitting that comprises a five-course, €48 set menu of haute-cuisine-quality food. On weekends and before 6 PM during the week a brasserie menu is served and reservations are not accepted, resulting in long lineups and brisk service. Start with charcuterie or pâté, then choose from open-face sandwiches, salads, and a handful of hot dishes such as braised beef cheek, roast tuna, and Camdeborde’s famed deboned and breaded pig’s trotter. Sidewalk tables make for prime people-watching in summer and Le Comptoir also runs a down-to-earth snack shop next door that serves crepes and sandwiches. | 9 carrefour de l’Odéon, St-Germain-des-Prés | 75006 | 01–44–27–07–50 | AE, DC, MC, V | Station: Odéon Ze Kitchen Galerie. $$$ | MODERN FRENCH | William Ledeuil made his name at the popular Les Bouquinistes (a Guy Savoy baby bistro) before opening this contemporary bistro in a loftlike space.


Migrant City: A New History of London by Panikos Panayi

Big bang: deregulation of the City of London, British Empire, Brixton riot, call centre, discovery of the americas, en.wikipedia.org, financial intermediation, ghettoisation, gig economy, glass ceiling, haute cuisine, immigration reform, income inequality, Mahatma Gandhi, manufacturing employment, mass immigration, multicultural london english, New Urbanism, offshore financial centre, plutocrats, Plutocrats, transatlantic slave trade, upwardly mobile, urban sprawl, white flight

The Viennese coffee shops, which may have attracted a slightly broader clientele than restaurants such as Pagani’s, sold a distinctively central European product. But it proves difficult to identify a specifically Italian cuisine in the restaurants described by Davis, certainly not of the type which would emerge after 1945. The menu at Pagani’s essentially consisted of continental haute cuisine, indicated, above all, by the fact that this restaurant, like other high-class establishments in central London, carried French menus. The Italian nature of these restaurants comes from ownership rather than food. The categorizations produced by Davis clearly used no scientific method. The dominance of French-inspired haute cuisine in central London and elsewhere before 191484 meant that all other methods of cooking had to assimilate into the descriptions it offered. At this stage in the history of Italian food in London, a significant space had not yet opened up for a distinct product appealing to a wide cross section of British society.

By 1815 the coffee bubble had burst as the figure declined to twelve coffee houses.9 They came back to life in the post-war period, although Mayhew identified ‘coffee stall keepers’ during the 1850s.10 We can best understand the influence of migrants on London’s eating establishments by focusing upon three themes. First, the foreigners who have played a central role in the evolution of the restaurant trade since the nineteenth century, because they have provided so much of the staffing from owners through to chefs, waiters and even cleaners. While these types of restaurants may have introduced French haute cuisine into London, migrants also brought with them a wide variety of other products, which often became assimilated into the British mainstream and attracted the label of British – most obviously Jewish fried fish, which joined together with potatoes to become fish and chips, and, more recently, curry. Indian restaurants (usually run by Bangladeshis) which sold curry marketed themselves as exotic and foreign from the end of the nineteenth century, as did owners of a series of establishments that sold other cuisines, which became a feature of life in the West End, more especially Soho, by the early twentieth century.

If we add to this those names of Turkish Cypriot, Chinese, Italian and other foreign origins, then it seems clear that migrants had come to play a major role in the fried fish trade by this time,73 a process which would continue as increasing diversification occurred in subsequent decades.74 FOREIGN FOOD FOR LONDONERS Migrants have therefore played a central role in the evolution of eating out in establishments which seem to sell British food, even though, in the case of both French haute cuisine and fried fish, a process of assimilation into the mainstream took place during the course of the Victorian and Edwardian eras. Migrants have, however, also sold overtly foreign products to Londoners, a process that began in the late nineteenth century, especially, but not exclusively, in Soho, and which spread to the rest of London and the country as a whole, in the post-war years. Continental restaurants which advertised themselves as such began to emerge during the late nineteenth century.


pages: 300 words: 65,976

The Gospel of Food: Everything You Think You Know About Food Is Wrong by Barry Glassner

Chuck Templeton: OpenTable:, Gary Taubes, haute cuisine, income inequality, longitudinal study, meta analysis, meta-analysis, New Urbanism, placebo effect, profit motive, Ralph Nader, randomized controlled trial, Saturday Night Live, stem cell, twin studies, urban sprawl, working poor

Restaurant Heaven 107 Defining Culinary Greatness Food should be honest and authentic and made of first-rate ingredients handled with respect. Do those principles provide the basis for a distinctive cuisine or culinary aesthetic? Theatrics aside, what defines gastronomic excellence in the present age? What does the cooking of today’s most revered chefs have in common? The old paradigm was clear: French haute cuisine. As recently as the 1970s, “best restaurants” lists for cities throughout the U.S. consisted almost entirely of places with French names, and the nation’s culinary elite were dyed-in-the-wool Francophiles. The late Julia Child launched her career in 1961 with Mastering the Art of French Cooking, a book cowritten with two French collaborators; and for her legendary PBS series, she christened herself “the French Chef.”

On treatment of VIPs and regular patrons, see also Steven Shaw, Turning the Tables. 12. Rebecca L. Spang, The Birth of the Restaurant (Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2001) (quote is from p. 223). 13. Spang, chap. 6 (quote is from p. 150). 14. Spang, epilogue (quote is from p. 234). 15. See also Patric Kuh, “Rolling a-a-a-nd Ashton,” Los Angeles Magazine (September 2003): 128–30. 16. Patric Kuh, The Last Days of Haute Cuisine (New York: Viking, 2001), p. 194. 17. William Grimes, “A Big Room for Bigger Appetites,” New York Times, April 23, 2003. 18. See also Adam Nagourney, “24 Restaurants and Still Hungry,” New York Times, June 22, 2005. 19. Florence Fabricant and Marian Burros, “Rocco DiSpirito Is Out at Union Pacific,” New York Times, September 29, 2004. 20. Spang, p. 177. 21. A model-cum-bartender from the cast told a reporter, “Our prize was our exposure.

Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Food and Wine magazine, 114, 118 food industry, 61–87, 143 “added value” and price, 61 American Heart Association endorsements and, 44 as beneficiaries of food reformers, xiii chefs as marketing tool, 211–12 consumer demand and, 74–76 flavorings and flavor chemists, 34–39 food irradiation and, 65–68 fortified foods and, 48–52 “fresh” labeling, 81–83 loss of faith in, xii marketing health benefits of foods, 209–14 “meal solutions,” 87 “natural” foods and flavors, 35–42 nutritional supplements and, 208 organic foods and, 62–65, 70–75 pork and “other white meat” campaign, 32–34 processed and frozen foods, positive aspects, 75–81, 83–87 Quorn and, 68–70 R & D operations, 76–81 food labels “artificial” ingredients, 36 calories, 176 demonized nutrients, 11 false or misleading, 53 “fresh” dispute, 81–83 frozen vs. fresh food, 81–82, 246n. 24 “natural” ingredients, 36, 41 food poisoning fast-food restaurants and, 155 food irradiation and, 65–68 foods of greatest risk, xi Food Safety Summit, 66–67 Food Standards Agency, Great Britain, 69 Forney, Robert, 202–5 France consumption of dietary fat in, 2 food as pleasure in, 3 French haute cuisine, 107–9, 248n. 30 French Paradox, 2 freshness and natural food, 42 Gascony, rates of heart disease in, 2 history of restaurants and culinary arts, 99–100, 104, 115 McDonald’s in, 150 France, Anatole, 151 French fries acrylamide in, 17 In-N-Out’s, 164 labeling as fresh, 246n. 24 McDonald’s, 164 276 Index French Laundry Cookbook (Keller), 112 French Laundry restaurant, 2, 96, 97, 109, 112–13 French Meadow Bakery, 48–52 Men’s Bread, 48–49, 51–52 Women’s Bread, 48–49, 51 French Paradox, 2 freshness demand for, xii France, freshness and natural food, 42 relative to processed or frozen foods, 83–84 labeling requirements, 81–83 lettuce, 83 nutrients and, 83 pineapple wedges breakthrough, 80–81 Friedman, Jeffrey, 178–79 Frito-Lay, 70 fruit(s).


pages: 364 words: 102,528

An Economist Gets Lunch: New Rules for Everyday Foodies by Tyler Cowen

agricultural Revolution, big-box store, business climate, carbon footprint, cognitive bias, creative destruction, cross-subsidies, East Village, en.wikipedia.org, food miles, guest worker program, haute cuisine, illegal immigration, informal economy, iterative process, mass immigration, oil shale / tar sands, out of africa, pattern recognition, Peter Singer: altruism, price discrimination, refrigerator car, The Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith, Tyler Cowen: Great Stagnation, Upton Sinclair, winner-take-all economy, women in the workforce

French cooks have focused on refining preexisting national and regional ideas, or in the case of nouvelle cuisine, they have thinned sauces and focused on pure ingredients. There hasn’t been that much of a mingling of ideas, at least not in recent times. If anything, the evolution of classic French cuisine was originally a reaction against earlier Arabic influences, most of all by taking sugar, cinnamon, and honey out of their prominent place in the main courses and segregating them into the desserts. You won’t often see Moroccan bistillah pie in French haute cuisine. Italy had low levels of immigration for much of the twentieth century, but like France it has focused on refining preexisting materials, techniques, and recipes. Immigration to Italy has been rising more recently, but an Italy without recent immigration still would have excellent food. It would be harder to hire restaurant waiters, and thus harder to keep a restaurant going, but the content of the food wouldn’t be so different.

Nonetheless the demand for smoked foods is growing, even if those are not barbecue foods in the traditional sense. It’s easy enough to order high-quality smoked meats over the Internet and have them delivered by FedEx or UPS. The upshot is that quality and availability of smoked salmon are higher in the United States than ever before, even if you don’t get those meals from classic barbecue restaurants. The idea of slow cooking at low temperatures is assuming a central role in American haute cuisine, although more and more it is separated from smoked flavor. New machines are capturing some of the best features of the classic barbecue pit and bringing them into top restaurants and even into some of our homes. The technique of sous vide (French for “slow vacuum”) enables large quantities of quality food to be prepared by slow cooking techniques. The food is first put into an airtight plastic bag and cooked in a precisely controlled water bath at a low temperature.

Cantonese: Many Chinese consider Cantonese food to be their most refined cuisine and the one capable of hitting the highest peaks consistently. It arguably does the most to draw upon the wealth of seafood off the Chinese coast and it employs a wide diversity of fresh Chinese vegetables. It’s fresh and subtle (or should be) and it requires a care with ingredients and handling comparable to that found in French haute cuisine. Unfortunately, most of that is bad news if you are sitting here in the United States. As with Sichuan, there are two kinds of Cantonese restaurants in the United States, but neither is especially promising. The first kind of Cantonese restaurant stems from the original invasion of Chinese-American food in the 1960s and afterward. The food in these restaurants is not at all spicy and the proprietors serve up mongrel dishes such as Egg Foo Yung, Chicken Fried Rice, and mediocre Moo Goo Gai Pan.


pages: 144 words: 33,034

Hosting an Elegant Dinner Party: The Surgeon in the Kitchen by Adam Frosh

haute cuisine, period drama

The creation of a sauce in this way is in effect an extension of the processes that are used to make stocks. We owe much to Georges Auguste Escoffier, a French chef, who, active in the early part of the twentieth century, laid many of the foundations of modern French cuisine. He codified the espagnole sauce, the basis for many sauce derivatives, including Demi-Glace and sauce Chasseur. Here, I describe more home kitchen friendly versions of the French haute-cuisine classics. The critical steps include multiple deglazings, caramelisation of the vegetables and the final reduction. It is important that the alcohol is evaporated from the wines during the deglazing process. Generally, the sauces can be prepared and refrigerated a day or two in advance or frozen and defrosted on the day. Sauce vegetables 2 onions chopped (including some brown outer skin) 1 stick celery, chopped 2 carrots, peeled and chopped 1 swede, peeled and chopped 9 oz (250 g) button mushrooms, chopped 5 oz (150 g) shiitake mushrooms, chopped 2 leeks, chopped 6 cloves garlic, roughly chopped Duck jus Carcases (uncooked) of two ducks chopped into 4-inch pieces 2 tbs olive oil ⅔ cup (150 ml) water Sauce vegetables ⅔ cup (150 ml) Madeira wine 15 black peppercorns 2 sprigs of fresh thyme 2 L chicken stock/water (see appendix on stocks) In a large stock pan, sauté the duck bone pieces in the olive oil.

The later practice of serving food in courses, service à la russe, meant that dinner parties necessarily took longer to complete and became increasingly ritualised with more and more decorative elaborations of the dining table. 4 Historical perspective: In early nineteenth-century France, Marie-Antoine Carême reached celebrity chef status through the early development of the grande (haute) cuisine style of cooking. He is also associated with the pièce montée, which is in effect an edible architectural structure of confectionary used as a centrepiece. Since this time, sugar and even ice sculptures have been used as highly elaborate and spectacular works of architectural and decorative central features of the table. 5 In Georgian times, high-quality glassware was generally imported at great price from specialist glassmakers such as the fine craftsmen in Murano.


Lonely Planet Best of Spain by Lonely Planet

augmented reality, bike sharing scheme, centre right, discovery of the americas, Frank Gehry, G4S, Guggenheim Bilbao, haute cuisine, illegal immigration, market design, place-making, trade route, young professional

Working with the original theatre-style layout, the developers have used the multi-level seating to array a series of restaurants that seem at once self-contained yet connected to the whole through the soaring open central space, with all of them in some way facing the stage area where cabaret-style or 1930s-era performances or live cooking shows provide a rather glamorous backdrop. It’s where food court meets haute cuisine, a daring combination of lunch or dinner with floorshow without the formality that usually infuses such places. Biotza Tapas, Basque €€ map Google map (%91 781 03 13; Calle de Claudio Coello 27; cold/hot pintxos €2.80/3.40, raciones from €6, set menus from €18; h1-5pm & 8pm-midnight Mon-Sat; mSerrano) This breezy Basque tapas bar is one of the best places in Madrid to sample the creativity of bite-sized pintxos (Basque tapas) as only the Basques can make them.

A lot of it is junk, but occasionally you’ll stumble across a ganga (bargain). Els Encants Vells / TONIFLAP / SHUTTERSTOCK © 5 Eating Barcelona has a celebrated food scene fuelled by a combination of world-class chefs, imaginative recipes and magnificent ingredients fresh from farms and the sea. Catalan culinary masterminds like Ferran Adrià and Carles Abellan have become international icons, reinventing the world of haute cuisine, while classic old-world Catalan recipes continue to earn accolades in dining rooms and tapas bars across the city. Shopping Strips Avinguda del Portal de l’Àngel This broad pedestrian avenue is lined with high-street chains, shoe shops, bookshops and more. It feeds into Carrer dels Boters and Carrer de la Portaferrissa, characterised by stores offering light-hearted costume jewellery and youth-oriented streetwear.

Tienda Librería de la Alhambra Souvenirs map Google map (%958 22 78 46; Calle Reyes Católicos 40; h9.30am-8.30pm) This is a fabulous shop for Alhambra aficionados, with a tasteful selection of quality gifts, including excellent coffee table–style tomes, children’s art books, hand-painted fans, arty stationery and stunning photographic prints, which you select from a vast digital library (from €14 for A4 size). 5 Eating Granada’s a place where gastronomy remains reassuringly down to earth – and cheap. What it lacks in flashy alta cocina (haute cuisine) it makes up for in generous portions of Andalucian standards. The city has a wealth of places serving decent tapas and raciones (large tapas servings). It also excels in Moroccan cuisine. 5 Alhambra & Realejo Hicuri Art Restaurant Vegan € map Google map (Plaza de los Girones 3; mains €7-12; h10am-10pm Mon-Sat; v) Granada’s leading graffiti artist, El Niño de las Pinturas, has been let loose on the inner and outer walls of Hicuri, and the results are positively psychedelic.


pages: 332 words: 102,372

The Trains Now Departed: Sixteen Excursions Into the Lost Delights of Britain's Railways by Michael Williams

Beeching cuts, British Empire, Google Earth, haute cuisine, joint-stock company, Neil Kinnock, plutocrats, Plutocrats, railway mania, Snapchat

Or the spectre of a train from a golden era of the past panting up the embankment? These are the ghosts of The Trains Now Departed. They are the railway lines, and services that ran on them that have disappeared and gone forever. A lost legacy of lines prematurely axed, as well as marvels of locomotive engineering sent to the scrapyard, and grand termini felled by the wrecker’s ball. Gone, too, are the vanished delights of train travel, such as haute cuisine in the dining car, the grand expresses with their evocative names, and continental boat trains to romantic far-off places. Such pleasures have all but vanished in our modern homogenised era of train travel. The Trains Now Departed is a journey into the soul of our railways, summoning up a magic which, although mired in time, is fortunately not lost for ever. About the Author Michael Williams is the best-selling author of On the Slow Train, On the Slow Train Again and Steaming to Victory.

Or the spectre of a train from a golden era of the past panting up the embankment? These are the ghosts of the trains now departed – lines prematurely axed often with gripping and colourful tales to tell, marvels of locomotive engineering prematurely sent to the scrapyard, and architecturally magnificent stations felled by the wrecker’s ball. Then there are the lost delights of train travel, such as haute cuisine in the dining car, the grand expresses with their evocative names, and continental boat trains to romantic far-off places. Such pleasures have all but vanished in our modern homogenised era of train travel. But why should nostalgia be on anyone’s mind in this age of fast, state-of-the-art trains, which routinely whisk us efficiently all over the developed world at speeds of up to 200 mph. Is it merely fanciful and indulgent to summon up some ‘lost age’ of the railways when more of us are choosing to use the rail network than at any time in history.

The Night Ferry, which ran between London’s Victoria and Paris, Brussels and Basle, was not some throwback to a vanished Victorian era; this was a grand train offering the ultimate in modern comfort: travel between London and the heart of Europe without ever having to leave your bed. Its last service ran as recently as 30 October 1980. Of course, there have been other boat trains – and glamorous ones too. None more so than the Golden Arrow, which also ran between Victoria and Paris, with its famous umber and cream art deco Pullman cars and haute cuisine menus. Then there was the Emerald Isle Express, connecting London with the Holyhead boat to Dun Laoghaire in Ireland, and the Hook Continental – infinitely glamorous, despite its mundane name – which conveyed its passengers comfortably to Holland from Liverpool Street via Harwich. But none could match the mystique of the Night Ferry, whose comfy sleeping cars rolled effortlessly onto specially adapted ships in the middle of the night, speeding on to their destinations on the opposite side of the Channel to arrive in time for breakfast.


pages: 938 words: 205,129

Mastering the Art of French Cooking, Volume 2 by Julia Child

haute cuisine

We have also our peerless editor, Judith Jones, to thank most sincerely and affectionately; her conception of the book has produced what you now hold in your hands. Contents Cover Other Books by This Author Title Page Copyright Dedication Foreword Acknowledgments Illustrations    Chapter One • SOUPS FROM THE GARDEN—BISQUES AND CHOWDERS FROM THE SEA    Chapter Two   • BAKING: BREADS, BRIOCHES, CROISSANTS, AND PASTRIES Chapter Three • MEATS: FROM COUNTRY KITCHEN TO HAUTE CUISINE  Chapter Four • CHICKENS, POACHED AND SAUCED—AND A COQ EN PÂTE    Chapter Five • CHARCUTERIE: SAUSAGES, SALTED PORK AND GOOSE, PÂTÉS AND TERRINES Chapter Six • A CHOICE OF VEGETABLES Chapter Seven  • DESSERTS: EXTENDING THE REPERTOIRE APPENDICES Stuffings Kitchen Equipment Cumulative Index for Volumes One and Two About the Authors Illustrations Illustrations by Sidonie Coryn Technical Drawings by Paul Child CHAPTER I Lobsters dismembering Crabs dismembering CHAPTER II French bread making dough and first rise second rise forming bâtards forming round loaves Special equipment Pain de mie equipment making dough forming loaves baking Brioches making dough and first rise molds forming and baking forming ring-shaped Kougloff Croissants making dough and first rise cutting and shaping crescents Upside-down pastry shells forming Rolling pins Making simple puff pastry (demi-feuilletée) Making classic puff pastry Vol-au-vent and bouchées cutting and forming small cutting and forming large scraping out center making cover decorating Cutting fleurons Petites bouchées, cutting Reconstructing leftover dough Cornets cutting and forming filling with cheese Rouleaux Cheese Napoleons Cheese feuilletée filling and cutting CHAPTER III Beef case making case filling case How to lard meat Beef tenderloin cuts trimming tying Filet en croûte enclosing in dough decorating serving Boning a leg of lamb Stuffed leg of lamb in pastry enclosing in dough decorating Saddle of lamb preparing for roasting carving Breast of veal Suckling pig roasting positions carving CHAPTER IV Half-boning chicken Half-boned chicken in pastry CHAPTER V Sausages filling casings forming in cheesecloth Caul fat Pâtés in brioche cases enclosing in dough Poultry anatomy disjointing poultry Pâté en croûte lining and filling baking and unmolding CHAPTER VI Cutting and arranging eggplant slices for a gratin Trimming and coring onions Stuffed whole cabbage stuffing and molding Stuffing individual cabbage leaves Potatoes Anna cooking pans arranging and baking Potatoes duchesse forming borders CHAPTER VII Cookie serving cups forming Le Saint-Cyr (chocolate mousse molded in meringue) Pastry shells for fruit tarts cutting and forming weighting Jalousie forming, stuffing, and cutting decorating Napoleons cutting and forming decorating serving Cornets and rouleaux forming Pithiviers forming decorating and glazing Couques forming Palmiers forming and cutting Le Succès forming meringue layers assembling Brésiliens Making a paper decorating cone APPENDIX TWO Frying pans Chicken fryers Saucepans and covers Colander, kettles, and marmites Casseroles and braising pans Gratin dishes and roasting pans Knives and choppers Bashers, bludgeons, and blunt instruments Scissors and pitters Spoons Forks Turnover tools Retrievers Wooden implements Gadgets for opening things for peeling and molding for grating for grinding pepper and pressing garlic for ricing potatoes for milling food for warming food at table for drying salad for grinding meat Pastry bag and attachments Electric mixer and attachments Hand-held electric beater Balloon whip and copper bowl Thermometers Measuring equipment Baking pans Rolling pins, croissant cutter, and pastry marble Pastry brush, scrapers, and a blender Small molds for pastry Pastry cutters and a pastry pricker Flan rings and vol-au-vent cutters Soufflé dishes and baking dishes Pâté molds Miscellaneous small baking molds Molds for baking, aspics, and frozen desserts Wine glasses Cork screws and bottle openers This symbol preceding a recipe title indicates that variations follow. (*) Wherever you see this symbol in the body of recipe texts you may prepare the dish ahead of time up to that point, then complete the recipe later.

After draining them, pull out the central flap at the base of the tail to draw out along with it the intestinal tube. (This action of removing the intestine is called châtter in French recipes.) Sauté and simmer the crayfish whole, as directed in the Master Recipe, but they need only 10 minutes of cooking in Step 3. To shell them, remove the tail meat only, and use all of it for the garnish in Step 7; the chests and shell debris go into the butter, Step 6. If you wish to be very haute cuisine, have a dozen extra crayfish and make a small amount of a simple fish mousse, using the raw tail meat. Then remove chest-leg sections (but not claws and feelers) from covering shell, and fill the shells with the mousse. Poach 5 minutes in stock or bouillon before floating them in the bisque at serving time. You should have 24 to 30 live crayfish for 2 quarts of soup, plus 12 or so extra if you are doing the mousse.

If you are serving the same day, keep in a warming oven or the turned-off oven. Otherwise arrange in a covered pan and freeze them. To reheat and crisp shells, either frozen or not, preheat oven to 425 degrees, place shells on a lightly buttered baking sheet and set in middle level of oven. Turn oven off and shells will be crisp in 5 to 8 minutes. VOL-AU-VENT [Large Patty Shell] A large patty shell is somewhat reminiscent of the oldtime haute cuisine; it is wonderfully dramatic to serve and always greatly enjoyed by your guests just because it is an unusual treat. The decorative cover, which is formed and baked separately, is optional and depends on how your table serving works out. If you have a cover, the filled vol-au-vent with cover poised on top of the food is presented for all to admire, then the cover must be removed to a separate dish for cutting and serving.


pages: 135 words: 53,708

Top 10 San Diego by Pamela Barrus, Dk Publishing

California gold rush, centre right, Charles Lindbergh, East Village, El Camino Real, G4S, haute cuisine, illegal immigration, Silicon Valley, the market place, transcontinental railway, urban renewal

A’s A dazzling city-view and contemporary cuisine at a local favorite. d Map K1 • 2550 5th Ave • (619) 239-1377 • $$$$$ San Diego’s Top 10 Intimate tables and a view of the Pacific complement the sophisticated French cuisine. d La Valencia Hotel (see p115) Top o’ the Cove A 100-year-old bungalow, classical cuisine, and an ocean view (see p101). Thee Bungalow Intimate dining rooms in a quiet bungalow. d Map A4 • 4996 W. Point Loma Blvd • (619) 224-2884 • $$$$ Candelas Mexican nouvelle cuisine in a hacienda ambience. Their seafood is a specialty. d Map J5 • 416 3rd Ave • (619) 702-4455 • $$$$ The Marine Room Haute cuisine, candlelight, and soft music arouse the senses (see p54). George’s at the Cove More wedding proposals take place at this superb restaurant than anywhere else in San Diego (see p101). Trattoria Acqua Enjoy northern Italian cuisine and the sea, and imagine you’re on the Riviera. d Map N2 • 1298 Prospect St, La Jolla • (858) 454--0709 • $$$$ For a key to price categories see p77. 55 San Diego’s Top 10 Left Interior of Café Bassam Right Façade of Corvette Diner Cafés & Bars Café Bassam An eclectic assortment of paintings, rifles, and old photos decorate the walls of this Gaslamp Quarter café.

$ $$ $$$ $$$$ $$$$$ under $20 $20–$40 $40–$55 $55–$80 over $80 Places to Eat in Tijuana La Diferencia A charming plant-filled and tiled hacienda offers gourmet choices such as shrimp chile rellenos, cactus salad, and seafood. d Map E3 • Blvd Sánchez Taboada 10611, Zona Río • (664) 634-3346 • $$ Cien Años La Casa del Mole The house specialty is mole sauce, which accompanies several meat dishes in this wellregarded restaurant. d Map E3 • Paseo de los Héroes 1501, Zona Río • (664) 634-6920 • No credit cards • $ La Espadaña Ancient recipes from the Aztecs and Mayans, as well as imaginative variations of Mexican haute cuisine are presented in elegant surroundings. d Map E3 The Spanish Mission-style dining room features mesquitegrilled meats, quail, and chicken filets. Breakfast here is one of the most popular in town. • José María Velazco 1407, Zona Río • (664) 634-3039 • $$$ d Map E3 • Blvd Sánchez Taboada 10813, Café La Especial Since 1952, patrons have eaten the carne asada – a thin filet of marinated grilled beef – savory tacos, and enchiladas with gusto. d Map E3 • Av Revolución 718 • (664) 685-6654 • $ Zona Río • (664) 634-1488 • $ Caesar’s Sports Bar & Grill History relates that the original Caesar salad took its name from the restaurant’s first owner, Caesar Cardini.


Lonely Planet London City Guide by Tom Masters, Steve Fallon, Vesna Maric

Boris Johnson, British Empire, centre right, Clapham omnibus, congestion charging, dark matter, discovery of the americas, double helix, East Village, financial independence, first-past-the-post, ghettoisation, haute cuisine, Isaac Newton, John Snow's cholera map, Mahatma Gandhi, market design, Nelson Mandela, place-making, South of Market, San Francisco, Stephen Hawking, transatlantic slave trade, urban planning, urban renewal, Winter of Discontent, young professional

East of Smithfield is the area now known as the Barbican, a vast arts complex and a visual statement that will either make your heart sing or your eyes ache depending what side of the architectural debate you bat for. Personally we love it, but there you go. Further east is Bank, the prosaically named district home to many of the major financial institutions of the country including the titular Bank of England. This is where the City can justly be called a bit sterile – pubs often only open Monday to Friday and eating choices split between Marks & Spencer sandwiches or five-course haute cuisine meals for those with expense accounts – yet beauties such as Lloyd’s of London, the Gherkin (30 St Mary Axe, Click here) and wonderful Leadenhall Market more than compensate for the lack of life at street level. Further to the east still is Tower Hill, home to the world-famous Tower of London and iconic Tower Bridge. This is an area dominated by faceless office blocks, although pockets of colour do spill over from the neighbouring multicultural areas of Aldgate and Whitechapel and well-heeled Wapping.

. £££ more than £20 ££ £10-20 £ less than £10 * * * Return to beginning of chapter THE WEST END With neighbourhoods as diverse as Soho, Mayfair, Bloomsbury and Marylebone, the West End is a difficult area to encapsulate, but it’s true: many of the city’s most eclectic, fashionable and, quite simply, best restaurants are dotted around this area. As with most things in London, it pays to be in the know: while there’s a huge concentration of mediocre places to eat along the main tourist drags, the best eating experiences are frequently tucked away on backstreets and not at all obvious. You’ll find everything here, from Hungarian to Korean and from haute cuisine to vegetarian cafes. Chinatown, as you might guess, is a great spot for inexpensive Chinese and other Asian food. Return to beginning of chapter SOHO & CHINATOWN LA TROUVAILLE Map French £££ 7287 8488; www.latrouvaille.co.uk; 12a Newburgh St W1; 2-/3-course set lunch £17/20, dinner £30/35; closed Sun; Oxford Circus Just what its name suggests it is, the ‘Find’ is perfect for a romantic dinner.

The Gallery restaurant downstairs buzzes informally in shimmering white and features video art projections. The Glade on the ground floor is the place for affordable lunch (two/three courses for £20/26) and the stunning Parlour patisserie to the right of the main entrance is great for tea and cakes. The ultimate attraction is the more formal Lecture Room & Library upstairs, where the high prices and haute cuisine in sumptuous surroundings from three-Michelin-starred chef Pierre Gagnaire attract an exclusive crowd. Upstairs you’ll also find the East Bar, with a dozen of London’s most unusual individual loos. WOLSELEY Map Modern European £££ 7499 6996; www.thewolseley.com; 160 Piccadilly W1; mains £10-36; 7am-midnight Mon-Fri, 8am-midnight Sat, 8am-11pm Sun; Green Park This erstwhile Bentley car showroom has been transformed into an opulent Viennese-style brasserie, with golden chandeliers and stunning black-and-white tiled floors, and it remains a great place for spotting celebrities.


pages: 663 words: 119,916

The Big Book of Words You Should Know: Over 3,000 Words Every Person Should Be Able to Use (And a Few That You Probably Shouldn't) by David Olsen, Michelle Bevilacqua, Justin Cord Hayes

deliberate practice, haute couture, haute cuisine, jitney, Lao Tzu, place-making, placebo effect, plutocrats, Plutocrats, Rosa Parks, Upton Sinclair

haute couture (OAT kyoo-CHOOR), noun High fashion. Haute couture is the most stylish and influential way of designing clothes at a given time. (Haute couture also refers to articles of clothing currently considered of the highest style.) Unfamiliar with the ways of HAUTE COUTURE, Wendell decided to pass up the fashion show. haute cuisine (oat kwi-ZEEN), noun Gourmet preparation of food. Haute cuisine can also refer to the preparation of meals as an art form. Glenn knows more than we do about HAUTE CUISINE; let’s let him pick the restaurant tonight. i.e. (eye ee), abbreviation, adverb An abbreviation for the Latin expression id est, meaning “that is.” Please make sure your child comes to school on the first day with all the necessary supplies, I.E., pencils, erasers, and notebooks. je ne sais quoi (zheuh-neuh-say-KWAH), noun From the French for “I don’t know what”; a special, intangible quality.


pages: 1,007 words: 181,911

The 4-Hour Chef: The Simple Path to Cooking Like a Pro, Learning Anything, and Living the Good Life by Timothy Ferriss

Airbnb, Atul Gawande, Buckminster Fuller, Burning Man, correlation does not imply causation, crowdsourcing, deliberate practice, en.wikipedia.org, Golden Gate Park, happiness index / gross national happiness, haute cuisine, Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall, Isaac Newton, Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, Kevin Kelly, Kickstarter, Loma Prieta earthquake, loss aversion, Louis Pasteur, Mahatma Gandhi, Marc Andreessen, Mark Zuckerberg, Mason jar, microbiome, Parkinson's law, Paul Buchheit, Paul Graham, Pepto Bismol, Ponzi scheme, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Silicon Valley, Skype, spaced repetition, Stephen Hawking, Steve Jobs, the High Line, Y Combinator

No need to memorize this; you’ll flip back to it often. Be sure to see your scorecard here. LESSON 01 SKILLS BRAISING, BLADE GRIP OSSO “BUKO” - * * * “Fucking delicious. Honestly, one of the easier things I’ve ever cooked. You were right to give this the #1 placement.” —RYAN HOLIDAY, NON-COOK RECIPE TESTER FOR THE 4-HOUR CHEF * * * Even if you’ve screwed up scrambled eggs in the past, you can get to haute cuisine in a day and acquire an amazing standby dish that will never fail you. This is that dish. Good marketing is important in the food world. When’s the last time you had Patagonian toothfish? Not recently, right? That’s because savvy spin doctors know you’ll eat more of it with a sexy rebranding: Chilean sea bass! But sometimes there’s more meaning behind a name. This version of osso buco, for instance, is called Osso “Buko,” not unlike the “Adidems” (think: Adidas) I bought in Beijing.

He is a master of turning the wild into “ingredients” people recognize. In 2004, he prepared a three-day, 45-course banquet from Escoffier’s landmark 1903 classic, Le Guide Culinaire.8 By “prepare,” I mean that he foraged, killed, or otherwise procured every ingredient from the outdoors… then re-created the feast himself, which took more than a week. This experiment was chronicled in his first book, The Scavenger’s Guide to Haute Cuisine. He started trapping for income in rural Michigan when he was 10. Now 38, he writes for a living, and his work is as likely to be seen in The New York Times as in Field and Stream. Now, he and I were sitting 20 ft above the ground in a deer blind dressed like a ghillie suit. Semitransparent camouflage netting draped down around the four sides of our 10 x 10–ft wilderness cubicle, hung over horizontal poles that reached our chins.

—AUGUSTE ESCOFFIER * * * When Grant Achatz launched Next, his highly anticipated second restaurant, he did so with a “Paris 1906” menu. It was an homage to the man hailed as the father of French cuisine: Auguste Escoffier. Sold-out table reservations were scalped for $3,000 on Craigslist. Escoffier ran the kitchen at the Paris Ritz Hotel in 1906. He also created kitchens as we know them (e.g., he popularized the brigade de cuisine organization), menus as we know them (e.g., the first à la carte menu), and haute cuisine as we know it. His landmark cookbook, Le Guide Culinaire, was published in 1903 and is still feared by culinary school students. Now you’ll know why. The following Carp à l’Ancienne recipe “borders on the realms of fantasy,” as Escoffier himself admitted. In simple terms, fish forcemeat (ground fish) is molded into the shape of a carp and topped with black truffle “scales.” This can get expensive.


pages: 728 words: 182,850

Cooking for Geeks by Jeff Potter

3D printing, A Pattern Language, carbon footprint, centre right, Community Supported Agriculture, Computer Numeric Control, crowdsourcing, Donald Knuth, double helix, en.wikipedia.org, European colonialism, fear of failure, food miles, functional fixedness, hacker house, haute cuisine, helicopter parent, Internet Archive, iterative process, Kickstarter, Parkinson's law, placebo effect, random walk, Rubik’s Cube, slashdot, stochastic process, the scientific method

I would get waxy potatoes and cut them up and put olive oil on them with rosemary and garlic and salt and pepper and grill them and for whatever reason I didn’t think that that qualified. My mother would occasionally do these incredible James Beard and Julia Child recipes, these elaborate recipes that took hours and hours of preparation and special ingredient shopping and that was what qualified as good cooking. It was haute cuisine, whereas the kind of cooking that I always did was just put something yummy on the table for dinner without a lot of effort. I think so often it’s the very simple dishes that actually can be some of the most special, most significant meals of our lives. What created this interest in learning to cook? Necessity. I loved having people over and I loved cooking for people. When I was working as a web developer in San Francisco, dinner parties were really my favorite ways of socializing.

Convenience foods and prepared meals burst onto the scene at the same time that freezers went into mass production and television sets became the "must have" item for the American family. Instant food and instant entertainment have been married ever since. The same family of chemicals that enabled the creation of the TV dinner (mmm, Kraft Macaroni & Cheese) also allowed for a new set of dishes to be created by haute cuisine chefs, sometimes called molecular gastronomy or modernist cuisine (we’ll use the latter term). These chefs use industrial chemicals to create entirely different ways of conveying flavors and exciting the senses. When done well, the dishes are not about additives at all, but about the perceptions and emotions that all good meals strive to evoke. No one is suggesting that vegetables and whole foods should be replaced with white powders.

