Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test

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pages: 363 words: 123,076

The Gang That Wouldn't Write Straight: Wolfe, Thompson, Didion, Capote, and the New Journalism Revolution by Marc Weingarten

1960s counterculture, Bonfire of the Vanities, British Empire, citizen journalism, cognitive dissonance, Donner party, East Village, Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test, Haight Ashbury, In Cold Blood by Truman Capote, Joan Didion, Kickstarter, Menlo Park, New Journalism, non-fiction novel, Norman Mailer, post-work, pre–internet, rent control, rolodex, Ronald Reagan, Stewart Brand, upwardly mobile, working poor, yellow journalism

“As I began to calm down, I had the feeling that I had entered into the sheen of this nubby twist carpet—a really wretched carpet, made of Acrilan—and somehow this represented the people of America, in their democratic glory.” Fortunately for Wolfe, such specious insights didn’t make it into The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test. The reviews of the book, which was published in August 1968 on the same day as his second collection of articles, The Pump House Gang, were far more enthusiastic than the notices for The Kandy-Kolored Tangerine-Flake Streamline Baby. “The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test is an astonishing book,” wrote C. D. B. Bryan in the New York Times Book Review. “Wolfe is precisely the right author to chronicle the transformation of Ken Kesey from respected author of ‘And One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest’ [sic] to an LSD enthusiast….

Thompson, The Proud Highway: Saga of a Desperate Southern Gentleman: The Fear and Loathing Letters, Volume 1 (New York: Villard, 1997), 524. “several hours of eating”: Hunter S. Thompson, Hell’s Angels: A Strange and Terrible Saga (New York: Modern Library, 1999), 220. Certain vibrations of the bus: Wolfe, The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test, 110. A very Christmas card: Ibid., 55. Miles, Miles, Miles: Ibid., 47. [S]ome blonde from out of town: Ibid., 176. “Certain passages—such as the Hell’s Angels gangbang”: From an interview sent to the author from Paul Krassner, used with Krassner’s permission. “The ceiling is moving”: Wolfe, The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test, 40. Wolfe would revert to a“controlled trance”;“I felt like my heart”: Toby Thompson, “The Evolution of Dandy Tom,”Vanity Fair, October 1987 5. THE CENTER CANNOT HOLD Biographical background on Joan Didion is taken from Joan Didion, Where I Was From (New York: Random House, 2003) and Michiko Kakutani, “Joan Didion: Staking Out California,”New York Times, June 10, 1979.

So they became our master explainers, our town criers, even our moral conscience—the New Journalists. Was it a movement? Not a movement in the Kerouac-Ginsberg-Corso sense or in the Abstract Expressionist sense. Many of these writers were cordial with each other, but they didn’t share apartments or sex partners. But consider the fact that most of the books and articles discussed in this book were all written within seven years of each other. Not just any stories, either, but The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test, Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas, Slouching Towards Bethlehem, Dispatches—some of the greatest journalism of the twentieth century, stories that changed the way their readers viewed the world. It was an unprecedented outpouring of creative nonfiction, the greatest literary movement since the American fiction renaissance of the 1920s. The first rule of what came to be known as New Journalism was that the old rules didn’t apply.


pages: 339 words: 57,031

From Counterculture to Cyberculture: Stewart Brand, the Whole Earth Network, and the Rise of Digital Utopianism by Fred Turner

1960s counterculture, A Declaration of the Independence of Cyberspace, Apple's 1984 Super Bowl advert, back-to-the-land, bioinformatics, Buckminster Fuller, business cycle, Claude Shannon: information theory, complexity theory, computer age, conceptual framework, Danny Hillis, dematerialisation, distributed generation, Douglas Engelbart, Douglas Engelbart, Dynabook, Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test, From Mathematics to the Technologies of Life and Death, future of work, game design, George Gilder, global village, Golden Gate Park, Hacker Ethic, Haight Ashbury, hive mind, Howard Rheingold, informal economy, invisible hand, Jaron Lanier, John Markoff, John von Neumann, Kevin Kelly, knowledge economy, knowledge worker, market bubble, Marshall McLuhan, mass immigration, means of production, Menlo Park, Mitch Kapor, Mother of all demos, new economy, Norbert Wiener, peer-to-peer, post-industrial society, postindustrial economy, Productivity paradox, QWERTY keyboard, Ralph Waldo Emerson, RAND corporation, Richard Stallman, Robert Shiller, Robert Shiller, Ronald Reagan, Shoshana Zuboff, Silicon Valley, Silicon Valley ideology, South of Market, San Francisco, Steve Jobs, Steve Wozniak, Steven Levy, Stewart Brand, technoutopianism, Ted Nelson, Telecommunications Act of 1996, The Hackers Conference, theory of mind, urban renewal, Vannevar Bush, Whole Earth Catalog, Whole Earth Review, Yom Kippur War

., On the Bus, 11. See also Lee and Shlain, Acid Dreams. 37. Lee and Shlain, Acid Dreams, 200. 38. Ken Kesey, “A Successful Dope Fiend,” 4. 39. Brand, “Notebooks,” December 18, 1962. 40. Wolfe, Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test, 13. 41. Lardas, Bop Apocalypse, 4. 42. Ginsberg quoted in Lardas, Bop Apocalypse, 10, 92 –93; Ginsberg, “New Consciousness.” 43. In this regard, as Daniel Belgrad has pointed out, they were part of a much larger move to embrace an aesthetic of “spontaneity” across the American art world. See Belgrad, Culture of Spontaneity, 196 –221. 44. Stewart Brand, interview, July 17, 2001. 45. Wolfe, Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test, 195. 46. Ibid., 222. 47. Ibid., 138, quotations on 127. 48. Ibid., 230 – 49. 49. America Needs Indians was one of several multimedia pieces Brand pulled together in the mid-1960s.

A scene began to emerge: some of the writers from Stanford, the artist Roy Seburn, psychologist Richard Alpert (later known as Baba Ram Dass), guitarist Jerry Garcia, Page Browning—all had begun to appear for various parties. Within a year, Kesey had put together a new scene, with Page Browning and Gurney Norman remaining from the original Perry Lane crew, and in the fall of 1964 he and the Pranksters painted up an old school bus and drove east on [ 62 ] Chapter 2 the first leg of the legendary tour chronicled in Tom Wolfe’s The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test. Brand did not go with them. As Wolfe put it, Brand represented “the restrained, reflective wing of the Merry Pranksters.”40 Even so, to Brand the Pranksters were a West Coast version of USCO’s techno-tribalism. If USCO had emerged out of an East Coast engagement with cold war avant-garde art, the Pranksters drew on the bohemian energy of San Francisco’s Beatnik scene. Since the mid-1940s, the Beats had built a small, highly influential social world, and with it a literature and a way of being that had an extraordinary impact on the counterculture, especially on its West Coast contingent.

[ 220 ] Chapter 7 In Quittner’s article, the global Net also called to mind the local network of relationships in which the leaders of the EFF found themselves enmeshed. Quittner organized the piece around several miniature portraits of key EFF people. At each stage, he carefully emphasized their extraordinary mobility, their access to people in power, and their material success. In The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test, Tom Wolfe took readers inside the garage where the Merry Pranksters painted their psychedelic bus. Quittner here took readers inside San Francisco’s Bistro Rôti—“a cozily upscale place overlooking the bay . . . woodburning stove . . . valet parking . . . white Jaguar in front . . .”—for the EFF’s quarterly board meeting. Diners included Bill Joy, founder of Sun Microsystems; David Liddle, head of Interval Research Corporation; Wired’s own Jane Metcalfe; and a handful of other Silicon Valley luminaries alongside the current board members.


pages: 98 words: 29,610

From Bauhaus to Our House by Tom Wolfe

Bonfire of the Vanities, Buckminster Fuller, Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test, Peter Eisenman, plutocrats, Plutocrats, The Chicago School, urban renewal

The light of the Silver Prince still shone here in the Radiant City. And the client still took itIta man. Also by Tom Wolfe The Kandy-Kolored Tangerine-Flake Streamline Baby The Pump House Gang The Painted Word The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test Radical Chic & Mau-Mauing the Flak Catchers Mauve Gloves & Madmen, Clutter & Vine The Right Stuff In Our Time The Bonfire of the Vanities A Man in Full Hooking Up I Am Charlotte Simmons Tom Wolfe is the author of a dozen books, among them such contemporary classics as The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test, The Bonfire of the Vanities, I Am Charlotte Simmons, and Radical Chic & Mau-Mauing the Flak Catchers. He lives in New York City. Notes 1 The government thought (quite mistakenly) that a new and cosmopolitan architecture might help transcend the country’s bitter racial and ethnic hostilities. 2 It was sometimes permissible to construct a “mono-pitch” roof, a roof with one sloping surface instead of two; and this exception to the rule for worker housing in the 1920s is given devout homage today, on a gigantic scale, in such office towers as the Citicorp Building in New York and Pennzoil Place in Houston. 3 Likewise, in the field of psychology.


pages: 394 words: 108,215

What the Dormouse Said: How the Sixties Counterculture Shaped the Personal Computer Industry by John Markoff

Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic, Apple II, back-to-the-land, beat the dealer, Bill Duvall, Bill Gates: Altair 8800, Buckminster Fuller, California gold rush, card file, computer age, computer vision, conceptual framework, cuban missile crisis, different worldview, Donald Knuth, Douglas Engelbart, Douglas Engelbart, Dynabook, Edward Thorp, El Camino Real, Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test, general-purpose programming language, Golden Gate Park, Hacker Ethic, hypertext link, informal economy, information retrieval, invention of the printing press, Jeff Rulifson, John Markoff, John Nash: game theory, John von Neumann, Kevin Kelly, knowledge worker, Mahatma Gandhi, Menlo Park, Mother of all demos, Norbert Wiener, packet switching, Paul Terrell, popular electronics, QWERTY keyboard, RAND corporation, RFC: Request For Comment, Richard Stallman, Robert X Cringely, Sand Hill Road, Silicon Valley, Silicon Valley startup, South of Market, San Francisco, speech recognition, Steve Crocker, Steve Jobs, Steve Wozniak, Steven Levy, Stewart Brand, Ted Nelson, The Hackers Conference, Thorstein Veblen, Turing test, union organizing, Vannevar Bush, Whole Earth Catalog, William Shockley: the traitorous eight

When that happened, it was not just as the result of developments within the insular world of computer design. It was the mid-sixties, and the outside world was both closing in and coming asunder in ways that shook the very foundations of American society. Engelbart’s project was to become a casualty of the chaos. It wasn’t until 1968 that Stewart Brand and Jim Fadiman made a very public appearance together, in a cameo in the opening pages of Tom Wolfe’s The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test. Brand is introduced as the “enamorado” of a half-Ottawa Native American, Lois Jennings, as the two bounce along in a truck Brand is driving through the San Francisco hills as they wait for Ken Kesey to get out of jail. Fadiman is described as the nephew of Clifton Fadiman, the writer and editor who was known for the encyclopedic knowledge he displayed on the Information Please radio programs of the 1930s and 1940s.

With time, civilians in the outside world began to get hints of the technology and become curious about it. Dave Evans was one of the Augment team members who had strong ties to the counterculture, and one evening Stewart Brand brought Ken Kesey by for a look at the NLS system. It was several years after the Merry Prankster era and Kesey’s legal problems over a marijuana arrest, and he had become a celebrity as a result of the publication of Tom Wolfe’s The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test, in which he was the main character. He was quarreling with Hollywood movie studios over the film based on his novel Sometimes a Great Notion and was preparing to retreat to a dairy farm in Oregon. For an hour, Evans took the system through its paces, showing the writer how it was possible to manipulate text, retrieve information, and collaborate with others. At the end of the demonstration Kesey sighed and said, “It’s the next thing after acid.”

