San Francisco homelessness

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pages: 572 words: 124,222

San Fransicko: Why Progressives Ruin Cities by Michael Shellenberger

activist fund / activist shareholder / activist investor, affirmative action, Affordable Care Act / Obamacare, Albert Einstein, anti-communist, Bay Area Rapid Transit, Bernie Sanders, business climate, centre right, coronavirus, correlation does not imply causation, Covid-19, COVID-19, crack epidemic, delayed gratification, desegregation, Donald Trump, Golden Gate Park, Haight Ashbury, housing crisis, Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), Jane Jacobs, mandatory minimum, mass incarceration, meta-analysis, microaggression, RAND corporation, randomized controlled trial, remote working, rent control, Ronald Reagan, San Francisco homelessness, Savings and loan crisis, Silicon Valley, single-payer health, South of Market, San Francisco, Steven Pinker, The Death and Life of Great American Cities, walkable city

In the same fifteen-year period, the homeless populations of Chicago, Greater Miami, and Greater Atlanta declined 19 percent, 32 percent, and 43 percent, respectively.29 While it is true that New York City saw an increase of 62 percent in its homeless population between 2005 and 2020, over 99 percent of New York’s homeless have access to shelter. In San Francisco, just 43 percent do.30 Against Benioff’s suggestion that San Francisco’s homeless population is heavily comprised of families with children, the research finds that far more homeless in the San Francisco Bay Area are adults without families than in other parts of the United States. Whereas families make up 32, 53, and 65 percent of the homeless in New York City, Chicago, and Boston, they make up just 9 percent of the Bay Area’s homeless population.31 San Francisco has a much higher share of unsheltered homeless who are “chronically homeless” than other cities.

The US Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) defines chronically homeless as those who have been homeless for a year, had four episodes of homelessness totaling twelve months in the last three years, or those who are too disabled to work.32 Of the roughly 5,200 unsheltered homeless people in San Francisco, 37 percent in 2020 were chronically homeless, in comparison to the 34 percent, 19 percent, 17 percent, and 16 percent chronically homeless in New York City, Greater Phoenix, Greater San Diego, and Boston, respectively.33 San Francisco’s mild climate alone cannot explain why it has more homeless people than other cities. Miami, Phoenix, and Houston have year-round warm weather and far fewer homeless than San Francisco per capita. Per capita homelessness in San Francisco, Greater Miami, Greater Phoenix, and Greater Houston in 2020 was 9.3, 1.3, 1.6, and 0.8 per 1,000 residents, respectively.

Anthony’s, which allowed me to use all of my General Assistance money for heroin and then sell my food stamp card to a merchant in Chinatown who would pay me 60 cents on the dollar for it.” According to a 2019 survey conducted by the homeless advocacy group Tipping Point, just one-fifth of San Francisco’s homeless said they were born in the city and only half had lived in the city for over ten years. In a different survey, nearly one-third of San Francisco’s homeless said they were homeless before coming to San Francisco. And among the 70 percent who said they became homeless after moving to San Francisco, we don’t know how long many of them had lived in the city. For some, it could have been as brief as a month, which is the time it takes to become eligible for General Assistance.15 Helping the neediest can create perverse incentives.


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City for Sale: The Transformation of San Francisco by Chester W. Hartman, Sarah Carnochan

affirmative action, Albert Einstein, Bay Area Rapid Transit, big-box store, business climate, Golden Gate Park, Haight Ashbury, housing crisis, illegal immigration, John Markoff, Loma Prieta earthquake, manufacturing employment, new economy, New Urbanism, profit motive, Ralph Nader, rent control, Ronald Reagan, San Francisco homelessness, Savings and loan crisis, Silicon Valley, South of Market, San Francisco, strikebreaker, union organizing, urban planning, urban renewal, very high income, young professional

Rachel Gordon, “Board Votes Down Alioto Amnesty for Homeless,” San Francisco Examiner, 26 October 1993. 170. Ibid. 171. Sharon Waxman, “Keeping Focus on Homeless,” Washington Post, 17 July 1996. 172. Quoted in Bill Mandel, “The City’s Changing Image,” San Francisco Examiner, 28 March 1983. 173. Evelyn Nieves, “Homelessness Tests San Francisco’s Ideals,” New York Times, 13 November 1998. Notes to Pages 381–385 / 461 174. Kathleen Sullivan, “Homeless Say Shelters Lack Basic Amenities,” San Francisco Examiner, 6 October 2000. 175. Carey Goldberg, “Homeless in San Francisco: A New Policy,” New York Times, 20 May 1996. 176.

McHenry, Food Not Bombs: How to Feed the Hungry and Build Community (Philadelphia: New Society Publishers, 1992); also, Jesse Drew, “Any Vegetable: The Politics of Food in San Francisco,” in Reclaiming San Francisco, ed. James Brook, Chris Carlsson, and Nancy J. Peters, 317 –31. 164. Andrew Ross and Andy Furillo, “Poll: Homeless S.F.’s No. 1 Problem,” San Francisco Examiner, 7 January 1990. 165. See Edward Lempinen, “Society’s Haves Getting Weary of Have-Nots,” San Francisco Chronicle, 31 October 1988; Andy Furillo, “Homeless Face Growing Hostility in Nation’s Cities,” San Francisco Examiner, 15 July 1990. 166. Ingfei Chen, “Jordan Recommends Tightening Up on Homeless,” San Francisco Chronicle, 10 July 1991. 167. Christine Spolar, “San Francisco’s New Urban Outlaws Carry Bedrolls and Sleep Outdoors,” San Francisco Chronicle, 24 November 1993. 168.

Housing Crisis and Housing Movement / 383 It’s clear that “compassion fatigue” had set in, as captured in headlines about San Francisco from national news accounts: “City of Tolerance Tires of Homeless,”185 “Homelessness Tests San Francisco’s Ideals.”186 And that— at least from city hall’s biased and jaundiced perspective—“Willie Brown has become the third mayor of San Francisco in a row to enter office with a plan for dealing with the homeless only to discover that nothing works.”187 As Paul Boden of the city’s Coalition on Homelessness observes about San Francisco’s political climate: “There is an attitude that with unemployment at record lows, with the stock market at record highs, if you’re poor, it’s your own damn fault.


pages: 311 words: 130,761

Framing Class: Media Representations of Wealth and Poverty in America by Diana Elizabeth Kendall

Bernie Madoff, blue-collar work, Bonfire of the Vanities, call centre, David Brooks, declining real wages, Donald Trump, employer provided health coverage, ending welfare as we know it, fixed income, framing effect, Georg Cantor, Gordon Gekko, greed is good, haute couture, housing crisis, illegal immigration, income inequality, mortgage tax deduction, new economy, payday loans, Ponzi scheme, Ray Oldenburg, Richard Florida, Ronald Reagan, San Francisco homelessness, Saturday Night Live, telemarketer, The Great Good Place, The Theory of the Leisure Class by Thorstein Veblen, Thorstein Veblen, trickle-down economics, union organizing, upwardly mobile, urban planning, working poor

Daily Papers Pit Middle Class against Homeless,” Media Alliance, 2000, http://www.media-alliance.org/mediafile/19-1/homeless.html (accessed October 12, 2003). 136. “Homeless Shelter Plan Attacked, Potrero Hill Neighbors Worry about Property Values,” San Francisco Chronicle, August 6, 1999, http://articles.sfgate. com/1999-08-06/news/17696660_1_homeless-shelter-neighborhood-homeless-people (accessed October 15, 2010). 137. “Showdown over Shelter: A Gritty Little Neighborhood Fights S.F. Plan for Homeless,” San Francisco Examiner, August 12, 1999. 138. John W. Fountain, “Chicago Looks for Home for Shelter for Homeless,” New York Times, May 15, 2003, A26. 139.

vii 9781442202238.print.indb vii 2/10/11 10:46 AM 9781442202238.print.indb viii 2/10/11 10:46 AM Chapter 1 Class Action in the Media San Francisco, California: They live—and die—on a traffic island in the middle of a busy downtown street, surviving by panhandling drivers or turning tricks. Everyone in their colony is hooked on drugs or alcohol. They are the harsh face of the homeless in San Francisco. The traffic island where these homeless people live is a 40-by-75 foot triangle chunk of concrete just west of San Francisco’s downtown. . . . The little concrete divider wouldn’t get a second glance, or have a name—if not for the colony that lives there in a jumble of shopping carts loaded with everything they own.

Government agencies (city, state, federal) don’t want to pick up the care for the homeless because it costs money so they look the other way when services used by the middle class collapse under the weight. Why shouldn’t the needs of the middle class be considered alongside the needs of the homeless?133 Headlines regarding the homeless and libraries crop up across the country. For example, a San Francisco newspaper reports that John Banks, a homeless man in a wheelchair, shows up at the main library every day when it opens and stays there until it closes, at which time, he returns to the bus terminal where he spends the night.134 As discussed in chapter 4, some journalists frame stories in a manner that engenders sympathy for the poor and homeless, asking, for instance, where a person like John Banks is supposed to stay.


pages: 506 words: 133,134

The Lonely Century: How Isolation Imperils Our Future by Noreena Hertz

"side hustle", Airbnb, airport security, algorithmic bias, Asian financial crisis, Bernie Sanders, big-box store, Broken windows theory, call centre, Capital in the Twenty-First Century by Thomas Piketty, car-free, Cass Sunstein, centre right, conceptual framework, Copley Medal, coronavirus, correlation does not imply causation, Covid-19, COVID-19, dark matter, deindustrialization, Diane Coyle, disinformation, Donald Trump, en.wikipedia.org, Erik Brynjolfsson, Fellow of the Royal Society, future of work, gender pay gap, gig economy, Gordon Gekko, greed is good, happiness index / gross national happiness, housing crisis, illegal immigration, independent contractor, industrial robot, Jane Jacobs, Jeff Bezos, job automation, job satisfaction, knowledge economy, labor-force participation, longitudinal study, low skilled workers, Lyft, Mark Zuckerberg, mass immigration, means of production, megacity, meta-analysis, move fast and break things, move fast and break things, Network effects, new economy, Pepto Bismol, QWERTY keyboard, Ray Oldenburg, remote working, rent control, RFID, Ronald Reagan, San Francisco homelessness, Second Machine Age, Shoshana Zuboff, Silicon Valley, Skype, Snapchat, Social Responsibility of Business Is to Increase Its Profits, Steve Jobs, surveillance capitalism, TaskRabbit, The Death and Life of Great American Cities, The Future of Employment, The Great Good Place, The Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith, Tim Cook: Apple, Uber and Lyft, uber lyft, urban planning, Wall-E, WeWork, working poor

The city itself is responsible for other instances of hostile architecture, from ‘inverse guillotines’ at the entrance to public transit (Lina Blanco, ‘BART’s Fare Evasion Crackdown Exposes the ‘Deadly Elegance’ of Hostile Design’, KQED, 23 July 2019, https://www.kqed.org/arts/13861966/barts-fare-evasion-crackdown-exposes-the-deadly-elegance-of-hostile-design) to sharp boulders outside the public library to paint in public places that will spray urine back at homeless people who may not have access to a suitable toilet (Kaitlin Jock, ‘You are not welcome here: Anti-homeless architecture crops up nationwide’, Street Roots News, 7 June 2019, https://news.streetroots.org/2019/06/07/you-are-not-welcome-here-anti-homeless-architecture-crops-nationwide). While it does not have the highest total number of people experiencing homelessness, San Francisco has one of the fastest growing homeless populations in the US, having risen a shocking 30% just between 2017 and 2018, by one measure (Jill Cowan, ‘San Francisco’s Homeless Population Is Much Bigger Than Thought, City Data Suggests’, New York Times, 19 November 2019, https://www.nytimes.com/2019/11/19/us/san-francisco-homeless-count.html). 24 James Walker, ‘Invisible in plain sight: fighting loneliness in the homeless community’, Open Democracy, 31 July 2019, https://www.opendemocracy.net/en/opendemocracyuk/invisible-plain-sight-fighting-loneliness-homeless-community/. 25 See Jane Jacobs, The Death and Life of Great American Cities (Random House, 1961). 26 ‘Welcome to the neighbourhood’, Royal Wharf, https://www.royalwharf.com/neighbourhood/. 27 Robert Booth, ‘Subsidised tenants are excluded from pool and gym in London block’, Guardian, 1 November 2018, https://www.theguardian.com/society/2018/nov/01/subsidised-tenants-are-excluded-from-pool-and-gym-in-london-tower. 28 Harriet Grant, ‘Too poor to play: children in social housing blocked from communal playground’, Guardian, 25 March 2019, https://www.theguardian.com/cities/2019/mar/25/too-poor-to-play-children-in-social-housing-blocked-from-communal-playground. 29 The company, for its part, claims that such exclusion was never its policy. 30 Harriet Grant, ‘Disabled children among social tenants blocked from communal gardens’, Guardian, 27 September 2019, https://www.theguardian.com/cities/2019/sep/27/disabled-children-among-social-tenants-blocked-from-communal-gardens. 31 ‘New UWS development could have separate entrance for poorer people’, West Side Rag, 12 August 2013, https://www.westsiderag.com/2013/08/12/new-uws-development-could-have-separate-entrance-for-poorer-people; Adam Withnall ‘“Poor door” controversy extends to Washington DC as affordable housing “wing” given entrance on different street – next to the loading bay’, Independent, 4 August 2014, https://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/americas/poor-door-controversy-extends-to-washington-dc-as-affordable-housing-wing-given-entrance-on-9646069.html; Hilary Osborne, ‘Poor doors: the segregation of London’s inner–city flat dwellers’, Guardian, 25 July 2014, https://www.theguardian.com/society/2014/jul/25/poor-doors-segregation-london-flats. 32 Adam Withnall, ‘“Poor door” controversy extends to Washington, D.C. as affordable housing “wing” given entrance on different street – next to the loading bay’; New York has now closed the loophole that allowed buildings with separate entrances to qualify for the ‘inclusionary housing’ tax break.

, Chicago Tribune, 11 Jan 2019, https://www.chicagotribune.com/opinion/commentary/ct-perspec-compassion-democrats-republicans-who-has-more-0113-story.html. 23 In one striking example of this dissonance, residents of the Mission Dolores neighbourhood actually paid out of their own pockets for huge sidewalk boulders to prevent homeless people from sleeping on their sidewalks (‘Boulders placed on San Francisco sidewalk to keep homeless residents away’, KTVU FOX 2, 30 September 2019, https://www.ktvu.com/news/boulders-placed-on-san-francisco-sidewalk-to-keep-homeless-residents-away). Others have campaigned against homeless shelters in their areas, sparking a legal battle that has dragged on for over eighteen months (Trisha Thadani, ‘SF residents vow to keep fighting Navigation Center as supes weigh its fate’, San Francisco Chronicle, 24 June 2019, https://www.sfchronicle.com/politics/article/Fate-of-controversial-Navigation-Center-now-in-14037517.php).