Compare the culinary iconoclasts to the fashions that show up on the Paris runways: while it might not be "everyday" wear or cuisine, the better concepts and ideas that start out at the high end eventually make their way into the clothing shops and onto the general restaurant scene. Many of the techniques that rely on food additives originated in Europe. Chef Ferran Adrià’s restaurant elBulli, in Spain, is considered by many to be the originator of much of modern haute cuisine. Chef Heston Blumenthal’s restaurant The Fat Duck, in the UK, has also established an international reputation for pushing the boundaries of food. Note By some accounts, one had a better chance of getting into Harvard than getting a reservation at elBulli. Should you have the opportunity and inclination to dine at them, both Alinea (Chef Grant Achatz’s restaurant in Chicago) and wd-50 (Chef Wylie Dufresne’s restaurant in New York City) are highly regarded and happen to use food additives in creating some of their dining experiences.


pages: 246 words: 116

Tyler Cowen-Discover Your Inner Economist Use Incentives to Fall in Love, Survive Your Next Meeting, and Motivate Your Dentist-Plume (2008) by Unknown

airport security, Andrei Shleifer, big-box store, British Empire, business cycle, cognitive dissonance, cross-subsidies, fundamental attribution error, George Santayana, haute cuisine, market clearing, microcredit, money market fund, pattern recognition, Ralph Nader, Stephen Hawking, The Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith, trade route, transaction costs

Your dining and your cooking knowledge often complement 142 I DISCOVER YOUR INNER ECONOMIST each other, but when it comes to new dishes you should usually start with the dining, and the cooking can follow. Here is another strategy in fine restaurants: ask the waiter what should be ordered. It is important, however, to phrase the question properly. Think about the waiter's incentives. Even at temples of haute cuisine, a waiter might have instructions to push a high-margin item or to market a standard dish that the kitchen has prepared in large numbers that evening. Don't just ask the waiter "What should I get?" The waiter may try to get rid of you quickly so as to move on to his next task. The waiter may also think you are no smarter, in culinary terms, than the average diner. Even at a good restaurant this can be an insulting assessment.

The Anglo-American nations, such as the United States, Canada, U. K., Australia, and New Zealand, all have relatively free labor markets and relatively liberal immigration policies. Thirty or forty years ago, these countries were culinary losers, famous for their bland meats and their boiled vegetables. Today they are all up-and-coming hotspots, gaining on the older culinary reputation of France. Many restaurants-whether haute cuisine or ethnic dining-in the AngloAmerican world are staffed and run by immigrants. Few of those workers expect six weeks' vacation or a sharply limited work week. 150 I 0 I S C 0 V ER YOU R INN ERE CON 0 MIS T It is not unusual for a French chef to move to New York, to hire Mexicans to cook French food for an American clientele, or perhaps to cook for French tourists visiting New York City. The key element in this equation is the Mexicans and their freedom to sell their labor.


pages: 244 words: 78,884

Finding Your Element: How to Discover Your Talents and Passions and Transform Your Life by Ken Robinson, Lou Aronica

fear of failure, follow your passion, Frank Gehry, haute cuisine, invisible hand, Ralph Waldo Emerson, science of happiness, Silicon Valley

When I was much younger, I loved drawing and painting but had to drop art at school to focus on other things. As a teenager and into my twenties and thirties, I always liked to fix things and was often to be found in hardware stores admiring routers and drill bits. I also enjoyed cooking and, at one stage when my children were young, had a small but well-deserved reputation for my pastry—at least with them. In short, from concertos to haute cuisine, I had many options that I might have pursued in my life but did not. Being fairly good at several things, of course, can make it much harder to know what to do with your life than if you are really good at something in particular. I’ll come back to that later. The fact is that when I was younger, I had no idea what my Element was, and would not have known even if the phrase had occurred to me at the time, which it had not.

He’s still an ardent fan and continued to play and coach in other capacities for many years. But he didn’t connect to the particular rhythms and rituals of the life of an apprentice. Instead, he became more focused on working with people and has had a lifelong interest in food and nutrition. Both he and Neil have been committed vegans since their early teens—not least because of one of my early attempts at haute cuisine involving a largely inedible rabbit pie. Incidentally, for Neil, being vegan also proved a point of tension with the dominant culture of professional soccer. Tribes aren’t always a perfect fit. But they do need to be good enough to sustain your connection. Who do you imagine your tribe to be? What sorts of communities attract you and what is it that you have in common with them? To explore these questions, try this exercise.


pages: 666 words: 131,148

Frommer's Seattle 2010 by Karl Samson

airport security, British Empire, Frank Gehry, glass ceiling, global village, haute cuisine, place-making, sustainable-tourism, transcontinental railway, urban sprawl, white picket fence

Recently, Capitol Hill has become the city’s hottest restaurant neighborhood, and with lots of great restaurants within a few blocks of one another, this is a good place to go trolling for a place to eat. If the area’s high prices seem discouraging, rest assured that you can also find plenty of less expensive restaurants in the Pike Place Market neighborhood. In fact, because the market is such a tourist attraction, it has scads of cheap places to eat. Just don’t expect haute cuisine at diner prices. You can, however, find a few gems, which I have listed in this chapter. Even trendy Belltown has a handful of good, inexpensive eateries. For real dining deals, though, you’ll need to head to the ’hoods. Seattle is a city of self-sufficient neighborhoods, and within these urban enclaves are dozens of good, inexpensive places to eat. These are neighborhood spots that aren’t usually patronized by visitors to the city, but if you have a car and can navigate your way out into such neighborhoods as Queen Anne, Madison Valley, Madison Park, and Ballard, you’ll have a seemingly endless number of choices.

You’ll find this place across from Pier 70 at the north end of the waterfront. 2801 Elliott Ave. 20 6/441-7724.www.osf.com. Reservations not accepted. Main courses $8–$13. AE, DISC, MC, V. Mon–Thurs 11:30am–2pm and 4:30–10pm; Fri 11:30am–2pm and 4:30–11pm; Sat noon–11pm; Sun noon–10pm (1st Mon in July to Labor Day also Mon–Fri 2–4:30pm). 4 Downtown & First Hill VERY EXPENSIVE The Georgian NORTHWEST/CONTINENTAL The Georgian is as grand as they come, and if you’re looking for haute cuisine, palatial surroundings, and superb service, no other restaurant in Seattle comes close. This is by far the most traditional and formal restaurant in the city. For the full Georgian experience, I recommend opting for the three-course or seven-course dinner. The seven-course dinner might include seared foie gras with pressed cherries, oysters with caviar and horseradish foam, seared scallops with truffle-bacon butter sauce, Dungeness crab bisque, bacon-wrapped pheasant with black trumpet mushrooms, a local cheese served with huckleberries, and, a trio of small cakes.

EXPENSIVE Brasa LATE-NIGHT/MEDITERRANEAN Chef Tamara Murphy, much lauded over the years by national food magazines, is one of Seattle’s finest chefs, and here, at her attractive Belltown restaurant, she has introduced many a Seattleite to the joys of Mediterranean cuisine. Because the space is equally divided between lounge and dining room, and because the lounge serves a long list of tapas until midnight on weekends, Brasa attracts a wide range of diners—from foodies out for an evening of haute cuisine and fine wine to revelers looking for a late-night bite. If you’ve got a few dinner companions, start with a variety of tapas. 2107 Third Ave. 20 6/728-4220.www.brasa.com. Reservations highly recommended. Main courses $18–$31. AE, DC, MC, V. Sun–Thurs 5–10:30pm; Fri–Sat 5–midnight. Dahlia Lounge PAN-ASIAN/NORTHWEST Out front, the neon chef holding a flapping fish may suggest that the Dahlia is little more than a roadside diner.


Coastal California by Lonely Planet

1960s counterculture, airport security, Albert Einstein, Asilomar, back-to-the-land, Bay Area Rapid Transit, Berlin Wall, buy and hold, California gold rush, call centre, car-free, carbon footprint, centre right, Chuck Templeton: OpenTable:, Donner party, East Village, El Camino Real, Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test, Frank Gehry, global village, Golden Gate Park, Haight Ashbury, haute cuisine, illegal immigration, Joan Didion, Khyber Pass, Kickstarter, Loma Prieta earthquake, low cost airline, Mason jar, McMansion, Ronald Reagan, Silicon Valley, South of Market, San Francisco, stealth mode startup, Steve Wozniak, trade route, transcontinental railway, Upton Sinclair, urban sprawl, white picket fence, women in the workforce, working poor, Works Progress Administration, young professional, Zipcar

The bar serves small bites, but the dining room’s the thing. Restaurant at Meadowood CALIFORNIAN $$$ ( 707-967-1205; www.meadowood.com; 900 Meadowood Lane; 4-/9-course menu $125/225; 5:30-10pm Mon-Sat) If you couldn’t score reservations at French Laundry, fear not: the clubby Restaurant at Meadowood – the valley’s only other Michelin-three-star restaurant – has a more sensibly priced menu, elegant but unfussy forest-view dining room, and lavish haute cuisine that’s never too esoteric. Auberge has better views, but Meadowood’s food and service far surpass the former. Silverado Brewing Co BREWPUB $$ ( 707-967-9876; www.silveradobrewingcompany.com; 3020 Hwy 29; mains $12-18; 11:30am-1am; ) Silverados’ microbrews measure up to Napa’s wines – Brewmaster Ken Mee’s Certifiable Blonde has organic ingredients and crazy-tasty malts, and competes for top choice with the hopped-up Amber Ale.

From the caviar cart to the cheese course, Cyrus is a meal to remember. Madrona Manor CALIFORNIAN $$$ ( 707-433-4231, 800-258-4003; www.madronamanor.com; 1001 Westside Rd; 4-/5-/6-course menu $73/82/91; 6-9pm Wed-Sun) You’d be hard-pressed to find a lovelier place to pop the question than this retro-formal Victorian mansion’s garden-view veranda – though there’s nothing old-fashioned about the artful Californian haute cuisine: the kitchen churns its own butter, each course comes with a different variety of still-warm house-baked bread, lamb and cheese originate down the road, and deserts include ice cream flash-frozen tableside. Reserve a pre-sunset table. Scopa ITALIAN $$ ( 707-433-5282; www.scopahealdsburg.com; 109-A Plaza St, Healdsburg; mains $12-26; 5:30-10pm Tue-Sun) Space is tight inside this converted barbershop, but it’s worth cramming in for perfect thin-crust pizza and rustic Italian home cooking, like Nonna’s slow-braised chicken, with sautéed greens, melting into toasty polenta.

Sugar Shack BREAKFAST $ (www.hbsugarshack.com; 2131/2 Main St; mains $5-10; 6am-4pm Mon, Tue & Thu, to 8pm Wed, to 5pm Fri-Sun) The sidewalk patio is the place to sit at this Main St stalwart for some of HB’s best people-watching. And if you’re here really early, you might catch surfer dudes donning their wetsuits. The $5.55 breakfast special comes with two pancakes, an egg and bacon or a sausage. Sign up for a table at the clipboard on the outside wall. Chronic Tacos MEXICAN $ (www.eatchronictacos.com; 328 11th St; mains under $8; 8am-9pm) For surfer haute cuisine, mosey into this sticker-covered shack and request a made-to-order Fatty Taco, then settle in for one of the best Mexican meals around. With the Dead playing on the stereo, a couple of surf bums shooting pool and chatty, laid-back staff, you might just never leave. You’ll see other locations scattered across SoCal. Park Bench Cafe BREAKFAST, CAFE $ (www.parkbenchcafe.com; 17732 Goldenwest St; mains breakfast $6-10, lunch $9-11; 7:30am-2pm Tue-Fri, to 3pm Sat & Sun; ) A short drive east on Goldenwest St from PCH lands you at this shady outdoor cafe in Huntington Central Park.


pages: 287 words: 80,050

The Wisdom of Frugality: Why Less Is More - More or Less by Emrys Westacott

Airbnb, back-to-the-land, Bertrand Russell: In Praise of Idleness, Bonfire of the Vanities, carbon footprint, clean water, Community Supported Agriculture, corporate raider, Daniel Kahneman / Amos Tversky, dark matter, Diane Coyle, discovery of DNA, Downton Abbey, dumpster diving, financial independence, full employment, greed is good, happiness index / gross national happiness, haute cuisine, hedonic treadmill, income inequality, invisible hand, Isaac Newton, loss aversion, McMansion, means of production, move fast and break things, move fast and break things, negative equity, New Urbanism, paradox of thrift, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Thales and the olive presses, Thales of Miletus, the market place, The Spirit Level, Thorstein Veblen, Upton Sinclair, Veblen good, Zipcar

Yet hardly anyone argues that we should regularly read pulp fiction in order to enhance our enjoyment of good literature, or watch plenty of dumb and tedious B movies so as to appreciate more fully the rare gems when they come along. In some other spheres—science, for instance, or politics—the argument would make even less sense. Thus the principle that having too much of a good thing may lessen one’s appreciation of that thing does not hold universally, and even where it does hold, it does not always provide grounds for eschewing quality. It may be a good reason for not overdosing on haute cuisine, but it is not a good reason to spend a lot of time watching bad television. The second main argument to support the idea that simple living enhances our capacity for pleasure is that it encourages us to attend to and appreciate the inexhaustible wealth of interesting, beautiful, marvelous, and thought-provoking phenomena continually presented to us by the everyday world that is close at hand.

Extravagance Enhances Our Understanding and Appreciation of Things A fourth reason for questioning the traditional condemnation of extravagance is that a willingness to spend and indulge can expand our capacities for understanding, appreciation, and expression. We touched on this idea earlier when discussing Babette’s Feast. Take food and drink as an example. Simple fare can be a fine thing, provided it is not so simple as to be nutritionally deficient, and overindulging in haute cuisine may perhaps diminish one’s ability to enjoy more ordinary dishes. But it is also true that sampling different cuisines and occasionally trying out novel foods—which can be expensive—helps to refine one’s palette. Not only is the variety itself enjoyable—even Epicurus recognizes that—but experiencing a wider range of foods, with respect to both quality and variety, yields a certain kind of knowledge.


pages: 294 words: 82,438

Simple Rules: How to Thrive in a Complex World by Donald Sull, Kathleen M. Eisenhardt

Affordable Care Act / Obamacare, Airbnb, asset allocation, Atul Gawande, barriers to entry, Basel III, Berlin Wall, carbon footprint, Checklist Manifesto, complexity theory, Craig Reynolds: boids flock, Credit Default Swap, Daniel Kahneman / Amos Tversky, diversification, drone strike, en.wikipedia.org, European colonialism, Exxon Valdez, facts on the ground, Fall of the Berlin Wall, haute cuisine, invention of the printing press, Isaac Newton, Kickstarter, late fees, Lean Startup, Louis Pasteur, Lyft, Moneyball by Michael Lewis explains big data, Nate Silver, Network effects, obamacare, Paul Graham, performance metric, price anchoring, RAND corporation, risk/return, Saturday Night Live, sharing economy, Silicon Valley, Startup school, statistical model, Steve Jobs, TaskRabbit, The Signal and the Noise by Nate Silver, transportation-network company, two-sided market, Wall-E, web application, Y Combinator, Zipcar

Protecting intellectual property is serious business in a world where recipes can often be discovered through reverse engineering or consulting a published cookbook (although chefs often omit little tricks and secret ingredients from their published recipes). One chef explained, “If another chef copies a recipe exactly, we are very furious: we will not talk to this chef anymore, and we won’t communicate information to him in the future.” These norms cross the French border, suggesting haute cuisine chefs everywhere follow the rules. The study’s authors cite a globetrotting case in which an Australian chef tried to pass off recipes he learned in a Chicago restaurant as his own. He was severely criticized in online blogs, and the story spread to other news media. The co-owner of the Chicago restaurant publicly questioned the chef’s “intellectual integrity” on eGullet, an online forum sponsored by the Society for Culinary Arts & Letters.

Modern comedy is driven by unique material rather than expert delivery, and today’s comedians have worked out rules to protect their intellectual property and sanctions to enforce these rules. The “Don’t steal jokes” rule emerged, like the rules of the road, out of ongoing interactions among community members, without any particular guiding hand, and is strictly enforced by the community itself (recall the haute cuisine chefs in chapter 1). Rules evolve to address the most pressing issues in communities. In the case of standup comedy, the resolution of who “owns” a joke is both an essential and nonobvious issue. For example, comedians often formulate material collaboratively. In this instance, the rule gives ownership of the joke to the person who came up with the premise, rather than the punch line. This rule arose through discussions among comedians and spread.


pages: 534 words: 15,752

The Sushi Economy: Globalization and the Making of a Modern Delicacy by Sasha Issenberg

air freight, Akira Okazaki, anti-communist, barriers to entry, Bretton Woods, call centre, creative destruction, Deng Xiaoping, global supply chain, haute cuisine, means of production, Nixon shock, Saturday Night Live, Silicon Valley, special economic zone, standardized shipping container, telemarketer, trade route, urban renewal

Some emphasize, as well, the importance of having a reliable fish retailer. A more thorough list of prerequisites for the production of good sushi would include historical exposure to business travelers, tourists, and skilled migrants; integration into international labor markets; intercontinental cargo connections; supply-chain expertise; and exposure to the worldly flavor currents of both haute cuisine and fast food. In other words, a book about what goes into the making of sushi has to really be a narrative about the development of twentieth-century global capitalism. A book that wants to revel in the beauty and deliciousness of sushi must be a celebration of globalization. This is that book. THE SUSHI ECONOMY PART ONE The Freight Economy One PRINCE EDWARD ISLAND, CANADA The Day of the Flying Fish The birth of modern sushi Wayne MacAlpine had been working as Japan Airlines’s lone cargo man in Canada for only a few months when the Teletype machine in his Toronto office began stammering with a surprising solution to the one-way traffic problem.

Whether bland flavors followed bland palates or vice versa is unclear, but the ensuing cycle birthed chop suey, chow mein, and menus listing more generals than some multilateral cease-fires. Yet in the United States, Japanese cuisine was never really an “ethnic” food—a bargain barrage of alien flavors to scout in out-of-the-way neighborhoods and celebrate for its rambunctious primitivism. In large part because of its celebrated aesthetics, Japanese food was always seen as fussy haute cuisine. (Russian food had a similar experience in nineteenth-century France: Its combination of smoked fishes, caviar, and delicate salads was immediately received by the bourgeoisie as sophisticated, cosmopolitan. That image, like Japanese food’s, may have been bolstered by the originating nation’s imperial dignity.) While ethnic-food trends tend to mirror immigration patterns—döner kebabs in Munich, couscous and spring rolls in Paris, tacos in San Antonio—cuisines that catch on, influence mainstream tastes, and receive culinary prestige have not historically bubbled up from immigrant enclaves.


Frommer's Mexico 2008 by David Baird, Juan Cristiano, Lynne Bairstow, Emily Hughey Quinn

airport security, AltaVista, Bartolomé de las Casas, centre right, colonial rule, East Village, glass ceiling, haute cuisine, indoor plumbing, low cost airline, low cost carrier, Maui Hawaii, out of africa, Pepto Bismol, place-making, Skype, sustainable-tourism, the market place, urban planning

Consequently, you can find restaurants of every type, size, and price range scattered across the city. Mexicans take their food and dining seriously, so if you see a full house, that’s generally recommendation enough. But those same places may be entirely empty if you arrive early— remember, here, lunch is generally eaten at 3pm, with dinner not seriously considered before 9pm. CHAPULTEPEC PARK & POLANCO VERY EXPENSIVE MEXICAN HAUTE CUISINE Aguila y Sol One of Mexico City’s most sophisticated and acclaimed restaurants is also one of the best Mexican restaurants you will find in the world. Chef-owner Martha Ortiz’s enchanted cuisine matches indigenous and pre-Hispanic ingredients to contemporary creations, leaving you the sense that an outing to Aguila y Sol is as much an artistic as a dining experience (Ortiz has designed a number of excellent cookbooks on sale at the restaurant). 112 CHAPTER 4 .

Main courses include Cantonese, Peking, Szechuan, and Mandarin selections, such as steamed red snapper with white-wine sauce, chicken in shrimp paste with sesame and crab sauce, and the house specialty, Peking duck. Tennyson 117, 2nd floor (at Av. Presidente Masaryk), Col. Polanco. & 55/5281-3410 or -2921. www.chezwok.com. Reservations recommended. Main courses $18–$55 (£9.90–£30). AE, MC, V. Daily Mon–Sat 1:30–11pm; Sun 1:30–5pm. Metro: Polanco. Moments MEXICAN HAUTE CUISINE A 16th century oasis in the midst of the world’s most populous city, the Hacienda de los Morales is an enchanted place for special occasions. The Spanish colonial decor includes dark wood furnishings, stone columns, and domed brick ceilings, with some tables looking out to garden fountains. The entrance patio doubles as an elegant bar, where you will find precious artwork and the original chapel where Spanish aristocrats once prayed.

Expertly prepared food includes the best of Mexican dishes, with an excellent selection of meat, fish, and seafood, as well as pastas, crepes, and other selections. A constant stream of weddings and special events takes place in private salons surrounding the gardens. Jacket and tie are suggested. Hacienda de los Morales Vázquez de Mella 525 (at Av. Horacio), Col. Polanco. & 55/5096-3054. Reservations recommended. Main courses $20–$40 (£11–£22). AE, MC, V. Daily 1pm–1am. Metro: Polanco. MEXICAN HAUTE CUISINE A star of the city’s superb dining scene, this signature venue of celebrated chef Patricia Quintana pays homage to the best of classic Mexican cooking. While there are only 19 tables in the simple atmosphere, what’s on your plate will more than make up for it. Located on Mexico’s version of Rodeo Drive, it remains one of the “must-dine” restaurants, so reservations are essential, even at lunch.


pages: 618 words: 159,672

Fodor's Rome: With the Best City Walks and Scenic Day Trips by Fodor's Travel Publications Inc.

call centre, Donald Trump, glass ceiling, haute couture, haute cuisine, Honoré de Balzac, Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, low cost airline, Mason jar, mega-rich, Murano, Venice glass, starchitect, urban planning, young professional

Yet here you also find some of the city’s most revered gourmet temples, featuring star chefs, inventive cuisine, and decidedly higher bills placed on the finest high-thread-count damask tablecloths. Quite a range, and yet this coexistence of high- and lowbrow is decidedly Roman. The Troiani brothers at Il Convivio (Vicolo dei Soldati 31 | 06/6869432) have been running what is essentially a high altar to alta cucina (haute cuisine) for many years, where revering top-notch ingredients is an art form. Pizzas are the thing at the famed Da Baffetto (Via Governo Vecchio 114 | 06/6861617), where there’s always a line. ROMAN PIZZA 101 The concept is simple: Naples may lay claim to the invention of pizza, but to many pizza purists, Rome perfected the dish. Roman pizza has a thin crust, which makes it important that the crust has the right ratio of crisp-to-chewy.

. | Average cost: €55 | Vicolo delle Vacche 9/a, Navona | 00186 | 06/6871499 | www.etabli.it | Closed Sun. in summer, Mon. in winter. Fodor’s Choice | Il Convivio. $$$$ | MODERN ITALIAN | In a tiny, nondescript vicolo north of Piazza Navona, the three Troiani brothers—Angelo in the kitchen, and brothers Giuseppe and Massimo presiding over the dining room and wine cellar—have quietly been redefining the experience of Italian eclectic alta cucina (haute cuisine) for many years. Antipasti include a selection of ultra-fresh raw seafood preparations in the mixed crudi, while a “carbomare” pasta is a riff on tradition, substituting pancetta with fresh fish roe and house-cured bottarga (salted fish roe). Or opt for one of the famed signature dishes, including a fabulous version of a cold-weather pigeon main course prepared four different ways. Service is attentive without being overbearing, and the wine list is exceptional.

Service is attentive without being overbearing, and the wine list is exceptional. It is definitely a splurge spot. | Average cost: €110 | Vicolo dei Soldati 31, Navona | 00186 | 06/6869432 | Reservations essential | Closed Sun., 1 wk in Jan., and 2 wks in Aug. No lunch. Fodor’s Choice | Il Pagliaccio. $$$$ | MODERN ITALIAN | To find some of the latest spins on Roman alta cucina (haute cuisine), you might be surprised to head to a hidden back street nestled between the upscale Via Giulia and the popular piazzas of Campo de’ Fiori and Navona. But that is where widely traveled chef Anthony Genovese has come to roost, after garnering his first Michelin star at luxe and lavish Palazzo Sasso hotel on the Amalfi Coast. Born in France to Calabrese parents, and having worked in such far-flung places as Japan and Thailand, it’s no surprise to note Genovese’s love of unusual spices, “foreign” ingredients, and Eastern preparations.


The Linguist: A Personal Guide to Language Learning by Steve Kaufmann

borderless world, British Empire, discovery of DNA, financial independence, haute cuisine, South China Sea, trade liberalization, urban sprawl

Conviviality around a meal table can be the best learning environment. Cicero, the Roman statesman and orator, defined convivium as “To sit down to dinner with friends because they share one's life.” This desire to communicate over food is common to all languages and cultures, and no doubt has an origin in the prehistoric sharing of the hunt. It reinforces a feeling of reciprocity between people. As a poor student, I did not often have the chance to enjoy haute cuisine. However, it was not uncommon when I was hitchhiking in Southern France for truck drivers to share with me a full course lunch, including wine. How they continued driving after that was a bit of a mystery to me. I understand that the control on drinking and driving in France has become more severe in recent years. Hitchhiking in Europe I am sure I hitchhiked tens of thousands of miles in those years, criss-crossing Europe from Spain to Sweden to Italy through Germany and all countries in between.


Lonely Planet London by Lonely Planet

Boris Johnson, British Empire, car-free, carbon footprint, centre right, congestion charging, discovery of the americas, East Village, Etonian, financial independence, haute couture, haute cuisine, Isaac Newton, John Snow's cholera map, low cost airline, Mahatma Gandhi, market design, place-making, post-work, Skype, trade route, transatlantic slave trade, urban renewal, Winter of Discontent

£ less than £10 ££ £10-20 £££ more than £20 Reservations » Make reservations at weekends, if you’re keen on a particular place, or if you’re in a group of more than four people. » Top-end restaurants often run multiple sittings, with allocated time slots (generally two hours); pick a late slot if you don’t want to be rushed. Tipping Most restaurants automatically tack a ‘discretionary’ service charge (usually 12.5%) onto the bill; this should be clearly advertised. If you feel the service wasn’t adequate, you can tip separately (or not tip at all). Haute Cuisine, Low Prices » Top-end restaurants offer set lunch menus that are great value; à la carte prices are sometimes cheaper for lunch. » Many West End restaurants offer good-value pre- or post-theatre menus. » The reliable internet booking service Top Table (www.toptable.co.uk) offers substantial discounts (up to 50% off the food bill) at selected restaurants. BYO » BYO is common among budget establishments; some charge corkage (£1 to £1.50 per bottle of wine). » Wine Pages (www.wine-pages.com) keeps a useful directory of BYO restaurants.

Wagamama (www.wagamama.com) The turnover is pretty quick at this fusion noodle place, which is great if you’re in a hurry, but not so if you like a little service with your food. Skylon (click here), atop Royal Festival Hall TRICIA DE COURCY LING/PHOTOLIBRARY Lonely Planet’s Top Choices Providores & Tapa Room (Click here) Fusion food at its best. Wapping Food (Click here) A perfect East End recipe: industrial decor meets haute cuisine. franco manca (Click here) London’s finest pizzas, locally prepared but with Italian flair. Gordon Ramsay (Click here) Three Michelin stars and a celeb chef. Gaucho Grill (Click here) Fabulous restaurant specialising in succulent Argentinian beef. Best by Budget £ Honest Burgers (Click here) E Pellici (Click here) Mangal Ocakbasi (Click here) Nevada Street Deli (Click here) Busaba Eathai (Click here) Taquería (Click here) ££ Moro (Click here) Ottolenghi (Click here) Magdalen (Click here) Al Boccon di’Vino (Click here) Kazan (Click here) £££ Les Trois Garçons (Click here) Gordon Ramsay at Claridge’s (Click here) Chez Bruce (Click here) Zuma (Click here) Le Boudin Blanc (Click here) Best by Cuisine Modern European Whitechapel Gallery Dining Room (Click here) Vincent Rooms (Click here) Launceston Place (Click here) Andrew Edmunds (Click here) Wild Honey (Click here) Indian Tayyabs (Click here) Café Spice Namasté (Click here) Mooli’s (Click here) Rasoi Vineet Bhatia (Click here) Cinnamon Club (Click here) Chinese Yauatcha (Click here) Bar Shu (Click here) Hunan (Click here) Baozi Inn (Click here) Pearl Liang (Click here) Vegetarian Gate (Click here) Mildreds (Click here) Manna (Click here) Gallery Cafe (Click here) Diwana Bhel Poori House (Click here) Italian Bocca di Lupo (Click here) Fifteen (Click here) Locanda Locatelli (Click here) Polpetto (Click here) British St John (Click here) Penny Black (Click here) Laughing Gravy (Click here) Inn the Park (Click here) Best Gastropubs Gun (Click here) Anchor & Hope (Click here) Garrison Public House (Click here) Duke of Cambridge (Click here) Lots Road Pub & Dining Room (Click here) Best for Views Skylon (Click here) Formans (Click here) Oxo Tower Restaurant & Brasserie (Click here) River Café (Click here) Min Jiang (Click here) Best Afternoon Teas Dean Street Townhouse (Click here) Orangery (Click here) Volupté (Click here) Bea’s of Bloomsbury (Click here) Wolseley (Click here) Best Food Markets Borough Market (Click here) Broadway Market (Click here) Portobello Road Market (Click here) Marylebone Farmers Market (Click here) Best Gourmet Shops Jones Dairy (Click here) Fortnum & Mason (Click here) Algerian Coffee Stores (Click here) Vintage House (Click here) Best Celebrity Chef Restaurants Viajante (Click here) Dinner by Heston Blumenthal (Click here) Nobu (Click here) HIX (Click here) Drinking & Nightlife West London pub TERRY HARRIS / ALAMY © There’s little Londoners like to do more than party.

Victoria & Pimlico Roussillon French £££ Offline map Google map ( 7730 5550; www.roussillon.co.uk; 16 St Barnabas St SW1; 3-course set lunch/ dinner £35/55; closed lunch Sat & all day Sun; Sloane Sq) On a quiet side street off Pimlico Rd, Michelin-starred Roussillon offers fine service, lovely muted decor and fresh English ingredients dexterously cooked à la française . There’s no à la carte; choose from among four to six starters and main courses at lunch or dinner, or there’s a more extravagant tasting menu (£48 to £58 at lunch, £75 at dinner) of eight courses. The Menu Légumes (£65) puts vegetarian cooking into the haute cuisine league. Hunan Chinese ££ Offline map Google map ( 7730 5712; 51 Pimlico Rd; lunch/dinner £28.80/41.80; Sloane Sq) In business since 1982 this understated Chinese restaurant imaginatively exercises a no-menu policy, so just present your preferences and let the dachu (chef) get cracking. If you need inspiration, however, staff assist with ideas, such as the appetising slow-cooked belly pork with Chinese spices and preserved vegetables.


Switzerland by Damien Simonis, Sarah Johnstone, Nicola Williams

Albert Einstein, bank run, car-free, clean water, Frank Gehry, Guggenheim Bilbao, haute couture, haute cuisine, indoor plumbing, Kickstarter, low cost airline, low cost carrier, Nelson Mandela, offshore financial centre, the market place, trade route, young professional

Schiff (%041 711 00 55; Graben 2; mains Sfr25-37; h11-12.30am summer, reduced hr winter) With a menu that seems equally split between fish and home-made pasta, this restaurant has a prime location on the main square, and the upstairs Panorama Bar to take advantage of the view. Gasthaus Rathauskeller (% 041 711 00 58; Oberer Altstadt 1; meals in Bistro/Zunftstube from Sfr28/75; h11.30am-2.30pm & 3.30-10.30pm Tue-Sat) Both the ground-floor bistro and the elegant, traditional and pricey haute cuisine Zunftstube above are dotted with corporate customers, but somehow the service is so professional and the surrounds so pleasant that it just doesn’t spoil the atmosphere. Confiserie Albert Meier (%041 711 10 49; www.die zugerkirschtorte.ch; Bahnhofplatz; h7am-6.30pm MonFri, 8am-4pm Sat) A local speciality is Zuger Kir- schtorte, a cherry cake made from pastry, biscuit, almond paste and butter cream, infused with strong cherry brandy.

Take tram No 1 or 14 to Musicaltheater or the No 33 bus to Mattenstrasse. Parterre (%061 695 89 98; Klybeckstrasse 1b; mains lunch specials Sfr25-35, other mains Sfr25-50; hlunch & dinner Mon-Fri, dinner Sat) Popular, upmarket Mediterranean restaurant, with fine wines and delicately flavoured dishes. Bruderholz-Stucki (%061 361 82 22; Bruderholzallee 42; lunch menus & à la carte evening mains from Sfr75; hlunch & dinner Tue-Sat) Gault Millau–rated haute cuisine in the suburbs. Sfr24-32; hdinner Mon-Sat, snacks & light meals served 8am-midnight Mon-Fri, 10am-midnight Sat) Unusual Drinking dishes such as pork chop marinated in beer with apricot chutney, or green curry in tortilla shells over fried sweet potato, mostly come off in this slightly alternative place overlooking the Kaserne park. There’s an array of newspapers and magazines, some English, to read over coffee and cake.

Their aspirations and eccentricities are the subject of the Museo Casa Anatta (%091 791 01 81; www.mon teverita.org; Via Collina 78; adult/student & senior Sfr6/4; h3-7pm Tue-Sun Jul & Aug, 2.30-6pm Tue-Sun Apr-Jun & Sep-Oct) on Monte Verità (take the small bus to Buxi from the post office; Sfr1). The Museo Comunale d’Arte Moderna (%091 golago Motta 17; set meals Sfr58-130, mains Sfr40-55; hTue-Sat) Although some think Locarno’s 759 81 40; Via Borgo 34; adult/concession Sfr7/5; h10amnoon & 3-6pm Tue-Sat, 4-6pm Sun), in Palazzo Pan- temple to French haute cuisine is a trifle stuffy, this lakeside gem is a guarantee of fine dining. Making no concessions to anyone, even the menu is in French. Tuck into some carré d’agneau rôti au romarin (roast lamb cooked in rosemary). caldi, includes paintings by artists connected with the town, among them Paul Klee, Ben Nicholson, Alexej Jawlensky and Hans Arp. The Collegio Papio (Via Cappelle), now a high school, boasts a fine Lombard courtyard and includes the 15th-century Chiesa Santa Maria della Misericordia, with medieval frescoes.


pages: 2,323 words: 550,739

1,000 Places to See in the United States and Canada Before You Die, Updated Ed. by Patricia Schultz

Albert Einstein, Alfred Russel Wallace, American Society of Civil Engineers: Report Card, Bretton Woods, Burning Man, California gold rush, car-free, Charles Lindbergh, Columbine, Donald Trump, East Village, El Camino Real, estate planning, Frank Gehry, glass ceiling, Golden Gate Park, Guggenheim Bilbao, Haight Ashbury, haute cuisine, indoor plumbing, interchangeable parts, Mars Rover, Mason jar, Maui Hawaii, Mikhail Gorbachev, Murano, Venice glass, Nelson Mandela, new economy, New Urbanism, Norman Mailer, out of africa, Pepto Bismol, place-making, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Ronald Reagan, Rosa Parks, Saturday Night Live, sexual politics, South of Market, San Francisco, The Chicago School, transcontinental railway, traveling salesman, upwardly mobile, urban decay, urban planning, urban renewal, urban sprawl, wage slave, white picket fence, Works Progress Administration, Yogi Berra, éminence grise

At dinner, out-of-towners fill the restaurant’s stunning Pool Room, with its central white marble pool and canopy of seasonally changing trees, but at lunchtime a certain set of New York power brokers use the Grill Room as their lunchtime cafeteria. The continental and nouveau American cuisine more than holds its own against all the hype. Celebrity chefs can be found all over. On tony Park Avenue, Daniel Boulud’s self-titled restaurant Daniel proves why fellow chefs and devoted patrons regard Boulud as one of the country’s most brilliant French-trained talents, trailblazing the future of haute cuisine. Refined fantasy describes both the restaurant’s decor and its poetic menu, which features technically complicated, perfectly executed, and artistically presented dishes. You can revel in Boulud’s inventive spirit less expensively at his neighborhoody Café Boulud and the French-American DB Bistro Moderne, justly famous for its sumptuous hamburger. In bustling Midtown West, French-born Eric Ripert, a permanent fixture among the city’s lineup of star chefs, heads the kitchen at Le Bernardin, an elegant temple that first revolutionized seafood cooking in the 1980s.

BEST TIMES: Fri and Sun, mid-May–late Sept for the museum’s popular “Schuylkill Stroll” walking tours; mid-Nov for the Philadelphia Museum Craft Show at the Pennsylvania Convention Center (www.pmacraftshow.org). Bon Appétit! PHILADELPHIA’S RESTAURANT ROW Philadelphia, Pennsylvania They say chef-owner Georges Perrier of Le Bec-Fin has a portrait of Napoleon in his office. French pride? Perhaps. Or maybe the hint of a comparison: Monsieur Bonaparte redrew the map of Europe, while Monsieur Perrier has redrawn the map of Philadelphia’s haute cuisine. It began in 1970, when the Lyon-born chef opened Le Bec-Fin (“the good taste”) at 13th and Spruce, which quickly became the toast of foodies from Philadelphia and beyond, earning acclaim as the East Coast’s (and possibly America’s) finest French restaurant. Relocated to Walnut Street in 1983, the restaurant has become not just a landmark but a kind of beacon, drawing other chefs into its neighborhood, transforming Walnut Street into Philadelphia’s restaurant row, a lodestar for the gastronomically inclined.