Vallee, Jacques. The Network Revolution: Confessions of a Computer Scientist. Berkeley, Calif.: And/Or Press, 1982. Waldrop, M. Mitchell. The Dream Machine: J.C.R. Licklider and the Revolution That Made Computing Personal. New York: Viking, 2001. Wayner, Peter. Free for All: How Linux and the Free Software Movement Undercut the High-Tech Titans. New York: Harper Business, 2000. Wolfe, Tom. The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test. New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 1968. Zachary, G. Pascal. Endless Frontier: Vannevar Bush, Engineer of the American Century. New York: Free Press, 1997. INDEX Adobe Systems Air Force, U.S. Albrecht, Bob est and folk dancing of Homebrew and Moore and Aldus Manutius algorithms Allen, Don Allen, Mary Allen, Paul Allison, Dennis Alpert, Richard Altair Alternatives conference Alto American Documentation Institute Ames Research Laboratory Ampex LSD and Andrews, Don Andrews, Paul antiwar activism Augment lab and Brand and Diffie and draft resistance Duvall and Felsenstein and militancy in Moore and Stanford and Apple Computer Alto and ARPA (Advanced Research Projects Agency) Augment funded by Augment funding terminated by SAIL funded by ARPAnet e-commerce on expansion of file-sharing in launch of Network Information Center (NIC) packet switching and Super AI computer for artificial intelligence (AI) golden years of McCarthy and; see also McCarthy, John modeling human intelligence and superbrain and Turing test and see also Stanford Artificial Intelligence Laboratory Art of Computer Programming, The (Knuth) ASCII AT&T Atari Atlantic Monthly augmentation complexity in Augmentation Research Center (Augmented Human Intellect Research Center) antiwar viewpoint and ARPAnet launch and ARPA’s funding of ARPA’s termination of funding of business manager hired at counterculture and departures from division of Engelbart’s Brooks Hall demonstration Engelbart’s loss of control of est and Fadiman and growth of hippie vibe at Kay at Moore and name change of NLS in, see NLS refashioning of SAIL and social experimentation at teenagers at text editing and Tymshare purchase of Xerox and Baer, Steve Baez, Joan Bakalinsky, Eric Bank of America Barringer, Felicity BASIC “borrowed” copy of Interaccess Tiny Bass, Walter Bates, Roger Baum, Allen Beach, Scott Beautiful Mind, A (Nasar) be-ins Bell, Gordon Bell Laboratories Bender, Dorothy Bennion, Dave Berkeley, Calif.


The Kingdom of Speech by Tom Wolfe

Ada Lovelace, Alfred Russel Wallace, Bonfire of the Vanities, British Empire, complexity theory, Copley Medal, Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test, failed state, Isaac Newton, Nelson Mandela, Norman Mailer, Steven Pinker, Thomas Malthus

., “The Mystery of Language Evolution,” Frontiers in Psychology, May 7, 2014. 159 Chris Sinha, “Language and Other Artifacts: Socio-Cultural Dynamics of Niche Construction,” Frontiers in Psychology, October 20, 2015. 160 Andy Clark, Being There: Putting Brain, Body, and World Together Again (Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, 1997), 193. About the Author Tom Wolfe is the author of more than a dozen books, among them The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test, The Right Stuff, The Bonfire of the Vanities, A Man in Full, I Am Charlotte Simmons, and Back to Blood. A native of Richmond, Virginia, he earned his BA at Washington and Lee University and a PhD in American Studies at Yale. He received the National Book Foundation’s 2010 Medal for Distinguished Contribution to American Letters. He lives in New York City. Also by Tom Wolfe The Kandy-Kolored Tangerine-Flake Streamline Baby The Pump House Gang The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test Radical Chic & Mau-Mauing the Flak Catchers The Painted Word Mauve Gloves & Madmen, Clutter & Vine The Right Stuff In Our Time From Bauhaus to Our House The Purple Decades The Bonfire of the Vanities A Man in Full Hooking Up I Am Charlotte Simmons Back to Blood Thank you for buying this ebook, published by Hachette Digital.


pages: 407 words: 90,238

Stealing Fire: How Silicon Valley, the Navy SEALs, and Maverick Scientists Are Revolutionizing the Way We Live and Work by Steven Kotler, Jamie Wheal

3D printing, Alexander Shulgin, augmented reality, Berlin Wall, Bernie Sanders, bitcoin, blockchain, Burning Man, Colonization of Mars, crowdsourcing, David Brooks, delayed gratification, disruptive innovation, Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test, Elon Musk, en.wikipedia.org, high batting average, hive mind, Hyperloop, impulse control, informal economy, Jaron Lanier, John Markoff, Kevin Kelly, lateral thinking, Mason jar, Maui Hawaii, McMansion, means of production, Menlo Park, meta analysis, meta-analysis, music of the spheres, pattern recognition, Peter Thiel, PIHKAL and TIHKAL, Ray Kurzweil, ride hailing / ride sharing, risk tolerance, science of happiness, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI), Silicon Valley, Silicon Valley startup, Skype, Steve Jobs, Tony Hsieh, urban planning

When we came back out [of the sessions], they took one look at us and said, ‘Whatever they do, don’t let them go back in that room!’” Over on Perry Lane, the bohemian cottage enclave where he lived, Kesey and his growing band of pranksters took things out of the lab and into the field. “Volunteer Kesey gave himself over to science21 at the Menlo Park vets hospital,” Tom Wolfe recounts in The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test, “and somehow drugs were getting up and walking out of there and over to Perry Lane.” “Half the time,” Wolfe continues, “Perry Lane would be like some kind of college fraternity row22 with everybody out on a nice autumn Saturday afternoon on the grass . . . playing touch football . . . an hour later Kesey and his circle would be hooking down something that in the entire world only they and a few other avant-garde neuropharmacological researchers even knew about.”

Drugged,” New York Times, November 26, 2012. 19. Stegner dismissed him as a sort of highly talented illiterate: Jackson J. Benson, Wallace Stegner: His Life and Work (Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 1996), p. 253. 20. “The scientists didn’t have the guts”: Joshua Fried, “What a Trip,” Stanford Alumni Magazine, January/February 2002. 21. “Volunteer Kesey gave himself over to science”: Tom Wolfe, The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test (New York: Farrar, Straus & Giroux, 1968), p. 45. 22. Half the time”: Ibid., p. 46; Richard Strozzi-Heckler, In Search of the Warrior Spirit: Teaching Awareness Disciplines to the Green Berets (Berkeley: Blue Snake Books, 2007), p. 17. 23. Armed with speakers mounted in the redwoods: John Markoff, What the Doormouse Said (New York: Viking, 2005), p. 122. 24. A round of post-Vietnam soul-searching”: FrankRose, “A New Age for Business?

See Tolle, Eckhart economy “experience,” 195 “transformation,” 195–96, 197 See also Altered States Economy; costs ecstasis advances in understanding of, 153 beginning of, 44 case for, 7–69 definition of, 23, 67 in everyday lives, 174–78 four forces of, 71 and “I” replaced be “we,” 68 as information technology, 46 “legitimately earned,” 59 as long-term practice, 214 misuse/dangers of, 181–200 onset of, 136 open-sourcing of, 128–29, 184–85, 187, 200 Plato’s views about, 11 Silva as ambassador of, 33–36 as solving wicked problems, 50, 158–79 and stealing kykeon, 5 as “stepping beyond oneself,” 11 as “sufficiently advanced technology,” 22 as teacher, 217 unconsciousness as alternative of, 7 user manual for, 201–18 validation of, 93 what is, 9–32 and why it matters, 33–50 and why we missed it, 51–69 See also specific force or topic Ecstasis Equation, 209–16 ecstasy and Pale of the State, 61–62 purposes for use of, 54 Shulgin development of, 121 traditional techniques of, 57, 69 Ecstatic Kabbalah, 109 Edwards, Trevor, 170 EEG technology, 26, 104, 194, 197 effortlessness benefits of, 42 “known issues”/downsides of, 193, 205–6 and learning, 220 and open-sourcing ecstasis, 200 as STER category, 41–43, 45 Tolle and, 76 and training for nonordinary states, 205–6 See also STER ego death of, 67 disintegration of, 126 inflation of, 202–3, 208 and music, 142 and neurobiology, 111, 113, 114 and psychedelics, 124, 126 repurposing of, 201–2 Einstein, Albert, 98 Eipmetheus, 221, 222 The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test (Wolfe), 189 electronic dance music (EDM), 30, 67, 85 electronic festivals, 142 Eleusinian Mysteries, 2–3, 168 Eleusis, 3, 19, 155 Eliade, Mircea, 57 elites: spreading of ecstatic culture by, 165–74 Ellie (AI), 100–102, 104 Ellison, Larry, 219–20 embodied/disembodied cognition, 97, 98, 99, 100, 101, 111, 152, 175 “emergent” leadership, 105–6 emotions and neurobiology, 97, 100–102 See also specific emotion empathy, 96, 97, 152, 193, 198 Empire State Building: Jones art at, 143, 144 “End of the Line” experience, 131 end of the world feeling, 204 endorphins, 20–21, 24, 42, 45, 85, 141, 217 enlightenment engineering, 146–48 entertainment and Altered States Economy, 30 See also type of entertainment entrepreneurs, 171, 172, 174, 204 Equinox Gyms, 195 Erhard, Werner, 79–80, 81 Erowid.


pages: 171 words: 54,334

Barefoot Into Cyberspace: Adventures in Search of Techno-Utopia by Becky Hogge, Damien Morris, Christopher Scally

A Declaration of the Independence of Cyberspace, back-to-the-land, Berlin Wall, Buckminster Fuller, Chelsea Manning, citizen journalism, cloud computing, corporate social responsibility, disintermediation, Douglas Engelbart, Douglas Engelbart, Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test, Fall of the Berlin Wall, game design, Hacker Ethic, informal economy, information asymmetry, Jacob Appelbaum, jimmy wales, John Markoff, Julian Assange, Kevin Kelly, mass immigration, Menlo Park, Mitch Kapor, MITM: man-in-the-middle, moral panic, Mother of all demos, Naomi Klein, Nelson Mandela, Network effects, New Journalism, Norbert Wiener, peer-to-peer, Richard Stallman, Silicon Valley, Skype, Socratic dialogue, Steve Jobs, Steve Wozniak, Steven Levy, Stewart Brand, technoutopianism, Telecommunications Act of 1996, The Hackers Conference, Vannevar Bush, Whole Earth Catalog, Whole Earth Review, WikiLeaks

In so being, they bequeathed my generation – or at least the folk who know enough to make it to the Chaos Congress each year – the tools and the vision we would one day employ in an attempt to reboot that culture, to turn consumers back into participants. When I was 19, Ken Kesey came to my home town, Brighton, along with a reproduction of Furthur, the psychedelic school bus he and the Merry Pranksters first drove around the US in the late sixties on one long trip funded by the proceeds of selling Kesey’s film rights for One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest. It was that journey that Tom Wolfe immortalised in The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test. Thirty years later in 1999, some of the original Merry Pranksters came with him to the Peace Statue on Brighton Beach – the electrical whizz kid Babbs, Mountain Girl – but Brand, the man sitting in front of me now, who travelled in Kesey’s inner circle in the sixties, was not among them. In nineties’ Brighton, Kesey came off to me as a rainbow-clad kids TV presenter past his prime – not surprising, given that the legacy of sixties psychedelic culture was perhaps felt strongest in eighties’ children’s TV.