In Accra, Ghana, massive stones have been placed under bridges to prevent the homeless finding shelter; in Seattle, gleaming bike racks were installed to block a flat, sheltered area previously used by rough sleepers, a move the municipal government later admitted was not inspired out of care for cyclists but, instead, was ‘part of the homelessness emergency response effort’, made ‘to prevent the area from being re-camped’.6 In Hong Kong, where the homeless population has tripled since 2004, public spaces were deliberately designed with barely any seating in order to repel loiterers and the homeless alike.7 Perhaps most nefariously, in San Francisco in 2015 the Cathedral of St Mary’s took the very unchristian step of installing a sprinkler system that doused rough sleepers in its entryways (unsurprisingly, to massive public outcry).8 Hostile architecture is not limited to anti-homeless strategies. In Philadelphia and in twenty other US metropolitan areas, street lights outside recreation centres are fitted with small devices, aptly named Mosquitoes, which emit an unpleasant high-pitched sound that can be heard only by young people, as the frequencies are no longer audible to their elders (this is due to a process called presbycusis, in which certain ear cells die off over time).9 The goal of these Mosquito devices is, according to the president of the company that makes them, to ‘ward off’ unruly, ‘loitering’ teenagers while conveniently keeping areas pleasant for adults.10 It’s for similar reasons that pink lights designed to highlight uneven skin and acne have been installed in public places around the UK – an ‘anti-loitering strategy’ designed with the hope that vain teenagers will disperse once their pimples and blemishes are exposed.11 According to one Nottingham resident who was at first ‘dubious’ of the concept, ‘it’s done the trick’.12 Although one can argue that hostile architecture is not a new phenomenon – think of moats around castles and ancient cities’ defensive walls – its modern incarnation has its roots in the ‘broken windows’ policing of the 1980s US, when everyday activities such as standing, waiting and sleeping (especially when ‘committed’ by people of colour) began to be criminalised as ‘disorderly’ and ‘antisocial’.13 Preventing these behaviours, the logic went, would make a space more ‘orderly’ and, in convincing locals to ‘claim their public spaces’, would also prevent crime.14 Hence, hanging out became ‘loitering’, sleeping on the street became ‘improper lodging’, dawdling became ‘loafing’, people-watching became ‘lurking’.15 The fact that the broken-windows theory has been revealed to be highly flawed – responsible for the over-policing of minorities16 and an ineffective deterrent for more serious crimes – has not stopped many cities from continuing to rely on its strategies.17 The result is that over the past fifteen years, cities around the globe are increasingly sprouting spikes.


pages: 393 words: 91,257

The Coming of Neo-Feudalism: A Warning to the Global Middle Class by Joel Kotkin

Admiral Zheng, Andy Kessler, autonomous vehicles, basic income, Bernie Sanders, call centre, Capital in the Twenty-First Century by Thomas Piketty, carbon footprint, Cass Sunstein, clean water, creative destruction, deindustrialization, demographic transition, don't be evil, Donald Trump, edge city, Elon Musk, European colonialism, financial independence, Francis Fukuyama: the end of history, gig economy, Gini coefficient, Google bus, guest worker program, Hans Rosling, Herbert Marcuse, housing crisis, income inequality, informal economy, Jane Jacobs, Jaron Lanier, Jeff Bezos, job automation, job polarisation, job satisfaction, Joseph Schumpeter, land reform, liberal capitalism, life extension, low skilled workers, Lyft, Mark Zuckerberg, market fundamentalism, Martin Wolf, mass immigration, megacity, Nate Silver, new economy, New Urbanism, Occupy movement, Parag Khanna, Peter Thiel, Plutocrats, plutocrats, post-industrial society, post-work, postindustrial economy, postnationalism / post nation state, precariat, profit motive, RAND corporation, Ray Kurzweil, rent control, Richard Florida, road to serfdom, Robert Gordon, Sam Altman, San Francisco homelessness, Satyajit Das, sharing economy, Silicon Valley, smart cities, Steve Jobs, Stewart Brand, superstar cities, The Death and Life of Great American Cities, The future is already here, The Future of Employment, The Rise and Fall of American Growth, Thomas L Friedman, too big to fail, trade route, Travis Kalanick, Uber and Lyft, uber lyft, universal basic income, unpaid internship, upwardly mobile, We are the 99%, Wolfgang Streeck, women in the workforce, working-age population, Y Combinator

ex_cid=SigDig. 25 Francesco Andreoli and Eugenio Peluso, “So close yet so unequal: Reconsidering spatial inequality in U.S. cities,” Dipartimento di Economia e Finanza, February 2017, https://dipartimenti.unicatt.it/economia-finanza-def055.pdf. 26 Rakesh Kochhar, “The American middle class is stable in size, but losing ground financially to upper-income families,” Pew Research Center, September 6, 2018, https://www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2018/09/06/the-american-middle-class-is-stable-in-size-but-losing-ground-financially-to-upper-income-families/; Wendell Cox, “2018 COU Standard of Living Index,” Center for Opportunity Urbanism, December 2018, https://opportunityurbanism.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/12/2018-COU-Standard-of-Living-Index.pdf. 27 Nathaniel Baum-Snow and Ronni Pavan, “Inequality and City Size,” Review of Economics and Statistics, vol. 95:5 (December 2013), 1535–48; https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4063360/; Enrico Moretti, “America’s Great Divergence,” Salon, May 20, 2012, https://www.salon.com/2012/05/20/america_resegregated/; James Parrott, “As Income Gap Widens, New York Grows Apart,” Gotham Gazette, January 18, 2011, http://www.gothamgazette.com/index.php/economy/683-as-incomes-gap-widens-new-york-grows-apart. 28 Amy Liu, “The Urgency to Achieve an Inclusive Economy in the Bay Area,” Brookings, June 7, 2018, https://www.brookings.edu/research/the-urgency-to-achieve-an-inclusive-economy-in-the-bay-area/. 29 Thomas Fuller, “San Francisco’s Homeless Crisis Tests Mayoral Candidates’ Liberal Ideals,” New York Times, May 30, 2018, https://www.nytimes.com/2018/05/30/us/san-francisco-mayoral-election-homeless.html; Bigad Shaban, “Survey of Downtown San Francisco Reveals Trash on Every Block, 303 Piles of Feces and 100 Drug Needles,” NBC Bay Area, February 2, 2018, https://www.nbcbayarea.com/news/local/Diseased-Streets-472430013.html; Alexis C.

., “The Growth of Top Incomes Across California,” California Budget and Policy Center, February 2016, https://calbudgetcenter.org/wp-content/uploads/The-Growth-of-Top-Incomes-Across-California-02172016.pdf; Chris Roberts, “How California’s Homeless Crisis Grew Obscenely Out of Control,” Observer, May 30, 2019, https://observer.com/2019/05/california-homeless-crisis-san-francisco/. 26 Amy Graff, “San Francisco metro area has lost 31,000 home-owning families in 10 years,” SFGate, July 13, 2018, https://www.sfgate.com/mommyiles/article/San-Francisco-low-percentage-families-homeowners-13069287.php; Megan Cassidy and Sarah Ravani, “San Francisco ranks No. 1 in US in property crime,” San Francisco Chronicle, October 2, 2018, https://www.sfchronicle.com/crime/article/The-Scanner-San-Francisco-ranks-No-1-in-13267113.php?psid=bwGGn; Aria Bendix, “San Francisco’s homelessness crisis is so bad, people appear to be using poop to graffiti the sidewalks,” SFGate, November 20, 2018, https://www.sfgate.com/technology/businessinsider/article/Meet-the-guy-in-charge-of-tackling-San-8331836.php. 27 Chris Brenner and Manuel Pastor, Equity, Growth, and Community: What the Nation Can Learn from America’s Metro Areas (Oakland: University of California Press, 2015), 167. 28 Rachel Massaro, “Silicon Valley Index,” Joint Venture, 2016, https://jointventure.org/images/stories/pdf; Dylan Wittenberg, “These Bay Area FinTech Companies Are Revolutionizing the Lending Space,” Benzinga, July 25, 2017, https://www.benzinga.com/fintech/17/07/9816489/these-bay-area-fintech-companies-are-revolutionizing-the-lending-space/index2016.pdf. 29 Issie Lapowsky, “Silicon Valley’s Biggest Worry Should Be Inequality, Not a Bubble,” Wired, February 4, 2015, https://www.wired.com/2015/02/silicon-valley-inequality-study/. 30 Gabriel Metcalf, “Four Future Scenarios for the San Francisco Bay Area,” SPUR Regional Strategy, August 2018, https://www.spur.org/sites/default/files/publications_pdfs/SPUR_Future_Scenarios_for_the_SF_Bay_Area.pdf; Alex Thomas, “The Demographics of Poverty in Santa Clara County,” New Geography, January 10, 2017, https://www.newgeography.com/content/005501-the-demographics-poverty-santa-clara-county; Jeff Desjardins, “Which Companies Make the Most Revenue Per Employee?”

Wages and job opportunities soared in the affluent, predominantly white precincts but dropped in the minority-dominated areas.28 Hugely inflated housing prices have chased many working-class and even middle-class people away to locations hours distant. Increasing numbers of residents sleep on friends’ couches, in their cars, or to a shameful extent in homeless encampments. San Francisco also suffers the highest rate of property crime per capita of any city in the United States.29 These patterns extend to other parts of the Bay Area, particularly in Silicon Valley. More than half of the Bay Area’s lower-income communities are in danger of mass displacement, according to a UC Berkeley study.30 Gated Cities: A Global Perspective Similar patterns can be seen in big cities around the world.


pages: 361 words: 81,068

The Internet Is Not the Answer by Andrew Keen

"Robert Solow", 3D printing, A Declaration of the Independence of Cyberspace, Airbnb, AltaVista, Andrew Keen, augmented reality, Bay Area Rapid Transit, Berlin Wall, bitcoin, Black Swan, Bob Geldof, Burning Man, Cass Sunstein, citizen journalism, Clayton Christensen, clean water, cloud computing, collective bargaining, Colonization of Mars, computer age, connected car, creative destruction, cuban missile crisis, David Brooks, disintermediation, disruptive innovation, Donald Davies, Downton Abbey, Edward Snowden, Elon Musk, Erik Brynjolfsson, Fall of the Berlin Wall, Filter Bubble, Francis Fukuyama: the end of history, Frank Gehry, Frederick Winslow Taylor, frictionless, full employment, future of work, gig economy, global village, Google bus, Google Glasses, Hacker Ethic, happiness index / gross national happiness, income inequality, index card, informal economy, information trail, Innovator's Dilemma, Internet of things, Isaac Newton, Jaron Lanier, Jeff Bezos, job automation, Joi Ito, Joseph Schumpeter, Julian Assange, Kevin Kelly, Kickstarter, Kodak vs Instagram, Lean Startup, libertarian paternalism, lifelogging, Lyft, Marc Andreessen, Mark Zuckerberg, Marshall McLuhan, Martin Wolf, Metcalfe’s law, move fast and break things, move fast and break things, Nate Silver, Nelson Mandela, Network effects, new economy, Nicholas Carr, nonsequential writing, Norbert Wiener, Norman Mailer, Occupy movement, packet switching, PageRank, Panopticon Jeremy Bentham, Paul Graham, peer-to-peer, peer-to-peer rental, Peter Thiel, Plutocrats, plutocrats, Potemkin village, precariat, pre–internet, RAND corporation, Ray Kurzweil, ride hailing / ride sharing, Robert Metcalfe, San Francisco homelessness, Second Machine Age, self-driving car, sharing economy, Silicon Valley, Silicon Valley ideology, Skype, smart cities, Snapchat, social web, South of Market, San Francisco, Steve Jobs, Steve Wozniak, Steven Levy, Stewart Brand, TaskRabbit, Ted Nelson, telemarketer, The future is already here, The Future of Employment, the medium is the message, the new new thing, Thomas L Friedman, Travis Kalanick, Tyler Cowen: Great Stagnation, Uber for X, uber lyft, urban planning, Vannevar Bush, Whole Earth Catalog, WikiLeaks, winner-take-all economy, working poor, Y Combinator

Class Warfare These alien overlords certainly don’t have much sympathy for the city’s poor and homeless. “San Francisco has some of the craziest homeless people I have ever seen in my life. Stop giving them money, you know they just buy alcohol and drugs with it, right? Next time just hand them a handle of vodka and a pack of cigarettes,” one founder of an Internet startup wrote in a notorious post titled “10 Things I Hate About You: San Francisco Edition.”56 Another tech founder and CEO was even more blunt, calling San Francisco’s homeless “grotesque . . . degenerate . . . trash.”57 Equally disturbing are the technorati’s solutions to the poverty and hunger afflicting many Bay Area residents.

It encapsulates what the New York Times’ Timothy Egan describes as the “dystopia by the Bay”—a San Francisco that is “a one-dimensional town for the 1 percent” and “an allegory of how the rich have changed America for the worse.”10 The Birches’ one-dimensional club is a 58,000-square-foot allegory for the increasingly sharp economic inequities in San Francisco. But there’s an even bigger issue at stake here than the invisible wall in San Francisco separating the few “haves” from the many “have-nots,” including the city’s more than five thousand homeless people. The Battery may be San Francisco’s biggest experiment, but there’s a much bolder social and economic experiment going on in the world outside the club’s tinted windows. This experiment is the creation of a networked society. “The most significant revolution of the 21st century so far is not political. It is the information technology revolution,” explains the Cambridge University political scientist David Runciman.11 We are the brink of a foreign land—a data-saturated place that the British writer John Lanchester calls a “new kind of human society.”12 “The single most important trend in the world today is the fact that globalization and the information technology revolution have gone to a whole new level,” adds the New York Times columnist Thomas Friedman.

The George Mason University economist Tyler Cowen, in his 2013 book, Average Is Over, concurs, arguing that today’s big economic “divide” is between those whose skills “complement the computer” and those whose don’t. Cowan underlines the “stunning truth” that wages for men, over the last forty years, have fallen by 28%.78 He describes the divide in what he calls this new “hyper-meritocracy” as being between “billionaires” like the Battery member Sean Parker and the homeless “beggars” on the streets of San Francisco, and sees an economy in which “10 to 15 percent of the citizenry is extremely wealthy and has fantastically comfortable and stimulating lives.”79 Supporting many of Frank and Cook’s theses in their Winner-Take-All Society, Cowen suggests that the network lends itself to a superstar economy of “charismatic” teachers, lawyers, doctors, and other “prodigies” who will have feudal retinues of followers working for them.80 But, Cowen reassures us, there will be lots of jobs for “maids, chauffeurs and gardeners” who can “serve” wealthy entrepreneurs like his fellow chess enthusiast Peter Thiel.


pages: 460 words: 107,454

Stakeholder Capitalism: A Global Economy That Works for Progress, People and Planet by Klaus Schwab, Peter Vanham

3D printing, additive manufacturing, agricultural Revolution, Apple II, Asian financial crisis, Asperger Syndrome, basic income, Berlin Wall, bitcoin, blockchain, blue-collar work, Branko Milanovic, Bretton Woods, British Empire, business process, capital controls, Capital in the Twenty-First Century by Thomas Piketty, car-free, carbon footprint, centre right, clean water, cleantech, cloud computing, collateralized debt obligation, collective bargaining, colonial rule, coronavirus, corporate governance, corporate social responsibility, Covid-19, COVID-19, creative destruction, Credit Default Swap, credit default swaps / collateralized debt obligations, cryptocurrency, cuban missile crisis, currency peg, cyber-physical system, decarbonisation, demographic dividend, Deng Xiaoping, Diane Coyle, don't be evil, European colonialism, Fall of the Berlin Wall, family office, financial innovation, Francis Fukuyama: the end of history, future of work, gender pay gap, gig economy, Gini coefficient, global supply chain, global value chain, global village, Google bus, high net worth, hiring and firing, housing crisis, income inequality, income per capita, independent contractor, industrial robot, intangible asset, Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), Internet of things, invisible hand, James Watt: steam engine, Jeff Bezos, job automation, joint-stock company, Joseph Schumpeter, Kenneth Rogoff, Khan Academy, Kickstarter, labor-force participation, low skilled workers, Lyft, manufacturing employment, Mark Zuckerberg, market fundamentalism, Marshall McLuhan, Martin Wolf, means of production, megacity, Mikhail Gorbachev, mini-job, mittelstand, move fast and break things, move fast and break things, neoliberal agenda, Network effects, new economy, open economy, Peace of Westphalia, Peter Thiel, precariat, Productivity paradox, profit maximization, purchasing power parity, race to the bottom, reserve currency, reshoring, ride hailing / ride sharing, Ronald Reagan, San Francisco homelessness, self-driving car, shareholder value, Shenzhen special economic zone , Shenzhen was a fishing village, Silicon Valley, Simon Kuznets, Social Responsibility of Business Is to Increase Its Profits, special economic zone, Steve Jobs, Steve Wozniak, TaskRabbit, The Chicago School, The Future of Employment, The inhabitant of London could order by telephone, sipping his morning tea in bed, the various products of the whole earth, the scientific method, Tim Cook: Apple, trade route, transfer pricing, Uber and Lyft, uber lyft, union organizing, universal basic income, War on Poverty, We are the 99%, women in the workforce, working poor, working-age population, Yom Kippur War, young professional, zero-sum game

January 2016, https://www.inc.com/bill-murphy-jr/9-words-to-live-by-its-always-better-to-beg-forgiveness-than-ask-permission.html 19 “Competition Is for Losers,” Peter Thiel, Wall Street Journal, September 2014, https://www.wsj.com/articles/peter-thiel-competition-is-for-losers-1410535536. 20 “Antitrust Procedures in Abuse of Dominance,” European Commission, August 2013, https://ec.europa.eu/competition/antitrust/procedures_102_en.html. 21 “If You Want to Know What a US Tech Crackdown May Look Like, Check Out What Europe Did,” Elizabeth Schulze, CNBC, June 2019, https://www.cnbc.com/2019/06/07/how-google-facebook-amazon-and-apple-faced-eu-tech-antitrust-rules.html. 22 “Why San Francisco's Homeless Population Keeps Increasing,” Associated Press, May 2019, https://www.marketwatch.com/story/the-homeless-population-in-san-francisco-is-skyrocketing-2019-05-17. 23 “A Decade of Homelessness: Thousands in S.F. Remain in Crisis,” Heather Knight, San Francisco Chronicle, 2014, https://www.sfchronicle.com/archive/item/A-decade-of-homelessness-Thousands-in-S-F-30431.php. 24 Trailblazer, Marc Benioff, October 2019, pp. 12–13. 25 “Marc Benioff Says Companies Buy Each Other for the Data, and the Government Isn't Doing Anything about It,” April Glaser, Recode., November 2016, https://www.vox.com/2016/11/15/13631938/benioff-salesforce-data-government-federal-trade-commission-ftc-linkedin-microsoft. 26 Trailblazer, Marc Benioff, October 2019, pp. 12–13. 27 “You Deserve Privacy Online.