Tel 877-773-2447 or 770-773-7480; www.barnsleyresort.com. Cost: from $299; dinner at Woodlands Grill $50. BEST TIMES: spring and fall for gardens and golf. At Callaway, Jan for the Southern Gardening Symposium, early Sept for the Sky High Hot Air Balloon Festival, and mid-Nov–Dec for the Fantasy in Lights holiday festival. Dining Highs in Georgia’s Low Country SAVANNAH’S BEST EATERIES Savannah, Georgia From temples of haute cuisine to down-home country restaurants, this hub of Georgia’s Low Country celebrates its food with inimitable gusto and panache. Housed in an elegant turn-of-the-century beaux arts mansion on the periphery of the Historic District, Elizabeth’s (aka “Miz Terry’s place”) has been Savannah’s most famous restaurant since it opened in 1981. Executive chef Elizabeth Terry continues to thrill loyalists with classic Low Country recipes and local ingredients interpreted by a young and affable staff led by brothers Greg and Gary Butch.


pages: 277 words: 41,815

Lonely Planet Pocket Berlin by Lonely Planet, Andrea Schulte-Peevers

Albert Einstein, Berlin Wall, call centre, Fall of the Berlin Wall, Frank Gehry, G4S, haute cuisine, indoor plumbing, Peter Eisenman, Ronald Reagan, Ronald Reagan: Tear down this wall, upwardly mobile, urban planning, urban renewal

For lunch, join the queue at Burgermeister (Click here), then hop on the U1 for the one-stop ride to Görlitzer Bahnhof (or walk on Skalitzer Strasse). Follow Oranienstrasse north, checking out UKO Fashion (Click here) and other secondhand, streetwear and knick-knack shops. Study the local boho crowd over coffee (or the first beer of the day) at Luzia (Click here). After dark is when Kreuzberg truly comes alive. Dinner options range from haute cuisine at Horváth (Click here) to rib-sticking German classics at Max und Moritz (Click here). The latter is probably a better choice if you’re planning to make a dedicated study of Kreuzberg’s bar scene. For further suggestions Click here and our Kotti Bar-Hop feature on Click here. Kreuzberg Eating 1 Horváth B4 2 Volt D4 3 Defne B4 4 Bar Raval E3 5 Henne A2 6 Max und Moritz A2 7 Kimchi Princess C3 8 Burgermeister G2 9 Il Casolare A4 Drinking 10 Club der Visionäre H4 11 Watergate G2 12 Madame Claude F3 13 Freischwimmer H3 14 Ankerklause B4 Entertainment 15 Magnet G2 16 Lido G3 Shopping 17 Killerbeast G3 18 Overkill F2 19 UKO Fashion C3 20 Hardwax B3 Local Life Kotti Bar-Hop Noisy, chaotic and sleepless, the area around Kottbusser Tor U-Bahn station (Kotti, for short) defiantly retains the punky-funky alt feel that’s defined it since the 1970s.


You're a Horrible Person, but I Like You: The Believer Book of Advice by The Believer

Burning Man, haute cuisine, Kickstarter, Mahatma Gandhi, nuclear winter, Saturday Night Live

But I hate doing dishes, and I especially hate the smell that wafts up from a stack of dirty dishes overflowing from the sink onto the counter. What do you recommend? Christy Danbury, CT Dear Christy: No one enjoys doing dishes. It’s one of those universally hated tasks that we all have to deal with, especially folks like you and I who have an ongoing (if nonexclusive) love affair with the art of haute cuisine. It’s basically a four-step process: 1. Cook (preferably something Thai or SoCal-LoCarb). 2. Eat (slowly—put your BlackBerry away!). 3. Relax, digest, enjoy a good sex pamphlet or take a crack at solving the Rubik’s Snake. 4. Have the cleaning woman do the dishes. Good luck, David ADDENDUM: Since this article was first published, I’ve received numerous inquiries from aspiring stay-at-home cooks who claim not to employ a cleaning woman, and/or whose cleaning woman doesn’t work after dinner.


pages: 337 words: 40,257

Pocket Milan & the Lakes by Lonely Planet, Paula Hardy

G4S, haute cuisine, Murano, Venice glass, plutocrats, Plutocrats, starchitect

(Click here) Barindelli Boat Tours Make a tour of Lake Como James Bond–style in a mahogany cigarette boat (Click here). Lago Maggiore Express Trace Lake Maggiore’s shoreline and cross the ‘Hundred Valleys’ on this train ride into Switzerland. (Click here) Funicolare Como-Brunate Swing high above the Lake Como in a glass-sided gondola for bird’s-eye views. (Click here) Best Lakeside Dining Taverna del Pittore Alta cucina (haute cuisine) on a terrace jutting out over Lake Maggiore. (Click here) Lo Scalo Eat lake perch on Cannobio’s pretty cobbled promenade. (Click here) Albergo Silvio Look out over the tiled dome of Santa Maria to the blooming gardens of Villa Carlotta. (Click here) Agriturismo Giacomino Meats, cheeses, honey and wine from the farm accompanied by mountainside views. (Click here) Best Museums Palazzo Borromeo Set against 10 tiered terraces of blooming flowers, the palace houses Old Masters such as Rubens, Titian and Mantegna.


pages: 803 words: 415,953

Frommer's Mexico 2009 by David Baird, Lynne Bairstow, Joy Hepp, Juan Christiano

airport security, AltaVista, Bartolomé de las Casas, centre right, colonial rule, East Village, glass ceiling, haute cuisine, indoor plumbing, low cost airline, low cost carrier, out of africa, Pepto Bismol, place-making, Skype, sustainable-tourism, the market place, urban planning, young professional

Mexicans take their food and dining seriously, so if you see a full house, that’s generally recommendation enough. But those same places may be entirely empty if you arrive early— remember, here, lunch is generally eaten at 3pm, with dinner not seriously considered before 9pm. Many establishments add a “cover” charge of $2 to $4 (£1–£2) per person to the bill. CHAPULTEPEC PARK & POLANCO VERY EXPENSIVE MEXICAN HAUTE CUISINE Aguila y Sol This sophisticated and acclaimed establishment is without question my favorite Mexican restaurant. Serving the best Mexican cuisine you will find anywhere in the world, chef-owner Martha Ortiz blends indigenous and pre-Hispanic ingredients with contemporary creations, and the results attain the level of art. (Ortiz has designed a number of excellent cookbooks, for sale at the restaurant).

The beautiful space reflects soft Mexican colors and is casually elegant but not stuffy, and the clientele includes some of the city’s best-known personalities. Emilio Castelar 229, 3rd floor (above Louis Vuitton shop at Av. Presidente Masaryk), Col. Polanco. & 55/5281-8354. Reservations recommended. Main courses $20–$35 (£10–£18). AE, MC, V. Mon–Sat 1:30–11:30pm; Sun 1:30– 5:30pm. Metro: Polanco. Moments MEXICAN HAUTE CUISINE Hacienda de los Morales A 16thcentury oasis amid the world’s most populous city, the Hacienda de los Morales is an enchanted place for special occasions. The Spanish colonial decor includes dark wood furnishings, stone columns, and domed brick ceilings, with some tables looking out to garden fountains. The entrance patio doubles as an elegant bar, where you will find precious artwork and the original chapel where Spanish aristocrats once prayed.

Expertly prepared food includes the best of Mexican dishes, with an excellent selection of meat, fish, and seafood, as well as pastas, crepes, and other selections. A constant stream of weddings and special events takes place in private salons surrounding the gardens. Jacket and tie are suggested. Vázquez de Mella 525 (at Av. Horacio), Col. Polanco. & 55/5096-3054. www.haciendadelosmorales.com. Reservations recommended. Main courses $20–$40 (£10–£20). AE, MC, V. Daily 1pm–1am. Metro: Polanco. MEXICAN HAUTE CUISINE Still at the top of the city’s superb dining scene, this signature venue of celebrated chef Patricia Quintana pays homage to the best of classic Mexican cooking. There are only 19 tables, and the atmosphere is simple, but what’s on your plate will more than compensate. Located on Mexico’s version of Rodeo Drive, it remains one of the capital’s most popular restaurants, so reservations are essential, even at lunch.


pages: 165 words: 47,193

The End of Work: Why Your Passion Can Become Your Job by John Tamny

Albert Einstein, Andy Kessler, asset allocation, barriers to entry, basic income, Bernie Sanders, cloud computing, commoditize, David Ricardo: comparative advantage, Downton Abbey, future of work, George Gilder, haute cuisine, income inequality, Jeff Bezos, knowledge economy, Mark Zuckerberg, Peter Thiel, profit motive, Saturday Night Live, Silicon Valley, Stephen Hawking, Steve Ballmer, Steve Jobs, There's no reason for any individual to have a computer in his home - Ken Olsen, trickle-down economics, universal basic income, upwardly mobile, Yogi Berra

That’s all there is to it.”20 If Grant Achatz had been born fifty years earlier, odds are he would have labored in obscurity. While he might have loved what he was doing, the public wasn’t much interested in eccentric geniuses pursuing “last resort” careers in the kitchen. Achatz is the beneficiary of a dramatic rise in prosperity that has given enough people the discretionary income and leisure to support him in the pursuit of his passion for haute cuisine. It’s an economy that allowed Danny Meyer’s Eleven Madison Park to hire a “coffee director” who personally prepares diners’ twenty-four-dollar cups of coffee at their tables.21 This kind of wealth also allows individuals to concentrate on what they do best, what the nineteenth-century economist David Ricardo called “comparative advantage.” Each of us does what he’s good at while “importing” everything else from others.


pages: 158 words: 76,072

Rough Guide Directions Marrakesh by Daniel Jacobs

haute cuisine

The natural red ochre pigment that bedecks its walls and buildings can at times seem dominant, but there’s no shortage of other colours, and few cities as vibrant as this one. Marrakesh breathes the scents of the Middle East and Africa: the spices, the incense, the fresh wood being cut and crafted in workshops right there on the street. Yet simultaneously it oozes a French-inspired elegance in its cool riads, haute cuisine, stylish boutiques and gorgeous clothes. Whatever the wider influences, Marrakesh is first and foremost a Moroccan INTRODUCTION 6 Koutobia Minaret at night city – the Moroccan city, even – basking in Morocco’s unique combination of Arab and Berber culture, that infuses its architecture, its craftwork, its cooking, and its people. For visitors, the Jemaa el Fna is undoubtedly the focus, a place without parallel in the world; really no more than an open space, it’s also the stage for a long-established ritual in which shifting circles of onlookers gather round groups of acrobats, musicians, dancers, storytellers, comedians and fairground acts.


pages: 598 words: 140,612

Triumph of the City: How Our Greatest Invention Makes Us Richer, Smarter, Greener, Healthier, and Happier by Edward L. Glaeser

affirmative action, Andrei Shleifer, Berlin Wall, British Empire, Broken windows theory, carbon footprint, Celebration, Florida, clean water, congestion charging, declining real wages, desegregation, different worldview, diversified portfolio, Edward Glaeser, endowment effect, European colonialism, financial innovation, Frank Gehry, global village, Guggenheim Bilbao, haute cuisine, Home mortgage interest deduction, James Watt: steam engine, Jane Jacobs, job-hopping, John Snow's cholera map, Mahatma Gandhi, McMansion, megacity, mortgage debt, mortgage tax deduction, New Urbanism, place-making, Ponzi scheme, Potemkin village, Ralph Waldo Emerson, rent control, RFID, Richard Florida, Rosa Parks, school vouchers, Seaside, Florida, Silicon Valley, Skype, smart cities, Steven Pinker, strikebreaker, Thales and the olive presses, the built environment, The Death and Life of Great American Cities, the new new thing, The Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith, trade route, transatlantic slave trade, upwardly mobile, urban planning, urban renewal, urban sprawl, William Shockley: the traitorous eight, Works Progress Administration, young professional

Today, of course, Indian restaurants in London are more than just curry shops. In 2001, the Michelin Guide broke with its French haute cuisine traditions and gave stars to two Indian restaurants in London. One of the chefs responsible for those stars has followed the path of urban entrepreneurship and opened his own restaurant, Rasoi Vineet Bhatia, which well deserves the 27 rating for food it received from Zagat in 2010, only one point below the heights reached by Gordon Ramsay. London’s top Indian chefs were generally born in India, but they have also spent years in the competitive world of London cooking. Their food is experimental and presents Asian traditions with haute cuisine flair. A good argument can be made that this fusion of India and Europe beats anything cooked in Mumbai. The abundance of city amenities explains why urbanites are so much more likely to partake of public pleasures.


pages: 232 words: 49,620

Ploughman's Lunch and the Miser's Feast: Authentic Pub Food, Restaurant Fare, and Home Cooking From Small Towns, Big Cities, and Country Villages Across the British Isles by Brian Yarvin

British Empire, haute cuisine

The phrase "pub grub" has changed its meaning frequently. Once it simply meant food that was easily reheated, but today it's something just a bit fancier than American diner food: good-quality burgers, sausages, salads, and sandwiches, along with traditional British specialties like dumplings and mince, meat pies, and fish and chips. There are also "gastropubs" with much more ambitious kitchens. In many cases, these are Britain's temples of haute cuisine, and even though they're in buildings that look like pubs, they have the atmosphere of four-star restaurants and prices to match. Is there an ideal time to visit? If you're looking to meet the locals, a weeknight might work best for you. If you're going to have only one pub meal, make it lunch on a Sunday. That's when people will be lining up for roast beef and Yorkshire pudding—and there's nothing's more British than that


pages: 190 words: 50,133

Lonely Planet's 2016 Best in Travel by Lonely Planet

Airbnb, Albert Einstein, anti-communist, British Empire, David Attenborough, haute cuisine, Maui Hawaii, sharing economy, South China Sea, Stanford marshmallow experiment, sustainable-tourism, urban planning, walkable city

Many people mistakenly think it’s an over-tall guard tower, but everyone agrees that its height serves as a constant reminder to the city that crime doesn’t pay. Classic restaurant experience Manchester has no shortage of fine dining, but since opening in 2013 Manchester House delivers it with plenty of local flair. Inspired by the molecular gastronomy of Blumenthal and El Bulli, chef Aiden Byrne serves up carefully crafted delicacies that have all of the sophistication but none of the preciousness of haute cuisine. The dining room is all industrial chic and informal elegance; even more popular is the buzzy lounge on the 12th floor, with its cocktails and local brews, to be enjoyed with stunning views of the Manchester cityscape. Best shopping From the boutiques of South King St and the high-fashion stores of Spinningfields to the high-street cornucopia of the Arndale Centre and the hipster shops of the Northern Quarter, Manchester has a cure for every strain of retail fever.


Great Meat: Classic Techniques and Award-Winning Recipes for Selecting, Cutting, and Cooking Beef, Lamb, Pork, Poultry, and Game by Dave Kelly, John Hogan, Glenn Keefer

haute cuisine

His food philosophy is simple … “nature provides us with some amazing produce so I try to showcase the food with slight manipulations.” www.cotswold-inns-hotels.co.uk/property/the_manor_house_hotel JOHN HOGAN Executive Chef at Keefer’s Restaurant, Chicago, John has years of experience at Chicago’s finest restaurants, and dozens of awards. His love of food dates back to his childhood when he watched his mother cooking special meals for his father. John is known for innovative haute cuisine and simple fare with his signature twists. For Keefer’s, Hogan developed a new menu of Chicago-style steak and seafood dishes. www.keefersrestaurant.com DAVE KELLY Dave may not be a chef, but his years in the butcher’s trade mean that he knows meat. For this book, Dave has written down some of the recipes that he cooks for family and friends. Simple and satisfying, they’re some of his favorites, and he hopes they’ll be yours too. www.rubyandwhite.com SAM MOODY Sam is Executive Chef at Bath Priory and was awarded his first Michelin star in 2012.


The Rough Guide to New York City by Martin Dunford

Anton Chekhov, Berlin Wall, Bonfire of the Vanities, Buckminster Fuller, buttonwood tree, car-free, Charles Lindbergh, Chuck Templeton: OpenTable:, clean water, colonial exploitation, colonial rule, desegregation, Donald Trump, East Village, Edward Thorp, Exxon Valdez, Frank Gehry, glass ceiling, haute cuisine, illegal immigration, Jane Jacobs, market bubble, Norman Mailer, paper trading, post-work, Saturday Night Live, sustainable-tourism, The Death and Life of Great American Cities, the High Line, transcontinental railway, Triangle Shirtwaist Factory, upwardly mobile, urban decay, urban planning, urban renewal, white flight, Yogi Berra, young professional

Travel essentials Costs On a moderate budget, expect to spend at least $200 per night on accommodation in a mid-range, centrally located hotel in high season, plus $20–30 per person for a moderate sit-down dinner each night and about $15–20 more per person per day for takeout and grocery meals. Getting around will cost $25 per person per week for unlimited public transportation, plus $10 each for the occasional cab ride. Sightseeing, drinking, clubbing, eating haute cuisine, and going to the theater have the potential to add exponentially to these costs. The New York City sales tax is 8.375 percent. Hotels are subject to a separate 13.38 percent hotel tax, and a $3.50 per night “occupancy tax.” You’re expected to tip in restaurants, bars, taxicabs, hotels (both the bellboy and the cleaning staff), and even some posh restrooms. In restaurants in particular, it’s unthinkable not to leave the minimum (15 percent of the bill) – even if you hated the service.

Chinese food, at its best in Chinatown but available all over the city, is comprised of familiar Cantonese dishes as well as spicier Sichuan and Hunan ones – most Specialty eating We’ve highlighted particular types of restaurants and listed them in boxes in the text. We’ve also picked out a few favorites in the city, which is very hard to do; most of the places recommended in this chapter are exactly that – recommended – though this might give you an easy guide: Favorites Burgers p.308 Haute cuisine p.328 Pizza (by the pie) p.330 Quintessential New York p.320 Sushi p.310 Types Brunch p.323 Restaurants with views p.325 Vegetarian restaurants p.311 RE S TAURANTS | Financial District restaurants specialize in one of the three. Japanese food runs the price gamut from super cheap to extremely expensive; there are a plethora of sushi establishments in the city. Other Asian cuisines are also in abundance, including Indian (best in Jackson Heights, Queens), Indonesian, Korean, Thai, and Vietnamese.

Start with the coriander tuna tostadas and move on to the red snapper in chipotle and corn broth. For dessert, the caramelized banana empanadas are unbeatable. Emporium Brasil 15 W 46th St, between Fifth and Sixth aves T212/764-4646. The place to go on Little Brazil Street for feijoada (a stew of black beans with hunks of dried pork and pig parts) on Saturdays. Fairly casual during the day, it becomes a little classier for dinner. Rough Guide favorites Haute cuisine Aquavit Midtown East, p.324 Babbo West Village, p.319 Chanterelle Tribeca, p.310 Danube Tribeca, p.309 Gramercy Tavern Union Square, p.322 Jean Georges Upper West Side, p.332 Rosa Mexicano 61 Columbus Ave, between W 62nd and 63rd sts T 212/977-7700. Right across from Lincoln Center, it’s the perfect location for a post-opera meal. Try the guacamole, which is mashed at your table, and their signature pomegranate margaritas.


Coastal California Travel Guide by Lonely Planet

1960s counterculture, Airbnb, airport security, Albert Einstein, anti-communist, Apple II, Asilomar, back-to-the-land, Bay Area Rapid Transit, Burning Man, buy and hold, California gold rush, call centre, car-free, carbon footprint, Donner party, East Village, El Camino Real, Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test, flex fuel, Frank Gehry, glass ceiling, Golden Gate Park, Haight Ashbury, haute couture, haute cuisine, income inequality, intermodal, Joan Didion, Kickstarter, Loma Prieta earthquake, low cost airline, Lyft, Mason jar, New Journalism, ride hailing / ride sharing, Ronald Reagan, Rosa Parks, Saturday Night Live, Silicon Valley, Silicon Valley startup, South of Market, San Francisco, starchitect, stealth mode startup, stem cell, Steve Jobs, Steve Wozniak, Stewart Brand, trade route, transcontinental railway, uber lyft, Upton Sinclair, upwardly mobile, urban sprawl, Wall-E, white picket fence, Whole Earth Catalog, women in the workforce, working poor, Works Progress Administration, young professional, Zipcar

The Golden Gate rises just outside the window-lined dining room. The on-site cafe serves to-go lunches, but for sit-down meals, including Sunday brunch, reservations are essential. oGary DankoCALIFORNIAN$$$ ( MAP GOOGLE MAP ; %415-749-2060; www.garydanko.com; 800 North Point St; 3-/5-course menu $86/124; h5:30-10pm; g19, 30, 47, jPowell-Hyde) Gary Danko wins James Beard Awards for his impeccable Californian haute cuisine. Smoked-glass windows prevent passersby from tripping over their tongues at the exquisite presentations – roasted lobster with blood oranges, blushing duck breast with port-roasted grapes, lavish cheeses and trios of crèmes brûlées. Reservations a must. THE FERRY BUILDING San Francisco’s monument to food, the Ferry Building still doubles as a trans-bay transit hub – but with dining options like these, you may never leave.

The stone-walled dining room dates to the 19th century, as does the ornate backbar, where cocktails get muddled to order. Free corkage. Restaurant at MeadowoodCALIFORNIAN$$$ ( MAP GOOGLE MAP ; %707-967-1205; www.meadowood.com; 900 Meadowood Lane; 12-course menu $275; h5:30-9:30pm Tue-Sat) If you couldn’t score reservations at French Laundry, fear not: Meadowood – the valley’s only other three-Michelin-star restaurant – has a slightly more sensibly priced menu, elegantly unfussy dining room and lavish haute cuisine that’s not too esoteric. Auberge has better views, but Meadowood’s food and service far surpass it. FarmsteadMODERN AMERICAN$$$ ( MAP GOOGLE MAP ; %707-963-4555; www.longmeadowranch.com; 738 Main St; mains $22-31; h11:30am-9:30pm Mon-Thu, to 10pm Fri & Sat, 11am-9:30pm Sun; v)S An enormous open-truss barn with big leather booths and rocking-chair porch, Farmstead draws an all-ages crowd and farms many of its own ingredients – including grass-fed beef and lamb – for an earthy menu highlighting wood-fired cooking.

At breakfast, look for homemade waffles and English muffins fresh from Costeaux Bakery. Sit in the garden. oMadrona ManorCALIFORNIAN$$$ ( GOOGLE MAP ; %707-433-4231, 800-258-4003; www.madronamanor.com; 1001 Westside Rd; 11-course menu $165; h6-9pm Wed-Sun)S You’d be hard-pressed to find a lovelier place to propose than this retro-formal Victorian mansion’s garden-view verandah – though there’s nothing old-fashioned about the artful haute cuisine: the kitchen churns its own butter, each course comes with a different variety of just-baked bread, courses include items such as Monterey abalone and Hokkaido-scallop crudo, and there's frozen lemon verbena for dessert. Reserve a presunset table. oSingleThread Farm-Restaurant-InnJAPANESE$$$ ( GOOGLE MAP ; %707-723-4646; www.singlethreadfarms.com; 131 North St; tasting menu per person $293; h5:30-11pm Tue-Sun) The most ambitious project in Northern California is SingleThread, a world-class restaurant and, secondarily, an inn, where omotenashi (warm hospitality in Japanese) reigns and dishes from an 11-course tasting menu are prepared in handmade Japanese donabe (earthenware pots).


pages: 226 words: 52,069

Bacon: A Love Story: A Salty Survey of Everybody's Favorite Meat by Heather Lauer

British Empire, haute cuisine, Hernando de Soto, if you build it, they will come, index card, Ronald Reagan

THE ULTIMATE BACON FANATIC While there are clearly huge numbers of chefs who love bacon and use it liberally in their cuisine, there is one chef whose obsession lifts him head and shoulders above the rest. That man is Greggory Hill. Formerly of a restaurant called David Greggory in Washington, DC, Chef Hill deserves a lot of credit for bacon’s elevated status in restaurants, especially in the nation’s capital. His dedication to The Best Meat Ever has helped to put it on the haute cuisine map, not to mention luring unsuspecting innocents into a lifetime membership in the Bacon Nation. Chef Hill’s regular lunch and dinner menus featured several dishes that involved the lovely strips. But what really distinguished him from other bacon-loving chefs were two regular events he hosted at the restaurant. Every Wednesday night he hosted a “Pork and Pinot Happy Hour.” But this was no gimmicky restaurant promotion—Chef Hill THE CULINARY AND CULTURAL RENAISSANCE OF BACON ~ 93 went out of his way each week to serve a series of small plates, all of which included some form of pork, often in the form of bacon.


Fodor's Barcelona by Fodor's

Albert Einstein, call centre, Frank Gehry, Guggenheim Bilbao, haute couture, haute cuisine, low cost airline, low cost carrier, market design, urban renewal, urban sprawl, young professional

Be advised: the sidewalk cafés along the Rambla are noisy, dusty, overpriced, and overexposed to thieves and pickpockets. Bars and cafés close at varying hours, though most of the hot spots in and around the Born are good until about 2:30 AM. TIP Menús del día (menus of the day), served only at lunchtime, are good values. Eating Out Strategy The selection here represents the best this city has to offer—from tapas bars to haute cuisine. Search “Best Bets” for top recommendations by price, cuisine, and experience. Or find a review quickly in the alphabetical listings by neighborhood. Hours Barcelona dines late. Lunch is served 2–4 and dinner 9–11. If you arrive a half-hour early, you may score a table but miss the life and fun of the place. Restaurants serving continuously 1 PM–1 AM are rarely the best ones. (Botafumeiro is an exception.)

The table for 16 can be partly or entirely reserved in advance; otherwise you take your chances with bar or stand-up table space. (Caveat: lines form on Fridays and Saturdays). | Tamarit 104, Eixample | 08015 | 93/424–5231 | Tues.–Sat. 7:30 PM–11 PM, Sun. 1–4 | Station: Rocafort, Poble Sec Jaume de Provença. $$$–$$$$ | MEDITERRANEAN | Locals come here because they want to discover more of famed chef Jaume Bargués’s haute-cuisine repertoire. Winning dishes include lenguado relleno de setas (sole stuffed with mushrooms) and the lubina (sea bass) soufflé. The traditionally designed restaurant, complete with a bar and a spacious yet intimate dining room, is in the Hospital Clinic part of the Eixample. | Provença 88, Eixample | 08029 | 93/430–0029 | Reservations essential | AE, DC, MC, V | Closed Mon., Aug., Easter wk, and Dec. 25 and 26.


Fodor's Venice and Northern Italy by Fodor's

car-free, glass ceiling, haute cuisine, Murano, Venice glass, trade route, urban planning, young professional

It is tempting to try them all. The setting is relaxed, the service informal, the prices strikingly reasonable. Outside the touristy center of town but quite convenient by subway, this trattoria is invariably packed with locals. | Via Temperanza 5 , Loreto | 20127 | 02/2613855 | AE, DC, MC, V | Closed Mon., Aug., and Dec. 22–Jan. 7. No lunch | Station: Pasteur. Porta Venezia Joia. $$$$ | VEGETARIAN | At this haute-cuisine vegetarian restaurant near Piazza della Repubblica, delicious dishes are artistically prepared by chef Pietro Leemann. Vegetarians, who often get short shrift in Italy, will marvel at the variety of culinary traditions—Asian and European—and artistry offered here. The ever-changing menu offers dishes in unusual formats: tiny glasses of creamed cabbage with ginger, spheres of crunchy vegetables that roll across the plate.

Piazza San Carlo, Via Po, and Via Maria Vittoria are lined with antiques shops, some—but not all—specializing in 18th-century furniture and domestic items. With branches in Milan, Bologna, and New York, Eataly (Via Nizza 230 , Lingotto | 10126 | 011/19506801 | www.eatalytorino.it) is perhaps Turin’s most famous food emporium. As well as a food market, food-related bookstore, and wine bar, there are several different food counters and restaurants offering everything from hamburgers to haute cuisine. Specialty food stores and delicatessens abound in central Turin. For a truly spectacular array of cheeses and other delicacies, try Turin’s famous Borgiattino (Via Accademia Albertina 38/a , Centro | 10123 | 011/8394686). Previous Chapter | Beginning of Chapter | Next Chapter | Contents Previous Chapter | Next Chapter | Contents Venaria Reale | Rivoli | Abbazia di Sant’Antonio di Ranverso | Sacra di San Michele | Saluzzo | Sestriere As you head west from Turin into the Colline (“little hills”), castles and medieval fortifications begin to pepper the former dominion of the house of Savoy, and the Alps come into better and better view.


Croatia by Anja Mutic, Vesna Maric

call centre, car-free, carbon footprint, centre right, friendly fire, G4S, haute cuisine, low cost airline, low cost carrier, starchitect

Otherwise, for 365KN, the owners will pick you up in Zagreb, take you to a local market en route to stock up on food, and drop you off at the house. If you ask, they can even leave you with some homemade pies, breads, cakes, grappa and veggies from their garden. Eating You’ll have to love Croatian and Italian food to enjoy Zagreb’s restaurants, but new places are branching out to include Japanese and other world cuisines. The biggest move is towards elegantly presented haute cuisine at haute prices. The city centre’s main streets, including Ilica, Teslina, Gajeva and Preradovićeva, are lined with fast-food joints and inexpensive snack bars. Note that many restaurants close in August for their summer holiday, which typically lasts anywhere from two weeks to a month. Vinodol CROATIAN €€ (Teslina 10; mains from 57KN) Well-prepared Central European fare is much-loved by both local and overseas patrons.

Slavonia also boasts the ancient cellars in Ilok as well as Croatia’s first wine hotel, Zdjelarević ( 035-427 775; www.zdjelarevic.hr) , located in Brodski Stupnik near Slavonski Brod, set among beautiful rolling hills and fish ponds. The hotel has marked bicycle and educational paths through the vineyards, which you can visit with an agronomist who will teach you about pedology (soils) and the differences between grape varieties. There’s a terrace restaurant serving haute cuisine paired with local wines and vineyard views, nicely appointed rooms and guided cellar tours. For a more down-home experience, visit Sobe Tonkić ( 035-273 408; www.sobe-tonkic.hr) , a rustic family-run guesthouse and restaurant featuring home-cooked local specialties and family wines. Sights TVRĐA Built under Habsburg rule as a defence against Turkish attacks, the 18th-century citadel was relatively undamaged during the recent war.


Rough Guide DIRECTIONS Dublin by Geoff Wallis

Celtic Tiger, Columbine, glass ceiling, haute cuisine

The stress is on cooking techniques, whether based on traditional recipes or drawing on influences from around the world, that allow the ingredients to speak for themselves. 02 Idea 11-60.indd 48 Ely Wine Bar An informal, good-value spot to sample excellent, carefully sourced food, some of it from the family farm in County Clare. P.92 ST STEPHEN’S GREEN TO THE GRAND CANAL 12/24/07 11:55:20 AM 02 Idea 11-60.indd 49 49 Eden Traditional Irish weather permitting, sit outside on Meeting House Square and tuck into West Cork scallops with potato and bacon salad. P.101 TEMPLE BAR The Tea Room Haute cuisine employing the best of Irish seasonal produce, in modernist surroundings. P.102 TEMPLE BAR Chapter One An acclaimed basement restaurant offering a delicious blend of Irish and French cuisines. P.145 NORTH FROM PARNELL SQUARE 12/24/07 11:55:29 AM Dublin views 50 Dublin has few tall buildings, so the backdrop of the Wicklow Mountains to the south is often visible from the city centre. And, if you do get up high, there aren’t many obstructions to your bird’s-eye view, which is often bisected by the River Liffey and its diverse bridges.


pages: 224 words: 68,641

Ratio by Michael Ruhlman

haute cuisine

If the roux is cooked to a dark, nutty brown, you may need to add as much as twice the amount to achieve the same consistency. Roux thickens fairly quickly, just as the liquid comes to a simmer. So you may choose to add your roux in increments until you have the consistency you want. Plain stock thickened with roux is often referred to by its classical names, velouté (for white stocks) and brown sauce (for stocks made from roasted bones). These are two of the mother sauces of traditional French haute cuisine, as is béchamel (which is milk thickened with roux). They’re typically made in restaurants, not at home, as soup or sauce bases, but it’s helpful to know that if you make a clam chowder, you are in effect making a velouté. A working recipe for velouté: Sweat 8 ounces of mirepoix, add 40 ounces of stock, raise the heat and bring the stock to a simmer, whisk in 4 ounces of roux, bring the mixture up to heat, pull the pot to the side of the heat, and skim as you cook it for 45 minutes to 1 hour, until the starchy flavor and feel is gone.


Ottolenghi: The Cookbook by Yotam Ottolenghi, Sami Tamimi

East Village, food miles, haute cuisine

If you don’t know it, you must try it (recipe); if you do, you will no doubt try it anyway. Unfussiness and simplicity in food preparation are, for us, the only way to maintain the freshness of a dish. Each individual ingredient has a clear voice, plain characteristics that are lucid and powerful – images, tastes and aromas you remember and yearn for. This is where we differ deeply from both complicated haute cuisine and industrial food: the fact that you can clearly taste and sense cumin or basil in our salad, that there is no room for guessing. Etti Mordo, an ex-colleague and a chef of passion, always used to say she hated dishes that you just knew had been touched a lot in the preparation. We love real food, unadulterated and unadorned. A chocolate cake should, first and foremost, taste of chocolate.


When Cultures Collide: Leading Across Cultures by Richard D. Lewis

Ayatollah Khomeini, British Empire, business climate, business process, colonial exploitation, corporate governance, global village, haute cuisine, hiring and firing, invention of writing, lateral thinking, Mahatma Gandhi, mass immigration, Nelson Mandela, new economy, oil shale / tar sands, old-boy network, open borders, profit maximization, profit motive, Scramble for Africa, Silicon Valley, trade route, transaction costs, upwardly mobile, urban sprawl, women in the workforce

Figures 8.1 and 8.2 show how Americans and the French look at the TEAM BUILDING AND HORIZONS 129 French Concepts and Values U.S. Concepts and Values Concepts and Values common to U.S. and France French Concepts and Values U.S. Concepts and Values U.S.A. HORIZON HORIZON F RE NCH Concepts and Values outside U.S. and French Ken Concepts and Values outside U.S. and French Ken Figure 8.1 French and U.S. Horizons: General Concepts modesty use of silence laid back U.S.A. HORIZON haute cuisine formal manners status by family or education respect for intellectuality savoir faire justice proud of revolution consumerism profit motive science arts liberty equality messianic media-driven direct, blunt discourse egalitarian company organization hunches risk-takers civil-service driven roundabout discourse hierarchical company organization obsession with logic cautious Asian standards of politeness understatement mañana mentality Figure 8.2 Horizons: French and U.S.

Discussion of religious or language issues. 21 France In both politics and business, the French like to be independent (at times maverick) and can appear frustrating to Americans, Japanese and Europeans alike. French people live in a world of their own, the center of which is France. They are immersed in their own history and tend to believe that France has set the norms for such things as democracy, justice, government and legal systems, military strategy, philosophy, science, agriculture, viniculture, haute cuisine and savoir vivre in general. Other nations vary from these norms and, according to the French, have a lot to learn before they get things right. The French know virtually nothing about many other countries, as their educational system teaches little of the history or geography of small nations or those that belonged to empires other than their own. Their general attitude toward foreigners is pleasant enough, neither positive nor negative.


Frommer's Israel by Robert Ullian

airport security, British Empire, car-free, Chuck Templeton: OpenTable:, East Village, haute cuisine, Khartoum Gordon, mass immigration, Maui Hawaii, place-making, Silicon Valley, Skype, sustainable-tourism, trade route, urban planning, urban sprawl, Yom Kippur War

If kashrut is not a concern, you can save a bit by seeking out nonkosher places. Glatt kosher and mehadrin (especially stringent supervision of kashrut) often means an even higher price. Most kosher restaurants have adapted so skillfully to their constraints that you will notice nothing very unusual in your dining experience. CUISINE For the first half of Israel’s existence, food was supposed to be simple and healthy. Exotic spices and sauces were not Israeli; haute cuisine was regarded as indecent. It was virtually anti-Zionist to be into the many ethnic cuisines that flooded the country from the far corners of the earth. The Ministry of Absorption taught new immigrant housewives from Hungary, Morocco, and Kurdistan how to make healthy chopped Israeli salad, and for Friday night dinner, unadorned grilled chicken leg quarters or that pièce de résistance of Israeli cuisine, the breaded chicken cutlet schnitzel.

Today, Israel is in love with exotic and fine food, as well as good wines, and the country is awash with young, imaginative chefs trained at the best schools and restaurants in Paris, London, New York, and Los Angeles. It used to be that half the mothers in Israel dreamed their child might become a doctor, a violinist, or a concert pianist. Now gourmet chef has been added to that wish list. You’ll find dozens of restaurants that are playgrounds for local chefs doing personal, inventive haute cuisine menus rooted in ancient local food traditions, immigrant recipes, and French, Mediterranean, nouvelle, and Asian traditions all blended together. Tel Aviv is the center for designer eateries. For very reasonable prices during afternoon (lunch) specials, you can sample the creations of Israeli chefs receiving international acclaim. In these stylish restaurants (and in lots of moderate places, too), you might have a first course of shrimp falafel served with herbed, rich yogurt or a seviche with lentils in a Japanese lemon marinade, then go on to a nouvelle version of traditional oven-baked lamb served on a bed of lentils and cracked wheat seasoned with local Palestinian zataar but cooked Moroccan-style, with plums, apricots, and almonds.

Main courses NIS 60–NIS 110 ($15–$28/£7.50–£14); lunch (Sun–Fri noon–5pm) NIS 50–NIS 70 ($13–$18/£6.25–£9). AE, DC, MC, V. Daily noon–midnight. 09_289693-ch05.qxp 154 10/28/08 12:19 PM Page 154 C H A P T E R 5 . S E T T L I N G I N TO J E RU S A L E M Terra Restaurant & Bar MEDITERRANEAN Set in intimate rooms with stone walls and arches, this little hideaway turns out elegant, gracefully inventive dishes at prices that are not out of sight. There are all kinds of haute cuisine meat and seafood tapas and unique appetizers, such as stir-fried chicken livers with chestnuts and brandy. There’s fish and pasta among the main courses, but the seafood and meat dishes are the more interesting choices. My favorites are shrimp baked in a terra cotta vessel with herbed saffron virgin olive oil, and calamari stuffed with seafood and feta cheese in a wine and garlic sauce. The menu constantly changes, but look for mussels steamed in champagne, shallots, and herbs, and rib-eye steak in smoked whiskey sauce.