Washington Post, August 3. http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2010/08/02/AR2010080202627.html. Turner, Fred. 2006. From Counterculture to Cyberculture: Stewart Brand, the Whole Earth Network, and the Rise of Digital Utopianism. United States: The University of Chicago Press. WikiLeaks. 2010. Collateral Murder. April 5. http://www.collateralmurder.com/. Wolfe, Tom. 1989. The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test. Great Britan: Black Swan. York, Jillian. 2010. Policing Content in the Quasi-Public Sphere. Bulletin. September 21. http://opennet.net/policing-content-quasi-public-sphere. Zemeckis, Robert. 1985. Back to the Future. Zuckerman, Ethan. New Berkman Paper on DDoS – silencing speech is easy, protecting it is hard. My Heart’s in Accra. http://www.ethanzuckerman.com/blog/2010/12/20/new-berkman-paper-on-ddos-silencing-speech-is-easy-protecting-it-is-hard/.


pages: 720 words: 197,129

The Innovators: How a Group of Inventors, Hackers, Geniuses and Geeks Created the Digital Revolution by Walter Isaacson

1960s counterculture, Ada Lovelace, AI winter, Alan Turing: On Computable Numbers, with an Application to the Entscheidungsproblem, Albert Einstein, AltaVista, Apple II, augmented reality, back-to-the-land, beat the dealer, Bill Gates: Altair 8800, bitcoin, Bob Noyce, Buckminster Fuller, Byte Shop, c2.com, call centre, citizen journalism, Claude Shannon: information theory, Clayton Christensen, commoditize, computer age, crowdsourcing, cryptocurrency, Debian, desegregation, Donald Davies, Douglas Engelbart, Douglas Engelbart, Douglas Hofstadter, Dynabook, El Camino Real, Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test, en.wikipedia.org, Firefox, Google Glasses, Grace Hopper, Gödel, Escher, Bach, Hacker Ethic, Haight Ashbury, Howard Rheingold, Hush-A-Phone, HyperCard, hypertext link, index card, Internet Archive, Jacquard loom, Jaron Lanier, Jeff Bezos, jimmy wales, John Markoff, John von Neumann, Joseph-Marie Jacquard, Leonard Kleinrock, Marc Andreessen, Mark Zuckerberg, Marshall McLuhan, Menlo Park, Mitch Kapor, Mother of all demos, new economy, New Journalism, Norbert Wiener, Norman Macrae, packet switching, PageRank, Paul Terrell, pirate software, popular electronics, pre–internet, RAND corporation, Ray Kurzweil, RFC: Request For Comment, Richard Feynman, Richard Stallman, Robert Metcalfe, Rubik’s Cube, Sand Hill Road, Saturday Night Live, self-driving car, Silicon Valley, Silicon Valley startup, Skype, slashdot, speech recognition, Steve Ballmer, Steve Crocker, Steve Jobs, Steve Wozniak, Steven Levy, Steven Pinker, Stewart Brand, technological singularity, technoutopianism, Ted Nelson, The Coming Technological Singularity, The Nature of the Firm, The Wisdom of Crowds, Turing complete, Turing machine, Turing test, Vannevar Bush, Vernor Vinge, Von Neumann architecture, Watson beat the top human players on Jeopardy!, Whole Earth Catalog, Whole Earth Review, wikimedia commons, William Shockley: the traitorous eight

The next night was kicked off by Kesey, who had been busted for drugs a few days earlier on Brand’s North Beach roof but was out on bail and orchestrating the event from a command scaffold. Featured were the Merry Pranksters and their Psychedelic Symphony, Big Brother and the Holding Company, the Grateful Dead, and members of the Hells Angels motorcycle gang. The writer Tom Wolfe tried to recapture the technodelic essence in his seminal work of New Journalism, The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test: Lights and movies sweeping around the hall; five movie projectors going and God knows how many light machines, interferrometrics, the intergalactic science-fiction seas all over the walls, loudspeakers studding the hall all the way around like flaming chandeliers, strobes exploding, black lights with Day-Glo objects under them and Day-Glo paint to play with, street lights at every entrance flashing red and yellow, and a troop of weird girls in leotards, leaping around the edges blowing dog whistles.

Brand’s succession of ventures, including the Whole Earth Catalog, were based just a few blocks from Engelbart’s Augmentation Research Center. Thus it was natural that they team up for a demonstration in December 1968 of Engelbart’s oNLine System. Thanks to Brand’s instincts as an impresario, the demo, which later became known as the Mother of All Demos, became a multimedia extravaganza, like an Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test on silicon. The event turned out to be the ultimate melding of hippie and hacker culture, and it has remained unchallenged, even by Apple product launches, as the most dazzling and influential technology demonstration of the digital age.39 The year had been turbulent. In 1968 the Tet Offensive turned America against the Vietnam War, Robert Kennedy and Martin Luther King were assassinated, and Lyndon Johnson announced he would not seek reelection.

The latter mission had seemed rather quirky when Engelbart began working on it, but when he showed off all of its elements in his December 1968 demo—a personal computer that humans could easily interact with in real time, a network that allowed collaborative creativity—it overshadowed the robot. The headline of the story from the conference in the next day’s San Francisco Chronicle was “Fantastic World of Tomorrow’s Computer.” It was about Engelbart’s oNLine System, not about the robot.42 As if to seal the marriage of the counterculture and cyberculture, Brand brought Ken Kesey to Engelbart’s lab to experience the oNLine System. Kesey, by then famous from Tom Wolfe’s The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test, got a full tour of how the system could cut, paste, retrieve, and collaboratively create books and other documents. He was impressed. “It’s the next thing after acid,” Kesey pronounced.43 ALAN KAY Alan Kay struggled to make sure that he got to Engelbart’s Mother of All Demos. He had a 102-degree fever and strep throat, but he was able to drag himself onto a plane from Utah, where he was a graduate student.


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World Without Mind: The Existential Threat of Big Tech by Franklin Foer

artificial general intelligence, back-to-the-land, Berlin Wall, big data - Walmart - Pop Tarts, big-box store, Buckminster Fuller, citizen journalism, Colonization of Mars, computer age, creative destruction, crowdsourcing, data is the new oil, don't be evil, Donald Trump, Double Irish / Dutch Sandwich, Douglas Engelbart, Edward Snowden, Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test, Elon Musk, Fall of the Berlin Wall, Filter Bubble, global village, Google Glasses, Haight Ashbury, hive mind, income inequality, intangible asset, Jeff Bezos, job automation, John Markoff, Kevin Kelly, knowledge economy, Law of Accelerating Returns, Marc Andreessen, Mark Zuckerberg, Marshall McLuhan, means of production, move fast and break things, move fast and break things, new economy, New Journalism, Norbert Wiener, offshore financial centre, PageRank, Peace of Westphalia, Peter Thiel, planetary scale, Ray Kurzweil, self-driving car, Silicon Valley, Singularitarianism, software is eating the world, Steve Jobs, Steven Levy, Stewart Brand, strong AI, supply-chain management, the medium is the message, the scientific method, The Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith, The Wisdom of Crowds, Thomas L Friedman, Thorstein Veblen, Upton Sinclair, Vernor Vinge, Whole Earth Catalog, yellow journalism

(He began messing around with acid in 1962, when it could be procured from legitimate medical experimenters.) Brand was the master of the uptight, straitlaced tasks that flummoxed most of his long-haired friends—renting a hall, publicizing an event. When he linked up with the writer Ken Kesey and his storied posse of drug-dabbling Merry Pranksters, he represented the “restrained, reflective wing” of that Day-Glo band of hipsters, at least in The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test, Tom Wolfe’s travelogue through the emerging counterculture. Though Brand wore a top hat with a flower, and he spoke in impish aphorisms, he remained a neatnik with a filing cabinet. His pièce de résistance was organizing the Trips Festival, the greatest of the Acid Test parties that Kesey’s crew hosted in San Francisco to celebrate their favorite drug. Brand put together a program for three days of psychedelia, which helped launch the 1960s, as we now know them.

This book ends on an optimistic note, because I have Theo and Sadie, naturally born idealists and the best company. With all my heart, thanks to my wife, Abby. She has supplied me with the love, encouragement, and wisdom to make it all the way through the challenges of writing and life. Notes CHAPTER ONE: THE VALLEY IS WHOLE, THE WORLD IS ONE as an “Indian freak”: Tom Wolfe, The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test (Farrar, Straus & Giroux, 1968), 2, 11. child of an advertising executive: For biographical details about Brand, I leaned heavily on three excellent books: Fred Turner, From Counterculture to Cyberculture (University of Chicago Press, 2006); John Markoff, What the Dormouse Said (Viking Penguin, 2005); Walter Isaacson, The Innovators (Simon & Schuster, 2014). “cosmic consciousness”: Turner, 59.


Woolly: The True Story of the Quest to Revive History's Most Iconic Extinct Creature by Ben Mezrich

butterfly effect, Danny Hillis, double helix, Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test, Jeff Bezos, Kickstarter, life extension, Louis Pasteur, mass immigration, microbiome, personalized medicine, Peter Thiel, Silicon Valley, Silicon Valley ideology, stem cell, Stewart Brand

Church could think of no better description of Brand and Phelan. In the late sixties, as the creator and publisher of the Whole Earth Catalogue, Brand had become a guide for those looking to live in harmony with the environment. He had blazed a countercultural trail that had inspired Church’s entire generation. One of Ken Kesey’s original Merry Pranksters, who were written about by Tom Wolfe in his book The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test, Brand had been a proponent of the use of LSD—the “turn on, tune in, drop out” movement. In fact, the Whole Earth Catalogue had actually grown out of an acid trip. After a particularly lucid experience in 1968, Brand had decided to sell buttons inquiring, “Why haven’t we seen a picture of the whole Earth yet?” At the time, Russia and the United States had gone into orbit multiple times and NASA very shortly would send a man to the moon.

–Canadian border, 133–42 education of, 134, 137–39, 145 family of, 135, 137, 141 immortalizing elephant cells and, 199–202, 205, 223 and implanting Mammoth genetic material into elephant cells, 162, 223, 226, 240, 242–43, 246–47 Mammoth team and, 145, 147–48, 152, 154, 159–63, 175, 188, 197–98, 201, 205, 223, 226, 242–43, 246–47 research on aging of, 136–39, 141–42, 198–99, 243 synthesizing stem cells and, 205, 223 wife of, 134–42, 145, 198 Yang’s relationship with, 141–42 dinosaurs, 42, 156 DNA of, 78, 80, 261–63 resurrection of, 78, 80 Disney Pavilion, 43 DNA, 127–28, 210, 219–20, 244, 271 ancient, 78, 80, 172, 261–63, 265–66 body size traits and, 259 Cas 9 protein and, 152–53 chemical building blocks of, 51, 53, 152 Church and, 17–19, 47, 50, 55, 59, 94, 109–10, 139, 221, 230, 261–66 cloning and, 191, 216 CRISPR and, 193, 231 Dhadwar and, 136–37, 152 double helix structure of, 47, 51, 152 editing of, 18, 109–10, 193, 264–65 fruit fly genetics and, 62 HGP and, 54 immortalizing cells and, 199 and implanting Mammoth genetic material into elephant cells, 162, 172, 174–75, 190, 246 Mammoths’ genetic traits and, 150 Minh’s Mammoth specimen and, 185 passenger pigeons and, 94 and proposed resurrection of Mammoths, 79–80, 110 sequencing of, 17, 50, 54–55, 74, 78, 94, 148 synthesizing stem cells and, 200–201 transplantation medicine and, 124 DNA Direct, 91–92 dogs, 222, 266–67 cloning of, 183, 215–17, 219, 224 Dolly the sheep, 109, 184 dragonflies, 26 Duke University, 47–50, 73, 225 E E. coli, 165, 168, 237–38, 244 Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test, The (Wolfe), 89 Elements Café, 143–45, 154, 156, 159, 161 elephants, 145, 261 acquiring stem cells of, 162–63, 167–68, 173, 189, 194 acquiring tissue of, 155–56, 158–62 African, 79, 84, 158–61, 206–7 Asian, 79, 84, 160–62, 166–69, 172, 205–11, 224, 226, 242, 262–63, 266–67, 269–70 Church’s childhood and, 95 Church’s visit with herd of, 204–9, 211, 223 in circuses, 205–7 comparisons between Mammoths and, 77, 79, 84–85, 147 complex and emotional lives of, 210–11 fetal GMO, 267 genome of, 154, 262, 264–67 gestation period of, 163, 259, 270 giving birth, 166–69 hemoglobin and, 262–63 herpes in, 211–12, 223–24 immortalizing cells of, 199–202, 205, 212, 223, 240, 242 implanting Mammoth genetic material into cells of, 110, 150–51, 153–54, 162–63, 172–75, 190–91, 223–24, 226, 240, 242–43, 246–48 ivory tusks of, 84–85, 211 placentas of, 162–63, 167–70, 173–74, 194 and proposed resurrection of Mammoths, 79–80 rareness of cancer in, 173, 194, 209–10, 259 during rutting season, 208 sequencing of, 189–90 sizes of, 258–59 synthetic uterus and, 226–27 temperaments of, 159–60, 168–69, 206–9 Zimov’s manifesto and, 118 elk, 101–5, 114–15, 251 Energy Department, U.S.


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The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test by Tom Wolfe

Asilomar, Bonfire of the Vanities, Buckminster Fuller, edge city, Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test, Golden Gate Park, Haight Ashbury, haute couture, Menlo Park, Ronald Reagan, stakhanovite, Stewart Brand, strikebreaker, the scientific method, Thorstein Veblen

The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test Chapter I Black Shiny FBI Shoes THAT'S GOOD THINKING THERE, COOL BREEZE, COOL BREEZE is a kid with three or four days' beard sitting next to me on the stamped metal bottom of the open back part of a pickup truck. Bouncing along. Dipping and rising and rolling on these rotten springs like a boat. Out the back of the truck the city of San Francisco is bouncing down the hill, all those endless staggers of bay windows, slums with a view, bouncing and streaming down the hill. One after another, electric signs with neon martini glasses lit up on them, the San Francisco symbol of "bar"—thousands of neon-magenta martini glasses bouncing and streaming down the hill, and beneath them hundreds, thousands of people wheeling around to look at this freaking crazed truck we're in, their white faces erupting from their lapels like marshmallows—streaming and bouncing down the hill—and God knows they've got plenty to look at.