Some observers, such as writer Douglas Rushkoff, who wrote Throwing Rocks at the Google Bus: How Growth Became the Enemy of Prosperity, realized it was just one of many signs that Big Tech's effect was to widen the divides between haves and have-nots and that if left unchecked, the situation would worsen. Others simply saw right past the issue. Even as homelessness in one of wealthiest cities in America was getting out of hand, there was no realization by most entrepreneurs that they could or should do anything about it. By 2019, San Francisco county had over 8,000 homeless people, up 17 percent from two years earlier,22 and a far cry from the city's 2004 ambition to end homelessness in a decade.23 This was the kind of civic slight that businesspeople like Benioff's father might have tackled head on. But when calls were made for the city's tech community to chip in, most responded with silence.

See also specific country Subsidiarity principle, 181–183 Suez Canal, 103, 200 Sustainable Development Goals (UN), 189, 206, 207, 250 Swabia (Germany), 4, 8, 19, 251 Sweden COVID-19 pandemic response by, 220 stakeholder concept adopted in, 174 vote for right-wing populist parties (2000, 2017–2019), 84fig Swiss Federation, 181 Switzerland continued trust in public institutions in, 196 history of direct democracy in, 195 precious stones/metals imported to China through, 64 T Tabula rasa, 237 Taiwan, 59, 98 See also Asian Tigers Tanzania, 70 TaskRabbit (US), 237 Tata Consulting Services (TCS) [India], 68 Tata Steel (India), 141 Taxation French Yellow Vests (Gilets Jaunes) protests over, 86–87 high Danish rate of, 119 OECD's efforts to create fair global tax rules for Internet, 212 San Francisco's Proposition C proposing tax to help the homeless, 212–213 Stakeholder Capitalism Metrics prosperity pillar on, 214, 249 Teacher Corps, 135 Tech Mahindra [India], 68 Technological disruption changing business landscape, 126–129 Dansk Metal's industrial robots, 115, 117 labor market and challenge of automation, 115–126 Singapore job displacement due to, 125–126 steam engine as, 102, 116, 130–131 See also Digital economy Technological revolutions First Industrial Revolution (19th century), 56, 71, 108, 116, 119, 130–134, 135, 161 First Technological Revolution, 45fig–46 Second Industrial Revolution (1945–early 1970s), 8, 18, 45fig, 105–106, 116, 119, 134–136, 204 Third Industrial Revolution, 15, 45, 116, 137–142 Fourth Industrial Revolution, 18, 45, 68, 71, 116, 122, 125, 142–145, 161–162, 177, 186, 201, 208, 212, 213, 237, 239 Technologies artificial intelligence (AI), 143–144, 145, 161 automation, 115–126 China's “maker movement” of tech start-ups, 55 climate change and technological process, 161–162 connective, 177, 225, 227–228 cryptocurrencies, 161 Dansk Metal's industrial robots working with employees, 115 general-purpose technologies (GPTs), 143 Internet and digital connectivity, 225, 227–228, 232 Internet of Things, 18, 72, 161 Kuznets Wave on income inequality fluctuation and, 45fig–46 shaping positive vs. negative applications of, 144–145 Shenzhen (China) known for homegrown tech companies, 55, 57–61 tech unicorns of ASEAN nations, 66, 67fig workers who oppose automation, 115–116 The Technology Trap (Frey), 116, 135 Tech unicorns (ASEAN nations), 66, 67fig Tencent (US), 55, 60, 143 Tesla (US), 201 Tett, Gillian, 216 Thailand economic recession (1997) in, 97–98 predicted economic growth (2020–2021) in, 65–66 rubber exports to China, 64 Thaker, Jagadish, 223 Thatcher, Margaret, 122 Theodul Glacier, 51 Thiel, Peter, 208–209 Third Industrial Revolution, 15, 45, 116, 137–142 Thompson, Nicholas, 128 3D printing, 107, 108, 116 Thunberg, Greta, 52–53, 86, 147–150, 168, 250 ThyssenKrupp, 141 Tik Tok, 61 TIME Magazine, 172 Tindall, Stephen, 221 Tokopedia (Indonesia), 97 Total (France), 95 “Trade in the Digital Era” report (2019) [OECD], 107 Traveloka (Indonesia), 97 Treaty of Versailles (1919), 5–6 Trente Glorieuses, 110 Throwing Rocks at the Google Bus: How Growth Became the Enemy of Prosperity (Rushkoff), 210 Trust loss of trust in public institutions, 196 rebuilding of public trust in business sector, 210–212 Tsinghua University's School of Economics and Management, 225–226 Tuberculosis sanatorium treatments, 11 Twain, Mark, 133 21st century stakeholder capitalism.


pages: 460 words: 107,454

Stakeholder Capitalism: A Global Economy That Works for Progress, People and Planet by Klaus Schwab

3D printing, additive manufacturing, agricultural Revolution, Apple II, Asian financial crisis, Asperger Syndrome, basic income, Berlin Wall, bitcoin, blockchain, blue-collar work, Branko Milanovic, Bretton Woods, British Empire, business process, capital controls, Capital in the Twenty-First Century by Thomas Piketty, car-free, carbon footprint, centre right, clean water, cleantech, cloud computing, collateralized debt obligation, collective bargaining, colonial rule, coronavirus, corporate governance, corporate social responsibility, Covid-19, COVID-19, creative destruction, Credit Default Swap, credit default swaps / collateralized debt obligations, cryptocurrency, cuban missile crisis, currency peg, cyber-physical system, decarbonisation, demographic dividend, Deng Xiaoping, Diane Coyle, don't be evil, European colonialism, Fall of the Berlin Wall, family office, financial innovation, Francis Fukuyama: the end of history, future of work, gender pay gap, gig economy, Gini coefficient, global supply chain, global value chain, global village, Google bus, high net worth, hiring and firing, housing crisis, income inequality, income per capita, independent contractor, industrial robot, intangible asset, Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), Internet of things, invisible hand, James Watt: steam engine, Jeff Bezos, job automation, joint-stock company, Joseph Schumpeter, Kenneth Rogoff, Khan Academy, Kickstarter, labor-force participation, low skilled workers, Lyft, manufacturing employment, Mark Zuckerberg, market fundamentalism, Marshall McLuhan, Martin Wolf, means of production, megacity, Mikhail Gorbachev, mini-job, mittelstand, move fast and break things, move fast and break things, neoliberal agenda, Network effects, new economy, open economy, Peace of Westphalia, Peter Thiel, precariat, Productivity paradox, profit maximization, purchasing power parity, race to the bottom, reserve currency, reshoring, ride hailing / ride sharing, Ronald Reagan, San Francisco homelessness, self-driving car, shareholder value, Shenzhen special economic zone , Shenzhen was a fishing village, Silicon Valley, Simon Kuznets, Social Responsibility of Business Is to Increase Its Profits, special economic zone, Steve Jobs, Steve Wozniak, TaskRabbit, The Chicago School, The Future of Employment, The inhabitant of London could order by telephone, sipping his morning tea in bed, the various products of the whole earth, the scientific method, Tim Cook: Apple, trade route, transfer pricing, Uber and Lyft, uber lyft, union organizing, universal basic income, War on Poverty, We are the 99%, women in the workforce, working poor, working-age population, Yom Kippur War, young professional, zero-sum game

January 2016, https://www.inc.com/bill-murphy-jr/9-words-to-live-by-its-always-better-to-beg-forgiveness-than-ask-permission.html 19 “Competition Is for Losers,” Peter Thiel, Wall Street Journal, September 2014, https://www.wsj.com/articles/peter-thiel-competition-is-for-losers-1410535536. 20 “Antitrust Procedures in Abuse of Dominance,” European Commission, August 2013, https://ec.europa.eu/competition/antitrust/procedures_102_en.html. 21 “If You Want to Know What a US Tech Crackdown May Look Like, Check Out What Europe Did,” Elizabeth Schulze, CNBC, June 2019, https://www.cnbc.com/2019/06/07/how-google-facebook-amazon-and-apple-faced-eu-tech-antitrust-rules.html. 22 “Why San Francisco's Homeless Population Keeps Increasing,” Associated Press, May 2019, https://www.marketwatch.com/story/the-homeless-population-in-san-francisco-is-skyrocketing-2019-05-17. 23 “A Decade of Homelessness: Thousands in S.F. Remain in Crisis,” Heather Knight, San Francisco Chronicle, 2014, https://www.sfchronicle.com/archive/item/A-decade-of-homelessness-Thousands-in-S-F-30431.php. 24 Trailblazer, Marc Benioff, October 2019, pp. 12–13. 25 “Marc Benioff Says Companies Buy Each Other for the Data, and the Government Isn't Doing Anything about It,” April Glaser, Recode., November 2016, https://www.vox.com/2016/11/15/13631938/benioff-salesforce-data-government-federal-trade-commission-ftc-linkedin-microsoft. 26 Trailblazer, Marc Benioff, October 2019, pp. 12–13. 27 “You Deserve Privacy Online.

Some observers, such as writer Douglas Rushkoff, who wrote Throwing Rocks at the Google Bus: How Growth Became the Enemy of Prosperity, realized it was just one of many signs that Big Tech's effect was to widen the divides between haves and have-nots and that if left unchecked, the situation would worsen. Others simply saw right past the issue. Even as homelessness in one of wealthiest cities in America was getting out of hand, there was no realization by most entrepreneurs that they could or should do anything about it. By 2019, San Francisco county had over 8,000 homeless people, up 17 percent from two years earlier,22 and a far cry from the city's 2004 ambition to end homelessness in a decade.23 This was the kind of civic slight that businesspeople like Benioff's father might have tackled head on. But when calls were made for the city's tech community to chip in, most responded with silence.

See also specific country Subsidiarity principle, 181–183 Suez Canal, 103, 200 Sustainable Development Goals (UN), 189, 206, 207, 250 Swabia (Germany), 4, 8, 19, 251 Sweden COVID-19 pandemic response by, 220 stakeholder concept adopted in, 174 vote for right-wing populist parties (2000, 2017–2019), 84fig Swiss Federation, 181 Switzerland continued trust in public institutions in, 196 history of direct democracy in, 195 precious stones/metals imported to China through, 64 T Tabula rasa, 237 Taiwan, 59, 98 See also Asian Tigers Tanzania, 70 TaskRabbit (US), 237 Tata Consulting Services (TCS) [India], 68 Tata Steel (India), 141 Taxation French Yellow Vests (Gilets Jaunes) protests over, 86–87 high Danish rate of, 119 OECD's efforts to create fair global tax rules for Internet, 212 San Francisco's Proposition C proposing tax to help the homeless, 212–213 Stakeholder Capitalism Metrics prosperity pillar on, 214, 249 Teacher Corps, 135 Tech Mahindra [India], 68 Technological disruption changing business landscape, 126–129 Dansk Metal's industrial robots, 115, 117 labor market and challenge of automation, 115–126 Singapore job displacement due to, 125–126 steam engine as, 102, 116, 130–131 See also Digital economy Technological revolutions First Industrial Revolution (19th century), 56, 71, 108, 116, 119, 130–134, 135, 161 First Technological Revolution, 45fig–46 Second Industrial Revolution (1945–early 1970s), 8, 18, 45fig, 105–106, 116, 119, 134–136, 204 Third Industrial Revolution, 15, 45, 116, 137–142 Fourth Industrial Revolution, 18, 45, 68, 71, 116, 122, 125, 142–145, 161–162, 177, 186, 201, 208, 212, 213, 237, 239 Technologies artificial intelligence (AI), 143–144, 145, 161 automation, 115–126 China's “maker movement” of tech start-ups, 55 climate change and technological process, 161–162 connective, 177, 225, 227–228 cryptocurrencies, 161 Dansk Metal's industrial robots working with employees, 115 general-purpose technologies (GPTs), 143 Internet and digital connectivity, 225, 227–228, 232 Internet of Things, 18, 72, 161 Kuznets Wave on income inequality fluctuation and, 45fig–46 shaping positive vs. negative applications of, 144–145 Shenzhen (China) known for homegrown tech companies, 55, 57–61 tech unicorns of ASEAN nations, 66, 67fig workers who oppose automation, 115–116 The Technology Trap (Frey), 116, 135 Tech unicorns (ASEAN nations), 66, 67fig Tencent (US), 55, 60, 143 Tesla (US), 201 Tett, Gillian, 216 Thailand economic recession (1997) in, 97–98 predicted economic growth (2020–2021) in, 65–66 rubber exports to China, 64 Thaker, Jagadish, 223 Thatcher, Margaret, 122 Theodul Glacier, 51 Thiel, Peter, 208–209 Third Industrial Revolution, 15, 45, 116, 137–142 Thompson, Nicholas, 128 3D printing, 107, 108, 116 Thunberg, Greta, 52–53, 86, 147–150, 168, 250 ThyssenKrupp, 141 Tik Tok, 61 TIME Magazine, 172 Tindall, Stephen, 221 Tokopedia (Indonesia), 97 Total (France), 95 “Trade in the Digital Era” report (2019) [OECD], 107 Traveloka (Indonesia), 97 Treaty of Versailles (1919), 5–6 Trente Glorieuses, 110 Throwing Rocks at the Google Bus: How Growth Became the Enemy of Prosperity (Rushkoff), 210 Trust loss of trust in public institutions, 196 rebuilding of public trust in business sector, 210–212 Tsinghua University's School of Economics and Management, 225–226 Tuberculosis sanatorium treatments, 11 Twain, Mark, 133 21st century stakeholder capitalism.


pages: 318 words: 82,452

The End of Policing by Alex S. Vitale

Affordable Care Act / Obamacare, anti-communist, Broken windows theory, citizen journalism, Columbine, deindustrialization, desegregation, Donald Trump, Edward Snowden, equal pay for equal work, Ferguson, Missouri, ghettoisation, hiring and firing, illegal immigration, immigration reform, income inequality, independent contractor, mandatory minimum, mass immigration, mass incarceration, moral panic, Occupy movement, open borders, rent-seeking, Ronald Reagan, San Francisco homelessness, strikebreaker, The Bell Curve by Richard Herrnstein and Charles Murray, white flight

Ellickson, “Controlling Chronic Misconduct in City Spaces: Of Panhandlers, Skid Rows, and Public Space Zoning,” Yale Law Journal 105, no. 5 (1996): 1165–1248; Maria Foscarinis, “Downward Spiral: Homelessness and Its Criminalization,” Yale Law and Policy Review 14, no. 1 (1996): 1–63. 16Kirk Johnson, “Property of a Homeless Man is Private, Hartford Court Says: Justices break new ground on the rights of the homeless,” New York Times, March 19, 1991; Bob Egelko, “Homeless have right to reclaim property,” San Francisco Chronicle, August 9, 2014; Gale Holland, “Seize a homeless person’s property? Not so fast, a federal judge tells L.A.,” Los Angeles Times, April 13, 2016. 17US Department of Justice, “Justice Department Files Brief to Address the Criminalization of Homelessness,” August 6, 2015. 18United States Interagency Council on Homelessness, Searching Out Solutions: Constructive Alternatives to the Criminalization of Homelessness (Washington, D.C.: United States Interagency Council on Homelessness, 2012). 19Bob Egelko, “U.N. panel denounces laws targeting homeless,” San Francisco Chronicle, May 2, 2014. 20Judicial Branch of Arizona Maricopa County, “Homeless Court,” n.d. 21National Low Income Housing Coalition, “Rental Inflation Drives Homelessness and Housing Instability for the Poor,” May 1, 2015. 22Virginia Housing Alliance, “Governor McAuliffe Announces 10.5 percent Decrease in Overall Homelessness in Virginia,” July 21, 2016. 23Maria La Ganga, “Utah says it won ‘war on homelessness,’ but shelters tell a different story,” Guardian, April 27, 2016. 24Kitsap Sun, “Opinion: Further questions about housing first,” July 14, 2016. 25Hasson Rashid, “Restoring Bread and Jams for the Homeless,” Alliance of Cambridge Tenants, June 21, 2014. 26San Francisco Homeless Resource, “Mission Neighborhood Research Center,” n.d http://sfhomeless.wikia.com/ 27Alex Vitale, “Why are New York cops shaming homeless people?”