Lonely Planet Greek Islands by Lonely Planet, Alexis Averbuck, Michael S Clark, Des Hannigan, Victoria Kyriakopoulos, Korina Miller

car-free, carbon footprint, credit crunch, eurozone crisis, G4S, haute couture, haute cuisine, low cost airline, low cost carrier, Norman Mailer, pension reform, period drama, sensible shoes, sustainable-tourism, trade route, transfer pricing, urban sprawl

It’s a buzzing, unpretentious spot serving tasty mezedhes from an oversized menu with a good dose of whimsy (such as the transvestite lamb, which is actually chicken). PSYRRI Hytra FINE DINING €€€ Offline map Google map ( 210 331 6767; www.hytra.gr; Navarhou Apostoli 7, Psyrri; mains €28-34; dinner Tue-Sun; Thisio) This tiny chute of a restaurant is decked out in oil paintings of bikes and motorcycles...Oh, yes, and has one Michelin star. One of Athens’ haute-cuisine hideouts, Hytra serves up exquisitely presented Greek food with a modern twist. In high season, it moves to the Westin Athens, Astir Palace Beach Resort in coastal Vouliagmeni. Ivis MEZEDHES €€ Offline map Google map ( 210 323 2554; Navarhou Apostoli 19, Psyrri; mezedhes €4-10; Thisio) This cosy corner mezedhopoleio, with its bright, arty decor, has a small but delicious range of simple, freshly cooked mezedhes.

Eat here for the fantastic sweep of plate glass looking out onto the unblemished south slope of the Acropolis. Food is pricey but service is attentive...Date night? KOLONAKI & PANGRATI Spondi FINE DINING €€€ ( 210 752 0658; Pironos 5, Pangrati; mains €35-50; 8pm-late) Two Michelin-starred Spondi is consistently voted Athens’ best restaurant, and the accolades are totally deserved. It offers Mediterranean haute cuisine, with heavy French influences, in a relaxed, chic setting in a charming old house. Choose from the menu or a range of set dinner and wine prix fixes . The restaurant has a lovely bougainvillea-draped garden. Popping the question? Come here (but book ahead, and take a cab – it’s hard to reach on public transport). Oikeio TAVERNA €€ Offline map Google map ( 210 725 9216; Ploutarhou 15, Kolonaki; specials €7-13; 1pm-2.30am Mon-Sat; Evangelismos) With excellent home-style cooking, this modern taverna lives up to its name (meaning ‘homey’).

Book ahead for fantastic views from west-side rooms. Hotel Manessi BUSINESS HOTEL €€ ( 22980 22273/25857; www.manessi.com; Paralia; d €65-90; ) Well placed at the mid-point of the harbour front, the Manessi is a bit worn in places but offers business-style rooms. Roloi APARTMENTS €€ ( 22980 25808; www.storoloi-poros.gr; studio €75-110, apt €150-180, house €250; ) Good source for apartments in town. Eating There’s not much haute cuisine on Poros, but traditional tavernas have character to match the cooking. Aspros Gatos SEAFOOD, TAVERNA € ( 22980 25650; www.whitecat.gr; Labraki 49; mains €6-15; lunch & dinner Easter-Oct) A short walk from town, 400m west of the bridge on the road to Neorion Beach, Poros’ best seafood taverna sits smack out over the water. Watch the local kayaking team do their thing as the jolly owner provides anything from bolognese to the catch of the day.


Northern California Travel Guide by Lonely Planet

Airbnb, Apple II, Asilomar, back-to-the-land, Bay Area Rapid Transit, big-box store, Burning Man, buy and hold, California gold rush, call centre, car-free, carbon footprint, clean water, dark matter, Donald Trump, Donner party, East Village, El Camino Real, Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test, Frank Gehry, friendly fire, glass ceiling, Golden Gate Park, Google bus, Haight Ashbury, haute couture, haute cuisine, housing crisis, Joan Didion, Kickstarter, Loma Prieta earthquake, Lyft, Mahatma Gandhi, Mark Zuckerberg, Mason jar, McMansion, means of production, Port of Oakland, ride hailing / ride sharing, Ronald Reagan, Silicon Valley, Silicon Valley startup, South of Market, San Francisco, stealth mode startup, stem cell, Steve Jobs, Steve Wozniak, Stewart Brand, the built environment, trade route, transcontinental railway, uber lyft, Upton Sinclair, urban sprawl, white picket fence, Whole Earth Catalog, women in the workforce, working poor, Works Progress Administration, young professional

The Golden Gate rises just outside the window-lined dining room. The on-site cafe serves to-go lunches, but for sit-down meals, including Sunday brunch, reservations are essential. oGary DankoCALIFORNIAN$$$ ( MAP GOOGLE MAP ; %415-749-2060; www.garydanko.com; 800 North Point St; 3-/5-course menu $86/124; h5:30-10pm; g19, 30, 47, jPowell-Hyde) Gary Danko wins James Beard Awards for his impeccable Californian haute cuisine. Smoked-glass windows prevent passersby from tripping over their tongues at the exquisite presentations – roasted lobster with blood oranges, blushing duck breast with port-roasted grapes, lavish cheeses and trios of crèmes brûlées. Reservations a must. Nob Hill, Russian Hill & Fillmore oSwan Oyster DepotSEAFOOD$$ ( MAP GOOGLE MAP ; %415-673-1101; 1517 Polk St; dishes $10-25; h10:30am-5:30pm Mon-Sat; g1, 19, 47, 49, jCalifornia) Superior flavor without the superior attitude of typical seafood restaurants – Swan's downside is an inevitable wait for the few stools at its vintage lunch counter, but the upside of high turnover is incredibly fresh seafood.

The stone-walled dining room dates to the 19th century, as does the ornate backbar, where cocktails get muddled to order. Free corkage. Restaurant at MeadowoodCALIFORNIAN$$$ ( MAP GOOGLE MAP ; %707-967-1205; www.meadowood.com; 900 Meadowood Lane; 12-course menu $275; h5:30-9:30pm Tue-Sat) If you couldn’t score reservations at French Laundry, fear not: Meadowood – the valley’s only other three-Michelin-star restaurant – has a slightly more sensibly priced menu, elegantly unfussy dining room and lavish haute cuisine that’s not too esoteric. Auberge has better views, but Meadowood’s food and service far surpass it. FarmsteadMODERN AMERICAN$$$ ( MAP GOOGLE MAP ; %707-963-4555; www.longmeadowranch.com; 738 Main St; mains $22-31; h11:30am-9:30pm Mon-Thu, to 10pm Fri & Sat, 11am-9:30pm Sun; v)S An enormous open-truss barn with big leather booths and rocking-chair porch, Farmstead draws an all-ages crowd and farms many of its own ingredients – including grass-fed beef and lamb – for an earthy menu highlighting wood-fired cooking.

At breakfast, look for homemade waffles and English muffins fresh from Costeaux Bakery. Sit in the garden. oMadrona ManorCALIFORNIAN$$$ ( GOOGLE MAP ; %707-433-4231, 800-258-4003; www.madronamanor.com; 1001 Westside Rd; 11-course menu $165; h6-9pm Wed-Sun)S You’d be hard-pressed to find a lovelier place to propose than this retro-formal Victorian mansion’s garden-view verandah – though there’s nothing old-fashioned about the artful haute cuisine: the kitchen churns its own butter, each course comes with a different variety of just-baked bread, courses include items such as Monterey abalone and Hokkaido-scallop crudo, and there's frozen lemon verbena for dessert. Reserve a presunset table. oSingleThread Farm-Restaurant-InnJAPANESE$$$ ( GOOGLE MAP ; %707-723-4646; www.singlethreadfarms.com; 131 North St; tasting menu per person $293; h5:30-11pm Tue-Sun) The most ambitious project in Northern California is SingleThread, a world-class restaurant and, secondarily, an inn, where omotenashi (warm hospitality in Japanese) reigns and dishes from an 11-course tasting menu are prepared in handmade Japanese donabe (earthenware pots).


France (Lonely Planet, 8th Edition) by Nicola Williams

active transport: walking or cycling, back-to-the-land, bike sharing scheme, British Empire, car-free, carbon footprint, centre right, Charles Lindbergh, Columbine, double helix, Guggenheim Bilbao, haute couture, haute cuisine, Henri Poincaré, Honoré de Balzac, illegal immigration, industrial robot, information trail, Jacquard loom, Joseph-Marie Jacquard, Kickstarter, Louis Blériot, Louis Pasteur, low cost airline, low cost carrier, Mahatma Gandhi, means of production, Murano, Venice glass, pension reform, post-work, QWERTY keyboard, ride hailing / ride sharing, Saturday Night Live, Silicon Valley, Skype, Sloane Ranger, supervolcano, trade route, urban renewal, urban sprawl, V2 rocket

La Margaretifera et la Candaise ( 02 47 95 93 15; Candes-sur-Martin; adult/under 12yr €7.50/5.50) provides atmospheric boat trips in traditional high-cabined Loire vessels known as toues, departing from Candes-sur-Martin. * * * L’Orangerie ( 02 54 78 05 36; 1 av du Dr Jean Laigret; menus €32-74) Polish up those pumps and dust off that evening dress – the Orangery is Blois’ most respected table. Tucked behind wrought-iron gates in a timber-storeyed building opposite the château, it’s cloud nine for connoisseurs of haute cuisine – plates are artfully stacked with ingredients, from duck liver to langoustine and foie gras (fattened liver), and the sparkling salon would make Louis XIV green with envy. On summer nights, opt for a courtyard table and prepare to be pampered. SELF-CATERING Food market (rue Anne de Bretagne; 7.30am or 8am-1pm Tue, Thu & Sat) Intermarché supermarket (16 av Gambetta) Drinking The best bars are in the old town, particularly in the small alleys off rue Foulerie.

You might not love the interior decor, but there’s no quibbling with the food – hunks of roast lamb, green-pepper duck and authentic bouillabaisse, delivered with a modern spin. Le Zinc ( 02 47 20 29 00; 27 place du Grand Marché; menus €20.50-25.50; closed Wed & lunch Sun) One of the new breed of French bistros, more concerned with simple, classic staples and market-fresh ingredients (sourced direct from the local Halles) than Michelin stars and haute cuisine cachet. Country dishes – duck breast, beef fillet, river fish – served up in a buzzy terracotta-floored dining room. Attractive and authentic. SELF-CATERING For all your picnicking needs: Atac supermarket 5 place du Général Leclerc ( 7.30am-8pm Mon-Sat); 19 place Jean Jaurès ( 9am-7.30pm Mon-Sat) The place Jean Jaurès branch is inside the shopping centre. Les Halles (covered market; place Gaston Pailhou; 7am-7pm) Drinking Place Plum and the surrounding streets are plastered in grungy bars and drinking dens, all of which get stuffed to bursting on hot summer nights.

Sleeping & Eating Chez Teresa ( 02 41 51 21 24; 6 av Rochechouart; d €49-55, mains €6.50-8.50) Keeping up Fontevraud’s English connections, this frilly little teashop is run by an expat Englishwoman with a passion for traditional teatime fare: tea for two with sandwiches, scones and cakes is just €8.50, and there are cute upstairs rooms if you fancy staying overnight. Hôtel Abbaye Royale de Fontevraud ( 02 41 51 73 16; www.hotelfp-fontevraud.com;, menus €23, €32, €38, & €47; dinner Mar-Nov) For something altogether more upmarket, try this gastronomic godsend at the base of the valley below the abbey, serving seriously haute cuisine (pigeon, duck, lobster, foie gras) under the arches of the old priory cloisters. The rooms (€55 to €115 for a double) are a bit corporate in comparison to the stellar food, but comfy nonetheless. Return to beginning of chapter ANGERS pop 151,000 Often dubbed ‘Black Angers’ due to the murky stone and dark slate used in its buildings, the riverside city is the eastern gateway to the Loire Valley.


pages: 297 words: 77,362

The Nature of Technology by W. Brian Arthur

Andrew Wiles, business process, cognitive dissonance, computer age, creative destruction, double helix, endogenous growth, Geoffrey West, Santa Fe Institute, haute cuisine, James Watt: steam engine, joint-stock company, Joseph Schumpeter, Kenneth Arrow, Kevin Kelly, knowledge economy, locking in a profit, Mars Rover, means of production, Myron Scholes, railway mania, Silicon Valley, Simon Singh, sorting algorithm, speech recognition, technological singularity, The Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith, Thomas Kuhn: the structure of scientific revolutions

It derives from a feeling that all that is in place is properly in place, that not a piece can be rearranged, that nothing is to excess. Beauty in technology does not quite require originality. In technology both form and phrases are heavily borrowed from other utterances, so in this sense we could say that, ironically, design works by combining and manipulating clichés. Still, a beautiful design always contains some unexpected combination that shocks us with its appropriateness. In technology, as in writing or speech—or haute cuisine—there are varying degrees of fluency, of articulateness, of self-expression. A beginning practitioner in architecture, like a beginner at a foreign language, will use the same base combinations—the same phrases—over and over, even if not quite appropriate. A practiced architect, steeped in the art of the domain, will have discarded any notion of the grammar as pure rules, and will use instead an intuitive knowledge of what fits together.


Food Trucks: Dispatches and Recipes From the Best Kitchens on Wheels by Shouse, Heather

haute cuisine, Kickstarter, Mason jar, Maui Hawaii, place-making, rolodex, side project, South of Market, San Francisco

Arriving in cities like Los Angeles and New York, which are nearly drowning in food truck options, I set about with copious notes in hand, consulted with area experts, and did a lot of walking and a lot of talking, with the principal goal of finding trucks and carts that were (a) serving delicious food, and (b) run by people with a story to tel . (In fact, I found so many fantastic eats that I included the extras as Side Dishes, which are sprinkled throughout these pages.) These meals on wheels turned out to be some of the best food I’ve eaten in my life, more memorable than multicourse tasting menus served in the ivory towers of haute cuisine, and the people behind these foods were often more inspiring than any “celebrity chef.” For the street cooks who are first-generation Americans, their livelihood is a connection to their community, their cart or truck serving as a hub for conversation and, of course, eating; they are also a sign that a particular region of India, Eastern Europe, or Mexico has arrived in the States, with its definitive foods in tow.


pages: 249 words: 77,342

The Behavioral Investor by Daniel Crosby

affirmative action, Asian financial crisis, asset allocation, availability heuristic, backtesting, bank run, Black Swan, buy and hold, cognitive dissonance, colonial rule, compound rate of return, correlation coefficient, correlation does not imply causation, Daniel Kahneman / Amos Tversky, diversification, diversified portfolio, Donald Trump, endowment effect, feminist movement, Flash crash, haute cuisine, hedonic treadmill, housing crisis, IKEA effect, impulse control, index fund, Isaac Newton, job automation, longitudinal study, loss aversion, market bubble, market fundamentalism, mental accounting, meta analysis, meta-analysis, Milgram experiment, moral panic, Murray Gell-Mann, Nate Silver, neurotypical, passive investing, pattern recognition, Ponzi scheme, prediction markets, random walk, Richard Feynman, Richard Thaler, risk tolerance, Robert Shiller, Robert Shiller, science of happiness, Shai Danziger, short selling, South Sea Bubble, Stanford prison experiment, Stephen Hawking, Steve Jobs, stocks for the long run, Thales of Miletus, The Signal and the Noise by Nate Silver, tulip mania, Vanguard fund

Another consequence of financial information overload is that it leads to drawing spurious correlations between variables. As Nate Silver reports, the government produces data on 45,000 economic variables each year!44 Pair this reality with the fact that there are relatively few dramatic economic events (e.g., there have been 11 recessions since the end of World War II) and you get what Silver refers to as putting data into a blender and calling the result haute cuisine. And then consider the strange case of the correlation between moves in the S&P 500 and Bangladeshi butter production. Yes, you read that right – Bangladeshi butter production. This relationship, which accounts for 95% of covariance, is of course spurious even though the fit is nearly perfect. The relationship was discovered and set forth by researchers anxious to prove the old axiom that correlation does not equal causation and to show that by analysing a glut of information you are bound to find relationships, even if no causal relationship exists.


Germany Travel Guide by Lonely Planet

Airbnb, Albert Einstein, bank run, Berlin Wall, bike sharing scheme, British Empire, call centre, car-free, carbon footprint, centre right, double helix, eurozone crisis, Fall of the Berlin Wall, Frank Gehry, glass ceiling, haute couture, haute cuisine, Honoré de Balzac, Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, Johannes Kepler, Kickstarter, low cost airline, low cost carrier, Mikhail Gorbachev, New Urbanism, oil shale / tar sands, Peace of Westphalia, Peter Eisenman, post-work, ride hailing / ride sharing, Ronald Reagan, Ronald Reagan: Tear down this wall, sensible shoes, Skype, starchitect, trade route, upwardly mobile, urban planning, urban renewal, V2 rocket, white picket fence

And you’ll quickly discover that German food is so much more than sausages and pretzels, schnitzel and roast pork accompanied by big mugs of foamy beer. Beyond the clichés awaits a cornucopia of regional and seasonal palate teasers. Share the German people’s obsession with white asparagus in spring, chanterelle mushrooms in summer and game in autumn. Indulge in black forest gateau, doner kebab, Spätzle or Michelin-starred haute cuisine. Sample not just famous beer but also world-class wines, most notably the noble riesling, while exploring ancient cellars. Experiencing the country through its food and drink will add a rich layer to your memories (and possibly your belly!). Top of section TOP EXPERIENCES Berlin Wall 1 Few events in history have the power to move the entire world. The Kennedy assassination; landing on the moon; 9/11...

Bratwurst Nuremberg’s finger-sized links, grilled and served in a bun or with sauerkraut, are top dogs in Germany (Click here) Pork knuckle A Munich beer hall like the Augustiner-Bräustuben is the perfect place for tackling this classic gut-buster (Click here) Doner kebab It was a Turkish immigrant in Berlin who first came up with the idea of tucking spit-roasted slivered meat into a pita bread along with salad and a garlicky sauce (Click here) Spätzle This noodle dish hails from the Stuttgart region and is often smothered in cheese or topped with lentils (Click here) Black forest gateau Enjoy a slice of this creamy liqueur-drenched sponge cake symphony at Café Schäfer in Triberg, where it was invented (Click here) Haute cuisine Baden-Württemberg has the country’s greatest density of Michelin-starred restaurants, including two three-star temples in Baiersbronn (Click here) Souvenirs Even in the age of global commerce, there are some treasures better unearthed in Germany than anywhere else. Käthe Wohlfahrt Weihnachtsdorf In this museum-like shop in Rothenburg ob der Tauber you can stock up on Christmas angels, ornaments and nutcrackers year-round (Click here) Ampelmann The endearing fellow on East Germany’s pedestrian traffic light has evolved into its own brand, with multiple stores in Berlin (Click here) Woodcarvings Carved wood sculptures are a speciality throughout the Alpine regions, but the workshops in Oberammergau are especially renowned (Click here) Glass Fans of the fragile can pick up exquisite hand-blown vases, glasses and bowls from traditional artisans in the Bavarian Forest (Click here) Marzipan Some of the world’s best marzipan hails from Niederegger in the northern German town of Lübeck (Click here) Porcelain Precious porcelain is the hallmark of Meissen, the cradle of European porcelain manufacturing (Click here) Top of section month by month Top Events Oktoberfest September Christmas Markets December Karneval/Fasching February Berlin Film Festival February Kieler Woche June January Except in the ski resorts, the Germans have the country pretty much to themselves this month.

Deidesheimer Hof LUXURY HOTEL €€€ (968 70; www.deidesheimerhof.de; Am Marktplatz; s/d from €110/155; ) This renowned hostelry has 28 supremely elegant rooms, each unique, and two fine restaurants: St Urban (mains cost €14.80 to €23.90), whose regional offerings include Saumagen, made with chestnuts in autumn; and, in the basement, the gourmet Schwarzer Hahn (mains cost €40 to €50; open 6.30pm to 9pm Tuesday to Saturday), which specialises in creative French- and Palatinate-style haute cuisine prepared with a Japanese touch. Check out the photos of kings and presidents who have dined here. Ketschauer Hof BOUTIQUE HOTEL €€€ (70000; www.ketschauerhof.com; Ketschauerhofstrasse 1; d €200-780, breakfast €25; ) A one-time winemaker’s mansion has been turned into a supremely romantic boutique hotel that mixes traditional luxury with elegant modern styling. Has 18 rooms and a gourmet restaurant.


pages: 255 words: 90,456

Frommer's Irreverent Guide to San Francisco by Matthew Richard Poole

Bay Area Rapid Transit, Chuck Templeton: OpenTable:, game design, glass ceiling, Golden Gate Park, Haight Ashbury, haute cuisine, Loma Prieta earthquake, Maui Hawaii, old-boy network, pez dispenser, sensible shoes, Silicon Valley, South of Market, San Francisco, Torches of Freedom, upwardly mobile

Union Square’s Biscuits and Blues isn’t quite as funky as it sounds, though it definitely takes pride in presenting down-home Southern-style cooking. Some of the best blues acts in the country keep the crowds coming, however (see the Nightlife chapter). Vegging out... The Mother of All Vegetarian Restaurants once was Greens, where there’s up to a 2-week waiting list to sample the fare that has spawned several cookbooks, international acclaim, and a devoted following. This is no hippie-veggie-health-food cafe; it is meatless haute cuisine, combining the best of French, Mediterranean, and California cookery. Unfortunately, the service has become inconsistent, and the menu has lost its edge. Still, it retains its status as a classic and is worth a visit for breakfasts and romantic late-night desserts—the dining room’s view of DINING Hungry for dinner and a good show? It ain’t cheap, but Teatro ZinZanni is a rollicking ride of food, whimsy, drama, and song within a stunningly elegant 1926 tent on the Embarcadero.


pages: 142 words: 18,753

Bobos in Paradise: The New Upper Class and How They Got There by David Brooks

1960s counterculture, affirmative action, Community Supported Agriculture, David Brooks, Donald Trump, Francis Fukuyama: the end of history, George Gilder, haute couture, haute cuisine, income inequality, Jane Jacobs, Jeff Bezos, means of production, Mikhail Gorbachev, New Urbanism, Norman Mailer, place-making, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Robert Bork, Silicon Valley, The Bell Curve by Richard Herrnstein and Charles Murray, The Death and Life of Great American Cities, Thorstein Veblen, Upton Sinclair, upwardly mobile, urban planning, War on Poverty, Yogi Berra

Near the center of town, there’s a new Los Angeles-style restaurant named Teresa’s Cafe, which gets crowded and noisy at night, a little enclave of Santa Monica bustle in the midst of the Philadelphia suburbs. In the old Wayne there weren’t any interesting food stores. And there certainly weren’t any restaurants with casual-sounding names like Teresa’s; instead, they had imposing French names like L’Auberge. But now it is the formidable French places that have had to adjust. The restaurant La Fourchette has changed its name to the less pretentious Fourchette 110. It’s traded in its French haute cuisine for more casual food. The menu looks like it was designed by a friendly Gérard Depardieu, not an imposing snob like Charles de Gaulle. The Great Harvest Bread Company has opened up a franchise in town, one of those gourmet bread stores where they sell apricot almond or spinach feta loaf for $4.75 a pop. This particular store is owned by Ed and Lori Kerpius. Ed got his MBA in 1987 and moved to Chicago, where he was a currency trader.


pages: 281 words: 86,657

The Great Inversion and the Future of the American City by Alan Ehrenhalt

anti-communist, big-box store, British Empire, crack epidemic, David Brooks, deindustrialization, Edward Glaeser, Frank Gehry, haute cuisine, Honoré de Balzac, housing crisis, illegal immigration, Jane Jacobs, manufacturing employment, mass immigration, McMansion, New Urbanism, Norman Mailer, Peter Calthorpe, postindustrial economy, Richard Florida, The Chicago School, The Death and Life of Great American Cities, too big to fail, transit-oriented development, upwardly mobile, urban decay, urban planning, urban renewal, walkable city, white flight, working poor, young professional

A four-block walk down Walnut Street, from the Bellevue hotel at Broad Street to Rittenhouse Square at Eighteenth, is a stroll past amenities comparable to those of Michigan Avenue or Fifth Avenue, but on a much less intimidating scale. Walnut Street is not a canyon. It’s a collection of low-slung century-old buildings with ground-floor retail that oozes wealth: Tiffany, Burberry, Godiva, Ralph Lauren; a sprinkling of spas and luxury salons; and an assortment of restaurants offering haute cuisine. One can take in the shops, stop to sip a Bacardi mojito at the sidewalk café outside Alma de Cuba, then order truffle-stuffed lamb loin with sweetbread tempura at Le Bec-Fin, the most elegant restaurant in town and one of the most famous on the East Coast. Virtually all the storefronts are occupied: 90 percent of them even in the trough of recession at the end of the last decade. And Walnut Street is not only plush, it is thronged with people throughout the daytime and the evening as well.


pages: 270 words: 81,311

In the Devil's Garden: A Sinful History of Forbidden Food by Stewart Lee Allen

anti-communist, British Empire, clean water, East Village, European colonialism, Filipino sailors, Golden Gate Park, haute cuisine, trade route

Louis had merely wanted to keep an eye on rebellious nobles. But by putting all the aristos under one roof, he inadvertently created a gastronomic hothouse where armies of chefs, pâtissiers, sommeliers, boulangers, and maîtres d’hôtel competed for the approval of the world’s fussiest eaters. One maître d’, François Vatel, went so far as to throw himself on his sword when the fish arrived a half hour late. Voilà, the birth of French haute cuisine. British nobility, on the other hand, were not obliged to dwell at court, and, living on their own estates enjoyed less-elevated fare. If the fish arrived late, good—it meant two helpings of boiled beef. Although this theory does explain the absence of a truly British high cuisine, my personal favorite relates to the so-called invention of childhood during the Victorian era of the 1800s. The Victorians were the first to completely embrace the notion that children are fundamentally different from adults.


Au Contraire: Figuring Out the French by Gilles Asselin, Ruth Mastron

affirmative action, business climate, feminist movement, haute cuisine, old-boy network, rolodex, Rosa Parks

One spokesperson from the Communistcontrolled union complained that the government, by allowing the company to impose such discipline, had awarded 6 Disney extraterritorial rights and that the region was becoming “the fifty-first American state.” (Kuisel 1993, 227) On the other hand, once you have successfully negotiated the obstacle course, and after a few years (or decades), you may almost become part of the family—or at least a good neighbor. McDonald’s hamburgers have been a huge commercial success in the land of haute-cuisine, despite the reservations of gourmets. In 1994 the chain was number one in France, both in terms of revenue and number of outlets. Nonetheless, the leader of basse-cuisine ran into problems with its French employees and was accused of violating French labor laws. The chain also met with criticism from other quarters. Perhaps the most galling aspect of the invasion of “McDo,” as French children and adolescents affectionately refer to it, is its success in conquering the taste buds of the younger generations.


pages: 449 words: 85,924

Lonely Planet Maldives (Travel Guide) by Planet, Lonely, Masters, Tom

British Empire, car-free, carbon footprint, haute cuisine, income inequality, Skype, sovereign wealth fund, sustainable-tourism, trade route, women in the workforce

The joli is a static version – net seats on a rectangular frame, usually made in sociable sets of three or four. Once made of coir rope and wooden sticks, these days steel pipes and plastic mesh are now almost universal – it’s like sitting in a string shopping bag, but cool; you'll see these curious and ingenious inventions all over inhabited islands. Taste of the Maldives Your culinary experience in the Maldives could be, depending on your resort, anything from haute cuisine ordered from a menu you’ve discussed with the chef in advance to bangers and mash at the all-you-can-eat buffet in the communal dining room. What it’s unlikely to be in either case is particularly Maldivian, given the dislocation from local life experienced in resorts. However, anyone staying in Male or on an inhabited island should take advantage of this opportunity to try real Maldivian food.


pages: 254 words: 81,009

Busy by Tony Crabbe

airport security, British Empire, business process, cognitive dissonance, Daniel Kahneman / Amos Tversky, fear of failure, Frederick Winslow Taylor, haute cuisine, informal economy, inventory management, Isaac Newton, job satisfaction, knowledge worker, Lao Tzu, loss aversion, low cost airline, meta analysis, meta-analysis, Milgram experiment, placebo effect, Richard Feynman, Rubik’s Cube, Saturday Night Live, science of happiness, Shai Danziger, Thorstein Veblen, Tim Cook: Apple

In the first week it became clear that the demand in its new location was strong. But then it all started going wrong. To meet the demand, the restaurant decided to hire cooks from a well-known, low-quality, high-turnover restaurant. Rather than accepting a need to restrict client numbers while training new staff, it filled the restaurant, and the kitchen staff simply did their best. In addition, not all their new clientele were appreciative of the innovative haute cuisine, so the menu was “dumbed down.” Rather than sticking to its formula of quality, interesting food, the restaurant tried to do everything for everyone. In a few short months, what had seemed like the glorious beginning of a very bright future was a distant memory. The restaurant lost its position in the market and failed to satisfy its customers; it closed shortly afterward. Trying to do everything for everyone is no strategic position at all.


pages: 266 words: 78,689

Frommer's Irreverent Guide to Las Vegas by Mary Herczog, Jordan S. Simon

Berlin Wall, Bob Geldof, glass ceiling, haute couture, haute cuisine, Maui Hawaii, Murano, Venice glass, Saturday Night Live, young professional

Domestic brewskis are a buck, and the crowd is Hunter S. Thompson meets Charles Bukowski: neo-punks, strippers, off-duty cops, all unconcernedly scratching private parts in full view. DINING 70 offers food from several regions of France (braised duck from Burgundy, sautéed sea bass from Provence), perhaps not quite as authentically as the self-back-patting hotel likes to think, but we give them credit for trying. It may not be haute cuisine, but it’s better than the other buffets in town, though there is no excuse for anything inspired by the Land That Invented The French Pastry for having such lousy desserts. Second best, by a nose, is the Bellagio Buffet, where all sorts of cuisine ( Japanese, dim sum, elaborate pastas) come together in ways not dissimilar to other Vegas buffets, but in upscale versions. Speaking of global dining, many Vegas buffet connoisseurs are devoted to the 12 distinct global dining experiences—Brazilian, Cantonese, Italian, Mexican, BBQ, Japanese sushi and teppanyaki, and so forth—found at the Rio Carnival World Buffet.


pages: 306 words: 94,204

Farm City: The Education of an Urban Farmer by Novella Carpenter

back-to-the-land, crack epidemic, David Attenborough, dumpster diving, Golden Gate Park, haute cuisine, Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall, Mason jar, McMansion, New Urbanism, Port of Oakland, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Silicon Valley, urban decay, urban renewal, Whole Earth Catalog

Next to Storey’s Guide on my nightstand was Elizabeth David’s French Provincial Cooking. I read with keen interest her many good ideas for cooking duck livers and making canard rôti au four. But how do you tell a child you’re going to cut off this adorable duck’s head, pluck its white feathers, and roast it in an oven, letting its fat naturally baste the meat? Children, I’ve found, don’t care much about haute cuisine. So I looked into Sophia’s innocent chocolate-colored eyes and mumbled something about eggs and breeding. Yes, I straight-up lied. After Sophia went home, I sat in the lot and looked at the ducks. There was an unmistakable gap in my knowledge of these creatures, right there in between the raising and the cooking. I knew how to raise them, and I knew how to cook them. How to get from a living duck to a duck ready to go in the oven—that was the trick.


pages: 336 words: 90,749

How to Fix Copyright by William Patry

A Declaration of the Independence of Cyberspace, barriers to entry, big-box store, borderless world, business cycle, business intelligence, citizen journalism, cloud computing, commoditize, creative destruction, crowdsourcing, death of newspapers, en.wikipedia.org, facts on the ground, Frederick Winslow Taylor, George Akerlof, Gordon Gekko, haute cuisine, informal economy, invisible hand, Joseph Schumpeter, Kickstarter, knowledge economy, lone genius, means of production, moral panic, new economy, road to serfdom, Ronald Coase, Ronald Reagan, semantic web, shareholder value, Silicon Valley, The Chicago School, The Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith, trade route, transaction costs, trickle-down economics, winner-take-all economy, zero-sum game

“The Impact of Culture on Creativity” (June 2009), available at: http://www.keanet.eu/en/impactcreativityculture.html. 160. Report at 21. 161. See U.S. Copyright From Letter 122, available at: http://www. copyright.gov/fls/fl122.html. 162. See Who Owns the Korean Taco?, NY Times, July 2, 2010, available at: http://freakonomics.blogs.nytimes.com/2010/07/02/whoowns-the-korean-taco/; Tania Su Li Cheng, “Copyright protection of haute cuisine: recipe for disaster?,” 30 European Intellectual Property Review 93 (2008); Christopher Buccafusco, “On the Legal Consequences of Sauces: Should Thomas Keller’s Recipes Be Per Se Copyrightable?,” 24 Cardozo Arts & Entertainment Law 1121 (2007); Journal Emmannuelle Fauchart and Eric von Hippel, “Norms-Based Intellectual Property Systems: The Case of French Chefs ,” MIT Sloan Research Paper No. 4576-06 , January 1, 2006, available at: http://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?


The Making of a World City: London 1991 to 2021 by Greg Clark

Basel III, Berlin Wall, Big bang: deregulation of the City of London, Boris Johnson, British Empire, business climate, business cycle, capital controls, carbon footprint, congestion charging, corporate governance, cross-subsidies, deindustrialization, Dissolution of the Soviet Union, East Village, Fall of the Berlin Wall, financial innovation, financial intermediation, global value chain, haute cuisine, housing crisis, industrial cluster, intangible asset, Kickstarter, knowledge economy, knowledge worker, labour market flexibility, low skilled workers, manufacturing employment, Masdar, mass immigration, megacity, New Urbanism, offshore financial centre, Pearl River Delta, place-making, rent control, Robert Gordon, Silicon Valley, smart cities, sovereign wealth fund, trickle-down economics, urban planning, urban renewal, working poor

New Labour’s highly open immigration policy prompted a further influx. By 1998, the New York Times was moved to comment on the transformation of London by immigrants: “For most of the last 50 years, the French have felt superior to the British. London was the capital of an empire in decline, a quaint but backward place where prospects were bleak and unthinkable things like fish and chips wrapped in newspaper passed for haute cuisine. But today, for tens of thousands of young French people, London has become the new European El Dorado thanks to the Channel Tunnel, British membership in the European Union, and two decades of Conservative governments’ – and now Prime Minister Tony Blair’s – bent on making the British economy more competitive.” (Whitney, 1998) Apart from 1992 and 1993, substantial net inflows of immigrants to London have taken place in every year since 1991 (Gordon et al., 2007: 17).


pages: 321 words: 90,247

Lights Out in Wonderland by Dbc Pierre

Berlin Wall, carbon footprint, dark matter, haute cuisine, market design, stem cell

“Hm, well—he’s hardly going to discuss any of that with me.” An icy glimmer still spreads through me, the room even starts to pixilate—not from what I’ve heard, but for what I sense is to come. It’s a slow dawning on a cataclysmic scale. “All I’ve heard thus far is that they may possibly get their hands on a small tiger.” “Uh? Tiger? Bad move, that surprises me—cats are crap.” “I think he said they weren’t going too haute cuisine, they were looking more for symbols. Simple, full-flavored produce.” “Putain, if it’s a cat we might only be able to work with the tail. Unless it’s a cub, a milk-fed cub—is it a cub? If it’s a cub tell him to start milk-feeding right away, it’ll need eight to ten weeks at least, I reckon. The quicker I can get on to it, the better—tell him to hold back on the menu for now. What’s their proposed date?”


Lonely Planet Ireland by Lonely Planet

bank run, banking crisis, Berlin Wall, Bernie Sanders, bike sharing scheme, Bob Geldof, British Empire, carbon footprint, Celtic Tiger, credit crunch, G4S, glass ceiling, global village, haute cuisine, hydraulic fracturing, Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), Jacquard loom, Kickstarter, land reform, reserve currency, sustainable-tourism, young professional

There's another branch ( MAP GOOGLE MAP ; %01-672 0010; www.elywinebar.ie; Custom House Quay; mains €16-28; hnoon-11pm Mon-Fri, 4pm-midnight Sat; jGeorge's Dock) in the Docklands. oRestaurant Patrick GuilbaudFRENCH€€€ ( MAP GOOGLE MAP ; %01-676 4192; www.restaurantpatrickguilbaud.ie; 21 Upper Merrion St; 2-/3-course set lunch €50/60, dinner menus €90-185; h12.30-2.30pm & 7.30-10.30pm Tue-Sat; g7, 46 from city centre) Ireland's only Michelin two-star is understandably considered the best in the country by its devotees, who proclaim Guillaume Lebrun's French haute cuisine the most exalted expression of the culinary arts. If you like formal dining, this is as good as it gets: the lunch menu is an absolute steal, at least in this stratosphere. Innovative and beautifully presented. The room itself is all contemporary elegance and the service expertly formal yet surprisingly friendly – the staff are meticulously trained and as skilled at answering queries and addressing individual requests as they are at making sure not one breadcrumb lingers too long on the immaculate tablecloths.