Hell, let's throw in some acid—they'll believe the damn ninny dope fiend would take the dread LSD and break his ass for good—and hell, slam the freaking vehicle into a tree, bleed verisimilitude all over the California littoral: "... I've lost the ocean again. Beautiful. I drive hundreds of miles looking for my particular cliff, get so trapped behind acid I can't find the ocean, end up slamming into a redwood ..." Beautiful. Ready, Ron? He gets into Boise's truck and they head off south for San Diego, the Mexican border, Tijuana and the land of all competent Outlaws. chapter XX The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test WHAT HAPPENED TO THE PRANKSTERS AFTER KESEY'S flight to Mexico was so much like what happened to the League after Leo fled in Hermann Hesse's book The Journey to the East—well, it was freaking weird, this particular synch ... exactly ... the Pranksters ! and the great bus trip of 1964! their whole movie. No; it went on. Hesse's fantasy coincided with theirs all the way. It went on—all the way to this weird divide— The leader of the League in The Journey to the East was named Leo.

Of the many other people I talked to or corresponded with, I particularly want to mention Vic Lovell, Paul Sawyer, Paul Krassner, Pat Hallinan, Brian Rohan, Paul Robertson, Jerry Garcia, Gary Goldhill, Michael Bowen, Anne Severson, Paul Hawken, Bill Tara, Michael Laton, Jack the Fluke, Bill Graham, John Bartholomew Tucker, Roger Grimsby, Marshall Efron, Robin White, Larry McMurtry, Larry Schiller, Donovan Bess, Carl Lehmann-Haupt, and Mr. and Mrs. Fred Kesey. About the Author TOM WOLFE is the author of a dozen books, among them such contemporary classics as The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test, The Right Stuff, The Bonfire of the Vanities, and A Man in Full. A native of Richmond, Virginia, he earned his B.A. at Washington and Lee University and a Ph.D. in American studies at Yale. He lives in New York City.


pages: 474 words: 130,575

Surveillance Valley: The Rise of the Military-Digital Complex by Yasha Levine

23andMe, activist fund / activist shareholder / activist investor, Airbnb, AltaVista, Amazon Web Services, Anne Wojcicki, anti-communist, Apple's 1984 Super Bowl advert, bitcoin, borderless world, British Empire, call centre, Chelsea Manning, cloud computing, collaborative editing, colonial rule, computer age, computerized markets, corporate governance, crowdsourcing, cryptocurrency, digital map, don't be evil, Donald Trump, Douglas Engelbart, Douglas Engelbart, drone strike, Edward Snowden, El Camino Real, Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test, Elon Musk, fault tolerance, George Gilder, ghettoisation, global village, Google Chrome, Google Earth, Google Hangouts, Howard Zinn, hypertext link, IBM and the Holocaust, index card, Jacob Appelbaum, Jeff Bezos, jimmy wales, John Markoff, John von Neumann, Julian Assange, Kevin Kelly, Kickstarter, life extension, Lyft, Mark Zuckerberg, market bubble, Menlo Park, Mitch Kapor, natural language processing, Network effects, new economy, Norbert Wiener, packet switching, PageRank, Paul Buchheit, peer-to-peer, Peter Thiel, Philip Mirowski, plutocrats, Plutocrats, private military company, RAND corporation, Ronald Reagan, Ross Ulbricht, Satoshi Nakamoto, self-driving car, sentiment analysis, shareholder value, side project, Silicon Valley, Silicon Valley startup, Skype, slashdot, Snapchat, speech recognition, Steve Jobs, Steve Wozniak, Steven Levy, Stewart Brand, Telecommunications Act of 1996, telepresence, telepresence robot, The Bell Curve by Richard Herrnstein and Charles Murray, The Hackers Conference, uber lyft, Whole Earth Catalog, Whole Earth Review, WikiLeaks

He had been the publisher of the Whole Earth Catalog, a wildly popular lifestyle magazine for the commune movement. He ran with Ken Kesey and his LSD-dropping Merry Pranksters, and he had played a central role in setting up and promoting the psychedelic concert where the Grateful Dead debuted and rang in San Francisco’s Summer of Love.10 Brand was deeply embedded in California’s counterculture and appeared as a major character in Tom Wolfe’s The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test. Yet there he was, acting as a pitch man for ARPA, a military agency that had in its short existence already racked up a bloody reputation—from chemical warfare to counterinsurgency and surveillance. It didn’t seem to make any sense.11 Stewart Brand was born in Rockford, Illinois. His mother was a homemaker; his father, a successful advertising man. After graduating from an elite boarding school, Brand attended Stanford University.

One group that frequented Wired’s pages, and one that would later come to mainstream prominence, was the Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF).101 Founded in San Francisco in 1990 by three millionaires who hung out on Stewart Brand’s The Well messaging board, EFF got its start lobbying for the budding Internet service provider industry.102 In 1993, EFF cofounder Mitch Kapor wrote an article for Wired that laid out his and EFF’s position on the future Internet: “Private, not public… life in cyberspace seems to be shaping up exactly like Thomas Jefferson would have wanted: founded on the primacy of individual liberty and a commitment to pluralism, diversity, and community.”103 Wired backed up EFF’s privatized vision, giving the organization space in the magazine to expound its views, while providing fawning coverage of the group’s activities. It compared the lobbying work the EFF was doing on behalf of its powerful telecom donors to the authority-bucking counterculture scene of the 1960s Bay Area. “In some ways, they are the Merry Pranksters, those apostles of LSD, who tripped through the 1960s in a psychedelic bus named Furthur, led by novelist Ken Kesey and chronicled by Tom Wolfe in The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test,” wrote Wired journalist Joshua Quittner in a profile of the EFF’s move to Washington, DC.104 “Older and wiser now, they’re on the road again, without the bus and the acid, but dispensing many similar-sounding bromides: Turn on, jack in, get connected. Feed your head with the roar of bits pulsing across the cosmos, and learn something about who you are.” Writing about corporate lobbyists working on behalf of telecoms to deregulate the Internet as if they were rebels and acid heads?

“Task Force to Focus on Information Revolution,” Deseret (UT) News, September 15, 1993, http://www.deseretnews.com/article/309821/TASK-FORCE-TO-FOCUS-ON-INFORMATION-REVOLUTION.html. 5. I attempted to interview Stewart Brand for this book, but he declined. “I have to pass,” he told me by email on May 28, 2015. “Working too hard on totally other subjects. May your book thrive.” 6. Stewart Brand, “SPACEWAR: Frantic Life and Symbolic Death among the Computer Bums,” Rolling Stone, December 7, 1972. 7. Ibid. 8. Ibid. 9. Ibid. 10. Tom Wolfe, The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test (New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 1968). 11. This chapter was greatly influenced and inspired by Fred Turner’s pioneering work on the ties between the military and industrial worlds that spawned the Internet and the hippie culture of the 1960s. Turner is a professor in the Department of Communication at Stanford University. I recommend that anyone who wants a better understanding of the utopian ideas that undergirds so much of our Internet culture today read his fabulous book, From Counterculture to Cyberculture: Stewart Brand, the Whole Earth Network, and the Rise of Digital Utopianism.


pages: 347 words: 90,234

You Can't Make This Stuff Up: The Complete Guide to Writing Creative Nonfiction--From Memoir to Literary Journalism and Everything in Between by Lee Gutkind

airport security, Albert Einstein, Atul Gawande, Columbine, Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test, In Cold Blood by Truman Capote, Joan Didion, Mark Zuckerberg, New Journalism, non-fiction novel, Norman Mailer, out of africa, personalized medicine, publish or perish, Ronald Reagan, Stephen Hawking, working poor, Year of Magical Thinking

” - Nasdijj, The Blood Runs Like a River Through My Dreams: the first of three memoirs by a Navajo writer who claims that he “became a writer to piss on all the many white teachers and white editors out there (everywhere) who said it could not be done. Not by the stupid mongrel likes of me.” 20 01 Barbara Ehrenreich, Nickel and Dimed: the Harper’s writer goes undercover as a house cleaner, waitress, and Walmart employee to see how the working poor make ends meet. - Ken Kesey, acclaimed novelist whose psychedelic parties featured prominently in Tom Wolfe’s The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test and Hunter S. Thompson’s Hell’s Angels, dies at age 66. - Hollywood falls in love with nonfiction: A Beautiful Mind, adapted from Sylvia Nasar’s biography of Nobel laureate John Nash, wins four Academy Awards, including best picture. Also this year: big-screen adaptations of Mark Bowden’s Black Hawk Down and Elizabeth Wurtzel’s Prozac Nation. 2002 Stranger than fiction: Augusten Burroughs’s Running with Scissors, the author’s memoir of an adolescence spent living with his mother’s psychiatrist’s unconventional family, starts a two-year stay on the New York Times best-seller list

Cader, Michael Campanella, Roy Capote, Truman Carson, Rachel Carter, Jimmy Carville, James Catch 22 (Heller) Causey, Chap “Centre Court” (McPhee) “Charging Lions” (Phillips) “Chick lit,” Chronology, altering Churchill, Winston Clancy, Tom Clarity in writing Clinton, Bill Clinton, Hillary Rodham Code Name, “Mary” (Gardiner) Cod (Kurlansky) Coffee House Colbert, Stephen The Colbert Report (television program) Collier’s (magazine) Collins, Addie Mae Colorado Review (journal) Color (Finlay) Composites Compression Conroy, Pat Conscience, author’s Cooke, Janet The Corrections (Franzen) Cousteau, Jacques Cox, Billy Creative nonfiction coining term covering yourself credibility and defining disseminating/marketing ethical and moral boundaries in fakers/exaggerators finding ideas for flexibility and freedom offered by goal of graduate programs in legitimacy in libel and defamation markets for name changing in objectivity debate personal/private poetry and public/issue-oriented publishing role of scenes in as second genre for authors selecting subjects for sharing with subjects prior to publication story and structure of (see Structure of creative nonfiction) subgenres time line of truth and Vanity Fair article on See also Immersion nonfiction; Memoir Creative nonfiction cinema Creative Nonfiction Foundation, mentoring help from Creative Nonfiction (magazine) creative nonfiction time line definition of creative nonfiction editing essays for factual mistake in on Frey controversy on introspection and interiority PodLit Twitter contest Creative writing degree programs Creative writing fellowships Credibility, fact checking and Criticism, Wilde on Croft, Steve The Curve of Binding Energy (McPhee) D’Agata, John Davis, Wade Dead persons defamation and writing about recreation and Death in the Afternoon (Hemingway) Death of a Salesman (Miller) Defamation Defoe, Daniel Defonseca, Misha DeLillo, Don Description The Devil in the White City (Larson) The Devil Wears Prada (Weisberger) de Wael, Monique Dialogue The Diary of Anne Frank Diction Didion, Joan “Difficult Decisions” (Gutkind) deconstructing focus and frame of Dillard, Annie DiMaggio, Joe Dinesen, Isak Disaster nonfiction Disclaimers Dixon, Jo Dobler, Bruce Docudrama/documentary films Don’t Let Me Be Lonely (Rankine) Dostoyevsky, Fyodor Down and Out in Paris and London (Hemingway) Dramatic reading skills Dutch (Morris) Easy Rider (film) Eat, Pray, Love (Gilbert) Eberstadt, Mary Editing line Eggers, Dave Ehrenreich, Barbara Einstein, Albert Eire, Carlos Eisenberg, Jesse The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test (Wolfe) Ellison, Harlan Embedded information Endings Entertainment Weekly (magazine) The Epic Story of the Building of the Brooklyn Bridge (McCullough) Esquire (magazine) Essays formal and informal lyric personal segmented Ethical and moral boundaries in creative nonfiction Exodus (Uris) Experience, writing and Experts, citing in creative nonfiction Fabrication The Fabulist (Glass) Fact checking D’Agata and David Sedaris personal truth vs.