.,” Los Angeles Times, April 13, 2016. 17US Department of Justice, “Justice Department Files Brief to Address the Criminalization of Homelessness,” August 6, 2015. 18United States Interagency Council on Homelessness, Searching Out Solutions: Constructive Alternatives to the Criminalization of Homelessness (Washington, D.C.: United States Interagency Council on Homelessness, 2012). 19Bob Egelko, “U.N. panel denounces laws targeting homeless,” San Francisco Chronicle, May 2, 2014. 20Judicial Branch of Arizona Maricopa County, “Homeless Court,” n.d. 21National Low Income Housing Coalition, “Rental Inflation Drives Homelessness and Housing Instability for the Poor,” May 1, 2015. 22Virginia Housing Alliance, “Governor McAuliffe Announces 10.5 percent Decrease in Overall Homelessness in Virginia,” July 21, 2016. 23Maria La Ganga, “Utah says it won ‘war on homelessness,’ but shelters tell a different story,” Guardian, April 27, 2016. 24Kitsap Sun, “Opinion: Further questions about housing first,” July 14, 2016. 25Hasson Rashid, “Restoring Bread and Jams for the Homeless,” Alliance of Cambridge Tenants, June 21, 2014. 26San Francisco Homeless Resource, “Mission Neighborhood Research Center,” n.d http://sfhomeless.wikia.com/ 27Alex Vitale, “Why are New York cops shaming homeless people?”

This creates a sense of social entitlement and financial insecurity that can drive even liberals to call on local governments to “get tough” on homeless people in their midst. My own research has documented the role of social activists with long histories of liberal activism calling for the removal of homeless encampments by police in New York and San Francisco.7 In addition, businesses feel tremendous pressure to displace panhandlers and those sleeping rough or acting strangely nearby. Managing this problem has been one of the drivers of the creation of “business improvement districts” that collect money from local businesses to enhance sanitation and security services and, in some cases, even create homeless services centers.


pages: 426 words: 136,925

Fulfillment: Winning and Losing in One-Click America by Alec MacGillis

Airbnb, Amazon Web Services, Bernie Sanders, call centre, carried interest, cloud computing, cognitive dissonance, coronavirus, Covid-19, COVID-19, death of newspapers, deindustrialization, Donald Trump, edge city, future of work, global pandemic, high net worth, housing crisis, Ida Tarbell, income inequality, information asymmetry, Jeff Bezos, Jeffrey Epstein, jitney, Lyft, mass incarceration, McMansion, new economy, offshore financial centre, Plutocrats, plutocrats, Ralph Nader, rent control, Richard Florida, ride hailing / ride sharing, Robert Mercer, Ronald Reagan, San Francisco homelessness, shareholder value, Silicon Valley, strikebreaker, Travis Kalanick, uber lyft, uranium enrichment, War on Poverty, white flight, winner-take-all economy, women in the workforce, working-age population, Works Progress Administration

Inequality between regions was also worsening inequality within regions. The more prosperity concentrated in certain cities, the more it concentrated within certain segments of those cities, exacerbating long-standing imbalances or driving those of lesser means out altogether. Dystopian elements in cities such as San Francisco—the homeless defecating on sidewalks in a place with $24 lunch salads and one-bedroom apartments renting for $3,600 on average; high-paid tech workers boarding shuttles to suburban corporate campuses while lower-paid workers settled for 200-square-foot “micro-apartments” or dorm-style arrangements with shared bathrooms or predawn commutes from distant cities such as Stockton—were a feature of both local and national inequality.

From the opening montage, the video moved through a string of interviews with those “people who no longer feel protected”: small-business owners losing goods to shoplifting or losing customers to the stink of urine, a neighbor appalled at homeless desecrating a cemetery, a veteran cop who quit in despair over being powerless to address the problem. “I couldn’t do it anymore,” he said. There were numbers, too: numbers showing that Seattle was now second in property crimes only to even more dystopian San Francisco, where 5,000 homeless lived on the streets (and where, in June 2019, a man would make himself into a viral sensation by dumping a bucket of water onto a homeless woman), and numbers showing how few crimes were actually prosecuted (one homeless meth user who had been arrested thirty-four times since 2014 was highlighted and shown refusing to climb out of a trash can), and numbers showing how much the area was spending on homelessness: $1 billion per year.

“That did not feel like Seattle”: Vianna Davila, “Fury, Frustration Erupt over Seattle’s Proposed Head Tax for Homelessness Services,” The Seattle Times, May 4, 2018. “people are losing their minds”: Author interview with Nick Hanauer, June 14, 2018. Michael Schutzler … sat in his office: Author interview with Michael Schutzler, June 13, 2018. San Francisco, where 5,000 homeless lived on the streets: “How to Cut Homelessness in the World’s Priciest Cities,” The Economist, December 18, 2019. Katie Wilson … composed a ten-page essay: An edited version of this essay appeared in The Cost of Free Shipping: Amazon in the Global Economy, edited by Jake Alimahomed-Wilson and Ellen Reese (London: Pluto Press, 2020).


pages: 252 words: 78,780

Lab Rats: How Silicon Valley Made Work Miserable for the Rest of Us by Dan Lyons

Airbnb, Amazon Web Services, Apple II, augmented reality, autonomous vehicles, basic income, bitcoin, blockchain, business process, call centre, Clayton Christensen, clean water, collective bargaining, corporate governance, corporate social responsibility, creative destruction, cryptocurrency, David Heinemeier Hansson, Donald Trump, Elon Musk, Ethereum, ethereum blockchain, full employment, future of work, gig economy, Gordon Gekko, greed is good, hiring and firing, housing crisis, impact investing, income inequality, informal economy, Jeff Bezos, job automation, job satisfaction, job-hopping, John Gruber, Joseph Schumpeter, Kevin Kelly, knowledge worker, Lean Startup, loose coupling, Lyft, Marc Andreessen, Mark Zuckerberg, McMansion, Menlo Park, Milgram experiment, minimum viable product, Mitch Kapor, move fast and break things, move fast and break things, new economy, Panopticon Jeremy Bentham, Paul Graham, paypal mafia, Peter Thiel, Plutocrats, plutocrats, precariat, prosperity theology / prosperity gospel / gospel of success, RAND corporation, remote working, RFID, ride hailing / ride sharing, Ronald Reagan, Rubik’s Cube, Ruby on Rails, Sam Altman, San Francisco homelessness, Sand Hill Road, self-driving car, shareholder value, Silicon Valley, Silicon Valley startup, six sigma, Skype, Social Responsibility of Business Is to Increase Its Profits, software is eating the world, Stanford prison experiment, stem cell, Steve Jobs, Steve Wozniak, Stewart Brand, super pumped, TaskRabbit, telemarketer, Tesla Model S, Thomas Davenport, Tony Hsieh, Toyota Production System, traveling salesman, Travis Kalanick, tulip mania, Uber and Lyft, Uber for X, uber lyft, universal basic income, web application, WeWork, Whole Earth Catalog, Y Combinator, young professional

New York Times, August 15, 2015. https://www.nytimes.com/2015/08/16/technology/inside-amazon-wrestling-big-ideas-in-a-bruising-workplace.html. Lemann, Nicholas. “The Network Man: Reid Hoffman’s Big Idea.” New Yorker, October 12, 2015. https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2015/10/12/the-network-man. Miller, Michael E. “‘Tech Bro’ Calls San Francisco ‘Shanty Town,’ Decries Homeless ‘Riffraff’ in Open Letter.” Chicago Tribune, February 18, 2016. http://www.chicagotribune.com/bluesky/technology/ct-tech-bro-letter-san-francisco-homeless-20160218-story.html. Mims, Christopher. “In Self-Driving-Car Road Test, We Are the Guinea Pigs.” Wall Street Journal, May 13, 2018. https://www.wsj.com/articles/in-self-driving-car-road-test-we-are-the-guinea-pigs-1526212802.

To visit them, you drive way up in the hills above Stanford University, where the parking lots are filled with Teslas, birds chirp in the eucalyptus trees, and skinny spandex-clad techies zip around on exotic carbon-fiber racing bikes that cost more than what some people pay for a car. By contrast, to visit Kapor Capital, you drive across the Bay Bridge from San Francisco, drop down off the highway, and drive through a vast homeless camp under a freeway overpass on Martin Luther King Jr. Way, past buildings decorated with graffiti art and pawn shops, bail bond services, and payday lenders. Oakland sits across the bay from San Francisco, but they’re remarkably different places. Oakland is a gritty, working-class city.

He is a legend in the world of venture capital and worth a reported $4 billion. He helped launch some of the biggest tech companies in the world, including Google, Yahoo, and PayPal. He is also one of the VCs who kicked in $50,000 each to support the 2016 ballot measure that would sweep homeless people off the streets in San Francisco. Yet he is revered by his peers. Many of them feel the same way he does about hiring women and people of color; they’re just polite enough not to say it out loud, in public. I’ve heard various theories for how things got so bad in Silicon Valley. One is that venture capitalists and tech companies are lazy about recruiting.


pages: 307 words: 17,123

Behind the cloud: the untold story of how Salesforce.com went from idea to billion-dollar company--and revolutionized an industry by Marc Benioff, Carlye Adler

Albert Einstein, Apple's 1984 Super Bowl advert, barriers to entry, Bay Area Rapid Transit, business continuity plan, call centre, carbon footprint, Clayton Christensen, cloud computing, corporate social responsibility, crowdsourcing, iterative process, Maui Hawaii, Nicholas Carr, platform as a service, San Francisco homelessness, Silicon Valley, software as a service, Steve Ballmer, Steve Jobs

Our 1-1-1 model disseminates a portion of the financial and intellectual wealth of the organization to those most in need: • 1 percent equity: using 1 percent of founding stock to offer grants and monetary assistance to those in need, especially to support youth and technology programs • 1 percent time: finding meaningful activities for salesforce.com employees during their six paid days off a year devoted to volunteerism, and promoting a culture of caring • 1 percent product: facilitating the donation of salesforce.com subscriptions to nonprofits, helping them increase their operating effectiveness and focus more resources on their core mission The 1-1-1 Model in Action A terrific example of how our 1-1-1 model works is a San Francisco initiative called Project Homeless Connect, which brings a wide variety of social service providers—housing experts, doctors, job something meaningful, which made them feel more invested in the company and inspired them to do their best. I thought that secondary gain further justified the hours our employees would be spending outside our office.

Dannie, who contributed a harrowing—but ultimately uplifting and hopeful—music video about self-harm, spoke passionately about why she and her friends made the film, their personal struggles, and how they’ve since committed to campaign on the issue of self-harm in schools. Theo, a San 151 BEHIND THE CLOUD Francisco student who has worked with the foundation practically since its inception, contributed a powerful film about homelessness in San Francisco. The city’s mayor, Gavin Newsom, who attended the event, took the opportunity to speak about the ways his administration was trying to address the problems Theo raised in his film. Ahmed and Dima, who hailed from countries with a long and bitter rivalry, and couldn’t communicate with one another in their native languages, discussed the unique opportunity to get to know one another.

When I saw the important people watch the film, I realized I have made something bigger. I am happy to see this. I didn’t ever believe it would be like this. It was never in my dreams.’’ I was amazed by what we could achieve by giving young people opportunity and encouragement. Theo’s film on homelessness in San Francisco helped build much needed awareness. Dannie’s film about self-harm encouraged the United Kingdom’s Parliament to increase the amount of money distributed to schools to fund a part-time counselor to help young people deal with emotional issues. The impact was real. Our mission to give people the tools and the platform to make a positive difference grew from there. 152 The Corporate Philanthropy Playbook Play #70: Create a Self-Sustaining Model In summer 2004, we witnessed the true financial power of our integrated model.


pages: 468 words: 123,823

A People's History of Poverty in America by Stephen Pimpare

"Robert Solow", affirmative action, British Empire, car-free, clean water, cognitive dissonance, Columbine, Daniel Kahneman / Amos Tversky, deindustrialization, delayed gratification, dumpster diving, East Village, Frederick Winslow Taylor, George Gilder, hedonic treadmill, hiring and firing, Howard Zinn, illegal immigration, impulse control, income inequality, index card, Jane Jacobs, low skilled workers, Mahatma Gandhi, mass incarceration, meta-analysis, moral panic, Naomi Klein, New Urbanism, payday loans, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Ronald Reagan, San Francisco homelessness, The Bell Curve by Richard Herrnstein and Charles Murray, The Death and Life of Great American Cities, The Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith, Thomas Malthus, union organizing, urban renewal, War on Poverty, white flight, working poor, Works Progress Administration

Louis) public housing and urban renewal efforts Public Works Administration (PWA) housing units Quigley, William “race mixing” in nineteenth-century slums racism of poor people and pregnant women on welfare Rafferty, Eliza railroads and transient lifestyles Rank, Mark Robert Raper, Arthur Raphael, Jody Reagan, Ronald Rector, Robert Red Cross redlining policies Reich, Charles Reitman, Ben relative poverty Relf, Mary Alice and Minnie The Reluctant Welfare State ( Jansson) reproductive behavior and welfare relief policies resistance and rebellion by the poor active resistance African Americans begging and clothing colonial-era and Communists and culture of poverty and deference required by welfare recipients Depression-era embracing indignation food riots indignation meetings by inmates of poorhouses/asylums marches of the unemployed national welfare rights movement nineteenth-century demands for national welfare program nineteenth-century tramps passive/everyday forms of resistance and radicals and slaves Townsend’s movement for national old-age pension urban groups formed to investigate relief workers voting and political participation women’s activism “working the system,” restaurant Dumpsters Reuther, Walter “riding the rails,” Riis, Jacob on the deserving poor and destruction of slum housing documenting “how the other half lives,” middle-class observations of slum life on moral pathologies of the urban poor on poverty rates in New York (1889) slide shows and the fascination with slums The Rise of David Levinsky (Cahan) Rivera, Ingrid Robinson, Patricia Roland, Mrs. L.P. Roosevelt, Eleanor Roosevelt, Franklin Rowley, Mrs. Hal Rowntree, Joseph Rudolph, Sue rural poverty Salazar, Roberto Salvation Army San Francisco homeless life on the streets poor female almshouse inhabitants Sante, Luc Sarat, Austin Save the Children (2005 study on poverty statistics) Schein, Virginia Schneiderman, Rose school meals programs Schwartz, Joel Scots Charitable Society Scott, James C. Seccombe, Karen Second Harvest Sen, Amartya poverty as lack of freedom on relative poverty and living standards on slavery in pre–Civil War South–70, 178 Senate Finance Committee Serviceman’s Readjustment Act of 1944 (GI Bill) sexual behavior and welfare relief policies sexual violence shame/stigma of receiving relief and actual benefits received by those eligible assumptions that the poor are stupid and attitudes toward poverty and welfare and beneficial effects of government relief charity and power/class colonial-era comparing attitudes of welfare recipients/ nonrecipients and deference/subservience Depression-era and the elderly feeling of surveillance feelings of inferiority/shame and food stamps and homelessness hunger and food relief and ignorance about lives of the poor and mass media morals and deserving/undeserving poor myth of the lazy poor pride and denials of relief–54, 158–59, 160–61 relief workers’ efforts to protect from and social critics of government aid and stereotypes the welfare myths and “white collar people,” and women on welfare sharecroppers and share-renters Sheridan, Jim Sherman, William T.

And I told her: here is the baby bottle. We had even warmed up the milk. But she looked at her husband, and her husband said he didn’t want it. What could I do about it, but just feel blue? I didn’t look upon it as charity. It seemed to me that here was a fella’s pride getting the best of him.54 Tony, homeless, living in San Francisco in the 1980s, also shunned aid and preferred to redeem recyclable cans and bottles—what he identifies as his work:The reason I do just about anything for work is I don’t believe in the food lines. I know where all of ’em are at, and I can go down there, but I don’t depend on ’em. I believe in at least being able to cover my own so I can keep myself fed, keep myself clothed and washed up. . . .


pages: 300 words: 76,638

The War on Normal People: The Truth About America's Disappearing Jobs and Why Universal Basic Income Is Our Future by Andrew Yang

3D printing, Airbnb, assortative mating, augmented reality, autonomous vehicles, basic income, Bear Stearns, Ben Horowitz, Bernie Sanders, call centre, corporate governance, cryptocurrency, David Brooks, Donald Trump, Elon Musk, falling living standards, financial deregulation, full employment, future of work, global reserve currency, income inequality, Internet of things, invisible hand, Jeff Bezos, job automation, John Maynard Keynes: technological unemployment, Khan Academy, labor-force participation, longitudinal study, low skilled workers, Lyft, manufacturing employment, Mark Zuckerberg, megacity, Narrative Science, new economy, passive income, performance metric, post-work, quantitative easing, reserve currency, Richard Florida, ride hailing / ride sharing, risk tolerance, Ronald Reagan, Sam Altman, San Francisco homelessness, self-driving car, shareholder value, Silicon Valley, Simon Kuznets, single-payer health, Stephen Hawking, Steve Ballmer, supercomputer in your pocket, technoutopianism, telemarketer, The future is already here, The Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith, Tyler Cowen: Great Stagnation, Uber and Lyft, uber lyft, unemployed young men, universal basic income, urban renewal, white flight, winner-take-all economy, Y Combinator

He estimated that 30 percent of the bank’s home office workers—more than 30,000 employees—were engaged in clerical tasks transferring information from one system to another, and he believed that their roles would be automated within the next five years. I had a similar conversation with a friend at another bank who told me that many of the people in the San Francisco homeless shelter he volunteers at used to work in clerical roles that are no longer necessary, and that his bank was similarly downsizing back office and clerical workers in large numbers. Some argue that it will be possible to automate only a portion of each person’s job. But if you have a department of 100 clerical workers and you find that 50 percent of their work can be automated, you fire half of them and tell the remaining workers to adjust.