Yamamori SushiJAPANESE€€ ( MAP GOOGLE MAP ; www.yamamorinoodles.ie; 38-39 Lower Ormond Quay; sushi €4-4.50, mains €17-35; hnoon-10.30pm; gall city centre) A sibling of the long-established Yamamori on South Great George's St, this large restaurant – spread across two converted Georgian houses and including a bamboo garden – does Japanese with great aplomb, serving up all kinds of favourites from steaming bowls of ramen to a delicious nami moriawase (sushi platter). oChapter OneMODERN IRISH€€€ ( MAP GOOGLE MAP ; %01-873 2266; www.chapteronerestaurant.com; 18 N Parnell Sq; 2-course lunch €32.50, 4-course dinner €75; h12.30-2pm Tue-Fri, 7.30-10.30pm Tue-Sat; g3, 10, 11, 13, 16, 19, 22 from city centre) Flawless haute cuisine and a relaxed, welcoming atmosphere make this Michelin-starred restaurant in the basement of the Dublin Writers Museum our choice for best dinner experience in town. The food is French-inspired contemporary Irish, the menus change regularly and the service is top-notch. The three-course pre-theatre menu (€39.50) is great if you're going to the Gate around the corner. Docklands oJuniors Deli & CafeITALIAN€€ ( MAP GOOGLE MAP ; %01-664 3648; www.juniors.ie; 2 Bath Ave; mains €18-21; h8.30am-2.30pm & 5.30-10pm Mon-Fri, 11am-3pm & 5.30-10.30pm Sat, 11am-3.30pm Sun; g3 from city centre, dGrand Canal Dock) Cramped and easily mistaken for any old cafe, Juniors is anything but ordinary.

Freshly prepared fish cakes, quiches, healthy salads and soups are complemented by daily specials such as a Wagyu beef burger. There are three comfy, good-value guest bedrooms upstairs (double €70). oBastionMODERN IRISH€€€ ( MAP GOOGLE MAP ; %021-470 9696; www.bastionkinsale.com; cnr Main & Market Sts; mains €18-31; h5-10pm Wed-Sun; v)S Awarded a Bib Gourmand in 2016, the newest addition to Kinsale's lengthy list of top restaurants offers diners a relaxed and informal entry into the world of haute cuisine. Waitstaff will guide you through the concise à la carte menu of local oysters, beef, fish and venison, but it's best to go for the seven-course tasting menu (€65) or the five-course early-bird menu (pre-6pm; €45). oFinn's TableMODERN IRISH€€€ ( MAP GOOGLE MAP ; %021-470 9636; www.finnstable.com; 6 Main St; mains €23-34; h6-10pm Mon, Tue & Thu-Sat)S Owning a gourmet restaurant in Kinsale means plenty of competition, but John and Julie Finn's venture is more than up to the challenge.


Lonely Planet Eastern Europe by Lonely Planet, Mark Baker, Tamara Sheward, Anita Isalska, Hugh McNaughtan, Lorna Parkes, Greg Bloom, Marc Di Duca, Peter Dragicevich, Tom Masters, Leonid Ragozin, Tim Richards, Simon Richmond

Albert Einstein, Berlin Wall, call centre, car-free, carbon footprint, crowdsourcing, Defenestration of Prague, Fall of the Berlin Wall, Frank Gehry, glass ceiling, haute cuisine, low cost airline, mass immigration, pre–internet, Steve Jobs, the High Line, Transnistria, urban planning, urban renewal, urban sprawl

Gran Cafe Dr ZhivagoRUSSIAN€€ (Гранд Кафе Dr Живаго MAP GOOGLE MAP ; %499-922 0100; www.drzhivago.ru; Mokhovaya ul 15/1; mains R540-1200; h24hr; mOkhotny Ryad) An excellent breakfast choice before visiting the Kremlin, this round-the-clock place mixes Soviet nostalgia with a great deal of mischievous irony in both design and food. The chef has upgraded the menu of a standard pioneer camp’s canteen to near haute cuisine level, with masterfully cooked porridge, pancakes, vareniki (dumplings) and cottage-cheese pies. oLavka-LavkaINTERNATIONAL€€ (Лавка-Лавка MAP GOOGLE MAP ; %8-903-115 5033; www.restoran.lavkalavka.com; ul Petrovka 21 str 2; mains R500-950; hnoon-midnight Tue-Thu & Sun, to 1am Fri & Sat; c; mTeatralnaya)S Welcome to the Russian Portlandia – all the food here is organic and hails from little farms where you may rest assured all the lambs and chickens lived a very happy life before being served to you on a plate.

Housed in several vaulted rooms of an atmospheric old townhouse with wooden ceiling beams, the fish is fresher than a spring shower. Go for something you wouldn’t normally find elsewhere like brodet (Croatian fish stew with polenta) or cuttlefish black risotto. oStrelecSLOVENIAN€€€ (Archer; MAP GOOGLE MAP ; %031 687 648; www.kaval-group.si/strelec.asp; Grajska Planota 1; mains €12-28; hnoon-10pm Mon-Sat) This is haute cuisine from on high – Ljubljana Castle's Archer's Tower, no less – with a menu that traces the city's history chosen by ethnologist Janez Bogataj and prepared by Igor Jagodic, recognised as one of the top chefs in Slovenia. Tasting menus are priced from €32 to €77 for between three and nine courses. Self-Catering Covered MarketMARKET (Pokrita Tržnica; MAP GOOGLE MAP ; Dolničarjeva ulica; h7am-4pm Mon-Fri, 7am-2pm Sat) The covered part of central market sells meats and cheeses. 6Drinking & Nightlife Ljubljana offers a dizzying array of drinking options, whether your tipple is beer, wine and spirits, or tea and coffee.


pages: 347 words: 97,721

Only Humans Need Apply: Winners and Losers in the Age of Smart Machines by Thomas H. Davenport, Julia Kirby

AI winter, Andy Kessler, artificial general intelligence, asset allocation, Automated Insights, autonomous vehicles, basic income, Baxter: Rethink Robotics, business intelligence, business process, call centre, carbon-based life, Clayton Christensen, clockwork universe, commoditize, conceptual framework, dark matter, David Brooks, deliberate practice, deskilling, digital map, disruptive innovation, Douglas Engelbart, Edward Lloyd's coffeehouse, Elon Musk, Erik Brynjolfsson, estate planning, fixed income, follow your passion, Frank Levy and Richard Murnane: The New Division of Labor, Freestyle chess, game design, general-purpose programming language, global pandemic, Google Glasses, Hans Lippershey, haute cuisine, income inequality, index fund, industrial robot, information retrieval, intermodal, Internet of things, inventory management, Isaac Newton, job automation, John Markoff, John Maynard Keynes: Economic Possibilities for our Grandchildren, John Maynard Keynes: technological unemployment, Joi Ito, Khan Academy, knowledge worker, labor-force participation, lifelogging, longitudinal study, loss aversion, Mark Zuckerberg, Narrative Science, natural language processing, Norbert Wiener, nuclear winter, pattern recognition, performance metric, Peter Thiel, precariat, quantitative trading / quantitative finance, Ray Kurzweil, Richard Feynman, risk tolerance, Robert Shiller, Robert Shiller, Rodney Brooks, Second Machine Age, self-driving car, Silicon Valley, six sigma, Skype, social intelligence, speech recognition, spinning jenny, statistical model, Stephen Hawking, Steve Jobs, Steve Wozniak, strong AI, superintelligent machines, supply-chain management, transaction costs, Tyler Cowen: Great Stagnation, Watson beat the top human players on Jeopardy!, Works Progress Administration, Zipcar

Using machines will deepen the empathy, or heighten the creativity, or refine the taste that people bring to the table. A good example is the new capability of IBM’s Watson to find novel combinations of food ingredients that add up to palatable dishes. Chefs, of course, are very creative people—and computers don’t even eat. But gastronomy is also, on one level, just chemistry. Lav Varshney, a computer scientist at IBM, explains that Watson entered the world of haute cuisine when a database of already highly rated recipes was fed into it. The next step was, akin to the marketing-message software, to “remix them, substitute things, do all kinds of other modifications and generate millions of new ideas for recipes.”24 But it wouldn’t be feasible to prepare all of those and foist the results onto courageous taste testers. To predict which will be the best ones, Watson tests its recipes against other criteria drawn from chemistry and psychology research into how humans respond to different flavor compounds.


pages: 352 words: 96,692

Celebration of Fools: An Inside Look at the Rise and Fall of JCPenney by Bill Hare

business climate, glass ceiling, haute couture, haute cuisine, McMansion, Ronald Reagan, shareholder value, walking around money, women in the workforce

Below was the nicely set out fountain and the terraced gardens that rose up to the giant but well-scaled parking garages sheathed in brick with ornamental copper cupolas. The huge cafeteria was just below the deck, of course, but her view (like all those from the suites) hid virtually all other human beings except gardeners. It was an architectural triumph of sorts. A special elevator, accessible only by the few with "Executive" access, connected this area with private dining rooms that were walled off from the cafeteria and had a different, more haute cuisine menu. And it was possible for a senior executive like Duff-Bloom to arrive and depart via either of two other small elevators and the underground galleries to the garages. This way one might avoid contact with virtually any of the nearly 3,000 nonexecutive associates who also dwelt in the Plano complex. Duff-Bloom had noted and strongly disapproved of several peers who did exactly that. The area was officially known simply and haughtily as "Executive," another bit of post–New York posturing.


pages: 354 words: 99,690

Thinking About It Only Makes It Worse: And Other Lessons From Modern Life by David Mitchell

bank run, Boris Johnson, British Empire, cognitive dissonance, collapse of Lehman Brothers, credit crunch, don't be evil, double helix, Downton Abbey, Etonian, eurozone crisis, haute cuisine, Julian Assange, lateral thinking, Northern Rock, offshore financial centre, payday loans, plutocrats, Plutocrats, profit motive, sensible shoes, Skype, The Wisdom of Crowds, WikiLeaks

“People have certain expectations of a Michelin restaurant but we don’t have cloths on the tables and our service isn’t very formal,” she explains. Her bare scrubbed wood tables (in 2004, when the place opened, there was only one of them) and seasonal ingredients wowed the Michelin men’s jaded appetites. Sick of starch and the sommelier’s bow, they found her approach refreshing. A tear was brought to the gastronomes’ eyes by her honest home cooking in a leafy environment a world away from the tarnished splendour of haute cuisine’s saline trickery. At its best, you can’t beat home cooking. But Mum doesn’t always make a roast and your favourite pudding. Sometimes it’s fish fingers with a side order of yesterday’s sprouts. Those attracted by the star, less tired of intricate dishes in swanky restaurants than the judges, may have thought the Suttons seeds rack and display of watering cans detracted from the ambience of their anniversary dinners.


pages: 299 words: 97,378

Home Sweet Anywhere: How We Sold Our House, Created a New Life, and Saw the World by Lynne Martin

connected car, Downton Abbey, East Village, haute cuisine, McMansion, pink-collar, Skype

“Robin, you are about to have one of the best meals you have ever had,” I told her excitedly on the way down the hill. The tiny place was beautifully decorated in soft greens and pale pinks with crisp linens and sparkling cutlery. It was so elegantly turned out that it could have fit perfectly into a big-city neighborhood, yet here it was, in a tiny country town. Everything was pristine and understated—except the food, which was over-the-top haute cuisine. The owner’s mother, the chef, outdid herself with two kinds of homemade ravioli, one with meat sauce and one with cream sauce, both delicious. Her risotto with beet sauce was outrageously good, and I found the dessert of caramelized fruit in a flaky crust with homemade ice cream practically a religious experience! We ordered everything they offered; each of the fifteen dishes we sampled was memorable.


pages: 831 words: 98,409

SUPERHUBS: How the Financial Elite and Their Networks Rule Our World by Sandra Navidi

activist fund / activist shareholder / activist investor, assortative mating, bank run, barriers to entry, Bernie Sanders, Black Swan, Blythe Masters, Bretton Woods, butterfly effect, Capital in the Twenty-First Century by Thomas Piketty, Carmen Reinhart, central bank independence, cognitive bias, collapse of Lehman Brothers, collateralized debt obligation, commoditize, conceptual framework, corporate governance, Credit Default Swap, credit default swaps / collateralized debt obligations, crony capitalism, diversification, East Village, Elon Musk, eurozone crisis, family office, financial repression, Gini coefficient, glass ceiling, Goldman Sachs: Vampire Squid, Google bus, Gordon Gekko, haute cuisine, high net worth, hindsight bias, income inequality, index fund, intangible asset, Jaron Lanier, John Meriwether, Kenneth Arrow, Kenneth Rogoff, knowledge economy, London Whale, Long Term Capital Management, longitudinal study, Mark Zuckerberg, mass immigration, McMansion, mittelstand, money market fund, Myron Scholes, NetJets, Network effects, offshore financial centre, old-boy network, Parag Khanna, Paul Samuelson, peer-to-peer, performance metric, Peter Thiel, plutocrats, Plutocrats, Ponzi scheme, quantitative easing, Renaissance Technologies, rent-seeking, reserve currency, risk tolerance, Robert Gordon, Robert Shiller, Robert Shiller, rolodex, Satyajit Das, shareholder value, Silicon Valley, social intelligence, sovereign wealth fund, Stephen Hawking, Steve Jobs, The Future of Employment, The Predators' Ball, The Rise and Fall of American Growth, too big to fail, women in the workforce, young professional

One of the most breathtaking receptions was hosted by Commerzbank at the truly spectacular Esma Sultan Palace. The antique three-story waterfront mansion had been tastefully restored, its ambiance further enhanced with elaborate lighting. Everyone who was anyone was in attendance, even though the palace was located in an old, narrow part of the city that required a time-consuming commute. Commerzbank pulled out all the stops and spoiled its guests with haute cuisine and fine wines. The Deutsche Bank reception featured the highest concentration of prestigious guests, which was at least partially due to CEO Joe Ackermann’s clout. Among the guests were Turkish businessman Kahraman Sadikoğlu, who invited Ackermann; Caio Koch-Weser, vice chairman of Deutsche Bank; Axel Weber, at the time president of the Bundesbank; their wives; and a few other guests—including lucky me—onto Ataturk’s yacht, the Savarona.


pages: 279 words: 96,180

Anything to Declare?: The Searching Tales of an HM Customs Officer by Jon Frost

airport security, blood diamonds, British Empire, friendly fire, haute cuisine, IFF: identification friend or foe, Louis Blériot

And the staff canteen was really no more than a glorified prefab Nissen hut from the time when Stansted was in the hands of the 8th Air Force of the USAAF (United States Army Air Force) during the Second World War. From looking at the regular canteen menu, I think they left some of their food behind as well. But, having already served in the regular Army, I was used to food that wasn’t exactly haute cuisine. After I had left the regulars, I’d joined the Territorial Army, which also allowed me to return to college in Cambridge. Near exam time, I was on TA duty in the officer’s mess of the Royal Anglians when I’d been approached by an ageing captain who was a little drunk. He was apparently worried that I was heading for the dole in the next couple of weeks and informed me that Customs at Stansted Airport was looking for bench officers.


Lonely Planet Mexico by John Noble, Kate Armstrong, Greg Benchwick, Nate Cavalieri, Gregor Clark, John Hecht, Beth Kohn, Emily Matchar, Freda Moon, Ellee Thalheimer

AltaVista, Bartolomé de las Casas, Burning Man, call centre, clean water, colonial rule, glass ceiling, haute cuisine, illegal immigration, informal economy, low cost airline, low cost carrier, Mahatma Gandhi, New Urbanism, off grid, place-making, Rosa Parks, Rubik’s Cube, Skype, sustainable-tourism, trade route, traffic fines, urban sprawl, wage slave

El Mural de los Poblanos ( 242-05-03; www.elmuraldelospoblanos.com; Av 16 de Septiembre 506; mains M$75-175; 1-11pm Mon-Sat, to 6pm Sun) Set back from the street in a gorgeous, plant-filled colonial courtyard, El Mural de los Poblanos serves excellent, traditional poblano dishes in an elegant setting. The house specialty is five kinds of mole. Other favorites include the smoky goat-cheese-stuffed ancho chile relleno (dried Poblano chili) and the trilogy of cemitas. * * * PUEBLA’S UNFORGETTABLE SEASONAL TREATS Justly famous for its haute cuisine, Puebla also offers an array of seasonal, local delicacies that adventurous eaters should not miss. Escamoles (March-June) Ant larvae, look like rice and are usually sautéed in butter. Gusanos de maguey (April-May) Worms that inhabit the maguey plant, fried in a drunken chili and pulque sauce. Huitlacoche (June-October) Inky-black corn fungus with an enchanting, earthy flavor. Sometimes spelt cuitlacoche.

Ambar ( 214-25-42; http://restaurante-ambar.com; Hidalgo Ote 201; mains M$78-230; 8pm-midnight Sun-Thu, to 2am Fri & Sat) On the upper level of the new Museo Modelo de Ciencias e Industria building, Ambar is laid out in a massive, appropriately industrial space with exposed beams and piping, two-story-high ceilings and sleek wooden furniture. Sports matches are projected on the stark white walls, creating an odd distraction from the haute cuisine ambience to which the restaurant aspires. The food, however, compensates. Dishes like salmon in asparagus sauce, giant shrimp with pistachio salsa, and duck with hibiscus sauce are a delight. Shopping The gigantic daily Mercado Juárez (cnr Fabela & Calle 5 de Mayo) is behind the bus station. On Friday, villagers swarm in to exchange fruit, flowers, pots, clothes and plastic goods. The market may be colorful, but it’s also chaotic and not a great place to buy local handicrafts.

Fonda Las Mercedes ( 312-61-13; Guzmán 47; mains M$145-185; 1:30pm-midnight Mon-Sat, to 6pm Sun) The bar ceiling at this hip, upscale spot is embedded with 200 clay pots, the intimate courtyard dining room is decorated with old stone columns and spheres and the kitchen serves four cuts of steak 10 different ways. Restaurante Lu ( 313-13-28; Portal Hidalgo 229; tasting menu $215; ) Inside the Hotel Casino, talented young chef Lucero Soto Arriaga turns humble pre-Hispanic ingredients into exquisite gems of alta cocina (Mexican haute cuisine). Her multicourse tasting menu might begin with tamales with smoked butter, then move on to delicate salads of dried nopal (cactus paddle) with caramelized pumpkin seeds, squash blossom-peanut tacos and whimsical confections of local fruits. Try to snag an outdoor table for perfect plaza views. Drinking & Entertainment Being a university town and the capital of one of Mexico’s most interesting states, Morelia has a thriving cultural life.


pages: 440 words: 109,150

The Secrets of Station X: How the Bletchley Park codebreakers helped win the war by Michael Smith

Alan Turing: On Computable Numbers, with an Application to the Entscheidungsproblem, British Empire, Etonian, haute cuisine, QWERTY keyboard, trade route

It seems to have been thought that these must be a party of elderly gentlemen with their young women. A chambermaid at the hotel who was complaining of over-work, on being told that times were serious and that she should not complain, said: “It’s alright for you, but some of us have to work.” Little did she realise what these odd people were doing.’ The chef sent in by Sinclair was in fact his favourite chef from the Savoy Grill and the meals were very much haute cuisine. But after a few days of trying to deal with the demands of the some of the more difficult codebreakers, the chef also attempted suicide. Clarke was forced to telephone the Buckinghamshire Chief Constable in an attempt to keep the story out of the papers and ensure that the codebreakers’ presence at Bletchley Park remained secret. ‘Then we learned that Chamberlain had flown to Munich and made an agreement with Hitler,’ Cooper recalled.


pages: 364 words: 104,697

Were You Born on the Wrong Continent? by Thomas Geoghegan

Albert Einstein, American Society of Civil Engineers: Report Card, banking crisis, Berlin Wall, Bob Geldof, collective bargaining, corporate governance, cross-subsidies, dark matter, David Brooks, declining real wages, deindustrialization, ending welfare as we know it, facts on the ground, Gini coefficient, haute cuisine, income inequality, John Maynard Keynes: Economic Possibilities for our Grandchildren, knowledge economy, knowledge worker, laissez-faire capitalism, low skilled workers, Martin Wolf, McJob, minimum wage unemployment, mittelstand, offshore financial centre, Paul Samuelson, payday loans, pensions crisis, plutocrats, Plutocrats, purchasing power parity, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Robert Gordon, Ronald Reagan: Tear down this wall, Saturday Night Live, Silicon Valley, The Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith, Thorstein Veblen, union organizing, Wolfgang Streeck, women in the workforce

Bonn was an old university town, the home of Beethoven and Robert Schumann, and most people living there had no interest in being the capital of Germany. When I asked people in English or in my rocky German where to find the parliament building, most of them were clueless. M., though, hated the idea of moving to Berlin. I met him for dinner at a place as tiny as anything in this tiny toy town of a capital. M. liked the chef here: “Extraordinary man! He is a German trying to make haute cuisine out of German food. Do you know it, in America?” “Sure, we have German restaurants.” “Bah, these are dreadful, I think. They are an embarrassment.” The restaurant was tiny; everything in Bonn seemed tiny, and they say one reason the politicians wanted to go to Berlin is that in tiny Bonn everyone could hear what the politicians were saying. M. continued to talk about the importance of cuisine: “You see, people are writing in our magazine about the connection between eating and eros.”


Lonely Planet's Best of USA by Lonely Planet

Affordable Care Act / Obamacare, Airbnb, Bay Area Rapid Transit, Berlin Wall, big-box store, Burning Man, car-free, carbon footprint, Charles Lindbergh, East Village, Fall of the Berlin Wall, Francisco Pizarro, Frank Gehry, Golden Gate Park, haute cuisine, mass immigration, obamacare, ride hailing / ride sharing, Ronald Reagan, Rosa Parks, Silicon Valley, South of Market, San Francisco, the High Line, the payments system, transcontinental railway, upwardly mobile, urban planning, urban renewal, Works Progress Administration

Considering that there are more than 23,000 restaurants in the five boroughs, with constant openings and closings, it’s true. Owing to its huge immigrant population and an influx of over 50 million tourists annually, New York captures the title of America’s greatest restaurant city, hands down. Its diverse neighborhoods serve authentic Italian food and thin crust–style pizza, all manner of Asian food, French haute cuisine, and classic Jewish deli food, from bagels to piled-high pastrami on rye. And the list goes around the globe: Moroccan, Indian, Vietnamese, Russian, Cuban, Brazilian and more. Plus, Manhattan boasts street-cart dining that puts some city restaurant scenes to shame. Clambake / ROBYNPHOTO / GETTY IMAGES © Mid-Atlantic: Global Cooking, Crab Cakes & Cheesesteaks Washington, DC, has a wide array of global fare – not surprising given its ethnically diverse population.


pages: 380 words: 104,841

The Human Age: The World Shaped by Us by Diane Ackerman

23andMe, 3D printing, additive manufacturing, airport security, Albert Einstein, augmented reality, back-to-the-land, carbon footprint, clean water, dark matter, dematerialisation, double helix, Drosophila, epigenetics, Google Earth, Google Glasses, haute cuisine, Internet of things, Loebner Prize, Louis Pasteur, Masdar, mass immigration, megacity, microbiome, nuclear winter, personalized medicine, phenotype, Ray Kurzweil, refrigerator car, Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence, SETI@home, skunkworks, Skype, stem cell, Stewart Brand, the High Line, theory of mind, urban planning, urban renewal, Whole Earth Catalog

Organovo, a leading biotech company in San Diego, has 3D-printed working blood vessels and brain tissue, and successfully transplanted them into rats. Human trials begin soon. After that, Organovo plans to provide 3D-printed tissues for heart bypass surgery. Meanwhile, a kidney is the first whole organ they’re working on—because it’s a relatively simple structure. Thin body parts like these are the easiest to design. Thicker organs, such as hearts and livers, require a stronger frame. For that, a lattice of sugar—like the haute cuisine sugar cages some chefs confect for desserts—is often used to provide a firm scaffolding, and then cells are layered over it. Sugar is nontoxic and melts in water, so when the organ is finished, the sugar scaffold is rinsed away, leaving hollow vessels for blood flow where they’re needed. The goal isn’t to create an exact replica of a human heart, lung, or kidney—which after all took millions of years to evolve—nor does it need to be.


pages: 396 words: 107,814

Is That a Fish in Your Ear?: Translation and the Meaning of Everything by David Bellos

Clapham omnibus, Claude Shannon: information theory, Douglas Hofstadter, Etonian, European colonialism, haute cuisine, invention of the telephone, invention of writing, natural language processing, Republic of Letters, Sapir-Whorf hypothesis, speech recognition

More specifically, words derived from Latin that end in English in -tion nearly always name a process and a result of that process: abstraction (the process of abstracting something) alongside an abstraction, construction (the business of building structures) alongside a construction (something built), and so on. In a related kind of word use, the teacher of a cordon bleu cookery lesson hardly needs to explain that the French use cuisine to name both the place where food is prepared (the kitchen) and the results of such preparation (haute cuisine, cuisine bourgeoise, etc.). Handling the different meanings of translation and a translation is therefore not a real problem. We should nonetheless keep in mind that they are not the same thing and always be wary of taking one for the other. The difficulty with translation is different. Many diverse kinds of text are habitually identified as instances of “a translation”: books, real estate contracts, car maintenance manuals, poems, plays, legal treatises, philosophical tomes, CD notes, and website texts, to list just a few.


pages: 407 words: 107,343

Felaheen by Jon Courtenay Grimwood

haute cuisine, polynesian navigation, sensible shoes

Five minutes to braise the lamb for table six and pass it across for plating. That was the difference between home cooking and doing it for real. Restaurant food got dressed, just like the customers. And an artistic sprig or a near-odourless/tasteless swirl of sauce could hide culinary sins as easily as discreet makeup and good clothes could hide sins of the flesh. Warm plates, flamboyant furnishings, elegant garnishes and adequate food, the demands of haute cuisine at Maison Hafsid were less than its devoted clientele imagined. "Three," shouted the chef and Raf swirled his pan, smelling oil, seared flesh and oregano. Across the other side of the cellar was a wood oven for which Raf sometimes seared lamb or beef to be roasted, so that no steam from raw meat might dampen the oven's desertlike dryness. It wasn't really Raf's job but Raf was racking up favours, taking shifts he didn't want, helping to hump crates too heavy for one person alone.


pages: 438 words: 109,306

Tower of Basel: The Shadowy History of the Secret Bank That Runs the World by Adam Lebor

banking crisis, Basel III, Berlin Wall, Big bang: deregulation of the City of London, Bretton Woods, British Empire, business climate, central bank independence, corporate governance, corporate social responsibility, deindustrialization, eurozone crisis, fiat currency, financial independence, financial innovation, forensic accounting, Goldman Sachs: Vampire Squid, haute cuisine, IBM and the Holocaust, Kickstarter, Occupy movement, offshore financial centre, Ponzi scheme, price stability, quantitative easing, reserve currency, special drawing rights

The meeting closes, the aides leave, and those remaining retire for dinner in the dining room on the eighteenth floor, rightly confident that the food and the wine will be superb. The meal, which continues until 11 p.m. or midnight, is where the real work is done. The protocol and hospitality, honed for more than eight decades, are faultless. Anything said at the dining table, it is understood, is not to be repeated elsewhere. Few, if any, of those enjoying their haute cuisine and grand cru wines—some of the best Switzerland can offer—would be recognized by passers-by, but they include a good number of the most powerful people in the world. These men—they are almost all men—are central bankers. They have come to Basel to attend the Economic Consultative Committee (ECC) of the Bank for International Settlements (BIS), which is the bank for central banks. Its current members include Ben Bernanke, the chairman of the US Federal Reserve; Sir Mervyn King, the governor of the Bank of England; Mario Draghi, of the European Central Bank; Zhou Xiaochuan of the Bank of China; and the central bank governors of Germany, France, Italy, Sweden, Canada, India, and Brazil.


Discover Greece Travel Guide by Lonely Planet

car-free, carbon footprint, credit crunch, G4S, haute couture, haute cuisine, low cost airline, low cost carrier, pension reform, sensible shoes, too big to fail, trade route, urban renewal

The ravioli with Swiss chard, chervil and cheese, and the tangy Mani sausage with orange are standouts. It’s great value and almost all starters and mains can be ordered as half-serves (at half-price), allowing you to try a range of dishes. Kolonaki & Pangrati SPONDI Fine Dining €€€ ( 210 752 0658; Pironos 5, Pangrati; mains €35-50; 8pm-late) Two Michelin–starred Spondi is consistently voted Athens’ best restaurant, and the accolades are totally deserved. It offers Mediterranean haute cuisine, with heavy French influences, in a relaxed, chic setting in a charming old house. Choose from the menu or a range of set dinner and wine prix fixes . The restaurant has a lovely bougainvillea-draped garden. ALATSI Cretan €€ ( 210 721 0501; Vrasida 13, Ilissia; mains €12-16.50; Evangelismos) Cretan food is in. Alatsi represents the new breed of trendy upscale restaurants, serving traditional Cretan cuisine, such as gamopilafo (wedding pilaf) with lamb or rare stamnagathi (wild greens), to fashionable Athenians.


Western USA by Lonely Planet

airport security, Albert Einstein, Apple II, Asilomar, back-to-the-land, Bay Area Rapid Transit, Burning Man, California gold rush, call centre, car-free, carbon footprint, Charles Lindbergh, Chuck Templeton: OpenTable:, Donner party, East Village, edge city, Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test, Frank Gehry, global village, Golden Gate Park, Haight Ashbury, haute couture, haute cuisine, illegal immigration, intermodal, Joan Didion, Kickstarter, Loma Prieta earthquake, Mahatma Gandhi, Mars Rover, Maui Hawaii, off grid, Silicon Valley, Silicon Valley startup, South of Market, San Francisco, starchitect, stealth mode startup, stem cell, Steve Jobs, Steve Wozniak, supervolcano, trade route, transcontinental railway, Upton Sinclair, urban planning, women in the workforce, Works Progress Administration, young professional, Zipcar

For an affordable B&B call in at Home by the Sea ( 877-332-2855; www.homebythesea.com; 444 Jackson St; d $105-115; ), where crashing waves will (hopefully) lull you to sleep and first-class hospitality will wake you up. Food in this fishing village means a visit to the slick, view-embellished confines of newly opened Redfish ( 541-336-2200; 517 Jefferson St; mains $15-20; 7am-10pm Wed-Sun) for organic Northwest haute cuisine. GOLD BEACH Situated at the mouth of the fabulous Rogue River, Gold Beach attracts anglers and adventurers looking to zip upstream via jet boat into the Wild Rogue Wilderness area. Hikers can appreciate the area’s spectacular coastline; visit Cape Sebastian State Park, a rocky headland 7 miles south, for a panorama stretching from California to Cape Blanco. Get details at the visitors center (www.goldbeach.org; 94080 Shirley Lane; 9am-5pm).

Blue Lion FUSION $$$ ( 307-733-3912; 160 N Millward St; mains $15-34; from 6pm) In a precious cornflower-blue house, the Blue Lion offers outdoor dining under grand old trees on the deck. It creatively combines Thai and French influences in dishes such as beef tenderloin au bleu and green curry prawns. Snake River Grill MODERN AMERICAN $$$ ( 307-733-0557; 84 E Broadway; mains $21-52 from 5:30pm) With a roaring stone fireplace and snappy white linens, this grill creates notable American haute cuisine. Grilled elk chops and wild mushroom pasta show a tendency toward the earthy. Sample the extensive wine list and the homemade ice cream or soufflé for dessert. Bubba’s Bar-B-Que BARBECUE $$ ( 307-733-2288; 100 Flat Creek Dr; mains $5-15; 7am-10pm) Get the biggest, fluffiest breakfast biscuits for miles at this friendly and energetic bring-your-own-bottle (BYOB) eatery. Later on, it’s got a decent salad bar, and serves up a ranch of ribs and racks.


pages: 404 words: 113,514

Atrocity Archives by Stross, Charles

airport security, anthropic principle, Berlin Wall, brain emulation, British Empire, Buckminster Fuller, defense in depth, disintermediation, experimental subject, glass ceiling, haute cuisine, hypertext link, Khyber Pass, mandelbrot fractal, Menlo Park, MITM: man-in-the-middle, NP-complete, the medium is the message, Y2K, yield curve

The next step is to do it without breaking the shell at all--immerse the egg in a suspension of some really tiny ferromagnetic particles then use electrophoresis to draw them into it, then figure out some way of making them clump together into long, magnetised chains inside it. With me so far?" "Mad, mad I say!" Pinky is bouncing up and down. "What are we going to do tonight, Brains?" "What we do every night, Pinky: try to take over the world!" (Of haute cuisine.) "But I've got to buy a couple of books before the shops close," says Pinky, and the spell is broken. "Hope you feel better, Bob. See you guys later." And he's gone. "Well that was useless," sighs Brains. "The lad's got no staying power. One of these days he'll settle down and turn all normal." I look at my flatmate gloomily and wonder why I put up with this shit. It's a glimpse of my life, resplendent in two-dimensional glory, from an angle that I don't normally catch--and I don't like it.


pages: 372 words: 116,005

The Secret Barrister: Stories of the Law and How It's Broken by Secret Barrister

cognitive bias, Donald Trump, G4S, glass ceiling, haute cuisine, Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), mandatory minimum, race to the bottom, Schrödinger's Cat, statistical model

Which is important, because, believe it or not, in order to qualify as a barrister in this country, a condition is that, as a student on the postgraduate £20,000-a-pop Bar Practical Training Course (as it now is), you have to attend your Inn and eat twelve meals. I kid you not. A fundamental requirement of membership of the oldest advocacy tradition in our legal history is that having ploughed yourself into a £32k professional loan (including interest),25 you must ingest heavily subsidized haute cuisine twelve times.26 And people say we’re out of touch with the modern world. Chambers house anything from half a dozen to several hundred self-employed barristers, and are designed to allow sole practitioners to pool knowledge, wisdom and overheads, such as rent and staff. The most important of these are the clerks. Clerks are our pimps. They get the work in to chambers, schmoozing solicitors and prostituting barristers to ensure that everyone’s diaries remain full, and that cases are covered.


pages: 424 words: 115,035

How Will Capitalism End? by Wolfgang Streeck

accounting loophole / creative accounting, Airbnb, basic income, Ben Bernanke: helicopter money, Bretton Woods, business cycle, capital controls, Capital in the Twenty-First Century by Thomas Piketty, Carmen Reinhart, central bank independence, centre right, Clayton Christensen, collective bargaining, conceptual framework, corporate governance, creative destruction, credit crunch, David Brooks, David Graeber, debt deflation, deglobalization, deindustrialization, disruptive innovation, en.wikipedia.org, eurozone crisis, failed state, financial deregulation, financial innovation, first-past-the-post, fixed income, full employment, Gini coefficient, global reserve currency, Google Glasses, haute cuisine, income inequality, information asymmetry, invisible hand, John Maynard Keynes: Economic Possibilities for our Grandchildren, Kenneth Rogoff, labour market flexibility, labour mobility, late capitalism, liberal capitalism, market bubble, means of production, moral hazard, North Sea oil, offshore financial centre, open borders, pension reform, plutocrats, Plutocrats, Plutonomy: Buying Luxury, Explaining Global Imbalances, post-industrial society, private sector deleveraging, profit maximization, profit motive, quantitative easing, reserve currency, rising living standards, Robert Gordon, savings glut, secular stagnation, shareholder value, sharing economy, sovereign wealth fund, The Future of Employment, The Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith, Thorstein Veblen, too big to fail, transaction costs, Uber for X, upwardly mobile, Vilfredo Pareto, winner-take-all economy, Wolfgang Streeck

A prototypical example was the range of Swatch watches, a marketing creation par excellence which first appeared in 1983, as Asian manufacturers began replacing mechanical clockwork with quartz-based microprocessors. Mass production did not disappear but became much more sophisticated, characteristically developing a market niche of its own, and thus becoming another instance of niche production. Alongside McDonald’s, which itself eventually moved towards something like product diversification, local and regional cuisines were rediscovered, and haute cuisine expanded as never before. Wine production followed automobile production almost step-by-step in the 1980s, as vintners gave up on generic blends of different grapes from various locations and returned to producing a range of diverse products, each with identifiably individual character and origin. The scale of the general turn towards commercialization is perhaps best illustrated by the world of sport.


pages: 450 words: 114,766

Milk! by Mark Kurlansky

Affordable Care Act / Obamacare, Bernie Sanders, British Empire, clean water, Donner party, double helix, feminist movement, haute cuisine, Louis Pasteur, Mahatma Gandhi, spice trade

When you ladle it out, ladle it with sesame oil and sprinkle it with sugar. 6 THE DAYS OF MILK AND BEER Medieval Europeans counted on dairy products—they were central to their diet—especially cheese. Milk was also used, occasionally for drinking but much more commonly in cooking. In the fourteenth century, Guillaume Tirel, more often known as Taillevent, the chief cook for Charles V of France, wrote a cookbook that is considered to be the founding document of French haute cuisine, French cooking for the upper class. Milk is not a leading ingredient in his recipes, but it does show up from time to time, often in unexpected ways. Taillevent avoided mixing milk with fish. This was a medieval taboo, though it was not always strictly adhered to. Jews were more concerned about mixing meat and dairy. The Dutch, irrepressible dairy consumers, ate herring with sour cream. But as far as we know, Taillevent and his royal patrons never combined fish and dairy, and in medieval Europe in general there are few recipes to be found with this combination.


California by Sara Benson

airport security, Albert Einstein, Apple II, Asilomar, back-to-the-land, Bay Area Rapid Transit, Berlin Wall, Burning Man, buy and hold, California gold rush, call centre, car-free, carbon footprint, Columbine, dark matter, desegregation, Donald Trump, Donner party, East Village, El Camino Real, Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test, Frank Gehry, global village, Golden Gate Park, Haight Ashbury, haute cuisine, Joan Didion, Khyber Pass, Loma Prieta earthquake, low cost airline, McMansion, means of production, Menlo Park, planetary scale, RFID, ride hailing / ride sharing, Ronald Reagan, Silicon Valley, South of Market, San Francisco, stem cell, Steve Jobs, Steve Wozniak, Stewart Brand, the new new thing, trade route, transcontinental railway, Upton Sinclair, urban sprawl, Wall-E, white picket fence, Whole Earth Catalog, working poor, Works Progress Administration, young professional

Eating & Drinking Sugar Shack ( 714-536-0355; 213 Main St; mains $5-8; breakfast & lunch) The sidewalk patio is the place to sit at this Main St stalwart for some of HB’s best people-watching. And if you’re here really early, you might catch surfer dudes donning their wet suits. The $5 Breakfast Special comes with two pancakes, an egg, and bacon or sausage. Sign up for a table at the clipboard on the outside wall. Chronic Tacos ( 714-960-0339; 328 11th St; mains under $7; breakfast, lunch & dinner) For surfer haute cuisine, mosey into this sticker-covered shack and request a made-to-order Fatty Taco, then settle in for one of the best Mexican meals around. With the Dead playing on the stereo, a couple of surf bums chillin’ by the pool tables, and chatty, laid-back staff, you might just never leave. Park Bench Cafe ( 714-842-0775; 17732 Goldenwest St; breakfast mains $6-10, lunch mains $9-10; breakfast & lunch; ) A short drive east on Goldenwest St from PCH lands you at this shady outdoor café in Huntington Central Park.