pages: 391 words: 105,382

Utopia Is Creepy: And Other Provocations by Nicholas Carr

Air France Flight 447, Airbnb, Airbus A320, AltaVista, Amazon Mechanical Turk, augmented reality, autonomous vehicles, Bernie Sanders, book scanning, Brewster Kahle, Buckminster Fuller, Burning Man, Captain Sullenberger Hudson, centralized clearinghouse, Charles Lindbergh, cloud computing, cognitive bias, collaborative consumption, computer age, corporate governance, crowdsourcing, Danny Hillis, deskilling, digital map, disruptive innovation, Donald Trump, Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test, Elon Musk, factory automation, failed state, feminist movement, Frederick Winslow Taylor, friendly fire, game design, global village, Google bus, Google Glasses, Google X / Alphabet X, Googley, hive mind, impulse control, indoor plumbing, interchangeable parts, Internet Archive, invention of movable type, invention of the steam engine, invisible hand, Isaac Newton, Jeff Bezos, jimmy wales, Joan Didion, job automation, Kevin Kelly, lifelogging, low skilled workers, Marc Andreessen, Mark Zuckerberg, Marshall McLuhan, means of production, Menlo Park, mental accounting, natural language processing, Network effects, new economy, Nicholas Carr, Norman Mailer, off grid, oil shale / tar sands, Peter Thiel, plutocrats, Plutocrats, profit motive, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Ray Kurzweil, recommendation engine, Republic of Letters, robot derives from the Czech word robota Czech, meaning slave, Ronald Reagan, self-driving car, SETI@home, side project, Silicon Valley, Silicon Valley ideology, Singularitarianism, Snapchat, social graph, social web, speech recognition, Startup school, stem cell, Stephen Hawking, Steve Jobs, Steven Levy, technoutopianism, the medium is the message, theory of mind, Turing test, Whole Earth Catalog, Y Combinator

Clearly, a much more intimate generation of computing devices is about to be unleashed upon the world. One can only hope that these new underwearables will be equipped with a vibrate mode. THE BUS February 10, 2014 BEFORE THE APP, BEFORE the smartphone, before the network, there was the bus. It was mobile. It was social. And it headed out of San Francisco toward a new world. Tom Wolfe told the tale well in The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test: “There are going to be times,” says Kesey, “when we can’t wait for somebody. Now, you’re either on the bus or off the bus. If you’re on the bus, and you get left behind, then you’ll find it again. If you’re off the bus in the first place—then it won’t make a damn.” And nobody had to have it spelled out for them. Everything was becoming allegorical, understood by the group mind, and especially this: “You’re either on the bus . . . or off the bus.”

(Gordon), 116–17 Doors, 126 dopamine, 332 dot-com crash, xvi Doudna, Jennifer, 335 driving, 195–98 Droit-Volet, Sylvie, 203–4 drones, 306 Drucker, Peter, 182 drugs, 119, 304, 331 psychoactive, 333–34 video games and, 262 virtual, 39–40 Drum, Kevin, 306 Dylan, Bob, 121, 294 dystopias, 108 ears, development and evolution of, 235 Earthlink, 280 “Easter, 1916” (Yeats), 88 Easton, David, 211 “E-book Reading Jumps; Print Book Reading Declines,” 140 ebooks, e-reader devices, 74, 122–23, 140–43, 225, 257, 274, 288, 290 reading experience transformed by, 252–54 economic gap, xix, 30–31, 176–77, 179 economy, effect of technology on, 174–77, 179–80 Edison, Thomas, xvii, 134, 229, 287 education, technological transformation of, 133–35 Edwards, Douglas, 280–82, 285 efficiency: in computer communication, 152–54 maximizing of, 84–85, 148, 164–65, 195–97, 209, 214, 234, 237–39, 303, 305 of robots, 321 Eiffel Tower, 341 e-learning fad, 134 election campaigns: of 2008, 314 of 2016, 314–20 transformed by technology, 314–20 Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test, The (Wolfe), 170 Eliot, T. S., 86–87, 144 Ellison, Larry, 17 Eloi, 114, 186 Elster, Jon, 64–65 email, 34, 73, 91, 134, 186 emancipation: central control vs., 165 computer technology perceived as path to, xvii–xix, 3, 11, 310 tools as, 308 see also liberation mythology embodied cognition, 297 Emerson, Ralph Waldo, 98, 100, 247–48, 254, 313 emojis, 167, 215 emoticons, 30, 215 emotional intelligence (EI), 162 EmoTree, 168 empathy, 251–52 Encyclopedia Britannica, 110–11 encyclopedias: open-source, 5–8, 110 traditional, 8, 14, 19, 110–11 see also Wikipedia endless-ladder myth, 174–77 “End of Books, The” (Uzanne), 287–88 “End of the Future, The” (Thiel), 116 England’s Dreaming (Savage), 63 Enlightenment, Age of, 271–72, 339 Ephron, Nora, 331 ethics, 48, 226 technology and, 304–11, 329–42 Etzler, John Adolphus, xvi–xvii Europeana, 272 European Union, 280 Everything Bad Is Good for You (Johnson), 13, 93–94 Everything Is Miscellaneous (Weinberger), 41 Exile on Main Street (album), 42–43, 45 “Exposure” (Heaney), xxii Extra Lives (Bissell), 260–63 eyeglasses, reality augmented by, 108–9, 131–32, 160–61 Facebook, xv, xvi, 30–31, 50, 106, 113, 115, 119, 137, 138, 155–59, 166, 178, 186, 197, 205, 210, 223, 257, 265, 269, 284 cynicism of, 158 marketing through, 53–54 political use of, 314, 317–20 privacy and, 107, 193 as record, 326–27 Facebook Home, 156–59 Facebook Social Advertising Event, 53 fact-mongering, 58–62 factory production, 308 efficiency in, 164–65, 237–38, 305 fads, 71–72 Faithfull, Marianne, 42 fallibility, human vs. computer, 321–23 farming, 296–98 technological advancement in, 305–6 Farrell, Thomas, 186 Faster (Gleick), 204 Favela Chic, 113–14 Federal Aviation Administration, 322–23 Federal Trade Commission, U.S.


pages: 462 words: 151,805

Gonzo: The Life of Hunter S. Thompson by Corey Seymour, Johnny Depp, Jann S. Wenner

Bonfire of the Vanities, buy low sell high, Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test, Golden Gate Park, Haight Ashbury, Mason jar, New Journalism, Norman Mailer, Ralph Nader, rolodex, Saturday Night Live, South China Sea, South of Market, San Francisco, Y2K

Tom Wolfe had a great deal of respect for Hunter and wrote wonderful things about him in his New Journalism anthology. I introduced them to each other for the first time when they were both writing for Rolling Stone. In fact, the first installment of the Rolling Stone version of “The Right Stuff” opens with a lede passage that’s an homage to Hunter’s style. TOM WOLFE Hunter had been very kind to me when I was writing The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test. I had gathered from Hell’s Angels that he had been present when Ken Kesey and his Merry Pranksters gave a party for the Hells Angels, which had happened before I had even known about Kesey and the Pranksters. I called Hunter up from out of the blue, and he sent me some tapes he had recorded at that crazy party, which was really generous of him. JANN WENNER Hunter appreciated New Journalism and read its practitioners.

JOHN WALSH, a former managing editor of Rolling Stone, is now a senior vice president and executive editor of ESPN, Inc. TEX WEAVER was a Woody Creek neighbor of Hunter’s. JANE WENNER is the wife of Jann Wenner and a vice president of Wenner Media. JANN WENNER is the founder, editor, and publisher of Rolling Stone. JOHN WILBUR is a former guard for the Washington Redskins. TOM WOLFE is the author of The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test, The Right Stuff, and Bonfire of the Vanities, among many other titles. BARNEY WYCOFF is an Aspen gallery owner. ACKNOWLEDGMENTS Fifteen years ago, Jann charged me with being Hunter’s aide-de-camp in New York. Two and a half years ago, he directed me to compile Hunter’s life story. I’m grateful to him for the opportunity, direction, leadership, advice, wisdom, and the many good times along the way.


pages: 200 words: 60,314

Beer Money: A Memoir of Privilege and Loss by Frances Stroh

cognitive dissonance, Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test, Golden Gate Park, Kickstarter, new economy, nuclear winter, post-work, South of Market, San Francisco, urban renewal

Partying our way through the inevitable depression of a Michigan winter, my friends and I had been out all night, then attended a sunrise meditation class at the Hare Krishna mansion in Detroit. The “Krishna center” was located on the sprawling estate of the Fisher Mansion, one of the old Detroit houses emblematic of the automotive industry’s heyday, donated to the sect by Alfie Ford. Meditation, music, drugs, and alcohol, they were all facets of the same mind-expanding trajectory—especially potent when combined. My friends and I had all read On the Road and The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test. And with the help of state-of-the-art amphetamines and a healthy dose of cynicism we had taken the legacy of the fifties and the sixties to new heights—in the eighties. The Corinthian pillars of the meditation hall were edged in gold. A robed, pot-bellied man with a Krishna ponytail sat lotus style facing the large group. We sat down in our stocking feet and tried to look spiritual.


pages: 538 words: 164,533

1968: The Year That Rocked the World by Mark Kurlansky

anti-communist, Berlin Wall, colonial rule, cuban missile crisis, desegregation, East Village, Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test, European colonialism, feminist movement, global village, Haight Ashbury, land reform, Marshall McLuhan, Mikhail Gorbachev, MITM: man-in-the-middle, Norman Mailer, post-industrial society, Ronald Reagan, South China Sea

The pair left Harvard in 1963 but continued experiments in Milbrook, New York. In 1966 LSD became an illegal substance by an act of Congress and Leary’s fame spread through arrests. Alpert became a Hindu and changed his name to Baba Ram Dass. In 1967, Allen Ginsberg urged everyone over the age of fourteen to try LSD at least once. Tom Wolfe’s bestselling book that extolled and popularized LSD, The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test, was published in 1968. It was an unpredictable drug. Some people had a pleasant experience and others nightmarish cycles of mania and depression or paranoia known as “a bad trip.” Students who took pride in being responsible drug abusers insisted that tripping be done under the supervision of a friend who did not take the drug but had experienced it before. To many, including Abbie Hoffman, there was a kind of unspoken fraternity of those who had taken acid, and those who had not were on the outside.

The Prague Spring and Its Aftermath: Czechoslovak Politics 1968–1970. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1997. Zeman, Z. A. B. Prague Spring: A Report on Czechoslovakia 1968. New York: Penguin Books, 1969. DRUGS Leary, Timothy. Flashbacks. Los Angeles: J. P. Tarcher, 1983. Lee, Martin A., and Bruce Shalin. Acid Dreams: The Complete Social History of LSD: The CIA, the Sixties, and Beyond. New York: Grove Press, 1992. Wolfe, Tom. The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test. New York: Farrar, Straus & Giroux, 1968. FEMINISM Davis, Flora. Moving the Mountain: The Women’s Movement in America Since 1960. New York: Simon & Schuster, 1991. de Beauvoir, Simone. The Second Sex: The Class Manifesto of the Liberated Woman. New York: Vintage, 1974. Evans, Sara. Personal Politics: The Roots of Women’s Liberation in the Civil Rights Movement and the New Left. New York: Vintage Books, 1980.


pages: 196 words: 65,045

Art of Creative Nonfiction: Writing and Selling the Literature of Reality by Lee Gutkind, Purba

Columbine, Donald Trump, Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test, friendly fire, In Cold Blood by Truman Capote, Joan Didion, Mason jar, New Journalism, Norman Mailer, Ronald Reagan

When I refer to creative nonfiction books I include memoirs (or autobiography), and documentary drama (a term more often used to refer to films, such as Hoop Dreams, which captures the lives of two inner-city high school basketball players over a six-year period). Page 8 The Creative Part Much of what is generically referred to as literary journalism can be classified as creative nonfiction. In the early 1960s, author and social commentator Tom Wolfe (The Right Stuff, The Electric Kool Aid Acid Test) coined a term that lasted for more than a decade-the "new journalism ." Wolfe's new journalism faded, but over the past five years creative nonfiction clearly has evolved as the accepted way of describing what is becoming the most important and popular genre in the literary world today. The best magazines-The New Yorker, Harper's, Vanity Fair, Esquire- publish more creative nonfiction than fiction and poetry combined.


pages: 253 words: 79,441

Better Than Fiction by Lonely Planet

airport security, British Empire, Cape to Cairo, Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test, transcontinental railway

My family’s annual vacations had always consisted of weeks-long summer driving trips, and almost exclusively north, to cool, tidy, familiar Minnesotas and Wisconsins and Manitobas. I had studied Spanish for ten years. I was 17 going on 18, out of high school a semester early, working a minimum-wage job and admitted to the college of my choice. And for three years my favorite book had been The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test, Tom Wolfe’s iconifying 1968 chronicle of Ken Kesey and his dozen friends’ pointless and profound coast-to-coast-to-coast 1964 trip across America in an old school bus. It was a moment, for people my age, when high adventure seemed not only possible but easy, not only easy but obligatory. And so in the summer of 1972, five other Omaha boys and I bought a stubby old yellow school bus.