The Future of Money by Bernard Lietaer

agricultural Revolution, banks create money, barriers to entry, Bretton Woods, business cycle, clean water, complexity theory, corporate raider, dematerialisation, discounted cash flows, diversification, fiat currency, financial deregulation, financial innovation, floating exchange rates, full employment, George Gilder, German hyperinflation, global reserve currency, Golden Gate Park, Howard Rheingold, informal economy, invention of the telephone, invention of writing, Lao Tzu, Mahatma Gandhi, means of production, microcredit, Money creation, money: store of value / unit of account / medium of exchange, Norbert Wiener, North Sea oil, offshore financial centre, pattern recognition, post-industrial society, price stability, reserve currency, risk free rate, Ronald Reagan, San Francisco homelessness, seigniorage, Silicon Valley, South Sea Bubble, The Future of Employment, the market place, the payments system, Thomas Davenport, trade route, transaction costs, trickle-down economics, two and twenty, working poor

The average rent for a twobedroom unit increased by 110% over the same time period, while rent for a vacant studio increased by a whopping 288%. This explains why 20% of the homeless families have at least one parent with a fulltime job. In short, the fastest-rising component of the homeless is the families of the 'working poor' of yesteryear. San Francisco is in no way a strange anomaly. Because the US Department of Education funds a project tracking schooling problems of homeless children in San Francisco Bay Area experienced by homeless children, it has prepared a report for the US Congress identifying the different ages of homeless children. Here again, only eligible recipients are counted, which means these children still have to be 'in the system' enough to actually try to go to school.

She explained that the best data is generated indirectly, because each county keeps track of actual numbers of families and children who seek assistance and are eligible for a particular shelter programme /the AFDC-HAP) during each fiscal year. Figure 4.5 shows that the number of homeless children in the San Francisco Bay Area alone passed the 40,000 mark in 1995: 325% higher than it was eight years earlier. These numbers reflect by definition only 'eligible recipients', so the actual numbers must be higher. There may be many reasons why the parents of these children became homeless, but the simplest is straightforward arithmetic.


pages: 58 words: 18,747

The Rent Is Too Damn High: What to Do About It, and Why It Matters More Than You Think by Matthew Yglesias

Edward Glaeser, falling living standards, Home mortgage interest deduction, income inequality, industrial robot, Jane Jacobs, land reform, mortgage tax deduction, New Urbanism, pets.com, rent control, rent-seeking, Robert Gordon, Robert Shiller, Robert Shiller, San Francisco homelessness, Saturday Night Live, Silicon Valley, statistical model, transcontinental railway, urban sprawl, white picket fence

But even in the heart of Silicon Valley most people aren’t computer programmers, just as most New Yorkers aren’t investment bankers and most Bostonians aren’t college professors. And yet high-income cities aren’t just richer on average—the median incomes are higher. The difference is crucial. If Bill Gates and two homeless guys go to a bar, then on average you’re looking at a very wealthy set of bar patrons. But the median bar patron is still a homeless guy. The San Francisco MSA had a median household income of $73,980 in 2009, over 20 percent higher than the national median. In the Washington, DC, area it’s $85,648. This reflects the fact that the typical person can, in fact, increase his productivity simply by relocating to a more prosperous location. The term “productivity” can be misleading in this regard.


pages: 404 words: 108,253

9Tail Fox by Jon Courtenay Grimwood

Kickstarter, large denomination, San Francisco homelessness, sexual politics, South of Market, San Francisco, transcontinental railway

Being Sergeant Bobby Zha wasn’t practical in a city where half the population had read about his death or seen it reported on TV, and where those who apparently counted themselves as his friends were probably still nursing hangovers from yesterday’s wake. ‘What are you planning to do with the cat?’ ‘Keep it,’ said Bobby. The colonel and Bobby had a deal. If anything happened then Bobby took care of Lucifer. As promises went, it was a small price for having Colonel Billy act as Sergeant’s Zha’s eyes and ears on the streets. In San Francisco the homeless weren’t just a problem. They were an embarrassment to a city so gilded it was happy to look down on New York. Much of Bobby’s old job had been about keeping them from becoming more embarrassing still. ‘It’s just an animal,’ said Latif. ‘Yeah,’ said Bobby. ‘Aren’t we all …’ They laid Colonel Billy to rest under a pile of rocks and hid the mound with brush taken from a nearby thorn bush.

In the rush of blood which followed the trees stopped talking, the sky ran through purple into black, the tree beneath which she sat shimmered a little and then the rush was done. ‘Okay?’ Louie asked. Lucifer grinned. People were friendlier to Louie now she had a cat tucked between her tits, with its head poking from the neck of her shirt. Even tourists, who’d yet to master that trick which allowed most of San Francisco to banish the homeless to the realm of ghosts and so had to work harder to render people like Louie invisible … even they laughed and nodded. One, a middle-aged man in T-shirt, pearl earring and black jeans had pulled $100 from his pocket and then hesitated, trapped between impulse and embarrassment. Unless he’d just been trapped by the contrast between Louie’s perfect body and the scars which uglied up her arms like notches on a stick.


Hollow City by Rebecca Solnit, Susan Schwartzenberg

blue-collar work, Brownian motion, dematerialisation, Golden Gate Park, Haight Ashbury, housing crisis, informal economy, Jane Jacobs, Loma Prieta earthquake, low skilled workers, new economy, New Urbanism, pets.com, rent control, San Francisco homelessness, Silicon Valley, South of Market, San Francisco, The Death and Life of Great American Cities, union organizing, upwardly mobile, urban planning, urban renewal, wage slave

San Francisco could ism in which its its content smoothed out, homogenized by become a hollow a Disneyland of urban- city, varicolored Victorian houses and diversity of skin colors and cuisines covers up the absence of the poor, the subversive, the creative, the elderly, the free. In a way, being delivered vacant to the brave altruism and idealism are It is it has, but it is of San Francisco is new technology economy, and two of the tenants facing homelessness. clear that the Internet wildly as all economy won't continue here to stay. Of boom to as course, the technology only extends the reach of a capitalist agenda that began privatizing the public and maximizing the commodification of everyday life long ago.

In the left side: Says to conver- news seems to New Mission News, on "Mission He Wants my Armory Developer Do the Right Thing" — fortress vacant for decades in one of the bleaker parts of the North Mission, once proposed site. Now On as a homeless is now slated to become a dot-com work- the right side, "Proposed Resource Center for the Homeless Homeless." pairing: shelter, on the And in the San Francisco Independent there's front page of the Neighborhood Planting Programs in Budget Peril" and "Planners a Is double Section, "Street Tree OK Pottery Barn for Market and Castro" with the subhead "Neighborhood Divided over Chain — SAN FRANCISCO, CAPITAL OF THE TWENTY-FIRST CENTURY These Store."

Artist of art- being given special Artists didn't seem to be numerous or wealthy enough to create significant displacement, but they were glamorous enough to attract Martha (The artist Rosler's 1988 anthology If You Lived Here: The City in Art, Theory, and Social Activism homelessness, housing and politics.) it. In San Francisco, fought for and won documents the debates then about artists' place in artists inspired New York's space and by the Manhattan example the "live /work" ordinance, the biggest Trojan horse it ever dragged into a was intended city. Like the New York certification inner-city cores program, to legitimize artists converting industrial space into live-in studios (and a tale could be told about industries that and about how a whole aesthetic and were leaving the scale George Gallery, its Herms' show developed out at the 2222 Fillmore Street, San Francisco, 1961


Lonely Planet Pocket San Francisco by Lonely Planet, Alison Bing

Albert Einstein, back-to-the-land, Bay Area Rapid Transit, Burning Man, Chuck Templeton: OpenTable:, edge city, G4S, game design, Golden Gate Park, Haight Ashbury, Mason jar, San Francisco homelessness, Silicon Valley, stealth mode startup, Stewart Brand, transcontinental railway, Zipcar

Firebreaks were created by dynamiting a trough along Van Ness Ave – setting off new fires. Citizens fled to Potrero Hill and Buena Vista Park, and for three days watched their city and its dreams of grandeur go up in smoke. The death toll topped 3000, and 100,000-plus city residents were left homeless. With politicians suddenly scarce, San Francisco’s entertainers staged the city’s comeback. All but one of the city’s 20 historic theaters had been destroyed by the earthquake and fire, but theater tents were set up amid still-smoking rubble. Opera divas sang their hearts out to San Francisco gratis – though the world’s most famous tenor, Enrico Caruso, vowed never to return to the city after the quake jolted him out of bed.

Public Holidays Holidays that may affect business hours and transit schedules include the following: New Year’s Day January 1 Martin Luther King Jr Day Third Monday in January Presidents’ Day Third Monday in February Easter Sunday (and Good Friday and Easter Monday) in March or April Memorial Day Last Monday in May Independence Day July 4 Labor Day First Monday in September Columbus Day Second Monday in October Veterans Day November 11 Thanksgiving Fourth Thursday in November Christmas Day December 25 Safe Travel Top Tip Keep your city smarts and wits about you, especially at night in the Tenderloin, SoMa and the Mission. After dark, Dolores Park, Buena Vista Park and the entry to Golden Gate Park at Haight and Stanyan Sts can turn seedy, with occasional drug dealing. Panhandlers and homeless people are a reality in San Francisco. People will probably ask you for spare change, but donations to local non-profits stretch further. For safety, don't engage with panhandlers at night or around ATMs. Otherwise, a simple ‘I'm sorry,’ is a polite response. Telephone Top Tip North American travelers can use their cell phones in San Francisco and the Bay Area, but should check with the carrier about roaming charges.


pages: 237 words: 74,109

Uncanny Valley: A Memoir by Anna Wiener

autonomous vehicles, back-to-the-land, basic income, blockchain, Burning Man, call centre, charter city, cloud computing, cognitive bias, cognitive dissonance, commoditize, crowdsourcing, cryptocurrency, Extropian, functional programming, future of work, Golden Gate Park, housing crisis, Jane Jacobs, job automation, knowledge worker, Lean Startup, means of production, medical residency, microaggression, new economy, New Urbanism, passive income, pull request, rent control, ride hailing / ride sharing, San Francisco homelessness, Sand Hill Road, self-driving car, selling pickaxes during a gold rush, sharing economy, Shenzhen special economic zone , side project, Silicon Valley, Silicon Valley startup, social web, South of Market, San Francisco, special economic zone, technoutopianism, telepresence, telepresence robot, union organizing, universal basic income, unpaid internship, urban planning, urban renewal, women in the workforce, Y2K, young professional

At sundown, in the doorways of stores selling tie-dye leggings and postcards of acid pioneers, people curled up in secondhand camping gear and atop cardboard boxes, a slightly safer option than sleeping in the park. It was possible that the tourists trawling the commercial strip mistook San Francisco’s homelessness epidemic for part of the hippie aesthetic. It was possible that the tourists didn’t think about the homelessness epidemic at all. * * * Weekends, once I ran out of work, were a challenge. Sometimes I met up with coworkers, but mostly I spent time alone. I felt free, invisible, and very lonely.


pages: 212 words: 69,846

The Nation City: Why Mayors Are Now Running the World by Rahm Emanuel

Affordable Care Act / Obamacare, Airbnb, blockchain, carbon footprint, clean water, deindustrialization, disinformation, Donald Trump, Edward Glaeser, Enrique Peñalosa, Filter Bubble, income inequality, informal economy, Jane Jacobs, Kickstarter, Lyft, megacity, new economy, New Urbanism, offshore financial centre, payday loans, ride hailing / ride sharing, Ronald Reagan, San Francisco homelessness, Silicon Valley, The Death and Life of Great American Cities, the High Line, transcontinental railway, Uber and Lyft, uber lyft, urban planning, War on Poverty, white flight, working poor

He has to do whatever it takes to make sure that the subway system is modernized. If he doesn’t, the progress of his great city will come to a halt, and the city will choke under his watch. In San Francisco, as the technology sector thrives, so, unfortunately, does rampant homelessness. The latter problem is a symptom of what I believe is one of the biggest challenges that face cities now and will face them in the future. That problem is the real cost of urban prosperity. One of the prime drivers behind the homelessness problem in San Francisco, and many other cities for that matter, is the rise in the cost of rent and the lack of affordable housing. These factors have not only created more homeless people.


pages: 398 words: 120,801

Little Brother by Cory Doctorow

airport security, Bayesian statistics, Berlin Wall, citizen journalism, Firefox, game design, Golden Gate Park, Haight Ashbury, Internet Archive, Isaac Newton, Jane Jacobs, Jeff Bezos, mail merge, Mitch Kapor, MITM: man-in-the-middle, RFID, San Francisco homelessness, Sand Hill Road, Silicon Valley, slashdot, Steve Jobs, Steve Wozniak, Thomas Bayes, web of trust, zero day

They're full of cameras. But Zeb knew what he was doing. He had me meet him in the last car of a certain train departing from Powell Street Station, at a time when that car was filled with the press of bodies. He sidled up to me in the crowd, and the good commuters of San Francisco cleared a space for him, the hollow that always surrounds homeless people. "Nice to see you again," he muttered, facing into the doorway. Looking into the dark glass, I could see that there was no one close enough to eavesdrop -- not without some kind of high-efficiency mic rig, and if they knew enough to show up here with one of those, we were dead anyway.

Van looked like she was waiting for me to say something, but I had nothing to say to that. She left me there. # Zeb had a pizza for me when I got back "home" -- to the tent under a freeway overpass in the Mission that he'd staked out for the night. He had a pup tent, military surplus, stenciled with SAN FRANCISCO LOCAL HOMELESS COORDINATING BOARD. The pizza was a Dominos, cold and clabbered, but delicious for all that. "You like pineapple on your pizza?" Zeb smiled condescendingly at me. "Freegans can't be choosy," he said. "Freegans?" "Like vegans, but we only eat free food." "Free food?" He grinned again.

They drifted around, looking awkward and uncomfortable in their giant shorts and loose-fitting shirts that no-doubt hung down to cover the chandelier of gear hung around their midriffs. Dolores Park is pretty and sunny, with palm trees, tennis courts, and lots of hills and regular trees to run around on, or hang out on. Homeless people sleep there at night, but that's true everywhere in San Francisco. I met Ange down the street, at the anarchist bookstore. That had been my suggestion. In hindsight, it was a totally transparent move to seem cool and edgy to this girl, but at the time I would have sworn that I picked it because it was a convenient place to meet up.


Rough Guide to San Francisco and the Bay Area by Nick Edwards, Mark Ellwood

1960s counterculture, airport security, back-to-the-land, Bay Area Rapid Transit, British Empire, Burning Man, California gold rush, carbon footprint, City Beautiful movement, El Camino Real, Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test, glass ceiling, Golden Gate Park, Haight Ashbury, haute cuisine, Joan Didion, Kickstarter, Loma Prieta earthquake, Menlo Park, Nelson Mandela, period drama, pez dispenser, Port of Oakland, rent control, Ronald Reagan, Rosa Parks, San Francisco homelessness, Sand Hill Road, Silicon Valley, South of Market, San Francisco, Steve Jobs, Steve Wozniak, strikebreaker, transcontinental railway, unpaid internship, upwardly mobile, urban decay, urban planning, urban renewal, white picket fence, Works Progress Administration, young professional

This cluster was the brainchild of brilliant urban planner Daniel Burnham, a follower of the “City Beautiful” movement, whose central tenet was that utopian cities in vaguely classical style would be so beautiful that they’d inspire civic loyalty and upstanding morals in even the most impoverished 111 San Francisco’s homeless SoMa, the T e n d e rl oi n , and C i v i c C e nte r San Francisco’s most intractable social problem is homelessness, an issue that’s clear even to casual tourists. Downtown, much of Market Street west of Hallidie Plaza is filled with vagrants day or night, drawn here by the social service administration buildings that sit on the blocks between Sixth and Eighth streets.

The fire all but leveled the entire area from the waterfront, north and south of Market Street, and west to Van Ness Avenue, whose grand mansions were dynamited in a politically daring move to form a firebreak. The statistics are staggering: 490 city blocks and 28,000 buildings were destroyed, causing $300–500m worth of damage – at the time, two-thirds of the property value of the city and one-third of the taxable property in all California. Half of San Francisco’s population – some 100,000 people – were left homeless and fled the city. Many of those who stayed set up camp in the barren reaches of what’s now Golden Gate Park, where soldiers from the Presidio undertook the mammoth task of establishing and maintaining a tent city for about 20,000 displaced San Franciscans. The official death toll has long been touted at only 500 people, but historians have challenged such figures and upped estimates to at least 3000 dead and likely thousands more.