JRDN (Map; 858-270-5736; Tower 23, 723 Feldspar St; breakfast mains $7-17, lunch $8-26, dinner $20-44; breakfast Sat & Sun, lunch & dinner daily) Sustainably farmed meats and seafood join local veggies for a plate-topping farmers market at chic, vowel-disdaining JRDN, where you can choose futuristic decor indoors or ocean views outdoors. Try dry scallops with crabmeat risotto, miso halibut and green-onion creamers (aka mashed potatoes). La Jolla La Jolla is a major haute-cuisine outpost, but there are some good budget options, too. Harry’s Coffee Shop (Map; 858-454-7381; 7545 Girard Ave; dishes $4-11; 6am-3pm) Classic coffee shop serving all-American fare with vinyl booths and a posse of regulars, from blue-haired socialites to sports celebs. Burger Lounge (Map; 858-456-0196; 1101 Wall St; Girard Ave; dishes $6-8; 11am-9pm, to 10pm Fri & Sat) The minimalist interior is in direct contrast to the messiness of the burgers at this new patty-and-bun joint one block east of Girard Ave.

Thanks to its proximity to Fronton Palacio Jai Alai and its Spanish Basque seafood, this small, friendly eatery has been packed with patrons since 1947. For some of the most savory, tender beef in town, leave the tourist area for a short drive to La Lena ( 686-4752; Blvd Agua Caliente Blvd 11191, Col Aviacion; lunch & dinner), a midrange local favorite with tranquil views of the Tijuana Country Club golf course. Everything from the guacamole to the rice and beans to the tortillas is top-notch, but try the brick filet. For alta cocina (haute cuisine), Cien Años ( 634-7662; Av Jose Marai Velazco 1407; 8am-11pm) serves ancient Mexican recipes, some going back to the Aztecs and Mayans. No shorts, jeans or T-shirts. An easy way to get to Tijuana is via the San Diego Trolley on the blue line, which runs from Old Town to downtown to San Ysidro ($3, about 30 minutes). From the Sam Ysidro stop, follow the pedestrian bridge mentioned above. You can also drive to the border, but it’s better to leave your car on the US side.


pages: 401 words: 122,457

Salt: A World History by Mark Kurlansky

British Empire, clean water, Deng Xiaoping, domestication of the camel, haute cuisine, Hernando de Soto, Honoré de Balzac, invention of movable type, long peace, Mahatma Gandhi, spice trade, The Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith, trade route

A simpler recipe using garum instead of salt is that for braised cutlets: Place the meat in a stew pan, add one pound of broth [garum], a like quantity of oil, a trifle of honey, and thus braise. And here is one for a fish sauce: Sauce for roasted red mullet: pepper, lovage, rue [an aromatic evergreen], honey, pine nuts, vinegar, wine, garum, and a bit of oil. Heat and pour over the fish. Although this style of cooking was a kind of haute cuisine for the elite, costly garum was frequently described as “putrid,” which is to say rotten. “That liquid of putrefying matter,” said Pliny. Seneca, the outspoken first-century philosopher, called it “expensive liquid of bad fish.” But his protégé, the poet Martial, apparently did not agree since he once sent garum with the note “accept this exquisite garum, a precious gift made with the first blood spilled from a living mackerel.”


pages: 1,203 words: 124,556

Lonely Planet Cape Town & the Garden Route (Travel Guide) by Lucy Corne

Berlin Wall, British Empire, Cape to Cairo, carbon footprint, haute couture, haute cuisine, load shedding, Mark Shuttleworth, mass immigration, Nelson Mandela, New Urbanism, Robert Gordon, upwardly mobile, urban renewal, urban sprawl

Slow MarketMARKET ( GOOGLE MAP ; www.slowmarket.co.za; Oude Libertas Rd, Oude Libertas; h9am-2pm Sat) Stellenbosch's original farmers market features lots of artisanal produce as well as crafts. 5Eating oLe Quartier Français: Living RoomBISTRO ( MAP GOOGLE MAP ; %021-876 2151; www.lqf.co.za; 16 Huguenot St; tapas R40-95; hbreakfast, lunch & dinner) Great for breakfast, light-ish lunches and delectable dinners that won't break the bank. The menu includes Asian-inspired tapas using African ingredients like wildebeest and springbok. Lust Bistro & BakeryBISTRO ( GOOGLE MAP ; www.lustbistro.com; Rte 45, cnr Simondium Rd; mains R75-130; hbreakfast & lunch) At Vrede en Lust winery, this is a refreshingly unfussy place to eat in a region known for haute cuisine. The focus is on sandwiches and pizzas, with all bread baked freshly. Try the sourdough pizza base. On Sunday there's a buffet lunch where you pay by the weight of your plate – bookings essential. Ryan's KitchenSOUTH AFRICAN ( MAP GOOGLE MAP ; www.ryanskitchen.co.za; Huguenot Rd, Place Vendome; mains R75-100, five-course tasting menu without/with wine R400/590; hlunch & dinner Mon-Sat) Loved by locals and recommended by travellers, this long-running restaurant marries South African ingredients with fine-dining techniques.


pages: 257 words: 56,811

The Rough Guide to Toronto by Helen Lovekin, Phil Lee

airport security, British Empire, car-free, glass ceiling, global village, Haight Ashbury, haute couture, haute cuisine, indoor plumbing, Jane Jacobs, joint-stock company, Khyber Pass, Kickstarter, Marshall McLuhan, megacity, place-making, urban renewal, urban sprawl

A delightful bedand-breakfast in a leafy suburban setting at the entrance to Discovery Harbour. The immaculate modern house, built in the style of a Victorian clapboard, has five extremely comfortable en-suite rooms, all with deep and downy mattresses. A fantastic breakfast is provided – ask for the carrot muffins. Highly recommended. $100. Eating and drinking Arthur’s 3 Beck Blvd. Not exactly haute cuisine, but this harbourside bar-cumrestaurant offers seafood dishes from as little as $12. Very popular with the locals. Blue Sky Family Restaurant 48 Main St. Agreeable small-town diner offering goodquality snacks and meals at very affordable prices. Great place for a gossip, too. Discovery Harbour 126 Discovery Harbour (late May to June Mon–Fri 10am–5pm; July to early Sept daily 10am–5pm; $6.50; T 705/549-8064, W www.discoveryharbour .on.ca), located about 5km north along the bay from Penetanguishene’s town centre on Jury Drive, is an ambitious reconstruction of the British naval base that was established here in 1817.


Lonely Planet Amsterdam by Lonely Planet

3D printing, Airbnb, haute couture, haute cuisine, post-work, QR code, Silicon Valley, trade route, tulip mania, young professional

Balthazar's Keuken Ever-changing, Mediterranean-tinged dishes served in a revamped blacksmith's forge. Buffet van Odette Airy, canal-side terrace for creative pastas and sandwiches. €€€ Wolf Atelier Ground-breaking gastronomy atop a disused railway bridge. Graham's Kitchen Ingredients at this diamond find are sourced from the Amsterdam area. Marius The chef whips up a four-course menu from his daily market finds. Ciel Bleu Two-Michelin-starred haute cuisine with 23rd-floor views over Amsterdam. Blauw aan de Wal A 17th-century herb_warehouse-turned-romantic-restaurant in the Red Light District. Best By Cuisine Traditional Dutch Bistro Bij Ons Honest-to-goodness Dutch classics. Letting Start the day with authentic Dutch breakfast dishes. La Falote Stewed fish, meatballs with endives, and other daily specials of home-style cooking. Pantry A gezellig (cosy, convivial) atmosphere and classic Dutch fare.


Cyprus Travel Guide by Lonely Planet

active transport: walking or cycling, back-to-the-land, British Empire, carbon footprint, clean water, colonial rule, haute cuisine, Kickstarter, New Urbanism, place-making, Skype

Classic HotelHOTEL €€ (2266 4006; www.classic.com.cy; Rigenis 94; s/d €80/97; ) This hotel, close to Pafos Gate, is a member of the ‘Small Luxury Hotels of the World’ group, and you can see why. Fully renovated in October 2010, everywhere, from the reception to the rooms, is done up in relaxing colours of creams and woods; the design is minimalist and the rooms are smart and comfortable. The 59 Knives restaurant, part of the hotel, specialises in haute cuisine, adding its own contribution to the Classic’s luxuries – together with the rooftop gym. CentrumHOTEL €€ (2245 6444; www.centrumhotel.net; Pasikratous 15; low-high incl breakfast s €70-90, d €90-110; ) A fairly stylish place that’s a cross between a boutique and a business hotel, the Centrum offers spacious rooms, some with balconies, decked out in blush and salmon colours; some have baths, too, so state your preference when booking.


Caribbean Islands by Lonely Planet

Bartolomé de las Casas, big-box store, British Empire, buttonwood tree, call centre, car-free, carbon footprint, clean water, colonial rule, cuban missile crisis, discovery of the americas, Donald Trump, glass ceiling, haute cuisine, income inequality, intermodal, jitney, Kickstarter, microcredit, offshore financial centre, place-making, Ronald Reagan, Rubik’s Cube, Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence, sustainable-tourism, urban planning, urban sprawl, white picket fence

If that’s not your idea of a vacation, you can drop in on yoga classes or meals for BS$10. The only way to get here is by boat, which leaves regularly from Mermaid Dock on East Bay St in Nassau. Eating Dining in Nassau can be a demoralizing experience, with high prices, huge crowds and low-quality food. But don’t despair – with a little extra patience and forethought, you can find anything from cheap and authentic Bahamian home cooking to the kind of haute cuisine that would feel at home in Paris or New York. DOWNTOWN NASSAU Café Matisse ITALIAN, INTERNATIONAL $$ ( 242-356-7012; www.cafe-matisse.com; Bank Lane; mains BS$15-26; lunch & dinner Tue-Sat) Tucked in the shadows of historic buildings and leafy palms, this casually elegant bistro just off Parliament Sq is a delightful escape from the cruise-ship-and-Bay-St mob scene. Savor top-notch pastas, pizzas and seafood dishes on the inviting back patio, where you’ll be served by crisp-shirted waiters to the sounds of cool world beats.

Poor old Pablo Neruda would be turning in his grave if this weren’t such an inviting place and a rare ray of light on the otherwise mildewed Malecón. Spend a poetic afternoon watching the waves splash over the sea wall. VEDADO La Torre FRENCH, CARIBBEAN $$$ ( 838-3088; Edificio Focsa, cnr Calles 17 & M; mains CUC$30) One of Havana’s tallest and most talked-about restaurants is perched high above downtown Vedado, atop the skyline-hogging Focsa building. A colossus of both modernist architecture and French/Cuban haute cuisine, this lofty fine-dining extravaganza combines sweeping city views with a progressive French-inspired menu that serves everything from artichokes to foie gras to tart almandine . Paladar El Hurón Azul PALADAR $$$ ( 879-1691; Humboldt No 153; meals CUC$15-20; noon-midnight Tue-Sun) This place is often touted as one of Havana’s best private restaurants and is locally famous for its adventurous smoked pork served with a pineapple salsa.

Whether you’ve come for a drink or for one of the overflowing international dishes (go for the ribs!), Calmos is a great spot to escape the parade of fine-dining tourists. L’Estaminet FRENCH $$$ ( 29-00-25; 103 Blvd de Grand Case; mains around €25; dinner) Traditional French fare in Grand Case? L’Estaminet is anything but! Take your taste buds on a gustatory adventure through the twisted mind of the owner and chef. Sample couplings of untraditional ingredients that prove that haute cuisine can be playful instead of pretentious. Lolos BBQ $ (mains €6-14) The big draw here for penny-pinchers is the collection of lolos between the main drag and ocean. These Creole barbecue shacks sit clustered around wooden picnic tables. There are six unique establishments (with oddly idiomatic names like Talk of the Town or Sky’s the Limit) comprising this steamy jungle of smoking grills – each one with its own specialty.


pages: 549 words: 139,625

Startide rising by David Brin

gravity well, haute cuisine

He reached out to steady the drying racks against the thunder. No sense in letting the meat go to waste. It had taken a lot of work to harvest it, strip it, and prepare it. They might need it for the voyage ahead. He wasn’t sure how the fen would take to the stuff, but it was nourishing ... the only food on the planet that an Earthling could eat. Gubru jerky, Tandu strips, and flayed Episiarch would never make it into haute cuisine, of course. But perhaps they were an acquired taste. He grinned and waved as Keepiru finally calmed down enough to bring the skiff to a halt nearby. How could I ever have doubted he’d still he alive? Hikahi wondered, joyfully. Gillian said he had to live. None of the Galactics could ever touch him. How could they? And why, in the wide universe, was I ever worried about getting home? Epilog : Rest : Rest And Listen : : Rest And Listen And Learn, Creideiki : : For The Startide Rises : : In The Currents Of The Dark : : And We Have Waited Long, For What Must Be : Postscript Dolphin names often sound as if they are Polynesian or Japanese.


pages: 441 words: 135,176

The Edifice Complex: How the Rich and Powerful--And Their Architects--Shape the World by Deyan Sudjic

Ayatollah Khomeini, Berlin Wall, British Empire, call centre, colonial rule, Columbine, cuban missile crisis, dematerialisation, Deng Xiaoping, Dissolution of the Soviet Union, Donald Trump, Frank Gehry, glass ceiling, Guggenheim Bilbao, haute couture, haute cuisine, megastructure, Mikhail Gorbachev, new economy, New Urbanism, oil shock, Peter Eisenman, Ronald Reagan, Socratic dialogue, urban planning, urban renewal, V2 rocket, Victor Gruen

In London, for all Berthet’s rhetoric about openness and democracy, the building is a precise representation of an entirely predictable hierarchy. The staff are in open-plan offices on the lower floors. The directors, who are herded together on floors ten and eleven, get to decorate their 1,000-square-feet private offices as they please, and have the use of the private dining rooms, with their starched linen tablecloths and haute cuisine, something of a contrast to the café for the other ranks on the reception floor. In all, fitting out the Bank cost £60 million, more than enough in fact to build a completely new office. But Attali wasn’t there to enjoy it for long. A sceptical British press, led by the Financial Times, started looking beyond the propaganda coming out of the bank about its heart-warming altruism and discovered that, in its first two years, the EBRD had budgeted to spend £1 million on hiring private jets to shuttle Attali back and forth from London to his apartment in Paris.


pages: 537 words: 135,099

The Rough Guide to Amsterdam by Martin Dunford, Phil Lee, Karoline Thomas

banking crisis, haute cuisine, illegal immigration, low cost airline, Nelson Mandela, place-making, plutocrats, Plutocrats, spice trade, sustainable-tourism, trade route, upwardly mobile, urban sprawl, young professional

Portions are large and the atmosphere is relaxed. Three-course menu €37.50, mains €17–25. Daily 6–11pm. Eating and drinking | Restaurants | The outer districts | Japanese Yamazato and Teppanyaki Sazanka Ferdinand Bolstraat 333 020/678 7111. Tram #25 from CS to Cornelis Troostplein. Situated in the swanky Okura Hotel, and dating back over thirty years, this was the first place to serve Japanese haute cuisine food in the Netherlands. Today two of the hotel’s four restaurants (including the French Ciel Bleu, on the 23rd floor) have Michelin stars, and this is one of the best places to eat Japanese food in the city; Yamazato is a very traditional sushi restaurant with over fifty specialities, and an à la carte menu featuring expertly prepared tempura, sashimi and sukiyaki. Reckon on paying €65–75 per person.


Canary Islands Travel Guide by Lonely Planet

AltaVista, call centre, carbon footprint, G4S, Haight Ashbury, haute cuisine, Kickstarter, low cost airline, low cost carrier, urban sprawl

A short, signposted walk or drive northwest from the waterfront is Castillo del Mar (www.castillo-del-mar.com; Parque Marítimo), an old banana-packaging factory that has been converted into a beautifully rustic and windblown cultural centre hosting concerts, exhibits and a tapas bar. Sadly, at the time of research, it was closed for legal and financial reasons, but as the owners and many island folk are fighting to have it reopened, it’s worth checking on the situation. Eating Haute cuisine it ain’t, but there are a couple of bars serving tapas and simple meals on the main plaza. Self-caterers can find some fresh produce at the tiny mercadillo (9am-1pm Mon-Sat), beside the town hall. Restaurante Parque Marítimo SEAFOOD € (922 80 15 61; mains €6-8) An informal bar and restaurant by the beach, you can order paella, local fish and shellfish here while squinting at the shimmering ocean.


City: A Guidebook for the Urban Age by P. D. Smith

active transport: walking or cycling, Albert Einstein, Andrew Keen, augmented reality, banking crisis, Berlin Wall, British Empire, Broken windows theory, Buckminster Fuller, Burning Man, business cycle, car-free, carbon footprint, clean water, colonial rule, congestion charging, cosmological principle, crack epidemic, double entry bookkeeping, edge city, Edward Lloyd's coffeehouse, en.wikipedia.org, Enrique Peñalosa, Fall of the Berlin Wall, Frank Gehry, garden city movement, global village, haute cuisine, income inequality, Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), invention of gunpowder, Jane Jacobs, John Snow's cholera map, Kevin Kelly, Kibera, Kickstarter, Kowloon Walled City, Masdar, megacity, megastructure, multicultural london english, mutually assured destruction, New Urbanism, Norman Mailer, peak oil, RFID, smart cities, starchitect, telepresence, the built environment, The Death and Life of Great American Cities, the High Line, Thomas Malthus, trade route, urban planning, urban renewal, urban sprawl, Victor Gruen, walkable city, white flight, white picket fence, young professional

However, no fast food is more closely associated with America than the hamburger. It’s an urban classic – a cheap and nourishing meal you could eat easily while hurrying along the sidewalk. It has spawned a multimillion-dollar global food industry. Today’s chains of fast food restaurants date from the 1920s. McDonald’s began in the 1940s, and by 1952 they were selling one million burgers and 145 tonnes of fries a year. Even France – the home of haute cuisine – has succumbed to the fast food trend. More than a million people a day now eat at McDonald’s in France. By 2007, it had a thousand branches and had become the second most profitable market for the US company in the world. Fast food businesses are now ubiquitous on city streets throughout the developed world: takeaway burger or pizza bars, ice-cream vans, hot-dog stalls, and – in New Orleans – sno-ball stands.


pages: 496 words: 131,938

The Future Is Asian by Parag Khanna

3D printing, Admiral Zheng, affirmative action, Airbnb, Amazon Web Services, anti-communist, Asian financial crisis, asset-backed security, augmented reality, autonomous vehicles, Ayatollah Khomeini, barriers to entry, Basel III, blockchain, Boycotts of Israel, Branko Milanovic, British Empire, call centre, capital controls, carbon footprint, cashless society, clean water, cloud computing, colonial rule, computer vision, connected car, corporate governance, crony capitalism, currency peg, deindustrialization, Deng Xiaoping, Dissolution of the Soviet Union, Donald Trump, energy security, European colonialism, factory automation, failed state, falling living standards, family office, fixed income, flex fuel, gig economy, global reserve currency, global supply chain, haute couture, haute cuisine, illegal immigration, income inequality, industrial robot, informal economy, Internet of things, Kevin Kelly, Kickstarter, knowledge worker, light touch regulation, low cost airline, low cost carrier, low skilled workers, Lyft, Malacca Straits, Mark Zuckerberg, megacity, Mikhail Gorbachev, money market fund, Monroe Doctrine, mortgage debt, natural language processing, Netflix Prize, new economy, off grid, oil shale / tar sands, open economy, Parag Khanna, payday loans, Pearl River Delta, prediction markets, purchasing power parity, race to the bottom, RAND corporation, rent-seeking, reserve currency, ride hailing / ride sharing, Ronald Reagan, Scramble for Africa, self-driving car, Silicon Valley, smart cities, South China Sea, sovereign wealth fund, special economic zone, stem cell, Steve Jobs, Steven Pinker, supply-chain management, sustainable-tourism, trade liberalization, trade route, transaction costs, Travis Kalanick, uber lyft, upwardly mobile, urban planning, Washington Consensus, working-age population, Yom Kippur War

With his fluency in Thai, Korean, and Mandarin, Nichkhun is one of a growing number of truly pan-Asian stars appearing in commercials and movies across the region. To capture ever more global entertainment mind share, the Korea Foundation for International Culture Exchange (KOFICE) has become a powerful agency dedicated to promoting Korea’s lucrative cultural exports. Asian food, too, has become a global sensation, from fast food to haute cuisine. Broadly defined, Asian cuisine is a vast collection of ingredients and culinary styles, from Mediterranean chickpeas to smoky grilled Central Asian lamb to Southeast Asian coconut milk and spices to Pacific Rim soy sauce. Each reflects a distinct cultural blending that has evolved over centuries, mostly with Asian neighbors. Colonial influence on Asian cuisine is far less prominent than the reverse.


pages: 411 words: 136,413

The Voice of Reason: Essays in Objectivist Thought by Ayn Rand, Leonard Peikoff, Peter Schwartz

affirmative action, Berlin Wall, British Empire, business process, cuban missile crisis, haute cuisine, invisible hand, Isaac Newton, laissez-faire capitalism, means of production, medical malpractice, profit motive, Ralph Nader, Ronald Reagan, source of truth, The Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith, trade route, transcontinental railway, urban renewal, War on Poverty

To revert to our nutrition analogy: it is as though the government socialized eating out, paying restaurants only what it computed to be the average cost per meal. There would then be a powerful incentive for restaurants to cut corners in every imaginable way—to serve only the cheapest foods in the smallest amounts in the cheesiest settings. What do you think would happen to the nation’s eaters—and its chefs—under such a setup? How long could the chefs preserve their dedication to preparing haute cuisine, when the restaurant owners, in self-preservation, were forced to fight them at every step and to demand junk food instead? There is now a new and deadly pressure on the doctors, which continuously threatens the independence and integrity of their medical judgment: the pressure to cave in to arbitrary DRG economies, while blanking out the effects on the patient. In some places, hospitals are offering special financial incentives to the physician whose expenditure per patient averages out to be relatively low.


pages: 495 words: 138,282

Ripe by Nigel Slater

haute cuisine, Mason jar

Match it to the warmth of thyme or mint and there is no doubting the provenance of your recipe. The fig’s friends, anchovy, pomegranate, almonds, prosciutto, honey, goat cheeses, and lavender, tell us much about where it feels at home. This is an ingredient that will also take being baked or simmered in red wine or squashed into jam or chutney and will happily end its days in a simple almond tart. But any attempt to get it into contrived “haute cuisine” and its magic will generally desert you. The fig’s laxative properties are well known but it also carries favorable levels of calcium, potassium, and trace minerals. Add this to its high fiber content and the picture of the historical importance of the fig becomes even clearer. Nowadays a fresh or dried fig is a treat, but for a long time it verged on being a staple food, and was particularly important to early travelers as it could be dried with ease, was light to carry, and could be used as sustenance along the way.


USA Travel Guide by Lonely, Planet

1960s counterculture, active transport: walking or cycling, Affordable Care Act / Obamacare, Albert Einstein, Asilomar, Bay Area Rapid Transit, Berlin Wall, Big bang: deregulation of the City of London, big-box store, bike sharing scheme, Bretton Woods, British Empire, Burning Man, California gold rush, call centre, car-free, carbon footprint, centre right, Charles Lindbergh, Chuck Templeton: OpenTable:, cuban missile crisis, desegregation, Donald Trump, Donner party, East Village, edge city, El Camino Real, Fall of the Berlin Wall, feminist movement, Frank Gehry, glass ceiling, global village, Golden Gate Park, Guggenheim Bilbao, Haight Ashbury, haute couture, haute cuisine, Hernando de Soto, Howard Zinn, illegal immigration, immigration reform, information trail, interchangeable parts, intermodal, jitney, Kickstarter, license plate recognition, Mars Rover, Mason jar, mass immigration, Maui Hawaii, McMansion, Menlo Park, Monroe Doctrine, new economy, New Urbanism, obamacare, off grid, Ralph Nader, Ralph Waldo Emerson, RFID, ride hailing / ride sharing, Ronald Reagan, Rosa Parks, Saturday Night Live, Silicon Valley, South of Market, San Francisco, starchitect, stealth mode startup, stem cell, supervolcano, the built environment, The Chicago School, the High Line, the payments system, trade route, transcontinental railway, union organizing, Upton Sinclair, upwardly mobile, urban decay, urban planning, urban renewal, urban sprawl, walkable city, white flight, working poor, Works Progress Administration, young professional, Zipcar

Boutique styling: sleek, white, minimalistic – king-sized beds and balconies with good views of Manhattan. 3B B&B $$ ( 347-762-2632; www.3bbrooklyn.com; 136 Lawrence St; dm/r incl breakfast $40/120; ) The 3rd floor unity of this downtown Brooklyn brownstone has been turned into a bright and contemporary four-room B&B. Eating In a city with nearly 19,000 restaurants, and new ones opening every single day, where are you supposed to begin? From Little Albania to Little Uzbekistan, your choice of ethnic eats is only a short subway ride away. A hotbed of buzz-worthy culinary invention and trends like artisanal doughnuts, farm-to-table pork sandwiches and haute cuisine reinterpretations of fried chicken, pizza and good ol’ burgers and fries, NYC’s restaurant scene, like the city is constantly reinventing itself. The latest foodie obsession is the flotilla of roving, tweeting food trucks, the 21st-century equivalent of the classic push-cart, selling gourmet cupcakes, dumplings and Jamaican curry goat and everything in between. A, B, C Those letter grades you see posted in the windows of every NYC restaurant aren’t the report cards of the owner’s kids.

Blue Lion FUSION $$$ ( 307-733-3912; 160 N Millward St; mains $15-34; from 6pm) In a precious cornflower-blue house, the Blue Lion offers outdoor dining under grand old trees on the deck. It creatively combines Thai and French influences in dishes such as beef tenderloin au bleu and green curry prawns. Snake River Grill MODERN AMERICAN $$$ ( 307-733-0557; 84 E Broadway; mains $21-52 from 5:30pm) With a roaring stone fireplace and snappy white linens, this grill creates notable American haute cuisine. Grilled elk chops and wild mushroom pasta show a tendency toward the earthy. Sample the extensive wine list and the homemade ice cream or soufflé for dessert. Bubba’s Bar-B-Que BARBECUE $$ ( 307-733-2288; 100 Flat Creek Dr; mains $5-15; 7am-10pm) Get the biggest, fluffiest breakfast biscuits for miles at this friendly and energetic bring-your-own-bottle (BYOB) eatery. Later on, it’s got a decent salad bar, and serves up a ranch of ribs and racks.

For an affordable B&B call in at Home by the Sea ( 877-332-2855; www.homebythesea.com; 444 Jackson St; d $105-115; ) , where crashing waves will (hopefully) lull you to sleep and first-class hospitality will wake you up. Food in this fishing village means a visit to the slick, view-embellished confines of newly opened Redfish ( 541-336-2200; 517 Jefferson St; mains $15-20; 7am-10pm Wed-Sun) for organic Northwest haute cuisine. GOLD BEACH Situated at the mouth of the fabulous Rogue River, Gold Beach attracts anglers and adventurers looking to zip upstream via jet boat into the Wild Rogue Wilderness area. Hikers can appreciate the area’s spectacular coastline; visit Cape Sebastian State Park , a rocky headland 7 miles south, for a panorama stretching from California to Cape Blanco. Get details at the visitors center (www.goldbeach.org; 94080 Shirley Lane; 9am-5pm) .


Frommer's Caribbean 2010 by Christina Paulette Colón, Alexis Lipsitz Flippin, Darwin Porter, Danforth Prince, John Marino

European colonialism, haute cuisine, jitney, Murano, Venice glass, offshore financial centre, Saturday Night Live, Skype, sustainable-tourism, white picket fence, young professional

. • The Reef Grill at Royal Palms (Grand Cayman; & 345/945-6358): E legant and hip, this hotshot r estaurant in the Royal P alms B each Club opens onto the fabled S even Mile Beach. Adjacent to a beachfront bar and grill, it is a citadel of fine cuisine, specializing in seafood recently plucked fr om the nearb y sea. The chefs tr eat seasonal pr oducts with car e, turning out technically pr ecise dishes that also hav e imagination. (Anyone for mashed potatoes garnished with chunks of lobster tail?) See p. 212. • La Belle Epoque (Martinique; & 596/ 64-41-19): The best haute cuisine on this island is dispensed at this longestablished gourmet citadel high abo ve the capital of F ort-de-France. The r estaurant is about as close as M artinique comes to duplicating the superb viands of Mother France. The cuisine sho ws a complete master y of a fer tile culinar y imagination. See p. 423. • Le Sapotillier (St. Barthélemy; & 590/ 27-60-28): B efore upstar t Anguilla stole a lot of their thunder , the chefs of St.

Small, serene, and secluded, visitors could enjoy the privacy of small-island life and still be close to S t. Maarten/St. Martin, with its gambling, shopping, and nightlife. However, the island ’s secret was let out in the 1990s when the opening of some super deluxe (and super expensive) hotels attracted a sophisticated jet set. Elegant r estaurants follo wed: The island now has as many or ev en mor e stylish temples of haute cuisine than St. Barts. Now one of the Caribbean ’s most chic destinations, Anguilla has nonetheless remained tranquil. I f y ou’re looking to DON’T MISS . . . rest, unwind, and be pampered, this is the place for you. The post-millennium opening of some moderately priced hotels means that ev en more visitors can enjo y Anguilla’s standards of tropical luxury. However, note that except for a handful of large-scale hotels, operations on Anguilla tend to be small and informal, as the island has tried to contr ol development and conser ve natural beauty and r esources.

Menu items change every 6 weeks but might include duck foie gras with toasted brioche, Parma ham with mango, cold poached scallops with mustar d sauce, a fricassee of lobster and mushr ooms in a pastr y shell, and grilled lamb sausage with mustard sauce on a bed of couscous. Dessert could be a blackand-white soufflé or a trio of tr opical sorbets. PONCE & THE SOUTHWEST 17 In the P once H ilton, A v. C aribe 1150. & 787/259-7676. Reser vations r ecommended. M ain c ourses $26–$35. AE, DC, DISC, MC, V. Mon–Sat 6:30–10:30pm. Mark’s at the Meliá INTERNATIONAL Mark French makes international haute cuisine with a P uerto Rican flair at this landmar k eatery, insisting on constantly changing menus and that everything be fresh. Recent standouts include tamarind barbecued lamb with yucca mojo; grilled lobster with tomato-and-chiv e salad; and fr eshly made sausage with pumpkin, cilantr o, and chicken. The corn-crusted red snapper with yucca purée and tempura jumbo shrimp with Asian salad are incredible.


pages: 462 words: 150,129

The Rational Optimist: How Prosperity Evolves by Matt Ridley

"Robert Solow", 23andMe, agricultural Revolution, air freight, back-to-the-land, banking crisis, barriers to entry, Bernie Madoff, British Empire, call centre, carbon footprint, Cesare Marchetti: Marchetti’s constant, charter city, clean water, cloud computing, cognitive dissonance, collateralized debt obligation, colonial exploitation, colonial rule, Corn Laws, creative destruction, credit crunch, David Ricardo: comparative advantage, decarbonisation, dematerialisation, demographic dividend, demographic transition, double entry bookkeeping, Edward Glaeser, en.wikipedia.org, everywhere but in the productivity statistics, falling living standards, feminist movement, financial innovation, Flynn Effect, food miles, Gordon Gekko, greed is good, Hans Rosling, happiness index / gross national happiness, haute cuisine, hedonic treadmill, Hernando de Soto, income inequality, income per capita, Indoor air pollution, informal economy, Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), invention of agriculture, invisible hand, James Hargreaves, James Watt: steam engine, Jane Jacobs, John Nash: game theory, joint-stock limited liability company, Joseph Schumpeter, Kevin Kelly, Kickstarter, knowledge worker, Kula ring, Mark Zuckerberg, meta analysis, meta-analysis, mutually assured destruction, Naomi Klein, Northern Rock, nuclear winter, oil shale / tar sands, out of africa, packet switching, patent troll, Pax Mongolica, Peter Thiel, phenotype, plutocrats, Plutocrats, Ponzi scheme, Productivity paradox, profit motive, purchasing power parity, race to the bottom, Ray Kurzweil, rent-seeking, rising living standards, Silicon Valley, spice trade, spinning jenny, stem cell, Steve Jobs, Steven Pinker, Stewart Brand, supervolcano, technological singularity, Thales and the olive presses, Thales of Miletus, The Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith, Thorstein Veblen, trade route, transaction costs, ultimatum game, upwardly mobile, urban sprawl, Vernor Vinge, Vilfredo Pareto, wage slave, working poor, working-age population, Y2K, Yogi Berra, zero-sum game

The various mechanisms of intellectual property are eerily echoed in the apparently lawless and highly competitive world of real recipes, recipes devised by French chefs for their restaurants. There is no legal protection for recipes: they cannot be patented, copyrighted or trademarked. But try setting up a new restaurant in Paris and pinching the best recipes from your rivals and you will rapidly find that this is not common land. As Emmanuelle Fauchart discovered by interviewing ten chefs de cuisine who had restaurants near Paris, seven with Michelin stars, the world of haute cuisine operates according to three norms, unwritten and unenforceable by law, but no less real for that. First, no chef may copy another chef’s recipe exactly; second, if a chef tells a recipe to another chef, the second chef may not pass it on without permission; third, chefs must give credit to the original inventor of a technique or idea. In effect, these norms correspond to patents, trade secrecy contracts and copyright.


Barcelona by Damien Simonis

Berlin Wall, call centre, carbon footprint, Fall of the Berlin Wall, feminist movement, Frank Gehry, haute couture, haute cuisine, Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), Kickstarter, land reform, Murano, Venice glass, New Urbanism, North Sea oil, sustainable-tourism, urban planning, urban renewal, urban sprawl

The setting alone, high up above the city and port, makes this perfect for a romantic couple. * * * BARCELONA’S GOURMET GAUDÍ He presents his latest culinary inventions like a child who has just made a fabulous mud pie. Indeed, if Ferran Adrià came up with a mud dish, it wouldn’t come as much of a surprise. Born in 1962, this self-taught chef has rocketed to the forefront of international haute cuisine with his fearless experimentation. The Gaudí of gourmets, he has been dubbed by his three-star Michelin colleague from the Basque Country, Juan Maria Arzak, ‘the most imaginative cook in all history’. The rough-spoken Adrià has been made a doctor honoris causa at Barcelona University (UB). During the 1980s Adrià worked his way up to head chef at a good, if unspectacular, Franco-Catalan restaurant, El Bulli (Click here), in a splendidly wild spot on the Costa Brava.


pages: 566 words: 151,193

Diet for a New America by John Robbins

Albert Einstein, carbon footprint, clean water, Flynn Effect, haute cuisine, Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), Isaac Newton, placebo effect, Ralph Nader, Ralph Waldo Emerson, RAND corporation, Stewart Brand, Whole Earth Review

It comes from the male calves born to dairy cows. The Latest Thing in Veal In a hotel room I stayed in recently there was a menu for the hotel restaurant. In the tradition of fine dining to which this hotel aspired there were three specialties of the house featured. These were all veal dishes—veal scallopini, veal Oscar, and veal piccata. Veal dishes are expensive and sound very high-class. With an Italian name, they bring to mind the haute cuisine of continental Europe. Few people know that in the past few decades there has been a revolution in the world of veal. Chef James Beard wrote in American Cookery: Good veal has always been difficult to find. But recently a Dutch process has come to our shores and is giving us a limited quantity of much finer veal than was generally available before…The calves…have delicate whitish-pink flesh and clear fat and are deliciously tender.


pages: 570 words: 158,139

Overbooked: The Exploding Business of Travel and Tourism by Elizabeth Becker

airport security, Asian financial crisis, barriers to entry, Berlin Wall, BRICs, car-free, carbon footprint, clean water, collective bargaining, colonial rule, computer age, corporate governance, Costa Concordia, Deng Xiaoping, European colonialism, Exxon Valdez, Fall of the Berlin Wall, Frank Gehry, global village, happiness index / gross national happiness, haute cuisine, indoor plumbing, Kickstarter, Masdar, Murano, Venice glass, open borders, out of africa, race to the bottom, Ralph Nader, Scramble for Africa, Silicon Valley, statistical model, sustainable-tourism, the market place, union organizing, urban renewal, wage slave, young professional, éminence grise

At first, her boss wondered why he was shelling out so much money for these “indirect benefits,” said Sanders, but now he is a convert. She has no trouble filling up her bookings with Frenchmen and foreigners who don’t flinch at paying these prices for the chance to dine at one of Bordeaux’s majestic wineries. Afterward, we tasted that wine in the château’s airy salon and over lunch in the classic high-ceilinged dining room. The menu was haute cuisine: small plates of foie gras with quail and grape, then lamb and gnocchi, Dutch cheese and candied peach, ending with figs and red fruit. We were now six: Véronique, her husband Alexander Van Beek, who is the director of two nearby châteaux, and another couple who own a glossy French magazine, Vins & Spiritueux. Finally, I asked about Juppé and tourism. There was uniform enthusiasm. No Gallic shrugs, no mouths turned down at the corner, no acid asides.


pages: 650 words: 155,108

A Man and His Ship: America's Greatest Naval Architect and His Quest to Build the S.S. United States by Steven Ujifusa

8-hour work day, big-box store, British Empire, Charles Lindbergh, computer age, glass ceiling, haute cuisine, interchangeable parts, Malcom McLean invented shipping containers, Mercator projection, Ronald Reagan, the built environment, trade route

One German-American on the payroll was the much-feared chief chef Otto Bismarck (no relation to the German chancellor), who had started out scrubbing pots and pans aboard Leviathan thirty years earlier. The cooks who worked under him dreaded the sight of his tall white chef’s hat floating above the hustle of America’s first-class galley. As befitting his name, Bismarck ran his kitchens like a Prussian drill sergeant, blowing a whistle when it was time to hose down the ranges. Yet he produced results: the German chef’s culinary creations rivaled the haute cuisine on any ship afloat, including that of the French Line’s chic Ile de France. For added cachet, the company contracted out the personnel for the three orchestras (one for each class) to Meyer Davis, who supplied musicians for society functions up and down the East Coast. Of course, the largest and most polished ensemble would entertain first-class passengers, many of whom were familiar with his effervescent dance music.


pages: 641 words: 147,719

The Rough Guide to Cape Town, Winelands & Garden Route by Rough Guides, James Bembridge, Barbara McCrea

affirmative action, Airbnb, blood diamonds, British Empire, Cape to Cairo, carbon footprint, colonial rule, F. W. de Klerk, ghettoisation, haute cuisine, Maui Hawaii, Murano, Venice glass, Nelson Mandela, out of africa, ride hailing / ride sharing, Robert Gordon, Skype, sustainable-tourism, trade route, transfer pricing, young professional

The Olive Tree 12 Wood Mill Lane Centre, Main Rd 044 382 5867; map. This local favourite offers bistro dining, with fresh ingredients and Mediterranean-influenced and beautifully plated dishes. Vegetarians have a couple of options, including vegetarian pasta (R100). Mon–Sat 6–10pm. Pembrey’s Bistro Brenton Rd, Belvidere 044 386 0005, pembreys.co.za; map. Highly rated restaurant that fuses country cooking with haute cuisine, run by the chef/owners. They use herbs and vegetables from the garden, and their desserts are full of tantalising fruity flavours such as sorbets and churned ice cream with lemon balm, elderflower and liquorice (R60). There is a Mediterranean-inspired salad buffet, and good meat dishes.The owners also have a great interest in wines so expect a most tempting wine list. Tues–Sat 6.30–10pm. Sailor Sam’s Main Rd, opposite the post office 044 382 6774; map.