pages: 687 words: 204,164

Back to Blood by Tom Wolfe

Bonfire of the Vanities, deskilling, Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test, fear of failure, Honoré de Balzac, illegal immigration, industrial robot, l'esprit de l'escalier

“Oh, my God, Nestor! That’s… so… wonderful!” said Ghislaine. About the Author Tom Wolfe is the author of more than a dozen books, among them The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test, The Right Stuff, The Bonfire of the Vanities, A Man in Full, and I Am Charlotte Simmons. A native of Richmond, Virginia, he earned his BA at Washington and Lee University and a PhD in American Studies at Yale. He received the National Book Foundation’s 2010 Medal for Distinguished Contribution to American Letters. He lives in New York City. ALSO BY TOM WOLFE The Kandy-Kolored Tangerine-Flake Streamline Baby The Pump House Gang The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test Radical Chic & Mau-Mauing the Flak Catchers The Painted Word Mauve Gloves & Madmen, Clutter & Vine The Right Stuff In Our Time From Bauhaus to Our House The Bonfire of the Vanities A Man in Full Hooking Up I Am Charlotte Simmons * “Look at her!


pages: 245 words: 83,272

Artificial Unintelligence: How Computers Misunderstand the World by Meredith Broussard

1960s counterculture, A Declaration of the Independence of Cyberspace, Ada Lovelace, AI winter, Airbnb, Amazon Web Services, autonomous vehicles, availability heuristic, barriers to entry, Bernie Sanders, bitcoin, Buckminster Fuller, Chris Urmson, Clayton Christensen, cloud computing, cognitive bias, complexity theory, computer vision, crowdsourcing, Danny Hillis, DARPA: Urban Challenge, digital map, disruptive innovation, Donald Trump, Douglas Engelbart, easy for humans, difficult for computers, Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test, Elon Musk, Firefox, gig economy, global supply chain, Google Glasses, Google X / Alphabet X, Hacker Ethic, Jaron Lanier, Jeff Bezos, John von Neumann, Joi Ito, Joseph-Marie Jacquard, life extension, Lyft, Mark Zuckerberg, mass incarceration, Minecraft, minimum viable product, Mother of all demos, move fast and break things, move fast and break things, Nate Silver, natural language processing, PageRank, payday loans, paypal mafia, performance metric, Peter Thiel, price discrimination, Ray Kurzweil, ride hailing / ride sharing, Ross Ulbricht, Saturday Night Live, school choice, self-driving car, Silicon Valley, speech recognition, statistical model, Steve Jobs, Steven Levy, Stewart Brand, Tesla Model S, the High Line, The Signal and the Noise by Nate Silver, theory of mind, Travis Kalanick, Turing test, Uber for X, uber lyft, Watson beat the top human players on Jeopardy!, Whole Earth Catalog, women in the workforce

Doug Engelbart, the NASA- and ARPA-funded researcher who performed the 1968 “mother of all demos” that showed for the first time all the hardware and software elements of modern computing, dropped acid at the International Foundation for Advanced Study, the legal home for academic inquiry into LSD that lasted until 1967. Operating the camera for Engelbart’s demo was Stewart Brand, the Whole Earth Catalog founder who helped organize LSD guru Ken Kesey’s infamous acid tests, massive drug-fueled cross-country bacchanals that were chronicled in Tom Wolfe’s book The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test. Brand was the most important connector between Minsky’s world of scientists and the counterculture. “We are as gods and might as well get good at it,” Brand wrote as the first line of the Whole Earth Catalog in 1968.16 That publication was a major source of inspiration for almost all the early Internet pioneers, from Steve Jobs to tech-publishing titan Tim O’Reilly. When developers created early Internet message boards, they were trying to recreate the freewheeling commentary and recommendation culture that flourished in the back pages of the Whole Earth Catalog, where readers wrote in to share requests, tools, and tips on communal living.


pages: 304 words: 87,702

The 100 Best Vacations to Enrich Your Life by Pam Grout

Albert Einstein, Buckminster Fuller, clean water, complexity theory, David Brooks, East Village, Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test, global village, Golden Gate Park, if you build it, they will come, Maui Hawaii, Mikhail Gorbachev, Nelson Mandela, Ralph Nader, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Ronald Reagan, supervolcano, transcontinental railway, urban sprawl, Yogi Berra

The Grateful Dead: Not only did the band donate the camp’s awesome sound system (it allows Wavy Gravy to blast the children out of bed each morning with Jimi Hendrix’s version of “The Star-Spangled Banner”), but Mickey Hart, the band’s drummer, often shows up at Camp Winnarainbow to teach the fine art of tom-tom making. B. B. King: When he was born, Wavy’s parents named him Hugh Romney. But, while doing a comedy show for B. B. King in 1969, it was the King of Blues himself who bequeathed Wavy the nickname he still uses today. Tom Wolfe: Wavy provided the name for Wolfe’s first novel, The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test, about the psychedelic sixties. While traveling with Ken Kesey’s Merry Pranksters, Wavy started calling LSD “electric kool-aid,” and Wolfe, who was also traveling with the Pranksters, figured it was the perfect name for his book. Everyone at Woodstock: It was Wavy who got up on the Woodstock stage in 1969 and famously announced: “What we have in mind is breakfast in bed for 400,000.” * * * But in June, the week before Camp Winnarainbow kicks off its official summer schedule, Wavy Gravy—the fast-quipping 1960s icon who emceed all three Woodstock rock concerts—begins the season with a circus and performing arts camp for grown-ups.


pages: 378 words: 94,468

Drugs 2.0: The Web Revolution That's Changing How the World Gets High by Mike Power

air freight, Alexander Shulgin, banking crisis, bitcoin, blockchain, Buckminster Fuller, Burning Man, cloud computing, credit crunch, crowdsourcing, death of newspapers, Donald Davies, double helix, Douglas Engelbart, Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test, fiat currency, Firefox, Fractional reserve banking, frictionless, Haight Ashbury, John Bercow, John Markoff, Kevin Kelly, Leonard Kleinrock, means of production, Menlo Park, moral panic, Mother of all demos, Network effects, nuclear paranoia, packet switching, pattern recognition, PIHKAL and TIHKAL, pre–internet, QR code, RAND corporation, Satoshi Nakamoto, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI), sexual politics, Skype, Stephen Hawking, Steve Jobs, Stewart Brand, trade route, Whole Earth Catalog, Zimmermann PGP

It now reads much like a printed blog; it was a paper website, in the words of blogger and author Kevin Kelly, that was sprinting before the web even took its first shaky steps.3 Its statement of intent in its launch issue reads like a manifesto that has been realized by today’s web users: ‘A realm of intimate personal power is developing – the power of the individual to conduct his own education, find his own inspiration, shape his own environment, and share his adventure with whoever is interested. Tools that aid this process are sought and promoted by the Whole Earth Catalog.’ Brand, whose collaborations with Ken Kesey’s Merry Pranksters would evolve into the Acid Tests, the 1960s proto-raves fuelled by LSD and documented by Tom Wolfe in The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test, felt that information technology was the next stage in humans’ evolutionary progress. Info-anarchists and cyber-utopians not only laid the foundations for the internet, but would act as outriders for the free software movement. The net’s founding mothers and fathers wanted to share their knowledge, and everyone else’s knowledge, all at once, all the time, for free, with no centralized control system.


pages: 321 words: 92,828

Late Bloomers: The Power of Patience in a World Obsessed With Early Achievement by Rich Karlgaard

Airbnb, Albert Einstein, Amazon Web Services, Apple's 1984 Super Bowl advert, Bernie Madoff, Bob Noyce, Brownian motion, Captain Sullenberger Hudson, cloud computing, cognitive dissonance, Daniel Kahneman / Amos Tversky, deliberate practice, Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test, Elon Musk, en.wikipedia.org, experimental economics, fear of failure, financial independence, follow your passion, Frederick Winslow Taylor, hiring and firing, Internet of things, Isaac Newton, Jeff Bezos, job satisfaction, knowledge economy, labor-force participation, longitudinal study, low skilled workers, Mark Zuckerberg, meta analysis, meta-analysis, Moneyball by Michael Lewis explains big data, move fast and break things, move fast and break things, pattern recognition, Peter Thiel, Sand Hill Road, science of happiness, shareholder value, Silicon Valley, Silicon Valley startup, Snapchat, Steve Jobs, Steve Wozniak, theory of mind, Tim Cook: Apple, Toyota Production System, unpaid internship, upwardly mobile, women in the workforce, working poor

You risk being seen as a traitor to your class, religion, or race. Sometimes the negative words are motivated by undisguised envy, spite, or unhealthy competitiveness. But more often, your critics may not be aware of their harmful negativity. They may sincerely couch their warnings in words of concern: “I don’t know, Sarah. I just don’t want you to get hurt.” As the author Tom Wolfe once said in explaining the philosophy behind The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test and The Right Stuff, “Status has more or less been my system for approaching any subject. For instance, The Right Stuff is not a book about space, it’s a book about status competition among pilots.” In Wolfe’s work, the evolutionary truth that humans compete in extreme ways for status is endlessly entertaining. But to actually experience the blunt end of it—to be a late bloomer near the bottom of the status order—is not fun.


pages: 915 words: 232,883

Steve Jobs by Walter Isaacson

air freight, Albert Einstein, Apple II, Apple's 1984 Super Bowl advert, big-box store, Bob Noyce, Buckminster Fuller, Byte Shop, centre right, Clayton Christensen, cloud computing, commoditize, computer age, computer vision, corporate governance, death of newspapers, don't be evil, Douglas Engelbart, Dynabook, El Camino Real, Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test, fixed income, game design, Golden Gate Park, Hacker Ethic, hiring and firing, Jeff Bezos, Johannes Kepler, John Markoff, Jony Ive, lateral thinking, Mark Zuckerberg, Menlo Park, Mitch Kapor, Mother of all demos, Paul Terrell, profit maximization, publish or perish, Richard Feynman, Robert Metcalfe, Robert X Cringely, Ronald Reagan, Silicon Valley, skunkworks, Steve Ballmer, Steve Jobs, Steve Wozniak, Steven Levy, Stewart Brand, supply-chain management, thinkpad, Tim Cook: Apple, Wall-E, Whole Earth Catalog

One person who encouraged the denizens of the counterculture to make common cause with the hackers was Stewart Brand. A puckish visionary who generated fun and ideas over many decades, Brand was a participant in one of the early sixties LSD studies in Palo Alto. He joined with his fellow subject Ken Kesey to produce the acid-celebrating Trips Festival, appeared in the opening scene of Tom Wolfe’s The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test, and worked with Doug Engelbart to create a seminal sound-and-light presentation of new technologies called the Mother of All Demos. “Most of our generation scorned computers as the embodiment of centralized control,” Brand later noted. “But a tiny contingent—later called hackers—embraced computers and set about transforming them into tools of liberation. That turned out to be the true royal road to the future.”

., 330, 566 education reform movement, 543–44 Egan, Jennifer, 261–63, 438 Egypt, 258 Ehret, Arnold, 36, 548 Eichler, Joseph, 7, 125 Einstein, Albert, xvii, xviii, xix, 91, 119, 171, 330, 332 Eisenhower, Dwight D., 8 Eisenstat, Al, 122, 198, 201, 202–3, 209–10, 216, 221 Eisner, Michael, xiv, 242, 289–92, 428, 432–38, 441 Disney-Pixar merger opposed by, 442 ouster of, 426–27 Senate testimony of, 432–33 SJ’s feud with, 432–35 Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test, The (Wolfe), 58 Electronic Data Systems, 227 Electronic Frontier Foundation, 280 Electronic News, 10 Elias, John, 469 Eliot, T. S., 98 Elliot, Jay, 83, 197, 200–201, 206 Ellison, Larry, xiv, 283, 289–90, 296, 299–300, 303, 306, 310, 311, 313, 320, 332, 333, 349, 365, 372, 374, 545 Emanuel, Rahm, 495, 497 EMI Music, 395, 420, 524 Eminem, 399, 402, 413 Emotional Rescue (Rolling Stones), 412 Empire Burlesque (Dylan), 207–8, 412 Engelbart, Doug, 57–58 ENIAC, 23 Entrepreneurs, The (documentary), 227 Esalen, 57 eSarcasm (website), 517 Espinosa, Chris, 81, 104, 132, 135 Esquire, 27, 219, 396, 478 Esslinger, Hartmut, 132, 193, 221, 222, 241 est, 57 Estridge, Don, 149 Evangelist, Mike, 381–82 Facebook, 275, 545 Fadell, Tony, xiv, 385–89, 405, 409–10, 466–69, 473, 492, 520 Fairchild Semiconductor, 9–10, 76, 79, 82, 568 FairPlay (management system), 399, 408 Faith No More, 498 Faraday, Michael, 519 Farber, Dan, 137 Fariña, Mimi, 250 Feadship, 529 Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), 241 Federalist Papers, The, 497 Felsenstein, Lee, 61, 70 Fernandez, Bill, 25, 104 Ferrentino, Rick, 12–13 Ferris, James, 128 Few Good Men, A (film), 456 Feynman, Richard, 330 File (app), 176 FileServer (software), 200, 205 Final Cut Pro, 380 Financial Times, 304, 309 Finding Nemo (film), 434 Fine Young Cannibals, 271 FingerWorks, 469 Fiore, Mark, 516 FireWire, 380–81, 390, 393 Fisher, George M.