Across the plaza from the Vaillancourt Fountain, under the Hyatt Regency tower, stands the whirling sculpture La Chiffonière (Rag Lady), by Jean Dubuffet. Dubuffet intended for the dark mass of stainless steel, jigsaw-puzzle-like pieces to form the abstract impression of a tattered homeless person – a nod to San Francisco’s highest-profile social problem. The Ferry Building Now one of San Francisco’s true gems, the Ferry Building makeover is arguably the most impressive of all the recent public space renovations in the city. Until the freeway flyover that rimmed the Embarcadero was demolished in 1992, however, few paid it any attention.


pages: 349 words: 114,914

We Were Eight Years in Power: An American Tragedy by Ta-Nehisi Coates

affirmative action, Affordable Care Act / Obamacare, Bernie Madoff, Bernie Sanders, Broken windows theory, Charles Lindbergh, crack epidemic, crony capitalism, David Brooks, deindustrialization, desegregation, Donald Trump, fear of failure, Ferguson, Missouri, Gunnar Myrdal, housing crisis, Howard Zinn, income inequality, jitney, low skilled workers, mandatory minimum, mass incarceration, moral panic, new economy, obamacare, payday loans, phenotype, Ronald Reagan, Rosa Parks, San Francisco homelessness, single-payer health, Steve Bannon, The Bell Curve by Richard Herrnstein and Charles Murray, War on Poverty, white flight

The burden continues after the father returns home, because a criminal record tends to injure employment prospects.*6 Through it all, the children suffer. Many fathers simply fall through the cracks after they’re released. It is estimated that between 30 and 50 percent of all parolees in Los Angeles and San Francisco are homeless. In that context—employment prospects diminished, cut off from one’s children, nowhere to live—one can readily see the difficulty of eluding the ever-present grasp of incarceration, even once an individual is physically out of prison. Many do not elude its grasp. In 1984, 70 percent of all parolees successfully completed their term without arrest and were granted full freedom.


pages: 255 words: 90,456

Frommer's Irreverent Guide to San Francisco by Matthew Richard Poole

Bay Area Rapid Transit, Chuck Templeton: OpenTable:, game design, glass ceiling, Golden Gate Park, Haight Ashbury, haute cuisine, Loma Prieta earthquake, Maui Hawaii, old-boy network, pez dispenser, San Francisco homelessness, sensible shoes, Silicon Valley, South of Market, San Francisco, Torches of Freedom, upwardly mobile

The Civic Center area houses the ballet, the opera, the symphony, the main library, and City Hall, along with a number of wonderful boutique hotels such as the Inn at the Opera, and restaurants that are virtually empty after 8:30pm (San Franciscans tend to eat before performances). Right in the middle of it all is a plaza that has been a constant battle site for San Francisco’s intractable homeless ACCOMMODATIONS 20 problem. Some find the scene repugnant; others chalk it up as an integral part of urban life. Public transportation is a breeze in this centrally located neighborhood, and parking is very reasonable at the Civic Center garage. (Don’t go to any of the private garages near the Opera House or you may have to call home for extra cash.)


pages: 460 words: 130,820

The Cult of We: WeWork, Adam Neumann, and the Great Startup Delusion by Eliot Brown, Maureen Farrell

"side hustle", activist fund / activist shareholder / activist investor, Adam Neumann (WeWork), Airbnb, Bear Stearns, Bernie Madoff, Burning Man, cloud computing, coronavirus, corporate governance, Covid-19, COVID-19, don't be evil, Donald Trump, East Village, Elon Musk, future of work, gender pay gap, global pandemic, global supply chain, Google Earth, Gordon Gekko, greed is good, hockey-stick growth, housing crisis, index fund, Internet Archive, Internet of things, Jeff Bezos, Lyft, Mark Zuckerberg, Maui Hawaii, Network effects, new economy, Peter Thiel, pets.com, post-oil, railway mania, ride hailing / ride sharing, rolodex, San Francisco homelessness, Sand Hill Road, self-driving car, sharing economy, side project, Silicon Valley, Silicon Valley startup, smart cities, Snapchat, software as a service, sovereign wealth fund, starchitect, Steve Jobs, super pumped, Tim Cook: Apple, Travis Kalanick, Uber and Lyft, Uber for X, uber lyft, WeWork, women in the workforce, Y Combinator, Zipcar

Wintroub’s appeal lay in his blend of techno-optimism and what seemed like a strong moral compass. Many entrepreneurs genuinely liked Wintroub; they believed he cared about them as people. He would call to check in on their families; he would grow teary-eyed when waxing sentimental about his grandfather or his wife and three daughters, or when describing the plight of the homeless in San Francisco. He was unabashedly emotional and admired for the time outside of work that he and his family devoted to social causes. Wintroub’s star rose precipitously at the bank. Dimon and other higher-ups in New York saw him as central to their aspirations for securing key positions in the largest deals.


pages: 284 words: 95,029

How to Fail: Everything I’ve Ever Learned From Things Going Wrong by Elizabeth Day

Airbnb, Desert Island Discs, disintermediation, fear of failure, financial independence, gender pay gap, microaggression, Mikhail Gorbachev, pre–internet, Rosa Parks, San Francisco homelessness, stem cell, unpaid internship

I decided to walk to the beach for an energetic cleanse of the more conventional kind, and a drunk homeless person started shouting endearments at me, which might or might not have been because of my newly steamed vagina but was probably more connected to the whisky bottle clutched in a brown paper bag in his hand. (A few days later, on a work trip to San Francisco, another drunk homeless man catcalled me as I walked past and shouted ‘NICE FEET!’, which is one of the most random compliments I’ve ever been given. I had not steamed my vagina on that occasion and, indeed, have never done so since.) My Week As Gwyneth culminated in a two-hour master-class with Tracy Anderson, the trainer Paltrow famously credits with giving her ‘the butt of a 22-year-old stripper’.


pages: 482 words: 147,281

A Crack in the Edge of the World by Simon Winchester

Albert Einstein, Asilomar, butterfly effect, California gold rush, Golden Gate Park, index card, indoor plumbing, lateral thinking, Loma Prieta earthquake, Menlo Park, place-making, risk tolerance, San Francisco homelessness, Silicon Valley, South of Market, San Francisco, supervolcano, The Chicago School, transcontinental railway, wage slave, Works Progress Administration

And then, at the end of the week, the weather turned damp and cold, as it so often does in spring in San Francisco, and then it began to rain, the fires were slowly snuffed out, and despite the mud of black ash everywhere and the dreary appearance of thousands upon thousands of gutted and ruined buildings, and despite the dripping misery of hundreds of thousands of refugees in their tent-cities and out on the grasses of the parks, at last the city could begin to think of what it might do next. It is known that 28,188 buildings were destroyed; 478 people were said to have been killed – a figure that has risen over the years to well over 3,000; and of the 400,000 people whom the last city census had counted as living in San Francisco, 225,000 were homeless. The great majority of these last were men, women and children seeking refuge – men, women and children who were, in other words, now of a class that the Promised Land had never imagined it might see created within its own domains. They were Americans seeking refuge from the calamity, and thus they were American refugees.

.* The scenes were utterly distressing: horribly mutilated victims, bewilderment, wailing and fear on all sides, violent patients tied to trees with sheets, screeching bloody murder. Though the Agnew’s disaster was especially dreadful, and though there were moderate death tolls in some other southern towns – in San Jose nineteen people died and 8,000 were made homeless – to the north of San Francisco things were a good deal worse. Both the force of the shock and the displacement caused by the rupture were considerably greater than in the south, and the experiences were generally much more distressing. The vineyard country of the Napa and Sonoma valleys – though at the time reeling from the phylloxera infestation – was hit particularly hard, and workers tell of the acres of vines taking on the appearance of the ocean, with the rows of grape arbours rising and falling in great waves as the shocks tumbled down the hillsides.


Falter: Has the Human Game Begun to Play Itself Out? by Bill McKibben

23andMe, Affordable Care Act / Obamacare, Airbnb, American Legislative Exchange Council, Anne Wojcicki, artificial general intelligence, Bernie Sanders, Bill Joy: nanobots, Burning Man, call centre, carbon footprint, Charles Lindbergh, clean water, Colonization of Mars, computer vision, David Attenborough, disinformation, Donald Trump, double helix, Edward Snowden, Elon Musk, ending welfare as we know it, energy transition, Flynn Effect, Google Earth, Hyperloop, impulse control, income inequality, Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), Jane Jacobs, Jaron Lanier, Jeff Bezos, job automation, Kim Stanley Robinson, life extension, light touch regulation, Mark Zuckerberg, mass immigration, megacity, Menlo Park, moral hazard, Naomi Klein, Nelson Mandela, obamacare, off grid, oil shale / tar sands, pattern recognition, Peter Thiel, Plutocrats, plutocrats, profit motive, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Ray Kurzweil, Robert Mercer, Ronald Reagan, Sam Altman, San Francisco homelessness, self-driving car, Silicon Valley, Silicon Valley startup, smart meter, Snapchat, stem cell, Stephen Hawking, Steve Jobs, Steve Wozniak, Steven Pinker, strong AI, supervolcano, technoutopianism, The Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith, traffic fines, Tragedy of the Commons, Travis Kalanick, urban sprawl, Watson beat the top human players on Jeopardy!, Y Combinator, Y2K, yield curve

In 2017 the United Nations sent its special rapporteur on extreme poverty and human rights to tour America. After a two-week visit, this Australian expert concluded that “for one of the world’s wealthiest countries to have forty million people living in poverty, and over five million living in ‘Third World’ conditions is cruel and inhuman.”2 He recounted many horrors—fourteen thousand homeless people in San Francisco arrested for public urination when the ratio of toilets to people in the city’s Skid Row “would not even meet the minimum standards the UN sets for Syrian refugee camps”; and the people he’d seen without any teeth because adult dental care isn’t covered by Medicaid—but he focused most closely on the prevalence of hookworm in rural America.


San Francisco by Lonely Planet

airport security, Albert Einstein, Apple II, back-to-the-land, banking crisis, Bay Area Rapid Transit, Burning Man, California gold rush, car-free, carbon footprint, centre right, Chuck Templeton: OpenTable:, David Brooks, Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test, G4S, game design, glass ceiling, Golden Gate Park, Haight Ashbury, Joan Didion, Loma Prieta earthquake, Mason jar, New Urbanism, San Francisco homelessness, Silicon Valley, South of Market, San Francisco, stealth mode startup, stem cell, Steve Jobs, Steve Wozniak, Stewart Brand, transcontinental railway, urban sprawl, Whole Earth Catalog, Zipcar

Glide Memorial United Methodist Church Church Offline map Google map ( 415-674-6090; www.glide.org; 330 Ellis St; celebrations 9am & 11am Sun; & Powell St) The 100-member Glide gospel choir kicks off Sunday celebrations, and the welcome is warm for whoever comes through the door – the diverse, 1500-plus congregation includes many who’d once lost all faith in faith. After the celebration ends, the congregation keeps the inspiration coming, providing a million free meals a year and housing for formerly homeless families – now that’s hitting a high note. San Francisco Main Library Notable Building Offline map Google map ( 415-557-4400; www.sfpl.org; 100 Larkin St; 10am-6pm Mon & Sat, 9am-8pm Tue-Thu, noon-5pm Fri & Sun; ; & Civic Center) The vast skylight dome sheds plenty of light through San Francisco’s Main Library. And this being San Francisco, the library actively appeals to broad audiences – to wit the African American Center, Chinese Center, the James C Hormel Gay & Lesbian Center, and the Center for San Francisco History.

After three days and two nights, most of the city was reduced to a smoldering black heap. The death toll mounted to an estimated 3000 people, plus an unknown number of prostitutes kept under lock and key. More than a third of the 300,000 people living in the city at the time were left homeless. Thousands left San Francisco for good, convinced its glory days were over. Built in 1907, soon after the earthquake, the Great American Music Hall still shows the determined flamboyance of post-earthquake San Francisco, with carved gilt decor recalling the city’s Gold Rush heyday and scantily clad frescoed figures hinting at other possible backstage entertainments.


pages: 1,293 words: 357,735

The Coming Plague: Newly Emerging Diseases in a World Out of Balance by Laurie Garrett

Albert Einstein, Berlin Wall, Bill Atkinson, biofilm, British Empire, Buckminster Fuller, clean water, correlation does not imply causation, discovery of penicillin, disinformation, double helix, European colonialism, Fall of the Berlin Wall, germ theory of disease, global pandemic, global village, Herbert Marcuse, indoor plumbing, invention of air conditioning, John Snow's cholera map, land reform, Live Aid, Louis Pasteur, Marshall McLuhan, mass incarceration, megacity, Menlo Park, Mikhail Gorbachev, Nelson Mandela, New Urbanism, phenotype, price mechanism, Ralph Nader, Ronald Reagan, Rosa Parks, San Francisco homelessness, South China Sea, the scientific method, trade route, transfer pricing, upwardly mobile, urban renewal, urban sprawl, Zimmermann PGP

But in desperately poor neighborhoods of the South Bronx one out of every 43 newborns, or 2.34 percent, was infected—and every one of them was born in a public hospital.113 Those numbers could only be expected to worsen as the epidemic’s demographics shifted into younger, predominantly heterosexual population groups.114 A significant percentage of the nation’s HIV-positive population was also homeless, living on the streets of American cities. A 1991 study, led by Andrew Moss, of homeless men and women in San Francisco found that 3 percent of those who had no identifiable risk factors for HIV exposure were infected. Another 8 percent of the homeless were HIV-positive due to injecting drug use, prostitution, or sex with an infected individual. Overall, more than one out of every ten homeless adults in San Francisco carried the virus.115 HIV wasn’t the only microbe that was exploiting opportunities in America’s urban poor population: hepatitis B (which by 1992 was responsible for 30 percent of all sexually transmitted disease in America), syphilis, gonorrhea, and chancroid were all appearing less commonly in Caucasian gay men and with alarming, escalating frequency in the heterosexual urban poor, particularly those who used crack cocaine or heroin.

Curran was discreetly named director of the quietly created task force, overseeing a budget of less than $200,000 and a staff of twenty, most on loan from other programs.4 The entire CDC budget for 1981 was just $288 million.5 Meanwhile, Gayling Gee was having a terrible time dealing with her Kaposi’s patient. Homeless, moving from one San Francisco crash pad to another, the young prostitute would scrounge enough change every morning to buy a cup of coffee, a doughnut, and bus fare to the hospital. “Help me, Gayling,” he would plead. “I don’t know what to do.” Too weak to work at any trade, he fell way outside the social services safety net of the day.


pages: 304 words: 87,702

The 100 Best Vacations to Enrich Your Life by Pam Grout

Albert Einstein, Buckminster Fuller, clean water, complexity theory, David Brooks, East Village, Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test, global village, Golden Gate Park, if you build it, they will come, Maui Hawaii, Mikhail Gorbachev, Nelson Mandela, Ralph Nader, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Ronald Reagan, San Francisco homelessness, supervolcano, transcontinental railway, two and twenty, urban sprawl, Yogi Berra

If this sounds a little like kid’s camp, slather on the sunscreen and listen up. For 12 weeks every summer, Camp Winnarainbow is a kid’s camp. Thanks to royalties from Jerry Garcia’s namesake Ben and Jerry’s ice cream flavor and grants from the Grateful Dead’s Rex Foundation, camp scholarships are provided to homeless kids from the San Francisco Bay Area, as well as to Native American kids from a South Dakota reservation. * * * SEVEN DEGREES OF WAVY GRAVY “You, too, can be sucked up in the tornado of talent.” —Wavy Gravy You might have played the trivia game Six Degrees of Kevin Bacon. The idea is that any actor can be linked via film roles to actor Kevin Bacon.


pages: 850 words: 254,117

Basic Economics by Thomas Sowell

affirmative action, air freight, airline deregulation, American Legislative Exchange Council, bank run, barriers to entry, big-box store, British Empire, business cycle, clean water, collective bargaining, colonial rule, corporate governance, correlation does not imply causation, cross-subsidies, David Brooks, David Ricardo: comparative advantage, declining real wages, Dissolution of the Soviet Union, diversified portfolio, European colonialism, fixed income, Fractional reserve banking, full employment, global village, Gunnar Myrdal, Hernando de Soto, hiring and firing, housing crisis, income inequality, income per capita, index fund, informal economy, inventory management, invisible hand, John Maynard Keynes: technological unemployment, joint-stock company, Just-in-time delivery, Kenneth Arrow, knowledge economy, labor-force participation, land reform, late fees, low cost airline, low cost carrier, low skilled workers, means of production, Mikhail Gorbachev, minimum wage unemployment, moral hazard, offshore financial centre, oil shale / tar sands, payday loans, Post-Keynesian economics, price discrimination, price stability, profit motive, quantitative easing, Ralph Nader, rent control, road to serfdom, Ronald Reagan, San Francisco homelessness, Silicon Valley, surplus humans, The Bell Curve by Richard Herrnstein and Charles Murray, The Chicago School, The Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith, Thomas Kuhn: the structure of scientific revolutions, Thomas Malthus, transcontinental railway, Vanguard fund, War on Poverty

Rising prices not only allocate existing housing, they provide incentives for rebuilding and for renters to use less space in the meantime, as well as incentives for those with space in their homes to take in roomers while rents are high. In short, just as there can be a shortage without any greater physical scarcity, so there can be a greater physical scarcity without any shortage. People made homeless by the huge 1906 San Francisco earthquake found housing more readily than people made homeless by New York’s rent control laws that took thousands of buildings off the market. Hoarding In addition to shortages and quality deterioration under price controls, there is often hoarding—that is, individuals keeping a larger inventory of the price-controlled goods than they would ordinarily under free market conditions, because of the uncertainty of being able to find it in the future.