Lancaster by John Nichol

back-to-the-land, British Empire, colonial rule, haute cuisine, Louis Blériot, V2 rocket, women in the workforce

I’m sure she thought she’d see our soldiers coming down the street right now if she parted the curtains. What a pity her wish couldn’t come true. ‘On the day, their dining-room table was set for fourteen and covered with a crisp white tablecloth. The other guests included Dr Diderol, a couple of men I knew to be from the Resistance, and other friends from nearby. We all drank a Pernod aniseed-flavoured aperitif, then settled down to Blanche’s haute cuisine. She’d really pushed the boat out. The banquet began with some crisp, crunchy radishes, followed by chicken soup, then crayfish. Next came some red-hot fireclay pots of some sort of spiced meat in garlic butter which you ate with a funny little fork. I filled my glass with some delicious Sancerre Blanc and ate up the lot. Delicious! ‘Then I noticed everyone was watching me intently, finally breaking into uproarious laughter


Lonely Planet France by Lonely Planet Publications

banking crisis, bike sharing scheme, British Empire, car-free, carbon footprint, centre right, Charles Lindbergh, Columbine, double helix, Frank Gehry, G4S, glass ceiling, haute couture, haute cuisine, Henri Poincaré, Honoré de Balzac, illegal immigration, Jacquard loom, Joseph-Marie Jacquard, Kickstarter, Louis Blériot, Louis Pasteur, low cost airline, low cost carrier, Mahatma Gandhi, mass immigration, Murano, Venice glass, ride hailing / ride sharing, sensible shoes, Silicon Valley, supervolcano, trade route, urban renewal, urban sprawl, V2 rocket

But for the best global cuisine, try the following: » Av de Choisy, av d’Ivry and rue Baudricourt, 13e Cheap Chinese and Southeast Asian (especially Vietnamese) eateries. » Bd de Belleville, 11e & 20e North African food, especially couscous. » Passage Brady, 10e ( Offline map ) Covered passage crammed with Indian, Pakistani and Bangladeshi specialities. » Rue Au Maire, 3e ( Offline map ) Small Chinese noodle shops and restaurants. » Rue Cadet, rue Richer and rue Geoffroy Marie, 9e ( Offline map ) Triangle of streets with Jewish (mostly Sephardic) and kosher food. » Rue Cail, 10e ( Offline map ) Fabulous array of Indian restaurants. » Rue de Belleville, 20e Dine on Chinese, Southeast Asian or Middle Eastern. » Rue Ste-Anne, 2e ( Offline map ) The heart of Paris’ Japantown. » Rue des Rosiers, 4e ( Offline map ) Jewish restaurants (some Ashkenazic, some Sephardic, not all kosher) serving specialities from Central Europe, North Africa and Israel. Many are closed Friday evenings, Saturdays and Jewish holidays. ÉTOILE & CHAMPS-ÉLYSÉES This area is renowned for haute cuisine – and haute prices – but if you choose to eat at one of the finer restaurants for lunch on a weekday, you’ll save a bundle and still get to treat your tastebuds to an extraordinary meal. Make sure to reserve. Under-the-radar restaurants are scattered in the back streets; gourmet food and drink shops, some with attached eateries, garland place de la Madeleine (Click here ). Ladurée PATISSERIE € Offline map Google map ( www.laduree.fr; 75 av des Champs-Élysées, 8e; pastries from €1.50; 7.30am-11pm; George V) One of the oldest patisseries in Paris, Ladurée has been around since 1862.

RV Parking CAMPGROUND € Contact the tourist office about its two RV parking sites, one near the castle and with waste disposal and showers (€5, May to September), and one on the river (free, October to April). Eating L’Orangerie GASTRONOMIC €€€ ( 02 54 78 05 36; www.orangerie-du-chateau.fr; 1 av du Dr Jean Laigret; menus €35-80; lunch & dinner Tue-Sat) This acclaimed eatery is cloud nine for connoisseurs of haute cuisine. Plates are artfully stacked (duck liver, langoustine, foie gras) and the sparkling salon would make Louis XIV envious. On summer nights, dine in the courtyard. Les Banquettes Rouges TRADITIONAL FRENCH €€ ( 02 54 78 74 92; www.lesbanquettesrouges.com; 16 rue des Trois Marchands; menus €17-32; lunch & dinner Tue-Sat) Handwritten slate menus and wholesome food distinguish the Red Benches: rabbit with marmalade, duck with lentils and salmon with apple vinaigrette, all done with a spicy twist.

Choose your topping (chicken, roasted veg, beef carpaccio, foie gras with artichokes and honey vinaigrette) and it’s served up quick as a flash on toasted artisanal bread. Le Zinc TRADITIONAL FRENCH €€ Offline map Google map ( 02 47 20 29 00; 27 place du Grand Marché; menus €19.50-24.50; lunch Tue & Thu-Sat, dinner Thu-Tue) More concerned with market-fresh staples (sourced from the nearby Halles) than with Michelin stars and haute cuisine cachet, this bistro impresses with its authentic, attractive presentation of country classics (duck breast, beef fillet, river fish). Les Halles MARKET Offline map Google map (www.halles-de-tours.com; place Gaston Pailhou; 7am-7pm Mon-Sat, 7am-1pm Sun) Tours’ big daily market. Drinking Place Plumereau and the surrounding streets are plastered with grungy bars and drinking dens, all of which get stuffed to bursting on hot summer nights.


pages: 3,292 words: 537,795

Lonely Planet China (Travel Guide) by Lonely Planet, Shawn Low

Albert Einstein, anti-communist, bike sharing scheme, carbon footprint, clean water, colonial rule, credit crunch, Deng Xiaoping, G4S, haute couture, haute cuisine, income inequality, indoor plumbing, Kickstarter, land reform, mass immigration, Pearl River Delta, place-making, Rubik’s Cube, Skype, South China Sea, special economic zone, sustainable-tourism, trade route, upwardly mobile, urban planning, urban renewal, urban sprawl, women in the workforce, Xiaogang Anhui farmers, young professional

Bali Holiday ResortHOTEL ( GOOGLE MAP ; %2982 4580; fax 2982 1044; www.lammabali.com; 8 Main St, Yung Shue Wan; r Sun-Fri HK$300-750, Sat & holidays HK$700-1400; fYung Shue Wan) Near the ferry in Yung Shue Wan, Bali has basic, pleasant, tile-floored rooms with TVs and fridges, as well as family apartments. Upper-floor rooms with balconies are the nicest. Wi-fi on the patio. 5Eating One of the world’s greatest food cities, Hong Kong offers culinary excitement whether you’re spending HK$20 on a bowl of noodles or megabucks on haute cuisine. The best of China is well represented, be it Cantonese, Shanghainese, Northern or Sichuanese. What’s more, the international fare on offer – French, Italian, Spanish, Japanese, Thai, Indian, fusion – is the finest and most diverse in all of China. Hong Kong is an expensive place to dine by regional Chinese standards, but cheaper than Sydney, London or New York, and with more consistent quality of food and service than most eateries in mainland China.

oAntonioPORTUGUESE ( MAP GOOGLE MAP ; %2899 9998; www.antoniomacau.com; 7 Rua dos Clerigos, Taipa; meals MOP$350-1200; hnoon-10.30pm; g22, 26) The cosy mahogany-framed dining room, the meticulously thought-out menu and the entertaining chef, Antonio Coelho, all make this the go-to place for traditional Portuguese food. If you can only try one Portuguese restaurant in Macau, make it this one. oGuincho a GaleraPORTUGUESE ( MAP GOOGLE MAP ; %8803 7676; 3rd fl, Hotel Lisboa, 2-4 Avenida de Lisboa; meals MOP$550-1800; hnoon-2.30pm & 6.30-10.30pm; g3, 10) The international branch of Portugal's famous Fortaleza do Guincho, this luxuriously decorated restaurant brings Portuguese haute cuisine to Macau. The menu features well-executed classical dishes, with a couple of Macanese additions. Set meals are available at lunch (from MOP$300) and dinner (from MOP$600). Espaco LisboaPORTUGUESE, MACANESE ( MAP GOOGLE MAP ; %2888 2226; 8 Rua das Gaivotas, Coloane; meals MOP$250-800; hnoon-3pm & 6.30-10pm Thu & Sun-Tue, noon-10.30pm Fri & Sat; c; g21A, 25, 26A) The home-style dishes here are solidly good, but what makes this two-storey restaurant in Coloane village unique is the combination of Portugual-inspired decor and a Chinese village house – in other words, the space ('espaco'). 6Drinking Macau’s unique and atmospheric drinking places are far removed from the glitz of the Outer Harbour.

The most influential of the eight major regional cuisines of China, it’s known for complex cooking methods, an obsession with freshness and the use of a wide range of ingredients. Many Cantonese dishes depend on quick cooking over high heat – these require skills (versus patience over a stew) that are less common in other regional cuisines. Cantonese chefs are also masters at making new techniques sizzle in their language. Dishes such as sweet and sour pork, crab shell au gratin and tempura-style prawns show an open-mindedness to foreign ideas. When it comes to haute cuisine, even northern cooks would acknowledge the superiority of their Cantonese colleagues in making the best of expensive items such as abalone. Also, much of the costliest marine life to grace the Cantonese table, such as deep-sea fish and large prawns, simply don’t grow in inland rivers. 3Entertainment Your best resource for entertainment in Guangzhou is www.gzstuff.com. o191 SpaceLIVE MUSIC (191Space 191 Space Yinle Zhuti Jiuba MAP GOOGLE MAP ; %8737 9375; www.191space.com; 191 Guangzhou Dadao Zhonglu; h8pm-2am; mLine 5, Wuyangcun, exit A) Two steps from the metro exit, this is a throbbing dive that features live indie gigs from China and overseas every weekend.


pages: 675 words: 344,555

Frommer's Hawaii 2009 by Jeanette Foster

airport security, California gold rush, Charles Lindbergh, glass ceiling, gravity well, haute couture, haute cuisine, indoor plumbing, Maui Hawaii, place-making, polynesian navigation, South China Sea, sustainable-tourism, urban renewal, urban sprawl, white picket fence, Yogi Berra

In room: A/C, TV, dataport, wireless Internet access ($13 per day), minibar, hair dryer, iron, safe, complimentary newspaper delivery. 4 Where to Dine On Oahu, the full range of dining choices includes chef-owned glamour restaurants, neighborhood eateries, fast-food joints, ethnic spots, and food courts in shopping malls. The recommendations below are organized by location, beginning with Waikiki, then neighborhoods west of Waikiki, neighborhoods east of Waikiki, and finally the Windward Coast and the North Shore. WAIKIKI VERY EXPENSIVE NEOCLASSIC FRENCH La Mer This is the splurge restaurant of Hawaii, the oceanfront bastion of haute cuisine, where two of the state’s finest chefs (George Mavrothalassitis and Philippe Padovani, each with his own eponymous restaurant now) quietly redefined fine dining in Hawaii. La Mer is romantic, elegant, and expensive; dress up not to be seen, but to match the ambience and food. It’s the only AAA Five Diamond restaurant in the state, with a second-floor, open-sided room with views of Diamond Head and the sound of trade winds rustling the nearby coconut fronds.

Southeast Asian fruit, such as mangosteen and rambutan, are beginning to appear in markets, along with the sweet white pineapple that is by now a well-established Big Island crop. Along with the lamb and beef from Big Island ranches and seafood from local fishermen, this fresh produce forms the backbone of ethnic cookery and Hawaii Regional Cuisine. Kailua-Kona is teeming with restaurants for all pocketbooks, while the haute cuisine of the island is concentrated in the Kohala Coast resorts. Waimea, also known as Kamuela, is a thriving upcountry community, a haven for yuppies, techies, and retirees who know a good place when they see one. In Hawi, North Kohala, expect bakeries, neighborhood diners, and one tropical-chic restaurant that’s worth a special trip. In Hilo in East Hawaii, you’ll find pockets of trendiness among the precious old Japanese and ethnic restaurants that provide honest, tasty, and affordable meals in unpretentious surroundings.


Eastern USA by Lonely Planet

1960s counterculture, active transport: walking or cycling, Affordable Care Act / Obamacare, Albert Einstein, Berlin Wall, bike sharing scheme, Bretton Woods, British Empire, car-free, carbon footprint, centre right, Charles Lindbergh, collective bargaining, cuban missile crisis, desegregation, Donald Trump, East Village, Fall of the Berlin Wall, Frank Gehry, glass ceiling, Guggenheim Bilbao, haute cuisine, Hernando de Soto, illegal immigration, immigration reform, information trail, interchangeable parts, jitney, Kickstarter, license plate recognition, Mason jar, mass immigration, McMansion, megacity, Menlo Park, new economy, New Urbanism, obamacare, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Ronald Reagan, Rosa Parks, Saturday Night Live, Silicon Valley, Skype, the built environment, the High Line, the payments system, transcontinental railway, union organizing, Upton Sinclair, upwardly mobile, urban decay, urban planning, urban renewal, urban sprawl, walkable city, white flight, Works Progress Administration, young professional

Boutique styling: sleek, white, minimalistic – king-sized beds and balconies with good views of Manhattan. 3B B&B $$ ( 347-762-2632; www.3bbrooklyn.com; 136 Lawrence St; dm/r incl breakfast $40/120; ) The 3rd floor unity of this downtown Brooklyn brownstone has been turned into a bright and contemporary four-room B&B. Eating In a city with nearly 19,000 restaurants, and new ones opening every single day, where are you supposed to begin? From Little Albania to Little Uzbekistan, your choice of ethnic eats is only a short subway ride away. A hotbed of buzz-worthy culinary invention and trends like artisanal doughnuts, farm-to-table pork sandwiches and haute cuisine reinterpretations of fried chicken, pizza and good ol’ burgers and fries, NYC’s restaurant scene, like the city is constantly reinventing itself. The latest foodie obsession is the flotilla of roving, tweeting food trucks, the 21st-century equivalent of the classic push-cart, selling gourmet cupcakes, dumplings and Jamaican curry goat and everything in between. A, B, C Those letter grades you see posted in the windows of every NYC restaurant aren’t the report cards of the owner’s kids.

It’s likely true, since according to the Zagat Guide (www.zagat.com), there are over 23,000 restaurants in the five boroughs (go ahead, do the math). Owing to its huge immigrant population and an influx of 49 million tourists annually, New York captures the title of America’s greatest restaurant city. Its diverse neighborhoods serve up authentic Italian food and thin crust-style pizza, all manner of Asian food, French haute cuisine and classic Jewish deli food, from bagels to piled-high pastrami on rye. More exotic cuisines are found here as well, from Ethiopian to Slavic. Don’t let NYC’s image as expensive get to you: the Zagat Guide says the average cost of a meal – including drink, tax and tip – is $42. There may be no free lunch in New York, but compared to other world cities, eating here can be a bargain. New England: Clambakes and Lobster Boils New England claims to have the nation’s best seafood, and who’s to argue?


The Rough Guide to Jerusalem by Daniel Jacobs

centre right, en.wikipedia.org, facts on the ground, Frank Gehry, haute cuisine, Khartoum Gordon, low cost airline, Skype, sustainable-tourism, trade route, urban planning, Wall-E

Establishments run by Christians or Jews are unlikely to be affected, while those catering mainly for tourists may open up regardless. Given that many local people are committed to fasting during Ramadan, you may feel it is considerate not to eat or smoke in the street during the day in this period. Arabesque American Colony Hotel, Nablus Rd T 02/627 9777. The most upmarket restaurant in East Jerusalem, serving French and other European haute cuisine. The Saturday all-you-can-eat buffet lunch (noon–3pm; US$50) is ever-popular, and the hotel also has a less expensive brasserie (daily 6pm– midnight), serving English-style cream teas from 3pm, plus a jasmine-scented garden restaurant for snacks and coffees. Daily 6.30am–10pm (meals served noon–3pm & 7–10pm). Licensed. Expensive. Askadinya 11 Shimon HaTzadik, Sheikh Jarrah T02/532 4590. Excellent French- and Italianstyle food, at this classy establishment, popular with the American Colony crowd.


pages: 1,181 words: 163,692

Lonely Planet Wales (Travel Guide) by Lonely Planet

active transport: walking or cycling, back-to-the-land, car-free, carbon footprint, Downton Abbey, global village, haute cuisine, Kickstarter, land reform, offshore financial centre, period drama, sensible shoes, trade route, urban renewal

Boosted by the abundance of fresh, local produce and a new generation of young chefs with an innovative, modern take on traditional Welsh recipes, the food scene is buzzing. A bowl of traditional cawl | FANFO / SHUTTERSTOCK © Welsh Specialities Historically, Welsh cuisine was based on what could be grown locally and cheaply. Food was functional and needed to satisfy the needs of labourers on the farm or workers down the mine. It was hearty and wholesome but not exactly haute cuisine. The most traditional Welsh dish remains cawl, the hearty, one-pot soupy stew of bacon, lamb, cabbage, swede and potato. It's one of those warm, cosy dishes that you long for when you're walking in the hills. Another famous favourite is Welsh rarebit, a kind of cheese on toast, generously drizzled with a secret ingredient tasting suspiciously like beer. For breakfast, there's nothing more Welsh than laverbread.


Greece by Korina Miller

car-free, carbon footprint, credit crunch, Google Earth, haute cuisine, illegal immigration, informal economy, invention of the printing press, pension reform, period drama, sensible shoes, too big to fail, trade route, upwardly mobile, urban renewal, urban sprawl, women in the workforce

Orizontes (Map; 210 722 7065; Lykavittos Hill; dishes €23-38) For a special night out, you can take the teleferik up to the peak of Lykavittos and watch the sun set over Athens. The menu at this upmarket restaurant is Mediterranean/international and the food and service are excellent, as is the wine list. Spondi (Map; 210 752 0658; Pironos 5, Pangrati; mains €30-50; 8pm-late) Spondi is consistently voted Athens’ best restaurant, and the accolades are totally deserved. It offers Mediterranean haute cuisine, with heavy French influences, in a relaxed, classy setting in a charming old house in Pangrati. There is a range of set dinner and wine menus, and the restaurant has a lovely garden terrace draped in bougainvillea in summer. This is a special-occasion place. Another good option to seek out is the modern Plous Podilatou, where you can dine by the Mikrolimano harbour in Piraeus. Return to beginning of chapter DRINKING Cafes Athens seems to have more cafes per capita than virtually any other city, inevitably packed with Athenians, prompting many a visitor to wonder if anyone ever works in this city.

Seven Brothers Hotel ( 22980 23412; www.7brothers.gr; Plateia Iroön; s/d/tr €55/65/75; ) Conveniently close to the hydrofoil dock, this modern hotel has bright, comfy rooms with small balconies and tea- and coffee-making facilities. Hotel Manessi ( 22980 22273/25857; www.manessi.com; Paralia; s/d €70/80; ) Well-placed at the mid-point of the harbour front, the recently renovated Manessi is a central option. The business-style rooms are comfy and immaculate. Eating There’s not much haute cuisine on Poros, but there are traditional tavernas with character to match the cooking. Taverna Karavolos ( 22980 26158; mains €5-7.80; 7pm-late) Karavolos means ‘big snail’ in Greek and snails are a speciality of the house here, served in a thick tomato sauce (€6). Classic Greek meat dishes and some fish dishes are also on the oft-changing menu. Head north from the cathedral for about 100m, then go left and down broad steps ­towards the harbour.


Lonely Planet Andalucia: Chapter From Spain Travel Guide by Lonely Planet

bike sharing scheme, British Empire, car-free, carbon footprint, centre right, credit crunch, discovery of the americas, Francisco Pizarro, haute cuisine, Kickstarter, Skype, trade route, urban renewal

RELIGIOUS Día de la Cruz On 3 May, squares, patios and balconies are adorned with floral crosses, beginning three days of revelry. MUSIC Festival Internacional de Música y Danza (www.granadafestival.org) For three weeks in June and July, first-class classical and modern performance takes over the Alhambra and other historic sites. Eating Granada’s a place where gastronomy remains reassuringly down to earth. What it lacks in flashy alta cocina (haute cuisine) it makes up for in generous portions of Andalucian standards. The city also has a wealth of places serving decent tapas and raciones (large tapas servings). FUSION Ruta del Azafrán €€ Offline map Google map (www.rutadelazafran.es; Paseo del Padre Manjón 1; mains €13-20) One of the few high-concept restaurants in Granada, this sleek spot with its steely-modern interior has an eclectic menu which ranges from Asian-inspired tempuras to broccoli-based pesto, lamb couscous and roasted pork.


pages: 741 words: 179,454

Extreme Money: Masters of the Universe and the Cult of Risk by Satyajit Das

affirmative action, Albert Einstein, algorithmic trading, Andy Kessler, Asian financial crisis, asset allocation, asset-backed security, bank run, banking crisis, banks create money, Basel III, Benoit Mandelbrot, Berlin Wall, Bernie Madoff, Big bang: deregulation of the City of London, Black Swan, Bonfire of the Vanities, bonus culture, Bretton Woods, BRICs, British Empire, business cycle, capital asset pricing model, Carmen Reinhart, carried interest, Celtic Tiger, clean water, cognitive dissonance, collapse of Lehman Brothers, collateralized debt obligation, corporate governance, corporate raider, creative destruction, credit crunch, Credit Default Swap, credit default swaps / collateralized debt obligations, Daniel Kahneman / Amos Tversky, debt deflation, Deng Xiaoping, deskilling, discrete time, diversification, diversified portfolio, Doomsday Clock, Edward Thorp, Emanuel Derman, en.wikipedia.org, Eugene Fama: efficient market hypothesis, eurozone crisis, Everybody Ought to Be Rich, Fall of the Berlin Wall, financial independence, financial innovation, financial thriller, fixed income, full employment, global reserve currency, Goldman Sachs: Vampire Squid, Gordon Gekko, greed is good, happiness index / gross national happiness, haute cuisine, high net worth, Hyman Minsky, index fund, information asymmetry, interest rate swap, invention of the wheel, invisible hand, Isaac Newton, job automation, Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, John Meriwether, joint-stock company, Jones Act, Joseph Schumpeter, Kenneth Arrow, Kenneth Rogoff, Kevin Kelly, laissez-faire capitalism, load shedding, locking in a profit, Long Term Capital Management, Louis Bachelier, margin call, market bubble, market fundamentalism, Marshall McLuhan, Martin Wolf, mega-rich, merger arbitrage, Mikhail Gorbachev, Milgram experiment, money market fund, Mont Pelerin Society, moral hazard, mortgage debt, mortgage tax deduction, mutually assured destruction, Myron Scholes, Naomi Klein, negative equity, NetJets, Network effects, new economy, Nick Leeson, Nixon shock, Northern Rock, nuclear winter, oil shock, Own Your Own Home, Paul Samuelson, pets.com, Philip Mirowski, plutocrats, Plutocrats, Ponzi scheme, price anchoring, price stability, profit maximization, quantitative easing, quantitative trading / quantitative finance, Ralph Nader, RAND corporation, random walk, Ray Kurzweil, regulatory arbitrage, rent control, rent-seeking, reserve currency, Richard Feynman, Richard Thaler, Right to Buy, risk-adjusted returns, risk/return, road to serfdom, Robert Shiller, Robert Shiller, Rod Stewart played at Stephen Schwarzman birthday party, rolodex, Ronald Reagan, Ronald Reagan: Tear down this wall, Satyajit Das, savings glut, shareholder value, Sharpe ratio, short selling, Silicon Valley, six sigma, Slavoj Žižek, South Sea Bubble, special economic zone, statistical model, Stephen Hawking, Steve Jobs, survivorship bias, The Chicago School, The Great Moderation, the market place, the medium is the message, The Myth of the Rational Market, The Nature of the Firm, the new new thing, The Predators' Ball, The Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith, Thorstein Veblen, too big to fail, trickle-down economics, Turing test, Upton Sinclair, value at risk, Yogi Berra, zero-coupon bond, zero-sum game

In the Japanese TV cooking show Ryōri no Tetsujin, literally “Ironmen of Cooking” (the American version is called The Iron Chef), chefs battled against each other to create dishes around a specific theme ingredient. Over time, bankers learned to cut and dice debt in more ways than any celebrity television chef. Securitization was a bacchanalian feast of unprecedented size for bankers and their acolytes. Securitization Recipes Securitization is a recipe for cutting and dicing debt into more debt. Like food recipes, securitization ranges from simple dishes to haute cuisine. The only ingredient is debt—mortgage loans, credit card loans, car loans, loans to companies, loans to people, loans to people who cannot pay, any loans at all. Poor quality loans are no barrier to an acceptable and edible final securitized product. Haute securitized debt depends on various condiments—SPVs, derivatives, bonds, tranches, over-collateralization, and excess spreads. Kitchen staff is needed—bankers and brokers to make loans; traders to structure the deal, price and hedge it; sales people; rating agencies to bless the deals as fit for investor consumption; servicers to monitor things; accountants to track the money; trustees to look after bondholders’ interests; lawyers to protect everybody, especially themselves.


pages: 829 words: 186,976

The Signal and the Noise: Why So Many Predictions Fail-But Some Don't by Nate Silver

"Robert Solow", airport security, availability heuristic, Bayesian statistics, Benoit Mandelbrot, Berlin Wall, Bernie Madoff, big-box store, Black Swan, Broken windows theory, business cycle, buy and hold, Carmen Reinhart, Claude Shannon: information theory, Climategate, Climatic Research Unit, cognitive dissonance, collapse of Lehman Brothers, collateralized debt obligation, complexity theory, computer age, correlation does not imply causation, Credit Default Swap, credit default swaps / collateralized debt obligations, cuban missile crisis, Daniel Kahneman / Amos Tversky, diversification, Donald Trump, Edmond Halley, Edward Lorenz: Chaos theory, en.wikipedia.org, equity premium, Eugene Fama: efficient market hypothesis, everywhere but in the productivity statistics, fear of failure, Fellow of the Royal Society, Freestyle chess, fudge factor, George Akerlof, global pandemic, haute cuisine, Henri Poincaré, high batting average, housing crisis, income per capita, index fund, information asymmetry, Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), Internet Archive, invention of the printing press, invisible hand, Isaac Newton, James Watt: steam engine, John Nash: game theory, John von Neumann, Kenneth Rogoff, knowledge economy, Laplace demon, locking in a profit, Loma Prieta earthquake, market bubble, Mikhail Gorbachev, Moneyball by Michael Lewis explains big data, Monroe Doctrine, mortgage debt, Nate Silver, negative equity, new economy, Norbert Wiener, PageRank, pattern recognition, pets.com, Pierre-Simon Laplace, prediction markets, Productivity paradox, random walk, Richard Thaler, Robert Shiller, Robert Shiller, Rodney Brooks, Ronald Reagan, Saturday Night Live, savings glut, security theater, short selling, Skype, statistical model, Steven Pinker, The Great Moderation, The Market for Lemons, the scientific method, The Signal and the Noise by Nate Silver, The Wisdom of Crowds, Thomas Bayes, Thomas Kuhn: the structure of scientific revolutions, too big to fail, transaction costs, transfer pricing, University of East Anglia, Watson beat the top human players on Jeopardy!, wikimedia commons

And third, as bad as their forecasts have been, the data that economists have to work with isn’t much good either. Correlations Without Causation The government produces data on literally 45,000 economic indicators each year.24 Private data providers track as many as four million statistics.25 The temptation that some economists succumb to is to put all this data into a blender and claim that the resulting gruel is haute cuisine. There have been only eleven recessions since the end of World War II.26 If you have a statistical model that seeks to explain eleven outputs but has to choose from among four million inputs to do so, many of the relationships it identifies are going to be spurious. (This is another classic case of overfitting—mistaking noise for a signal—the problem that befell earthquake forecasters in chapter 5.)


pages: 685 words: 203,949

The Organized Mind: Thinking Straight in the Age of Information Overload by Daniel J. Levitin

airport security, Albert Einstein, Amazon Mechanical Turk, Anton Chekhov, Bayesian statistics, big-box store, business process, call centre, Claude Shannon: information theory, cloud computing, cognitive bias, complexity theory, computer vision, conceptual framework, correlation does not imply causation, crowdsourcing, cuban missile crisis, Daniel Kahneman / Amos Tversky, delayed gratification, Donald Trump, en.wikipedia.org, epigenetics, Eratosthenes, Exxon Valdez, framing effect, friendly fire, fundamental attribution error, Golden Gate Park, Google Glasses, haute cuisine, impulse control, index card, indoor plumbing, information retrieval, invention of writing, iterative process, jimmy wales, job satisfaction, Kickstarter, life extension, longitudinal study, meta analysis, meta-analysis, more computing power than Apollo, Network effects, new economy, Nicholas Carr, optical character recognition, Pareto efficiency, pattern recognition, phenotype, placebo effect, pre–internet, profit motive, randomized controlled trial, Rubik’s Cube, shared worldview, Skype, Snapchat, social intelligence, statistical model, Steve Jobs, supply-chain management, the scientific method, The Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith, The Wisdom of Crowds, theory of mind, Thomas Bayes, Turing test, ultimatum game, zero-sum game

More grinding of wheat and skinning of fowl, perhaps. But the anthropological and historical record tells a very different story. In terms of food, our ancestors tended to eat what they could get their hands on. All kinds of things that we don’t eat today, because they don’t taste very good by most accounts, were standard fare only because they were available: rats, squirrels, peacocks—and don’t forget locusts! Some foods that we consider haute cuisine today, such as lobster, were so plentiful in the 1800s that they were fed to prisoners and orphans, and ground up into fertilizer; servants requested written assurance that they would not be fed lobster more than twice a week. Things that we take for granted—something as basic as the kitchen—didn’t exist in European homes until a few hundred years ago. Until 1600, the typical European home had a single room, and families would crowd around the fire most of the year to keep warm.


Germany by Andrea Schulte-Peevers

Albert Einstein, bank run, Berlin Wall, call centre, car-free, carbon footprint, centre right, computer age, credit crunch, Donald Trump, Fall of the Berlin Wall, Frank Gehry, glass ceiling, Google Earth, haute couture, haute cuisine, Honoré de Balzac, Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, Johannes Kepler, Kickstarter, low cost airline, low cost carrier, Mikhail Gorbachev, New Urbanism, Peace of Westphalia, Peter Eisenman, place-making, post-work, ride hailing / ride sharing, sensible shoes, Skype, trade route, urban planning, urban renewal, V2 rocket, white picket fence

Upstairs you can hang off the bar in fine style, sipping delicious wines and more, while a piano tinkles out a lounge feel. It also has classical and other music during its frequent events. Gauss ( 566 16; www.restaurant-gauss.de; Obere Karspüle 22, enter on Theaterstrasse; 3-5 course menu €35-56; 6pm-midnight Tue-Sat; ) Chef Jacqueline Amirfallah upholds this cellar restaurant’s reputation as Göttingen’s best gourmet experience with exquisite (and changing) haute cuisine, such as lamb with aubergine, mint yogurt, red lentils and couscous. There’s a noticeable emphasis on seasonal ingredients. Return to beginning of chapter Drinking P-Cafe (opposite) and Myer’s (left) are as much popular drinking holes as places to nibble and nosh, and Junkernschänke has a classy lounge bar. Explore eating and drinking options on the square in front of the Junges Theater or along Goetheallee.

Local fish dishes (rollmops and so on) dominate the menu, or you can stop by for coffee and cake between meal times. There’s an above-average kids’ menu, too. Albert & Emile ( 493 4373; Altschmiedestrasse 28; mains €10.90-16.90; from 6.30pm Tue-Sat) Rostock’s most romantic place to dine is this French jewel. Behind the ivy-covered facade it’s a haven of black-and-white marble tiles and dark timber, chansonniers crooning from the speakers and accomplished haute cuisine on the handwritten menu. Amberg 13 ( 490 6262; Amberg 13; mains €14.30-15.90; 5-11pm Tue-Sun plus brunch from 11am 2nd & 4th Sun of month) This relaxed, unassuming restaurant is locally renowned for its ambitious and creative cuisine, with dishes such as Kalbshaxe (knuckle of veal) accompanied by polenta and capsicum, onion, rosemary and sherry ragout, or rabbit with chanterelle mushrooms, garlic gnocchi and green beans.


Colorado by Lonely Planet

big-box store, California gold rush, carbon footprint, Columbine, East Village, haute couture, haute cuisine, Kickstarter, payday loans, Steve Wozniak, trade route, transcontinental railway, young professional

Evergreen Cafe DINER $ ( 719-395-8984; www.evergreencafebv.com; 418 US Hwy 24; mains $4.75-8.75; ) Fun and funky, this canary yellow traincar of a diner on Hwy 24 north of Main St is where you’ll find some seriously tasty offerings, such as zucchini fries, milkshakes and sinful bread pudding, not to mention killer omelettes, melts, burgers and salads. Asian Palate PAN-ASIAN $$ ( 719-395-6679; www.theasianpalate.com; 328 E Main St; mains $11.95-21.95; 11:30am-10pm Mon-Fri, 5-10pm Sat & Sun; ) Eclectic Asian fare is what passes for haute cuisine in Buena Vista. Dishes such as massaman curry, pork larb and beef with udon noodles are typical kitchen fare, while raw morsels appear from the sushi bar. All are served in minimalist environs – think high-beamed ceilings and burgundy walls strategically cracked to reveal swatches of original brick. Eddyline Restaurant & Brewery CONTEMPORARY AMERICAN $$ ( 719-966-6000; www.eddylinepub.com; 926 S Main St; mains $7.99-23.99; 10am-11pm; ) Soaring ceilings, a loft-style interior with a cozy bar area and sunny streetside patio seating, no wonder this South Main District brewpub is many a locals’ choice for best restaurant in town.


Frommer's London 2009 by Darwin Porter, Danforth Prince

airport security, British Empire, double helix, East Village, Edmond Halley, glass ceiling, haute cuisine, Isaac Newton, Maui Hawaii, Murano, Venice glass, New Urbanism, place-making, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Ronald Reagan, Sloane Ranger, Stephen Hawking, sustainable-tourism, urban renewal, young professional

. • Best Place for Spotting Celebrities: If Demi and Ashton, or virtually any visiting celebrities are in town, chances are they’ll be hiding out behind a translucent silk curtain in the center of London’s hot new restaurant, Alain Ducasse at the Dorchester, on the lobby level of the chic Dorchester hotel, Park Lane (& 020/ 7629-8866). A chef maestro many critics hail as the world’s greatest has crossed the Channel to open this citadel of haute cuisine. See p. 168. • Best for Seafood: After a long slumber, the famous Scott’s, 20 Mount St., W1 (& 020/7495-7309), has reopened in a swank restaurant in Mayfair. It began as an oyster warehouse in 1851, but gone from that rustic beginning to Mayfair glitter, peddling market-fresh Dover sole and “cockles and mussels.” See p. 171. • Best Gastro Pub: At last London’s enfant terrible chef, Gordon Ramsay, has entered the gastro-pub sweepstakes by opening The Narrow, 44 Narrow St., E14 (& 020/7592-7950).


pages: 389 words: 210,632

Frommer's Oregon by Karl Samson

airport security, Burning Man, carbon footprint, Frank Gehry, glass ceiling, haute cuisine, indoor plumbing, sustainable-tourism, transcontinental railway, upwardly mobile, urban renewal, urban sprawl, white picket fence, Works Progress Administration

However, families looking for a long beach and steady winds for flying kites will likely enjoy Lincoln City. Motel rates here, though often high for what you get, are generally better than those in beach towns that are longer on charm. You’ll also find an abundance of vacation homes for rent here. Likewise, restaurants catering to big families and small pocketbooks are the norm. Such restaurants purvey hot meals rather than haute cuisine, and you can eat your fill of seafood without going broke. Once referred to as “20 miracle miles,” Lincoln City is no longer the miracle it once was. Miracle miles have become congested sprawl, and a summer weekend in Lincoln City can mean coping with bumper-to-bumper traffic. Not surprisingly, many have come to think of this as “20 miserable miles.” If at all possible, come during the week or during the off season to avoid the crowds.