Cataloging the World: Paul Otlet and the Birth of the Information Age by Alex Wright

1960s counterculture, Ada Lovelace, barriers to entry, British Empire, business climate, business intelligence, Cape to Cairo, card file, centralized clearinghouse, corporate governance, crowdsourcing, Danny Hillis, Deng Xiaoping, don't be evil, Douglas Engelbart, Douglas Engelbart, Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test, European colonialism, Frederick Winslow Taylor, hive mind, Howard Rheingold, index card, information retrieval, invention of movable type, invention of the printing press, Jane Jacobs, John Markoff, Kevin Kelly, knowledge worker, Law of Accelerating Returns, linked data, Livingstone, I presume, lone genius, Menlo Park, Mother of all demos, Norman Mailer, out of africa, packet switching, profit motive, RAND corporation, Ray Kurzweil, Scramble for Africa, self-driving car, semantic web, Silicon Valley, speech recognition, Steve Jobs, Stewart Brand, Ted Nelson, The Death and Life of Great American Cities, the scientific method, Thomas L Friedman, urban planning, Vannevar Bush, Whole Earth Catalog

Dressed in the white shirt of a working engineer, the soft-spoken former Navy telegraph operator demonstrated a working model of a system that struck many of the idealistic San Francisco counterculture types in attendance as representing nothing short of a revolution in human consciousness. Equipped with a video monitor, keyboard, and central pro­ cessor, Engelbart’s demo included applications for word processing, sending messages between users, and even building links from one document to another. Stewart Brand (of the Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test and Whole Earth Catalog fame) manned a video camera trained on Engelbart’s on-stage keyboard, while Engelbart proceeded to show a working prototype of a fully functional hypertext system, including a word processor, video and graphics displays, and the ability to link one document to another, all connected to another computer in Menlo Park by a 1,200-baud modem. The system also 258 T he I ntergalactic N etwor k featured a never-before-seen device for pointing at objects on the screen: a small wooden box with wheels attached to the bottom that Engelbart eventually dubbed the “mouse.”


pages: 465 words: 109,653

Free Ride by Robert Levine

A Declaration of the Independence of Cyberspace, Anne Wojcicki, book scanning, borderless world, Buckminster Fuller, citizen journalism, commoditize, correlation does not imply causation, creative destruction, crowdsourcing, death of newspapers, Edward Lloyd's coffeehouse, Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test, Firefox, future of journalism, Googley, Hacker Ethic, informal economy, Jaron Lanier, Joi Ito, Julian Assange, Justin.tv, Kevin Kelly, linear programming, Marc Andreessen, Mitch Kapor, moral panic, offshore financial centre, pets.com, publish or perish, race to the bottom, Saturday Night Live, Silicon Valley, Silicon Valley startup, Skype, spectrum auction, Steve Jobs, Steven Levy, Stewart Brand, subscription business, Telecommunications Act of 1996, Whole Earth Catalog, WikiLeaks

On the other hand, information wants to be free, because the cost of getting it out is getting lower and lower all the time. So you have these two fighting against each other. Brand’s own information wanted to be expensive, and he made a small fortune in the publishing business. A bohemian intellectual who befriended both Buckminster Fuller and Ken Kesey, Brand appeared as a character in Tom Wolfe’s Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test and campaigned for NASA to release a picture of Earth from space. As living off the land became part of the post-hippie zeitgeist, he created the Whole Earth Catalog, an influential compendium of advice that Steve Jobs once referred to as “sort of like Google in paperback form.”19 He started out peddling an early version from the back of his truck and went on to sell more than a million copies of a later edition.


pages: 382 words: 105,819

Zucked: Waking Up to the Facebook Catastrophe by Roger McNamee

4chan, Albert Einstein, algorithmic trading, AltaVista, Amazon Web Services, barriers to entry, Bernie Sanders, Boycotts of Israel, Cass Sunstein, cloud computing, computer age, cross-subsidies, data is the new oil, Donald Trump, Douglas Engelbart, Douglas Engelbart, Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test, Elon Musk, Filter Bubble, game design, income inequality, Internet of things, Jaron Lanier, Jeff Bezos, John Markoff, laissez-faire capitalism, Lean Startup, light touch regulation, Lyft, Marc Andreessen, Mark Zuckerberg, market bubble, Menlo Park, Metcalfe’s law, minimum viable product, Mother of all demos, move fast and break things, move fast and break things, Network effects, paypal mafia, Peter Thiel, pets.com, post-work, profit maximization, profit motive, race to the bottom, recommendation engine, Robert Mercer, Ronald Reagan, Sand Hill Road, self-driving car, Silicon Valley, Silicon Valley startup, Skype, Snapchat, social graph, software is eating the world, Stephen Hawking, Steve Jobs, Steven Levy, Stewart Brand, The Chicago School, Tim Cook: Apple, two-sided market, Uber and Lyft, Uber for X, uber lyft, Upton Sinclair, WikiLeaks, Yom Kippur War

The Innovators: How a Group of Hackers, Geniuses and Geeks Created the Digital Revolution, by Walter Isaacson (New York: Simon & Schuster, 2014), looks back on the key people whose work created Silicon Valley. What the Dormouse Said: How the 60s Counterculture Shaped the Personal Computer Industry, by John Markoff (New York: Viking, 2005), shows how hippie culture became the culture of the PC industry. Tom Wolfe’s The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test (New York: Farrar Straus and Giroux, 1968) is a helpful introduction to the culture embraced by a core group in Silicon Valley at a critical time. Fire in the Valley: The Making of the Personal Computer, by Paul Freiberger and Michael Swaine (Berkeley: Osborne/McGraw-Hill, 1984), is the best book I know on the early days of the personal computer industry, from computer clubs to the start of Microsoft and Apple, to the battle that followed.


Coastal California by Lonely Planet

1960s counterculture, airport security, Albert Einstein, Asilomar, back-to-the-land, Bay Area Rapid Transit, Berlin Wall, buy and hold, California gold rush, call centre, car-free, carbon footprint, centre right, Chuck Templeton: OpenTable:, Donner party, East Village, El Camino Real, Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test, Frank Gehry, global village, Golden Gate Park, Haight Ashbury, haute cuisine, illegal immigration, Joan Didion, Khyber Pass, Kickstarter, Loma Prieta earthquake, low cost airline, Mason jar, McMansion, Ronald Reagan, Silicon Valley, South of Market, San Francisco, stealth mode startup, Steve Wozniak, trade route, transcontinental railway, Upton Sinclair, urban sprawl, white picket fence, women in the workforce, working poor, Works Progress Administration, young professional, Zipcar

A mile in from San Gregorio State Beach on Hwy 1, kick off your shoes and stomp your feet to live bluegrass, Celtic and folk music on the weekends at the landmark San Gregorio General Store (www.sangregoriostore.com), and check out the wooden bar singed by area branding irons. Eight miles east is the tiny township of La Honda, former home to One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest author Ken Kesey, and the launching spot for his 1964 psychedelic bus trip immortalized in Tom Wolfe’s The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test. Housed in an old blacksmith’s shop, Apple Jack’s Inn ( 650-747-0331) is a rustic, down-home bar offering live music on weekends and lots of local color. PESCADERO A foggy speck of coastside crossroads between the cities of San Francisco and Santa Cruz, 150-year-old Pescadero is a close-knit rural town of sugar-lending neighbors and community pancake breakfasts. But on weekends the tiny downtown strains its seams with long-distance cyclists panting for carbohydrates and day trippers dive-bombing in from the ocean-front highway.

You’ve probably already read books by Californians without knowing it, for example, Ray Bradbury’s 1950s dystopian classic Fahrenheit 451; Alice Walker’s Pulitzer Prize–winning The Color Purple ; Ken Kesey’s quintessential ’60s novel One Flew Over the Cuckoo ’ s Nest ; UC Berkeley professor Maxine Hong Kingston’s The Woman Warrior ; Michael Chabon’s Pulitzer Prize-winning The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier and Clay ; or Dave Eggers, the Bay area hipster behind McSweeney’s quarterly literary journal. Few writers nail California culture as well as Joan Didion. She’s best known for her collection of essays, Slouching Towards Bethlehem, which takes a caustic look at 1960s flower power and Haight-Ashbury. Tom Wolfe also put ’60s San Francisco in perspective with The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test, which follows Ken Kesey’s band of Merry Pranksters, who began their acid-laced ‘magic bus’ journey near Santa Cruz. By that time, the Beat generation of writers had already fired up San Francisco’s North Beach literary scene beginning in the 1950s, including with Allen Ginsberg’s epic poem Howl and Jack Kerouac’s iconic novel On the Road. In the early 1970s, Charles Bukowski’s semiautobiographical novel Post Office captured down-and-out downtown LA, while Richard Vasquez’s Chicano took a look at the Latino barrio.


Coastal California Travel Guide by Lonely Planet

1960s counterculture, Airbnb, airport security, Albert Einstein, anti-communist, Apple II, Asilomar, back-to-the-land, Bay Area Rapid Transit, Burning Man, buy and hold, California gold rush, call centre, car-free, carbon footprint, Donner party, East Village, El Camino Real, Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test, flex fuel, Frank Gehry, glass ceiling, Golden Gate Park, Haight Ashbury, haute couture, haute cuisine, income inequality, intermodal, Joan Didion, Kickstarter, Loma Prieta earthquake, low cost airline, Lyft, Mason jar, New Journalism, ride hailing / ride sharing, Ronald Reagan, Rosa Parks, Saturday Night Live, Silicon Valley, Silicon Valley startup, South of Market, San Francisco, starchitect, stealth mode startup, stem cell, Steve Jobs, Steve Wozniak, Stewart Brand, trade route, transcontinental railway, uber lyft, Upton Sinclair, upwardly mobile, urban sprawl, Wall-E, white picket fence, Whole Earth Catalog, women in the workforce, working poor, Works Progress Administration, young professional, Zipcar

A mile in from San Gregorio State Beach ( GOOGLE MAP ; %650-726-8819; www.parks.ca.gov; Hwy 1, San Gregorio; per car $8; h8am-sunset) on Hwy 1, kick off your shoes and stomp your feet to live bluegrass, Celtic and folk music on the weekends at the San Gregorio General Store ( GOOGLE MAP ; %650-726-0565; www.sangregoriostore.com; 7615 Stage Rd, San Gregorio; hstore 10:30am-6pm Sun-Thu, to 7pm Fri, 10am-7pm Sat, to 6pm Sun). Check out the wooden bar singed by area branding irons. Eight miles further east is the tiny township of La Honda, former home to One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest author Ken Kesey and the launching spot for his 1964 psychedelic bus trip immortalized in Tom Wolfe’s The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test. Housed in a 19th-century blacksmith’s shop, Apple Jack’s ( GOOGLE MAP ; %650-747-0331; 8790 Hwy 84, La Honda; hnoon-2am) is a rustic, down-home country-and-western bar with motorcycles lined up in a row outside. To stretch your legs in the redwoods, Sam McDonald County Park ( GOOGLE MAP ; %650-879-0238; http://parks.smcgov.org/sam-mcdonald-park; 13435 Pescadero Creek Rd, Loma Mar; per car $6; h8am-8pm Apr-Aug, closes earlier Sep-Mar; pc), 2 miles south of La Honda, has forested hiking trails and a secluded hike-to cabin ( GOOGLE MAP ; %650-390-8411; www.sierraclub.org/loma-prieta/hikers-hut; per night adult $20-30, child $10; n).