{53} Diana Geddes, “The Doors Have Closed on Furnished Accommodation,” The Times of London, January 24, 1975, p. 11. {54} William Tucker, Zoning, Rent Control and Affordable Housing (Washington: Cato Institute, 1991), p. 21. {55} Christopher Jencks, The Homeless (Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1994), p. 99. {56} Richard W. White, Jr., Rude Awakenings: What the Homeless Crisis Tells Us (San Francisco: ICS Press, 1991), p. 123. {57} Joseph Berger, “For Some Landlords, Real Money in the Homeless,” New York Times, February 9, 2013, p. A15. {58} Laurie P. Cohen, “Home Free: Some Rich and Famous of New York City Bask in Shelter of Rent Law,” Wall Street Journal, March 21, 1994, p.


pages: 294 words: 77,356

Automating Inequality by Virginia Eubanks

autonomous vehicles, basic income, business process, call centre, cognitive dissonance, collective bargaining, correlation does not imply causation, deindustrialization, disruptive innovation, Donald Trump, Elon Musk, ending welfare as we know it, experimental subject, housing crisis, IBM and the Holocaust, income inequality, job automation, mandatory minimum, Mark Zuckerberg, mass incarceration, minimum wage unemployment, mortgage tax deduction, new economy, New Urbanism, payday loans, performance metric, Ronald Reagan, San Francisco homelessness, self-driving car, statistical model, strikebreaker, underbanked, universal basic income, urban renewal, War on Poverty, working poor, Works Progress Administration, young professional, zero-sum game

Street Meeting: Multiethnic Neighborhoods in Early Twentieth-Century Los Angeles. Oakland, CA: University of California Press, 2005. Willse, Craig. The Value of Homelessness: Managing Surplus Life in the United States. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 2015. Wolch, Jennifer, and Michael J. Dear. Malign Neglect: Homelessness in an American City. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass Publishers, 1993. Documents My understanding of Los Angeles was enlarged by several fascinating research trips to the Central Branch of the Los Angeles Library and I am grateful for the help of its talented and enthusiastic research librarians. I relied especially on their historical newspaper archives and their government documents collection, which holds copies of the legendary “Centropolis” and Silver Book plans for downtown Los Angeles development.


pages: 190 words: 62,941

Wild Ride: Inside Uber's Quest for World Domination by Adam Lashinsky

"side hustle", Airbnb, always be closing, Amazon Web Services, autonomous vehicles, Ayatollah Khomeini, business process, Chuck Templeton: OpenTable:, cognitive dissonance, corporate governance, DARPA: Urban Challenge, Donald Trump, Elon Musk, gig economy, Golden Gate Park, Google X / Alphabet X, hustle culture, independent contractor, information retrieval, Jeff Bezos, Lyft, Marc Andreessen, Mark Zuckerberg, megacity, Menlo Park, new economy, pattern recognition, price mechanism, ride hailing / ride sharing, San Francisco homelessness, Sand Hill Road, self-driving car, Silicon Valley, Silicon Valley startup, Skype, Snapchat, South of Market, San Francisco, sovereign wealth fund, statistical model, Steve Jobs, super pumped, TaskRabbit, Tony Hsieh, transportation-network company, Travis Kalanick, turn-by-turn navigation, Uber and Lyft, Uber for X, uber lyft, ubercab, young professional

I learn over time that this is partly how Kalanick amuses himself and partly a reflection of his earnest side. He’s a seeker, a dreamer. If he’s moved by the plight of the Cambodian people under the murderous Khmer Rouge or by the slum dwellers of Mumbai, he hasn’t done anything about the homeless in his own city of San Francisco. His ideas are thrilling but also baffling, and he relishes challenges to his flights of fancy. I’m reminded of his pitch to me for a new kind of media company, in which companies commission journalists to write stories while reserving full veto power. We argued vehemently about it.


pages: 1,007 words: 181,911

The 4-Hour Chef: The Simple Path to Cooking Like a Pro, Learning Anything, and Living the Good Life by Timothy Ferriss

Airbnb, Atul Gawande, Buckminster Fuller, Burning Man, correlation does not imply causation, crowdsourcing, deliberate practice, en.wikipedia.org, Golden Gate Park, happiness index / gross national happiness, haute cuisine, Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall, Isaac Newton, Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, Kevin Kelly, Kickstarter, Loma Prieta earthquake, loss aversion, Louis Pasteur, Mahatma Gandhi, Marc Andreessen, Mark Zuckerberg, Mason jar, microbiome, Parkinson's law, Paul Buchheit, Paul Graham, Pepto Bismol, Ponzi scheme, Ralph Waldo Emerson, San Francisco homelessness, Silicon Valley, Skype, spaced repetition, Stephen Hawking, Steve Jobs, the High Line, Y Combinator

This meant I needed to answer the question: “How likely am I to get sick from eating city pigeons?” THE OFFICIAL CHANNELS In a conversation with a wonderful team at UC Davis, I provided the context: I wanted to determine the toxic loads of pigeons that might be consumed by homeless people in San Francisco. This wasn’t complete fiction. I’d taken daylong homeless tours of the Tenderloin through vayable.com, and though most homeless people know where to get food from shelters, pigeons weren’t out of the question. The call with the UC Davis team centered on potential study design: We could do a full necropsy (studying the entire bird for parasitology, bacterial load, and more) or simply analyze the livers.


pages: 301 words: 89,076

The Globotics Upheaval: Globalisation, Robotics and the Future of Work by Richard Baldwin

agricultural Revolution, Airbnb, AltaVista, Amazon Web Services, augmented reality, autonomous vehicles, basic income, business process, business process outsourcing, call centre, Capital in the Twenty-First Century by Thomas Piketty, Cass Sunstein, commoditize, computer vision, Corn Laws, correlation does not imply causation, Credit Default Swap, David Ricardo: comparative advantage, declining real wages, deindustrialization, deskilling, Donald Trump, Douglas Hofstadter, Downton Abbey, Elon Musk, Erik Brynjolfsson, facts on the ground, future of journalism, future of work, George Gilder, Google Glasses, Google Hangouts, hiring and firing, impulse control, income inequality, industrial robot, intangible asset, Internet of things, invisible hand, James Watt: steam engine, Jeff Bezos, job automation, knowledge worker, laissez-faire capitalism, low skilled workers, Machine translation of "The spirit is willing, but the flesh is weak." to Russian and back, manufacturing employment, Mark Zuckerberg, mass immigration, mass incarceration, Metcalfe’s law, new economy, optical character recognition, pattern recognition, Ponzi scheme, post-industrial society, post-work, profit motive, remote working, reshoring, ride hailing / ride sharing, Robert Gordon, Robert Metcalfe, robotic process automation, Ronald Reagan, San Francisco homelessness, Second Machine Age, self-driving car, side project, Silicon Valley, Skype, Snapchat, social intelligence, sovereign wealth fund, standardized shipping container, statistical model, Stephen Hawking, Steve Jobs, supply-chain management, TaskRabbit, telepresence, telepresence robot, telerobotics, Thomas Malthus, trade liberalization, universal basic income

One Californian company, Knightscope, leverages the mismatch by providing robot security guards who can do the “being there” part while staying continuously in touch with real human security guards who can take over if a real incident occurs. Knightscope guards are already used in malls and out on the streets of San Francisco, where it chases away homeless people. It has cameras, laser scanners, a microphone, and a speaker. It can drive itself around at a slow walking pace. It is not a good as a human security guard, but it is a whole lot cheaper, renting out at seven dollars an hour (below minimum wage). And it doesn’t need breaks or overtime on holidays.


pages: 274 words: 81,008

The New Tycoons: Inside the Trillion Dollar Private Equity Industry That Owns Everything by Jason Kelly

activist fund / activist shareholder / activist investor, barriers to entry, Bear Stearns, Berlin Wall, call centre, carried interest, collective bargaining, corporate governance, corporate raider, Credit Default Swap, diversification, eat what you kill, Fall of the Berlin Wall, family office, fixed income, Goldman Sachs: Vampire Squid, Gordon Gekko, housing crisis, income inequality, late capitalism, margin call, Menlo Park, Occupy movement, place-making, Rod Stewart played at Stephen Schwarzman birthday party, rolodex, Ronald Reagan, Rubik’s Cube, San Francisco homelessness, Sand Hill Road, Savings and loan crisis, shareholder value, side project, Silicon Valley, sovereign wealth fund, two and twenty

His own entrepreneurial streak led to the creation of the Roberts Enterprise Development Fund, a “venture philanthropy organization,” according to its website.3 In 1990, Roberts was among the first to try to apply private-sector metrics to the world of non-profits and philanthropy. “I was looking to do something that that if we didn’t do it, it wouldn’t get done.” He hired a consultant to study homelessness, a pressing issue in San Francisco, where the mild climate and relatively liberal values have led to a high homeless population. The first effort, to financially support homeless women who’d been the victims of domestic abuse, was, Roberts said, “a total failure” because the women often went back to their abusers once they had a little bit of money.


pages: 201 words: 67,347

Attempting Normal by Marc Maron

back-to-the-land, desegregation, medical malpractice, San Francisco homelessness, Saturday Night Live

This is the sort of thing that happens in mind. In my mind, I transcend simple goodness and reach for the beatific. In my mind, I’m very busy with my good works. Not complaining, just busy. But what about real life? How am I measuring up? I was recently walking down the street in San Francisco and I saw dozens of homeless people. I started to judge them. Who am I going to give money to? Limb missing? You get a dollar. Crack-head or drunk? A quarter. I won’t necessarily deny anyone, but I will judge their need based on my own moral compass. I have no consistent policy in place, aside from always giving people with missing limbs money.


pages: 302 words: 92,507

Cold: Adventures in the World's Frozen Places by Bill Streever

Albert Einstein, carbon footprint, coastline paradox / Richardson effect, Edward Lorenz: Chaos theory, Exxon Valdez, Mason jar, refrigerator car, San Francisco homelessness, South China Sea, Thales of Miletus, the scientific method, University of East Anglia

Summer days in San Francisco can be as cold as winter days, but fog and wind conspire to turn certain summer days into blustery baths of chilled mist that permeates the marrow. None of this is to say that winter temperatures themselves cannot drop in San Francisco. Three months ago, in January, a winter cold snap resulted in temperatures below freezing, and just inland thermometers flirted with the twenty-degree mark. San Francisco’s shelters filled with homeless people. Stephanie Schaaf, a spokes-woman for shelter operators, was quoted in the San Francisco Chronicle: “Yesterday we took in over 500 people, and usually our shelters are pretty full anyway, with maybe 275. We’re breaking out mats, spreading them across the floors, in the hallways, pretty much anywhere there’s open space.”


pages: 624 words: 180,416

For the Win by Cory Doctorow

anti-globalists, barriers to entry, Burning Man, creative destruction, double helix, Internet Archive, inventory management, lateral thinking, loose coupling, Maui Hawaii, microcredit, New Journalism, Ponzi scheme, post-materialism, random walk, RFID, San Francisco homelessness, Silicon Valley, skunkworks, slashdot, speech recognition, stem cell, Steve Jobs, Steve Wozniak, supply-chain management, technoutopianism, union organizing, wage slave

She packed up her laptop and stepped out into the parking lot. Across the freeway, she could make out the bones of the Great America fun-park roller-coasters whipping around and around in the warm California sun. These little tech-hamlets down the 101 were deceptively utopian. All the homeless people were miles north on the streets of San Francisco, where pedestrian marks for panhandling could be had, where the crack was sold on corners instead of out of the trunks of fresh-faced, friendly coke-dealers’ cars. Down here it was giant malls, purpose-built dot-com buildings, and the occasional fun-park. Palo Alto was a university-town theme-park, provided you steered clear of the wrong side of the tracks, the East Palo Alto slums that were practically shanties.

Her naked arms and legs were badly tracked out, and Suzanne had a horrified realization that among the stains on her tank-top were a pair of spreading pools of breast milk, dampening old white, crusted patches over her sagging breasts. “For my baby. A dollar would help, a dollar.” There were homeless like this in San Francisco, too. In San Jose as well, she supposed, but she didn’t know where they hid. But something about this woman, cracked out and tracked out, it freaked her out. She dug into her purse and got out a five dollar bill and handed it to the homeless woman. The woman smiled a snaggletoothed stumpy grin and reached for it, then, abruptly, grabbed hold of Suzanne’s wrist.


pages: 252 words: 79,452

To Be a Machine: Adventures Among Cyborgs, Utopians, Hackers, and the Futurists Solving the Modest Problem of Death by Mark O'Connell

3D printing, Ada Lovelace, AI winter, Airbnb, Albert Einstein, Amazon Picking Challenge, artificial general intelligence, brain emulation, clean water, cognitive dissonance, computer age, cosmological principle, dark matter, disruptive innovation, double helix, Edward Snowden, effective altruism, Elon Musk, Extropian, friendly AI, global pandemic, impulse control, income inequality, invention of the wheel, Jacques de Vaucanson, John von Neumann, knowledge economy, Law of Accelerating Returns, life extension, lifelogging, Lyft, Mars Rover, means of production, Norbert Wiener, Peter Thiel, profit motive, Ray Kurzweil, RFID, San Francisco homelessness, self-driving car, sharing economy, Silicon Valley, Silicon Valley ideology, Singularitarianism, Skype, Stephen Hawking, Steve Wozniak, superintelligent machines, technological singularity, technoutopianism, The Coming Technological Singularity, Travis Kalanick, trickle-down economics, Turing machine, uber lyft, Vernor Vinge

I felt that I was catching a glimpse of the absurdity that lay beneath everything we thought of as the world—beneath reason, and science, and the idea of human progress. Everything seemed suddenly, giddyingly revealed as bizarre and self-evidently preposterous: the scientist talking about liberating men and women from the captivity of flesh, the malfunctioning mechanism of the homeless man in a heap on a San Francisco sidewalk muttering his madness and misery into a void, the writer deluding himself with thoughts of seeing into the heart of things, and making a note to write something about the tittering derelict, the smell of weed, Nietzsche’s mad animals. — In the weeks and months after I returned from San Francisco, I thought obsessively about the idea of whole brain emulation.