Fodor's Costa Rica 2012 by Fodor's

Berlin Wall, buttonwood tree, call centre, car-free, carbon footprint, David Attenborough, haute cuisine, Pepto Bismol, place-making, sustainable-tourism, urban renewal, urban sprawl

A little farther west, at the entrance to town, lies this sculpture-filled campo santo, founded in 1813 and declared a national monument in 1994. It’s worth a stroll through the San Francisco section, overflowing with ornate mausoleums and lovely tomb sculptures, backed by views of distant mountains. | Av. 2, entrance to city, on west side | 30102 . Where to Eat in Cartago Although you can find decent pasta and pizza, haute cuisine just doesn’t exist here. Cartago does give you a fine opportunity to eat some comida típica (typical food). On just about any street downtown you’ll find a soda (simple café), and the women in the kitchen will serve you the same style of food they cook at home for their own families. One rule of thumb: the busier, the better—the locals know where to eat well. La Puerta del Sol


Spain by Lonely Planet Publications, Damien Simonis

Atahualpa, business process, call centre, centre right, Colonization of Mars, discovery of the americas, Francisco Pizarro, Frank Gehry, G4S, glass ceiling, Guggenheim Bilbao, haute couture, haute cuisine, illegal immigration, intermodal, Islamic Golden Age, land reform, large denomination, low cost airline, place-making, Skype, trade route, upwardly mobile, urban planning, urban renewal, urban sprawl, Winter of Discontent, young professional

La Casa del Arco (974 36 44 48; www.lacasadelarco.net in Spanish; Calle de San Nicolás 4; 2-/3-course menú from €15; ) A haven of imaginative vegetarian food and with a delightfully alternative ambience, La Casa del Arco is terrific. Downstairs is a nice little bar, the Tetaría el Arco, which stages occasional music sessions and other events. Restaurante El Portón (974 35 58 54; Plaza del Marqués de la Cadena 1; menú €13-36) Located in a little tree-shaded plaza, this classy venue serves haute-cuisine versions of Aragonese fare. Reservations are a must. Highly recommended. Other good choices: Bodegas Langa (974 36 04 94; Plaza de San Pedro 5) Gourmet-food-store-cum-summer-tapas-bar. Casa Martín (974 35 69 04; Calle de Santa Orosia 2; menú del día €10.50, meals €20-30) Try the guisado de jabalí (wild boar stew; €9.90). Getting There & Away Five buses go to Huesca (€7.15, 1¼ hours) and Zaragoza (€13.20, 2¼ hours) most days, and two go to Pamplona (€7.75, 1¾ hours) from the central bus station (974 35 50 60; Plaza de Biscós).

Parador Alcázar del Rey Don Pedro ( 954 14 10 10; www.parador.es; s/d €127.54/159.43-170.13; ) Carmona’s luxuriously equipped parador feels even more luxurious for the ruined Alcázar in its grounds. The refectory-style dining room (menú del día €31) is one of the best in town. Casa de Carmona ( 954 19 10 00; www.casadecarmona.com; Plaza de Lasso 1; r incl breakfast €175-180; ) A superluxurious hotel in a beautiful 16th-century palace, the Casa de Carmona feels like the aristocratic home that it used to be. Its elegant restaurant (mains €18 to €25) serves haute cuisine with an andaluz (Andalucian) touch. Carmona offers its very own tapas tour – the map is available from the Tourist Office. Start at cool, dark Bodega L’Antigua (Plaza del Palanque; tapas/raciones €1.50-3.00) opposite the Tourist Office and see if you can work your way around the 20 featured bars by closing time! Return to beginning of chapter OSUNA pop 18,000 / elev 330m Just off the A92 towards Granada, 91km from Seville, Osuna is the loveliest of Sevilla province’s country towns, with beautifully preserved baroque mansions and an amazing Spanish Renaissance monastery.


Rough Guide to San Francisco and the Bay Area by Nick Edwards, Mark Ellwood

1960s counterculture, airport security, back-to-the-land, Bay Area Rapid Transit, British Empire, Burning Man, California gold rush, carbon footprint, City Beautiful movement, El Camino Real, Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test, glass ceiling, Golden Gate Park, Haight Ashbury, haute cuisine, Joan Didion, Kickstarter, Loma Prieta earthquake, Menlo Park, Nelson Mandela, period drama, pez dispenser, Port of Oakland, rent control, Ronald Reagan, Rosa Parks, Sand Hill Road, Silicon Valley, South of Market, San Francisco, Steve Jobs, Steve Wozniak, strikebreaker, transcontinental railway, unpaid internship, upwardly mobile, urban decay, urban planning, urban renewal, white picket fence, Works Progress Administration, young professional

Creative cuisine, featuring unheard-of combinations like chile rellenos with walnut pomegranate sauce or roasted rabbit with potato gnocchi, makes this restaurant a culinary adventure. Wine Spectator Greystone Restaurant 2555 Main St, St Helena t707/967-1010. Created courses such as roasted monkfish with fava beans and Bohemian pheasant cost $20–30 in this upscale but relaxed bistro. Bouchon 6534 Washington St, Yountville t 707/944-8037. Parisian chic and haute cuisine at high prices – the terrine de fois gras goes for $45, but most entrees are around $25–30. by budding Culinary Institute of America chefs, the California/Mediterranean cuisine is served in an elegant ivy-walled mansion just outside of town, with a tastefully wacky Art Deco interior. Reasonably priced considering the delicious, large portions of chicken, duck, fish, and venison. Brannan’s 1374 Lincoln Ave, Calistoga t 707/942-2233.


The River Cottage Fish Book: The Definitive Guide to Sourcing and Cooking Sustainable Fish and Shellfish by Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall

California gold rush, clean water, deindustrialization, delayed gratification, haute cuisine, Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall, Kickstarter, market bubble, means of production, sensible shoes

Of the freshwater species, only trout, salmon, and eels have kept their culinary cachet in the face of the ever-increasing supply of sea-caught fish—despite the fact that many freshwater species make excellent eating. Pike is undoubtedly among them; perch, carp, grayling, and zander are, in our view, the other contenders. On the continent, meanwhile, the culture of eating freshwater fish still thrives. Pike rates highly. Quenelles de brochet—light and moussey poached pike dumplings—is among the classics of French haute cuisine, and is often served with a crayfish sauce. The Germans like to stuff a whole pike with bread crumbs, onions, herbs, and spices and bake it. In fact, the continental appetite for pike has created some problems in international angling relations. Ireland has long been a mecca for British pike anglers. But in the 1990s, the “locals” were unsettled by an influx of German anglers coming to fish for “their” pike.


Fodor's Costa Rica 2013 by Fodor's Travel Publications Inc.

airport security, Berlin Wall, buttonwood tree, call centre, car-free, carbon footprint, David Attenborough, glass ceiling, haute cuisine, Pepto Bismol, place-making, sustainable-tourism, urban sprawl

At a spring behind the church, people fill bottles with water believed to have curative properties. Miraculous healing powers are attributed to the saint, and devotees have placed thousands of tiny symbolic crutches, ears, eyes, and legs in a room to the left of the altar. Tour buses and school groups, along with shops selling the saint’s likeness, make the scene a bit of a circus. * * * WHERE TO EAT IN CARTAGO Although you can find decent pasta and pizza, haute cuisine just doesn’t exist here. Cartago does give you a fine opportunity to eat some comida típica (typical food). On just about any street downtown you’ll find a soda (simple café), and the women in the kitchen will serve you the same style of food they cook at home for their own families. One rule of thumb: the busier, the better—the locals know where to eat well. La Puerta del Sol. $ | COSTA RICAN | A cut above the usual soda, this large, long-established restaurant across from the basilica has been feeding pilgrims since 1957.


pages: 941 words: 237,152

USA's Best Trips by Sara Benson

Albert Einstein, California gold rush, car-free, carbon footprint, desegregation, diversified portfolio, Donald Trump, Donner party, East Village, Frank Gehry, glass ceiling, Golden Gate Park, Haight Ashbury, haute couture, haute cuisine, if you build it, they will come, indoor plumbing, Kickstarter, lateral thinking, McMansion, mega-rich, New Urbanism, Ralph Waldo Emerson, rolodex, Ronald Reagan, side project, Silicon Valley, the High Line, transcontinental railway, trickle-down economics, urban renewal, urban sprawl, white flight, white picket fence, Works Progress Administration

* * * Sleep with the echo of our first president at the John Rutledge House Inn, the private home to one of the signers of the Constitution. George Washington mentioned the fab breakfast here in his diary, and the restored rooms and elegant common space evoke colonial times. The most fablantic town in Georgia is, of course, Savannah. The literate city filled with antebellum mansions and haute cuisine was made even more famous by what’s known as “the book” – Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil, a Southern Gothic true crime novel based on a local hustler’s murder by a well-known antiques dealer. To see the original home to the transvestite star Lady Chablis from the book, shimmy into Club One, the first multistory entertainment complex in Savannah. For the oldest mansion in Savannah, head thee to the Olde Pink House.


Egypt Travel Guide by Lonely Planet

call centre, carbon footprint, Eratosthenes, friendly fire, G4S, haute cuisine, Khartoum Gordon, late fees, low cost airline, low cost carrier, spice trade, sustainable-tourism, Thales and the olive presses, trade route, urban planning, urban sprawl

Revolving Restaurant French $$$ Offline map Google map ( 2365 1234; Grand Nile Tower, Manial; entrées E£75-145, mains E£180-260; 7pm-midnight) Start with terrine de foie gras as you peer at the Pyramids from the 41st floor. By the time your filet d’agneau with tomato confit and a sweet garlic doughnut arrives, you’ll be looking east to the Citadel. Sure, it’s a gimmick, but the Revolving Restaurant at least has good French haute cuisine as well. And, unlike in the rest of this Saudi-run hotel, alcohol is served. Coptic Cairo Elfostat Tivoli Egyptian $$ Offline map Google map (Sharia Hassan al-Anwar; entrées E£5-16, mains E£30-45 9:30am–7pm) The best place to rest up after a Coptic Cairo tour, though no real local feel as it’s part of the built-for-tourists Souq al-Fustat complex. Still, prices are reasonable considering the garden setting.


Lonely Planet Chile & Easter Island (Travel Guide) by Lonely Planet, Carolyn McCarthy, Kevin Raub

California gold rush, call centre, carbon footprint, centre right, Colonization of Mars, East Village, haute cuisine, Kickstarter, land reform, low cost airline, mass immigration, New Urbanism, off grid, place-making, QR code, Skype, sustainable-tourism, trade route, upwardly mobile, urban sprawl, white picket fence

Vintage adverts, Chilean memorabilia and old bottles decorate the wood-paneled inside, but it’s the sidewalk tables that diners really fight over – even on weeknights you should book ahead. The Av Providencia location also features the hugely popular Bar:Liguria Offline map Google map ( open to 3am) a drinking destination in itself. Astrid y Gastón PERUVIAN $$$ Offline map Google map ( 650-9125; www.astridygaston.com; Antonio Bellet 201; mains CH$8000-13,500; 1-3pm & 8pm-midnight Mon-Fri, dinner only Sat; Pedro de Valdivia) The seasonally changing menu of Peruvian haute cuisine has made this one of Santiago’s most critically acclaimed restaurants. The warm but expert waitstaff happily talk you through the chef’s subtle, modern take on traditional ceviches, chupes (fish stews) and cochinillo (suckling pig), all beautifully presented. The barman deserves an ovation for his complex cocktails: Peruvian pisco comes with physalis juice in the Aquaymanto, for example. Doner House TURKISH $ Offline map Google map (www.donerhouse.cl; Av Providencia 1457; mains CH$1900-4200; noon-10pm Mon-Fri, to 9pm Sat; Manuel Montt) The doner maestro – Santiago’s first purveyor of Turkish kebap – carves up a killer shawarma at this tiny eatery.


Cuba Travel Guide by Lonely Planet

Bartolomé de las Casas, battle of ideas, business climate, car-free, carbon footprint, cuban missile crisis, G4S, glass ceiling, haute cuisine, Hernando de Soto, Kickstarter, Monroe Doctrine, new economy, ride hailing / ride sharing, Ronald Reagan, transatlantic slave trade, transcontinental railway, transfer pricing, urban planning

Opening times can be sporadic and it’s often busy. Phone ahead. La Torre FRENCH, CARIBBEAN $$$ OFFLINE MAP GOOGLE MAP ( 838-3088; Edificio Focsa, cnr Calles 17 M; mains from CUC$15; 11:30am-12:30am) One of Havana’s tallest and most talked-about restaurants is perched high above downtown Vedado atop the skyline-hogging Focsa building. A colossus of both modernist architecture and French/Cuban haute cuisine, this lofty fine-dining extravaganza combines sweeping city views with a progressive French-inspired menu that serves everything from artichokes to foie gras to tarte amandine (almond tart). The prices are as distinctly non-Cuban as the ingredients, but with this level of service, it might be worth it. FOOD TO GO There are some great peso places sprinkled about, though few have names; look for the streets.


Great Britain by David Else, Fionn Davenport

active transport: walking or cycling, Albert Einstein, Beeching cuts, Boris Johnson, British Empire, call centre, car-free, carbon footprint, clean water, colonial rule, Columbine, congestion charging, credit crunch, David Attenborough, Etonian, food miles, glass ceiling, global village, haute cuisine, illegal immigration, Isaac Newton, James Watt: steam engine, Kickstarter, land reform, Livingstone, I presume, Mahatma Gandhi, mass immigration, mega-rich, negative equity, new economy, North Sea oil, Northern Rock, offshore financial centre, period drama, place-making, Skype, Sloane Ranger, South of Market, San Francisco, Stephen Hawking, the market place, trade route, transatlantic slave trade, upwardly mobile, urban planning, urban renewal, urban sprawl, Winter of Discontent

Breakfasts, light lunches, afternoon tea and dinners are served in a bright, elegant dining room or a lovely plant-filled courtyard. Highlights include pistachio-crusted local lamb and chocolate torte with fennel ice cream. Drapers Hall ( 01743-344679; St Mary’s Pl; mains £12-17.50; lunch & dinner) The sense of history is palpable in this well-fossilised 16th-century hall, fronted by an elegant Elizabethan facade. Award-wining, Anglo-French haute cuisine is divided between dark oak-panelled rooms decked out in sumptuous fabrics and antique screens. The connoisseur’s wine list is also well worthy of a special occasion. Drinking Armoury ( 01743-340525; www.armoury-shrewsbury.co.uk; Victoria Ave) There’s a great warmth and conviviality to this converted riverside warehouse. Towering bookshelves, old pictures and curios help straddle the divide between posh restaurant (mains £9 to £17) and informal pub; large, curved windows invite in plenty of light, while a plethora of blackboard menus invite you to sample wines, guest ales and hearty British dishes.

Return to beginning of chapter DRINKING There is an ever-expanding circuit of cool hang-outs for Cardiff’s urban cognoscenti. These are some of the latest picks around town. Cafe Bar Europa (Map; 2066 7776; 25 Castle St; 10am-5pm Tue-Sun) Favoured by an arty and politics crowd, the charismatic Europa is a daytime hang-out with fair-trade coffees, snacks and a friendly welcome. * * * HAUTE CUISINE & HIPPIE CHIC Cardiff’s hippest district is currently focused on the suburbs of Canton and Pontcanna, a few blocks strolling west from the guesthouses of Cathedral Rd. The area offers some distinct flavours of the new Cardiff. Le Gallois (off Map; 2034 1264; www.legallois.co.uk; 6-10 Romilly Cres, Canton; 2-course set lunches £12.95, dinner mains around £17; lunch & dinner Tue-Sat, lunch Sun) is still renowned as one of Cardiff’s finest despite some recent changes to the management.


Egypt by Matthew Firestone

call centre, clean water, credit crunch, friendly fire, haute cuisine, Khartoum Gordon, Right to Buy, spice trade, sustainable-tourism, Thales and the olive presses, trade route, urban sprawl, young professional

Revolving Restaurant (Map; 2365 1234; Grand Hyatt Hotel, off Corniche el-Nil; dishes E£65-130; 7pm-1am) Located on the 41st floor of the Grand Hyatt, the Revolving Restaurant boasts some impressive stats: at 30m in diameter, the room rotates 360 degrees in 75 minutes, and takes in views of the Pyramids, the Nile and most of Cairo. While the revolving experience is enough of a reason to visit, the French haute cuisine prepared here in the show kitchen is nothing less than exquisite. Islamic Cairo There are plenty of fast-food joints around Midan al-Hussein but the restaurants in this part of town are limited – you really have to like grilled meat, and not be too squeamish about hygiene. BUDGET Al-Halwagy (Map; Midan al-Hussein; dishes E£5-30; 24hr) Not directly on the square, but just behind a row of buildings, this good ta’amiyya, fuul and salad place has been around for nearly a century.


pages: 879 words: 309,222

Nobody's Perfect: Writings From the New Yorker by Anthony Lane

a long time ago in a galaxy far, far away, colonial rule, dark matter, Frank Gehry, haute cuisine, Index librorum prohibitorum, Mahatma Gandhi, Maui Hawaii, moral hazard, Norman Mailer, profit motive, Ronald Reagan, sexual politics, The Great Good Place, trade route, University of East Anglia, Upton Sinclair, urban decay, urban planning

Although I am not a good cook, I am not a dreadful one, either; I once had a go at mouclade d’Aunis, once made a brave fist of cul de veau braisé Angevin, and once came very close to buying a carp. Last summer, I did something difficult with monkfish tails; the dish took two days to prepare, a full nine minutes to eat, and three days to wash up after. But an hour in front of my cookbooks is enough to slash my ambitions to the bone—to convince me that in terms of culinary evolution I remain a scowling tree-dweller whose idea of haute cuisine is to grub for larvae under dead bark. And we all know the name of the highly developed being standing tall at the other end of the scale. Super-skilled, free of fear, the last word in human efficiency, Martha Stewart is the woman who convinced a million Americans that they have the time, the means, the right, and—damn it—the duty to pipe a little squirt of soft cheese into the middle of a snow pea, and to continue piping until there are “fifty to sixty” stuffed peas raring to go.


pages: 1,758 words: 342,766

Code Complete (Developer Best Practices) by Steve McConnell

Ada Lovelace, Albert Einstein, Buckminster Fuller, call centre, continuous integration, data acquisition, database schema, don't repeat yourself, Donald Knuth, fault tolerance, Grace Hopper, haute cuisine, if you see hoof prints, think horses—not zebras, index card, inventory management, iterative process, Larry Wall, loose coupling, Menlo Park, Perl 6, place-making, premature optimization, revision control, Sapir-Whorf hypothesis, slashdot, sorting algorithm, statistical model, Tacoma Narrows Bridge, the scientific method, Thomas Kuhn: the structure of scientific revolutions, Turing machine, web application

It should be planned into the project as work begins; it should be part of the technical fiber of the project as work continues; and it should punctuate the end of the project, verifying the quality of the product as work ends. The General Principle of Software Quality There's no such thing as a free lunch, and even if there were, there's no guarantee that it would be any good. Software development is a far cry from haute cuisine, however, and software quality is unusual in a significant way. The General Principle of Software Quality is that improving quality reduces development costs. Understanding this principle depends on understanding a key observation: the best way to improve productivity and quality is to reduce the time spent reworking code, whether the rework arises from changes in requirements, changes in design, or debugging.


Southwest USA Travel Guide by Lonely Planet

1919 Motor Transport Corps convoy, Albert Einstein, Berlin Wall, Burning Man, carbon footprint, Columbine, Donner party, El Camino Real, friendly fire, G4S, haute couture, haute cuisine, housing crisis, illegal immigration, immigration reform, indoor plumbing, Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), low earth orbit, off grid, place-making, supervolcano, trade route, transcontinental railway, walkable city, Works Progress Administration, X Prize

Room rates include breakfast at the popular Hogan Restaurant (cnr Main St & Moenave Rd; mains $6-14; breakfast, lunch & dinner) next door, which has an extensive menu of Southwestern, Navajo and American dishes. Smoking rooms available. Pets $10 per night. Kate’s Café DINER $ (cnr Main St & Edgewater Dr; mains $7-13; breakfast, lunch & dinner) Don’t be put off by the booth with the posterior-eating hole in the seat, just sit on the other side. This ain’t haute cuisine, but it serves up decent, locally popular diner grub. For a latte and web-surfing, swing by Hogan Espresso & More (cnr Main St & Moenave Rd; 7am-7pm Mon-Fri, 9am-7pm Sat & Sun). Navajo National Monument The sublimely well-preserved Ancestral Puebloan cliff dwellings of Betatkin and Keet Seel are protected as the Navajo National Monument (928-672-2700; www.nps.gov/nava; Hwy 564; admission free; 8am-6pm Jun–mid-Sep, 9am-5pm mid-Sep–May) and can only be reached on foot.


pages: 1,079 words: 321,718

Surfaces and Essences by Douglas Hofstadter, Emmanuel Sander

affirmative action, Albert Einstein, Arthur Eddington, Benoit Mandelbrot, Brownian motion, cognitive dissonance, computer age, computer vision, dematerialisation, Donald Trump, Douglas Hofstadter, Ernest Rutherford, experimental subject, Flynn Effect, Georg Cantor, Gerolamo Cardano, Golden Gate Park, haute couture, haute cuisine, Henri Poincaré, Isaac Newton, l'esprit de l'escalier, Louis Pasteur, Mahatma Gandhi, mandelbrot fractal, Menlo Park, Norbert Wiener, place-making, Sapir-Whorf hypothesis, Silicon Valley, statistical model, Steve Jobs, Steve Wozniak, theory of mind, upwardly mobile, urban sprawl, yellow journalism, zero-sum game

Even when people reach such high peaks of creativity, they do so totally through their conceptual repertoire that comes from their mundane existence. Each of us is continually creating extensions of or variations on what we already know, and at the base of this huge edifice lie our most primitive needs. And our constant quest to meet these primitive needs leads us to undertake activities having seemingly unlimited levels of sophistication. The need for food gave rise to haute cuisine; the need for warmth gave rise to high fashion; the need for shelter gave rise to architecture; the need to move about gave rise to vehicles of innumerable sorts; the need to mate gave rise to erotic art and innumerable love songs and poems; the need to reproduce gave rise to families and their interactions; the need to exchange goods gave rise to huge networks of interdependent economies; the need to cooperate gave rise to governments; the need to understand the world gave rise to science; the need to communicate gave rise to a thousand constantly-evolving technologies… We humans have created an unlimited cornucopia of elaborate variations on the themes of what we know, but we are incapable of going beyond that.


pages: 1,213 words: 376,284

Empire of Things: How We Became a World of Consumers, From the Fifteenth Century to the Twenty-First by Frank Trentmann

Airbnb, Anton Chekhov, Ayatollah Khomeini, Berlin Wall, Big bang: deregulation of the City of London, British Empire, Capital in the Twenty-First Century by Thomas Piketty, car-free, carbon footprint, Cass Sunstein, choice architecture, clean water, collaborative consumption, collective bargaining, colonial exploitation, colonial rule, Community Supported Agriculture, cross-subsidies, Daniel Kahneman / Amos Tversky, David Ricardo: comparative advantage, deindustrialization, dematerialisation, Deng Xiaoping, deskilling, equity premium, Fall of the Berlin Wall, Fellow of the Royal Society, financial exclusion, fixed income, food miles, full employment, germ theory of disease, global village, haute cuisine, high net worth, income inequality, index card, informal economy, Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), Internet of things, James Watt: steam engine, John Maynard Keynes: Economic Possibilities for our Grandchildren, Joseph Schumpeter, Kitchen Debate, knowledge economy, labour mobility, libertarian paternalism, Livingstone, I presume, longitudinal study, mass immigration, McMansion, mega-rich, moral panic, mortgage debt, Murano, Venice glass, Naomi Klein, New Urbanism, post-industrial society, post-materialism, postnationalism / post nation state, profit motive, purchasing power parity, Ralph Nader, rent control, Richard Thaler, Right to Buy, Ronald Reagan, school vouchers, Scientific racism, Scramble for Africa, sharing economy, Silicon Valley, Skype, stakhanovite, the built environment, the market place, The Spirit Level, The Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith, Thomas L Friedman, Thomas Malthus, Thorstein Veblen, trade liberalization, trade route, transatlantic slave trade, union organizing, upwardly mobile, urban planning, urban sprawl, Washington Consensus, women in the workforce, working poor, young professional, zero-sum game

The stark contrast between the feasts of the elite and monotony for the rest is gone.100 All social classes eat meat and snack on processed foods, although some princes may prefer the organic variety from their own certified farm. Supermarkets have weakened (though not eliminated) regional food cultures. Together, TV, leisure and relative affluence have popularized cooking and baking as serious hobbies and a sign of distinction, where hosts play chef and perform in the kitchen. In the process, elite haute cuisine lost its dominant status. At the same time, there is evidence that food cultures may be as diverse today as they were half a century ago, before TV and eating out took off; the inter-war years, probably, marked a bigger change, as the middle classes lost their cooks and suddenly had to cook for themselves. Eating in affluent societies may simply have articulated fresh differences. The most nuanced study we have – on British society – has found ongoing differentiation.


The Rough Guide to England by Rough Guides

active transport: walking or cycling, Airbnb, Albert Einstein, bike sharing scheme, Bob Geldof, Boris Johnson, British Empire, car-free, Columbine, congestion charging, Corn Laws, deindustrialization, Downton Abbey, Edmond Halley, Etonian, food miles, haute cuisine, housing crisis, Isaac Newton, James Watt: steam engine, John Harrison: Longitude, Kickstarter, low cost airline, Neil Kinnock, offshore financial centre, period drama, plutocrats, Plutocrats, the market place, trade route, transatlantic slave trade, University of East Anglia, upwardly mobile, urban sprawl

And it needn’t be expensive – even in the fanciest restaurants, set menus (most often served at lunch) can be a great deal, and sharing plates can be a godsend if you want to cut costs. The city’s dynamic street food scene, meanwhile, with food trucks, carts and pop-up stalls dishing up artisan food at low prices, offers an amazing diversity. Keep track of the ever-shifting scene on kerbfood.com, streetfeastlondon.com and realfoodfestival.co.uk. Bear in mind also that many pubs serve food, from simple pub grub to haute cuisine – check out the gastropubs in our Drinking section. Westminster Café Café in the Crypt St Martin-in-the-Fields, Trafalgar Square, WC2N 5DN 020 7766 1158, stmartin-in-the-fields.org; Charing Cross; map. This handy café – below the church, in the eighteenth-century crypt – is a nice spot at which to fill up. The daily-changing selection focuses on home-made British comfort food, plus soups, salads and puds.


Greece Travel Guide by Lonely Planet

active transport: walking or cycling, Airbnb, capital controls, car-free, carbon footprint, credit crunch, haute couture, haute cuisine, illegal immigration, indoor plumbing, Kickstarter, low cost airline, low cost carrier, pension reform, period drama, sensible shoes, trade route, urban sprawl

TrapezariaMODERN GREEK€€ ( MAP GOOGLE MAP ; %210 921 3500; www.trapezaria.gr; Efforionos 13, Pangrati; mains €8-15; h7pm-midnight Tue-Sat, 1-6pm Sun; mEvangelismos, Akropoli) In an unassuming spot, this stylish contemporary Greek restaurant packs in locals in search of good, affordable eats, served with style. The wine list is remarkable. oSpondiMEDITERRANEAN€€€ ( MAP GOOGLE MAP ; %210 756 4021; www.spondi.gr; Pyrronos 5, Pangrati; mains €38-50, set menus from €69; h8pm-late) Two Michelin–starred Spondi is frequently voted Athens’ best restaurant, and the accolades are deserved. It offers Mediterranean haute cuisine, with heavy French influences, in a relaxed, chic setting in a charming old house. Choose from the menu or a range of set dinner and wine prix fixes. The restaurant has a lovely, bougainvillea-draped garden. Book ahead, and take a cab – it’s hard to reach on public transport. 6Drinking & Nightlife One local favoured pastime is going for coffee. Athens’ ubiquitous, packed cafes have some of Europe’s most expensive coffee (between €3 and €5) – you’re essentially hiring the chair and can linger for hours.


Central America by Carolyn McCarthy, Greg Benchwick, Joshua Samuel Brown, Alex Egerton, Matthew Firestone, Kevin Raub, Tom Spurling, Lucas Vidgen

airport security, Bartolomé de las Casas, California gold rush, call centre, centre right, clean water, cognitive dissonance, currency manipulation / currency intervention, digital map, Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test, failed state, Francisco Pizarro, Frank Gehry, haute cuisine, illegal immigration, Joan Didion, land reform, liberation theology, low cost airline, low cost carrier, Mahatma Gandhi, Monroe Doctrine, Ronald Reagan, Skype, sustainable-tourism, trade route, transcontinental railway, urban renewal, urban sprawl, women in the workforce

Sleeping & Eating All the places to stay and eat in Nueva Ocotepeque are on or near Calle Intermedio, which runs through town. Hotel Turista ( 653-3639; Av General Francisco Morazán; d without bathroom L230, s/d L230/360;) Freshly decked out in pastel-hued glory, this is the best of the cheapies around the bus stations. It’s surprisingly nice and clean for the price. Servi Pollo (combos L45-78; 6am-9pm) Well, you weren’t expecting to get haute cuisine here, were you? This fast-food joint has fried and roast chicken, as well as burgers. From the bus stop go south, left at the Banco Occidente, then take the second right. Getting There & Away Two long-distance bus companies serve Nueva Ocotepeque: Congolón ( 653-3064) is half a block south of the Parque Central while Sultana ( 653-2405) is two blocks north of the park. Destinations: Agua Caliente (L20; 30 min; every 30min from 6am-6pm) Buses leave from the Transporte San José terminal two blocks north of the park.


Ireland (Lonely Planet, 9th Edition) by Fionn Davenport

air freight, Berlin Wall, Bob Geldof, British Empire, carbon footprint, Celtic Tiger, centre right, credit crunch, glass ceiling, global village, haute cuisine, Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), Jacquard loom, Kickstarter, McMansion, new economy, period drama, reserve currency, risk/return, sustainable-tourism, urban planning, urban renewal, urban sprawl, young professional

* * * Restaurant Patrick Guilbaud (Map; 676 4192; www.restaurantpatrickguilbaud.ie; 21 Upper Merrion St; 2-/3-course set lunch €38/50, dinner mains €38-50; 12.30-2.30pm & 7.30-10.30pm Tue-Sat) With two Michelin stars on its resumé, this elegant restaurant is one of the best in Ireland, and head chef Guillaume Lebrun does his best to ensure that it stays that way. Next door to the Merrion Hotel, Guilbaud has French haute cuisine that is beautifully executed and served in delectable surroundings. The lunch menu is a steal, at least in this stratosphere. The Liberties & Kilmainham Fast-food outlets and greasy-spoon diners still dominate the food map in this part of the city, but there’s one spot that rises out of the boiling oil and batter-in-a-bucket and takes its place among the legends. Leo Burdock’s (Map; 454 0306; 2 Werburgh St; cod & chips €8.50; noon-midnight Mon-Sat, 4pm-midnight Sun) You will often hear that you haven’t eaten in Dublin until you’ve queued in the cold for a cod and chips wrapped in paper from the city’s most famous chipper.


pages: 1,336 words: 415,037

The Snowball: Warren Buffett and the Business of Life by Alice Schroeder

affirmative action, Albert Einstein, anti-communist, Ayatollah Khomeini, barriers to entry, Bob Noyce, Bonfire of the Vanities, Brownian motion, capital asset pricing model, card file, centralized clearinghouse, Charles Lindbergh, collateralized debt obligation, computerized trading, corporate governance, corporate raider, Credit Default Swap, credit default swaps / collateralized debt obligations, desegregation, Donald Trump, Eugene Fama: efficient market hypothesis, Everybody Ought to Be Rich, global village, Golden Gate Park, Haight Ashbury, haute cuisine, Honoré de Balzac, If something cannot go on forever, it will stop - Herbert Stein's Law, In Cold Blood by Truman Capote, index fund, indoor plumbing, intangible asset, interest rate swap, invisible hand, Isaac Newton, Jeff Bezos, John Meriwether, joint-stock company, joint-stock limited liability company, Long Term Capital Management, Louis Bachelier, margin call, market bubble, Marshall McLuhan, medical malpractice, merger arbitrage, Mikhail Gorbachev, money market fund, moral hazard, NetJets, new economy, New Journalism, North Sea oil, paper trading, passive investing, Paul Samuelson, pets.com, plutocrats, Plutocrats, Ponzi scheme, Ralph Nader, random walk, Ronald Reagan, Scientific racism, shareholder value, short selling, side project, Silicon Valley, Steve Ballmer, Steve Jobs, supply-chain management, telemarketer, The Predators' Ball, The Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith, Thomas Malthus, too big to fail, transcontinental railway, Upton Sinclair, War on Poverty, Works Progress Administration, Y2K, yellow journalism, zero-coupon bond

By the time Peter came home from Stanford that summer, she was growing tomatoes in the yard on Farnam Street and searching for Pepsi at thirty cents off a gallon. After so many months, “I never gave it a thought,” Astrid says. “It just happened naturally.”1 Astrid “just disappeared” from the downtown scene, says an acquaintance.2 Meeting her, Buffett’s friends were taken aback at the match. She was sixteen years younger, a blue-collar girl. Nonetheless, she knew everything that Buffett didn’t about haute cuisine and fine wines, shellfish forks and chef’s knives. In contrast to Susie’s spending habits and preference for all things modern, Astrid haunted junk shops looking for bargain antiques. She prided herself on paying the least amount possible for her thrift-shop wardrobe; so parsimonious was Astrid that she made Buffett look like a wastrel. Far more of a homebody than Susie, her interests—cooking, gardening, bargain hunting—were narrow compared to Susie’s constantly expanding and evolving tastes.


England by David Else

active transport: walking or cycling, Albert Einstein, back-to-the-land, Berlin Wall, Boris Johnson, British Empire, call centre, car-free, carbon footprint, colonial rule, Columbine, congestion charging, David Attenborough, David Brooks, Etonian, food miles, glass ceiling, haute cuisine, Isaac Newton, James Watt: steam engine, Kickstarter, Mahatma Gandhi, mass immigration, Nelson Mandela, new economy, New Urbanism, out of africa, period drama, place-making, sceptred isle, Skype, Sloane Ranger, South of Market, San Francisco, Stephen Hawking, the market place, trade route, transatlantic slave trade, unbiased observer, upwardly mobile, urban planning, urban renewal, urban sprawl, Winter of Discontent

Breakfasts, light lunches, afternoon tea and dinners are served in a bright, elegant dining room or a lovely plant-filled courtyard. Highlights include pistachio-crusted local lamb and chocolate torte with fennel ice cream. Drapers Hall ( 01743-344679; St Mary’s Pl; mains £12-17.50; lunch & dinner) The sense of history is palpable in this well-fossilised 16th-century hall, fronted by an elegant Elizabethan facade. Award-wining, Anglo-French haute cuisine is divided between dark oak-panelled rooms decked out in sumptuous fabrics and antique screens. The connoisseur’s wine list is also well worthy of a special occasion. Drinking Armoury ( 01743-340525; www.armoury-shrewsbury.co.uk; Victoria Ave) There’s a great warmth and conviviality to this converted riverside warehouse. Towering bookshelves, old pictures and curios help straddle the divide between posh restaurant (mains £9-17) and informal pub; large, curved windows invite in sheds of light, while a plethora of blackboard menus invite you to sample wines, guest ales and hearty British dishes.


Southeast Asia on a Shoestring Travel Guide by Lonely Planet

active transport: walking or cycling, airport security, Alfred Russel Wallace, anti-communist, British Empire, call centre, car-free, carbon footprint, clean water, clockwatching, colonial rule, Google Earth, haute cuisine, indoor plumbing, Kickstarter, large denomination, low cost airline, low cost carrier, Mason jar, megacity, period drama, Skype, South China Sea, spice trade, superstar cities, sustainable-tourism, trade route, urban sprawl, white picket fence, women in the workforce

* * * About Art & Craft Café VEGETARIAN $$ (Na Thon; dishes 80-180B; breakfast & lunch; ) An artistic oasis in the midst of hurried Na Thon, this cafe serves an eclectic assortment of healthy and wholesome food, gourmet coffee, and, as the name states, art and craft, made by the owner and her friends. Relaxed and friendly, this is also a gathering place for Samui’s dwindling population of bohemians and artists. Nikki Beach LOUNGE (www.nikkibeach.com/kohsamui; Lipa Noi) The acclaimed luxury brand has brought their international savoir faire to the secluded west coast of Ko Samui. Expect everything you would from a chic address in St Barts or St Tropez: haute cuisine, chic decor and gaggles of jetsetters. Themed brunch and dinner specials keep the masses coming throughout the week. Information Bangkok Samui Hospital ( 0 7742 9500, emergency 0 7742 9555) Your best bet for just about any medical problem. Hyperbaric Chamber ( 0 7742 7427; Big Buddha Beach) The island’s dive medicine specialists. Immigration Office ( 0 7742 1069; Na Thon; 8.30am-noon & 1-4.30pm Mon-Fri) Expect extensions to take the entire afternoon.