A Paradise Built in Hell: Extraordinary Communities That Arise in Disaster by Rebecca Solnit

Berlin Wall, Burning Man, centre right, Community Supported Agriculture, David Graeber, different worldview, dumpster diving, Golden Gate Park, illegal immigration, Loma Prieta earthquake, means of production, Mikhail Gorbachev, Naomi Klein, Nelson Mandela, race to the bottom, Ralph Waldo Emerson, rent control, San Francisco homelessness, South of Market, San Francisco, Thomas Malthus, Upton Sinclair, urban planning, War on Poverty, yellow journalism

Or they destroyed much of the city made of architecture and property, even as they claimed to defend it from fire and from the public that was portrayed, over and over, as a potential or actual mob or bunch of thieves. The citizens responded differently to the occasion as they took care of each other and reinforced the society that each city is first and foremost. The writer Mary Austin, who was there for the earthquake and its aftermath, said that the people of San Francisco became houseless, but not homeless, “for it comes to this with the bulk of San Franciscans, that they discovered the place and the spirit to be home rather than the walls and the furnishings. No matter how the insurance totals foot up, what landmarks, what treasures of art are evanished, San Francisco, our San Francisco is all there yet.


pages: 371 words: 93,570

Broad Band: The Untold Story of the Women Who Made the Internet by Claire L. Evans

"side hustle", 4chan, Ada Lovelace, Albert Einstein, British Empire, colonial rule, Colossal Cave Adventure, computer age, crowdsourcing, dark matter, dematerialisation, Doomsday Book, Douglas Engelbart, Douglas Engelbart, Douglas Hofstadter, East Village, Edward Charles Pickering, game design, glass ceiling, Grace Hopper, Gödel, Escher, Bach, Haight Ashbury, Harvard Computers: women astronomers, Honoré de Balzac, Howard Rheingold, HyperCard, hypertext link, index card, information retrieval, Internet Archive, Jacquard loom, John von Neumann, Joseph-Marie Jacquard, knowledge worker, Leonard Kleinrock, Mahatma Gandhi, Mark Zuckerberg, Menlo Park, Mondo 2000, Mother of all demos, Network effects, old-boy network, On the Economy of Machinery and Manufactures, packet switching, pets.com, rent control, RFC: Request For Comment, rolodex, San Francisco homelessness, semantic web, Silicon Valley, Skype, South of Market, San Francisco, Steve Jobs, Steven Levy, Stewart Brand, subscription business, technoutopianism, Ted Nelson, telepresence, Whole Earth Catalog, Whole Earth Review, women in the workforce, Works Progress Administration, Y2K

Joan had found her way to Project One after a stranger in a Santa Barbara health-food restaurant told her to knock on the warehouse window when she got to San Francisco and say “Jeremiah Skye sent you.” She took the directory gig because it married her love of electronics with progressive action. Like Sherry, she spent her days on the phone: checking in on San Francisco’s social workers, suicide-prevention hotlines, homeless shelters, senior centers, community groups, and Switchboards. “It really felt to me like putting the tools to exactly what they were meant to be used for, to serve the needs of people,” she tells me, a cat perched on her shoulder, when I reach her over Skype. “They figured out a way to put technology to use in a way that really touched people’s lives, and that just seemed completely appropriate and cool.”


pages: 338 words: 104,684

The Deficit Myth: Modern Monetary Theory and the Birth of the People's Economy by Stephanie Kelton

2013 Report for America's Infrastructure - American Society of Civil Engineers - 19 March 2013, Affordable Care Act / Obamacare, American Society of Civil Engineers: Report Card, Asian financial crisis, bank run, Bernie Madoff, Bernie Sanders, blockchain, bond market vigilante , Bretton Woods, business cycle, capital controls, central bank independence, collective bargaining, Covid-19, COVID-19, currency manipulation / currency intervention, currency peg, David Graeber, David Ricardo: comparative advantage, decarbonisation, deindustrialization, discrete time, Donald Trump, eurozone crisis, fiat currency, floating exchange rates, Food sovereignty, full employment, Gini coefficient, global reserve currency, global supply chain, Hyman Minsky, income inequality, inflation targeting, Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), investor state dispute settlement, Isaac Newton, Jeff Bezos, liquidity trap, Mahatma Gandhi, manufacturing employment, market bubble, Mason jar, Modern Monetary Theory, mortgage debt, Naomi Klein, National Debt Clock, new economy, New Urbanism, Nixon shock, Nixon triggered the end of the Bretton Woods system, obamacare, open economy, Paul Samuelson, Ponzi scheme, Post-Keynesian economics, price anchoring, price stability, pushing on a string, quantitative easing, race to the bottom, reserve currency, Richard Florida, Ronald Reagan, San Francisco homelessness, shareholder value, Silicon Valley, Tax Reform Act of 1986, trade liberalization, urban planning, working-age population, Works Progress Administration, yield curve, zero-sum game

They never do anything for us anyway.”73 Drive around many major cities and you’ll see struggling neighborhoods with people barely scraping by, rundown buildings, an absence of grocery stores, and so on. Travel a short distance and you might enter a neighborhood with multimillion-dollar homes or swanky apartments with uniformed doormen, its inhabitants living a completely different kind of life. Homeless people line the streets of New York, San Francisco, and LA, on blocks where the bars and restaurants roar with money. Professional athletes sign multimillion-dollar contracts; every tweak and twinge in their bodies is instantly attended to by top specialists, while millions of Americans cannot afford even basic health insurance.


pages: 514 words: 152,903

The Best Business Writing 2013 by Dean Starkman

Asperger Syndrome, bank run, Basel III, Bear Stearns, call centre, clean water, cloud computing, collateralized debt obligation, Columbine, computer vision, Credit Default Swap, credit default swaps / collateralized debt obligations, crowdsourcing, Erik Brynjolfsson, eurozone crisis, Exxon Valdez, factory automation, fixed income, full employment, Goldman Sachs: Vampire Squid, hiring and firing, hydraulic fracturing, Ida Tarbell, income inequality, jimmy wales, job automation, John Markoff, Kickstarter, late fees, London Whale, low skilled workers, Mahatma Gandhi, market clearing, Maui Hawaii, Menlo Park, Occupy movement, oil shale / tar sands, Parag Khanna, Pareto efficiency, price stability, Ray Kurzweil, San Francisco homelessness, Silicon Valley, Skype, sovereign wealth fund, stakhanovite, Stanford prison experiment, Steve Jobs, Stuxnet, tail risk, the payments system, too big to fail, Vanguard fund, wage slave, Y2K, zero-sum game

Kennan is thirty-four and quite short, with a long biker beard, a silver fleck of a nose stud and, almost always, a Wildhorse cigarette in one hand. Edgy energy keeps him in motion; he describes himself as “a very overanalytical individual.” Desperate to get his kids out of a homeless shelter after he lost his job in San Francisco, Kennan heard about the Safe Parking program from a friend. He saved his cash assistance for two and a half months and used the $700 to buy the RV then waited two weeks until the rest of his welfare money came in to get it registered. “I basically plunged all the funds I had into the vehicle and then coped with just food stamps,” he says.


pages: 825 words: 228,141

MONEY Master the Game: 7 Simple Steps to Financial Freedom by Tony Robbins

3D printing, active measures, activist fund / activist shareholder / activist investor, addicted to oil, affirmative action, Affordable Care Act / Obamacare, Albert Einstein, asset allocation, backtesting, Bear Stearns, bitcoin, buy and hold, clean water, cloud computing, corporate governance, corporate raider, correlation does not imply causation, Credit Default Swap, Dean Kamen, declining real wages, diversification, diversified portfolio, Donald Trump, estate planning, fear of failure, fiat currency, financial independence, fixed income, forensic accounting, high net worth, index fund, Internet of things, invention of the wheel, Jeff Bezos, Kenneth Rogoff, lake wobegon effect, Lao Tzu, London Interbank Offered Rate, market bubble, money market fund, mortgage debt, new economy, obamacare, offshore financial centre, oil shock, optical character recognition, Own Your Own Home, passive investing, profit motive, Ralph Waldo Emerson, random walk, Ray Kurzweil, Richard Thaler, risk free rate, risk tolerance, riskless arbitrage, Robert Shiller, Robert Shiller, salary depends on his not understanding it, San Francisco homelessness, self-driving car, shareholder value, Silicon Valley, Skype, Snapchat, sovereign wealth fund, stem cell, Steve Jobs, survivorship bias, tail risk, telerobotics, The future is already here, the rule of 72, thinkpad, transaction costs, Upton Sinclair, Vanguard fund, World Values Survey, X Prize, Yogi Berra, young professional, zero-sum game

In 2013 over 540,000 people attended 100 Maker Faires globally, and in 2014 Maker Media, creator of the faires, is expecting that number to climb to 140 Maker Faires. President Obama recently hosted a Maker Faire at the White House, where a 17-foot robotic giraffe named Russell greeted him, and the president toured a tiny portable house and played a keyboard made of bananas. He also met Marc Roth, from San Francisco, who was living in a homeless shelter when he started going to a local “TechShop” to learn how to use 3-D printers and laser cutters. Sixteen months later he had started his own laser-cutting business, and now runs a program to teach high-tech skills to others who need a fresh start. Obama also gave a shout-out to two tween-age girls from North Carolina who started a robotics company instead of getting a paper route.


Frommer's San Francisco 2012 by Matthew Poole, Erika Lenkert, Kristin Luna

airport security, Albert Einstein, Bay Area Rapid Transit, California gold rush, car-free, centre right, Chuck Templeton: OpenTable:, El Camino Real, glass ceiling, Golden Gate Park, Haight Ashbury, Loma Prieta earthquake, Mason jar, Maui Hawaii, McDonald's hot coffee lawsuit, place-making, Port of Oakland, post-work, San Francisco homelessness, sensible shoes, Silicon Valley, South of Market, San Francisco, Torches of Freedom, transcontinental railway, urban renewal, Works Progress Administration, young professional

Drawbacks: Not the nicest part of town. Expect panhandlers and take taxis after dark. Moderate The Phoenix Hotel ★★ If you’d like to tell your friends you stayed in the same hotel as David Bowie, Keanu Reeves, Moby, Franz Ferdinand, and Interpol, this is the place to go. On the fringes of San Francisco’s aromatic Tenderloin District (rife with the homeless and addicts), this well-sheltered retro 1950s-style hotel is a gathering place for visiting rock musicians, writers, and filmmakers who crave a dose of Southern California—hence the palm trees and pastel colors. The focal point of the Palm Springs–style hotel is a small, heated outdoor pool adorned with a mural by artist Francis Forlenza and ensconced in a modern sculpture garden.


pages: 291 words: 88,879

Going Solo: The Extraordinary Rise and Surprising Appeal of Living Alone by Eric Klinenberg

big-box store, carbon footprint, David Brooks, deindustrialization, deskilling, employer provided health coverage, equal pay for equal work, estate planning, fear of failure, financial independence, fixed income, Joseph Schumpeter, knowledge economy, longitudinal study, mass incarceration, New Urbanism, Ralph Waldo Emerson, rent control, Richard Florida, San Francisco homelessness, selection bias, Silicon Valley, Skype, speech recognition, women in the workforce, working poor, young professional

Supportive housing facilities like those built by Common Ground are cost-effective and, as a number of scientific studies have shown, cost-saving ways to help people who are on their own and in trouble; they can even produce benefits for the communities in which they are located. Consider findings published in two top medical journals, Psychiatric Services and JAMA: The Journal of the American Medical Association. One article, an analysis of homeless single adults with psychiatric and substance abuse disorders in San Francisco, reports, “Providing permanent supportive housing . . . reduced their use of costly hospital emergency department and inpatient services, which are publicly provided.” A second, which tracks chronically homeless singles with severe alcohol problems in Seattle, reports that those who were placed in a supportive housing complex—one that allows residents to drink in their rooms and offers a range of voluntary services—cut their consumption of alcohol, their encounters with the criminal justice system, and their use of expensive health services.


Northern California Travel Guide by Lonely Planet

Airbnb, Apple II, Asilomar, back-to-the-land, Bay Area Rapid Transit, big-box store, Burning Man, buy and hold, California gold rush, call centre, car-free, carbon footprint, clean water, dark matter, Donald Trump, Donner party, East Village, El Camino Real, Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test, Frank Gehry, friendly fire, glass ceiling, Golden Gate Park, Google bus, Haight Ashbury, haute couture, haute cuisine, housing crisis, Joan Didion, Kickstarter, Loma Prieta earthquake, Lyft, Mahatma Gandhi, Mark Zuckerberg, Mason jar, McMansion, means of production, Port of Oakland, ride hailing / ride sharing, Ronald Reagan, San Francisco homelessness, Silicon Valley, Silicon Valley startup, South of Market, San Francisco, stealth mode startup, stem cell, Steve Jobs, Steve Wozniak, Stewart Brand, the built environment, trade route, transcontinental railway, uber lyft, Upton Sinclair, urban sprawl, white picket fence, Whole Earth Catalog, women in the workforce, working poor, Works Progress Administration, young professional

In recent years, cities such as San Francisco and Sacramento have seen an uptick of 3%, according to the Department of Housing and Urban Development, and nearly half of the nation's 'unsheltered' homeless are living on the streets of California. With the additional impact of the housing boom and changing demographics of San Francisco, some suggest that the numbers are actually much higher. The sheer visibility of homeless people in Northern California, particularly in San Francisco, is a shock for many visitors. Understanding the causes and demographics of Northern California’s homeless is not easy. Some are teens who have run away or been kicked out by their families, but the largest contingent of homeless Californians are US military veterans.


pages: 373 words: 112,822

The Upstarts: How Uber, Airbnb, and the Killer Companies of the New Silicon Valley Are Changing the World by Brad Stone

Affordable Care Act / Obamacare, Airbnb, Amazon Web Services, Andy Kessler, autonomous vehicles, Ben Horowitz, Boris Johnson, Burning Man, call centre, Chuck Templeton: OpenTable:, collaborative consumption, East Village, fixed income, Google X / Alphabet X, hockey-stick growth, housing crisis, inflight wifi, Jeff Bezos, Justin.tv, Kickstarter, Lyft, Marc Andreessen, Mark Zuckerberg, Menlo Park, Mitch Kapor, Necker cube, obamacare, Paul Graham, peer-to-peer, Peter Thiel, race to the bottom, rent control, ride hailing / ride sharing, Ruby on Rails, San Francisco homelessness, Sand Hill Road, self-driving car, semantic web, sharing economy, side project, Silicon Valley, Silicon Valley startup, Skype, South of Market, San Francisco, Startup school, Steve Jobs, TaskRabbit, Tony Hsieh, transportation-network company, Travis Kalanick, Uber and Lyft, Uber for X, uber lyft, ubercab, Y Combinator, Y2K, Zipcar

In Silicon Valley, this is what passes for getting the last laugh. To the casual observer, the home-rental site Airbnb didn’t seem like it could ride this wave, let alone come to embody it. At the start of the year, its employees were still crowded into the office on Tenth Street in SoMa (the South of Market area in San Francisco), with bad cell phone reception inside and the homeless camping on the street outside. The startup was run almost entirely by its triumvirate of co-founders, who had two college degrees in design and one in computer science among them. Behind the scenes, though, Airbnb was booming. The activities of Nate Blecharczyk, the growth hacker, had cranked the flywheel.


pages: 513 words: 141,963

Chasing the Scream: The First and Last Days of the War on Drugs by Johann Hari

Airbnb, centre right, failed state, glass ceiling, global pandemic, illegal immigration, mass incarceration, McJob, moral panic, Naomi Klein, placebo effect, profit motive, RAND corporation, Rat Park, Ronald Reagan, San Francisco homelessness, science of happiness, Steven Pinker, traveling salesman, War on Poverty

If this logic had been extended to a few more substances, the drug war graveyard would still be a rolling green field. The day after Christmas in 2013, Billie Holiday’s godson, Bevan Dufty—whom she had suckled, telling his mother with a laugh, “This is my baby, bitch!”—was sitting in a San Francisco clinic. He was in charge of helping the homeless in the city, and he was there to help a heroin addict who was in withdrawal and had just been thrown off his methadone program. The addict turned to Bevan and said he wanted to rip the skin off his body, because he couldn’t bear to be without the drug for one more minute.


pages: 590 words: 153,208

Wealth and Poverty: A New Edition for the Twenty-First Century by George Gilder

"Robert Solow", affirmative action, Albert Einstein, Bear Stearns, Bernie Madoff, British Empire, business cycle, capital controls, cleantech, cloud computing, collateralized debt obligation, creative destruction, Credit Default Swap, credit default swaps / collateralized debt obligations, crony capitalism, deindustrialization, diversified portfolio, Donald Trump, equal pay for equal work, floating exchange rates, full employment, George Gilder, Gunnar Myrdal, Home mortgage interest deduction, Howard Zinn, income inequality, independent contractor, invisible hand, Jane Jacobs, Jeff Bezos, job automation, job-hopping, Joseph Schumpeter, knowledge economy, labor-force participation, longitudinal study, margin call, Mark Zuckerberg, means of production, medical malpractice, minimum wage unemployment, Money creation, money market fund, money: store of value / unit of account / medium of exchange, Mont Pelerin Society, moral hazard, mortgage debt, non-fiction novel, North Sea oil, paradox of thrift, Paul Samuelson, Plutocrats, plutocrats, Ponzi scheme, post-industrial society, price stability, Ralph Nader, rent control, Robert Gordon, Ronald Reagan, San Francisco homelessness, Silicon Valley, Simon Kuznets, skunkworks, Steve Jobs, The Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith, Thomas L Friedman, upwardly mobile, urban renewal, volatility arbitrage, War on Poverty, women in the workforce, working poor, working-age population, yield curve, zero-sum game

With government looming in the bedroom and the male role in procreation relegated to passive irresponsibility, the male is cuckolded by the welfare state. Excesses in food stamps foster obesity, a nation of gastropaths. Free and rent-controlled housing comes to mean an ever-greater incidence of homelessness, thronging and devaluing real estate from the Presidio in San Francisco to Central Park in New York. There are only two ways to manage health care without destroying the system with runaway costs. One is to allow the government to ration care and control every medical expense, reducing the population to medical mendicants and destroying incentives for medical innovation and good health practices.