But no author has captured California culture with such unflinching clarity as Joan Didion, whose prose burns through the page like sun on a misty California morning. Her collection of literary nonfiction essays Slouching Towards Bethlehem captures 1960s flower power at the exact moment it blooms and wilts. Didion pioneered immersive first-person New Journalism with fellow ’60s California chroniclers Hunter S Thompson (Hells Angels: A Strange and Terrible Saga) and Tom Wolfe (The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test). In the 1970s, Charles Bukowski’s semiautobiographical novel Post Office captured down-and-out Downtown LA, while Richard Vasquez’ Chicano took a dramatic look at LA’s Latino barrio. Armistead Maupin captured the rise of disco, cults, medical marijuana, feminism and gay pride in 1970s San Francisco as it happened in his serialized Tales of the City. Bret Easton Ellis followed the short lives and fast times of coked-up Beverly Hills teenagers in Less Than Zero, the definitive chronicle of ’80s excess.


The Bonfire of the Vanities by Tom Wolfe

affirmative action, Berlin Wall, Bonfire of the Vanities, Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test, interchangeable parts, plutocrats, Plutocrats, rent control, Socratic dialogue, traveling salesman, yellow journalism, zero-coupon bond

He was reportedly on a sailing vessel in the Aegean Sea with his bride of two weeks, Lady Evelyn, daughter of Sir Gerald Steiner, the publisher and financier. Also by Tom Wolfe The Kandy-Kolored Tangerine-Flake Streamline Baby The Pump House Gang The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test Radical Chic & Mau-Mauing the Flak Catchers The Painted Word Mauve Gloves & Madmen, Clutter & Vine The Right Stuff In Our Time From Bauhaus to Our House A Man in Full Hooking Up I Am Charlotte Simmons © 2004 by Mark Seliger Tom Wolfe is the author of a dozen books, among them such contemporary classics as The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test and I Am Charlotte Simmons. He lives in New York City. THE BONFIRE OF THE VANITIES. Copyright © 1987 by Tom Wolfe. All rights reserved. Printed in the United States of America. No part of this book may be used or reproduced in any manner whatsoever without written permission except in the case of brief quotations embodied in critical articles or reviews.


Howard Rheingold by The Virtual Community Homesteading on the Electronic Frontier-Perseus Books (1993)

Apple II, Brewster Kahle, Buckminster Fuller, commoditize, conceptual framework, Douglas Engelbart, Douglas Engelbart, Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test, experimental subject, George Gilder, global village, Hacker Ethic, Haight Ashbury, Howard Rheingold, HyperCard, John Markoff, Kevin Kelly, knowledge worker, license plate recognition, loose coupling, Marshall McLuhan, Menlo Park, meta analysis, meta-analysis, Mitch Kapor, packet switching, Panopticon Jeremy Bentham, profit motive, RAND corporation, Ray Oldenburg, rent control, RFC: Request For Comment, Ronald Reagan, Saturday Night Live, Steve Jobs, Steve Wozniak, Steven Levy, Stewart Brand, technoutopianism, Ted Nelson, telepresence, The Great Good Place, The Hackers Conference, urban decay, Whole Earth Catalog, Whole Earth Review, young professional

Brand had been part of the faculty at an online institute devoted 26-04-2012 21:42 howard rheingold's | the virtual community 4 de 27 http://www.rheingold.com/vc/book/2.html to stretching the imaginations of business leaders--the Western Behavioral Sciences Institute (WBSI)--which introduced him to the effectiveness of computer conferencing. WBSI was also where he connected with Larry Brilliant. Brilliant and Brand shared a history at the center of several of the most colorful events of the 1960s: Brand was "on the bus" with Ken Kesey and the Merry Pranksters (Kesey's pot bust, as described in Tom Wolfe's Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test, happened on the roof of Brand's apartment; Brand was one of the organizers of the seminal Trips Festival that gave birth to Bill Graham Presents and the whole rock concert scene). Brilliant had been part of the Prankster-affiliated commune, the Hog Farm (which had organized the security arrangements for Woodstock around the judicious use of cream pies and seltzer bottles and had whipped up "breakfast in bed for 400,000").


San Francisco by Lonely Planet

airport security, Albert Einstein, Apple II, back-to-the-land, banking crisis, Bay Area Rapid Transit, Burning Man, California gold rush, car-free, carbon footprint, centre right, Chuck Templeton: OpenTable:, David Brooks, Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test, G4S, game design, glass ceiling, Golden Gate Park, Haight Ashbury, Joan Didion, Loma Prieta earthquake, Mason jar, New Urbanism, Silicon Valley, South of Market, San Francisco, stealth mode startup, stem cell, Steve Jobs, Steve Wozniak, Stewart Brand, transcontinental railway, urban sprawl, Whole Earth Catalog, Zipcar

➡ San Francisco Stories: Great Writers on the City (edited by John Miller) One hundred and fifty years of San Francisco impressions, including Jack London’s 1906 earthquake reports and Jack Kerouac’s attempts to hold a Downtown day job. ➡ Hell’s Angels: A Strange and Terrible Saga (Hunter S Thompson) This spare-no-details account of the outlaw Bay Area motorcycle club invented gonzo journalism and scandalized the nation. ➡ The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test (Tom Wolfe) His florid style seems dated, but Wolfe had extraordinary presence of mind to capture the ’60s with Ken Kesey, the Merry Pranksters, the Grateful Dead and Hell’s Angels. ➡ Martin Eden (Jack London) San Francisco’s first literary star started out as the Prince of the Oyster Pirates, a waterfront bad boy who got by on his wits in this semi-autobiographical account. Best for Comics & Graphic Novels Cartoon Art Museum gift shop (SoMa) Isotope (Hayes Valley) Kinokuniya Books & Stationery (Japantown) Neon Monster (Noe Valley) Green Apple Books (the Richmond) Graphic Novels Ambrose Bierce and Mark Twain set the San Francisco standard for sardonic wit, but recently Bay Area graphic novelists like R Crumb and Daniel Clowes have added a twist to this tradition with finely drawn, deadpan behavioral studies.


pages: 522 words: 162,310

Fantasyland: How America Went Haywire: A 500-Year History by Kurt Andersen

affirmative action, Albert Einstein, animal electricity, anti-communist, Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic, augmented reality, back-to-the-land, Bernie Sanders, British Empire, Burning Man, California gold rush, Celebration, Florida, centre right, cognitive dissonance, Columbine, corporate governance, Credit Default Swap, David Brooks, delayed gratification, dematerialisation, disintermediation, disruptive innovation, Donald Trump, Donner party, Downton Abbey, Edward Snowden, Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test, failed state, Ferguson, Missouri, God and Mammon, Gordon Gekko, greed is good, high net worth, illegal immigration, invisible hand, Isaac Newton, John von Neumann, Kickstarter, large denomination, Mark Zuckerberg, market fundamentalism, McMansion, Mikhail Gorbachev, Minecraft, moral panic, mutually assured destruction, new economy, New Urbanism, Norman Mailer, placebo effect, pre–internet, Ralph Waldo Emerson, RAND corporation, Ronald Reagan, Silicon Valley, smart meter, Snapchat, South Sea Bubble, Steve Jobs, Ted Kaczynski, the scientific method, Thomas Kuhn: the structure of scientific revolutions, trade route, transcontinental railway, urban renewal, Whole Earth Catalog, WikiLeaks, Y2K, young professional

Thirty-two million living Americans have used psychedelics; if they were members of a religion, it would be the second largest in the country. Americans’ rate of lifetime use of cannabis is two or three or four times that of northern Europeans. For many people, drugs’ fantasy-encouraging effects extend beyond the minutes or hours of being high, leaching into everyday thought, not always usefully. — THE GREAT CONTEMPORANEOUS firsthand account of this 1960s, I think, is The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test, Tom Wolfe’s book about Kesey and his acid-dropping Merry Prankster adventures. Eight years later, in the mid-1970s, as the Big Bang of subjectivity and hedonism blasted its new elements and energies through the American universe, Wolfe memorialized the larger transformation. He wrote an essay in New York magazine that’s remembered today for coining a term, the Me Decade, still used as a catchphrase for the touchy-feely narcissism of the 1970s’ newfangled self-improvement schemes.


California by Sara Benson

airport security, Albert Einstein, Apple II, Asilomar, back-to-the-land, Bay Area Rapid Transit, Berlin Wall, Burning Man, buy and hold, California gold rush, call centre, car-free, carbon footprint, Columbine, dark matter, desegregation, Donald Trump, Donner party, East Village, El Camino Real, Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test, Frank Gehry, global village, Golden Gate Park, Haight Ashbury, haute cuisine, Joan Didion, Khyber Pass, Loma Prieta earthquake, low cost airline, McMansion, means of production, Menlo Park, planetary scale, RFID, ride hailing / ride sharing, Ronald Reagan, Silicon Valley, South of Market, San Francisco, stem cell, Steve Jobs, Steve Wozniak, Stewart Brand, the new new thing, trade route, transcontinental railway, Upton Sinclair, urban sprawl, Wall-E, white picket fence, Whole Earth Catalog, working poor, Works Progress Administration, young professional

Tales of the City (Armistead Maupin) This 1976 romp follows San Francisco characters: pot-growing landladies, ever-hopeful Castro club-goers, and titillated Midwestern arrivals. Woman Warrior: Memoirs of a Girlhood Among Ghosts (Maxine Hong Kingston) A memoir of growing up Chinese American in Stockton, reflecting the shattered mirror of Californian identity. Slouching Towards Bethlehem (Joan Didion) These 1968 essays burn through the hippie haze to reveal glassy-eyed teenage revolutionaries adrift in the summer of love. The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test (Tom Wolfe) Follow Ken Kesey, the Merry Pranksters, the Grateful Dead and Hell’s Angels as they tune in, turn on and drop out. The Man in the High Castle (Philip K Dick) The bestselling Berkeley sci-fi writer presents the ultimate what-if scenario: imagine San Francisco circa 1962 if Japan and Nazi Germany had won WWII. Martin Eden (Jack London) Semiautobiographical account of San Francisco’s first literary star, who got by on his wits in the illicit oyster trade.

A mile in from San Gregorio State Beach on Hwy 1, kick off your shoes and stomp your feet to live bluegrass, Celtic and folk music on the weekends at the landmark San Gregorio General Store ( 650-726-0565), and check out the wooden bar singed by area branding irons. Eight miles east is the tiny township of La Honda, former home to One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest author Ken Kesey, and the launching spot for his 1964 psychedelic bus trip immortalized in Tom Wolfe’s The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test. Housed in an old blacksmith’s shop, Apple Jack’s Inn ( 650-747-0331) is a rustic, down-home bar offering live music on weekends and lots of local color. * * * South of the lighthouse, Fitzgerald Marine Reserve ( 650-363-4020) at Moss Beach is an extensive area of natural tidal pools. Feel free to walk out and explore the pools at low tide, though be careful, as it’s slippery.


Rough Guide to San Francisco and the Bay Area by Nick Edwards, Mark Ellwood

1960s counterculture, airport security, back-to-the-land, Bay Area Rapid Transit, British Empire, Burning Man, California gold rush, carbon footprint, City Beautiful movement, El Camino Real, Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test, glass ceiling, Golden Gate Park, Haight Ashbury, haute cuisine, Joan Didion, Kickstarter, Loma Prieta earthquake, Menlo Park, Nelson Mandela, period drama, pez dispenser, Port of Oakland, rent control, Ronald Reagan, Rosa Parks, Sand Hill Road, Silicon Valley, South of Market, San Francisco, Steve Jobs, Steve Wozniak, strikebreaker, transcontinental railway, unpaid internship, upwardly mobile, urban decay, urban planning, urban renewal, white picket fence, Works Progress Administration, young professional

Ken Kesey came here from Oregon in 1958 on a writing fellowship, working nights as an orderly on the psychiatric ward of one local hospital, and getting paid $75 a day to test experimental drugs (LSD among them) in another. Drawing on both experiences, Kesey wrote One Flew over the Cuckoo’s Nest in 1960 and quickly became a counter-culture hero, a period admirably chronicled by Tom Wolfe in The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test. Approaching from the Palo Alto CalTrain and SamTrans bus station, which acts as a buffer between the town and the university, the campus is entered via a half-mile-long, palm-tree-lined boulevard that deposits you at its heart, the Quadrangle, bordered by the phallic Hoover Tower, whose observation platform (daily 10am–4.30pm; $2) is worth ascending to for the view, and the colorful gold-leaf mosaics of the Memorial Church.


Western USA by Lonely Planet

airport security, Albert Einstein, Apple II, Asilomar, back-to-the-land, Bay Area Rapid Transit, Burning Man, California gold rush, call centre, car-free, carbon footprint, Charles Lindbergh, Chuck Templeton: OpenTable:, Donner party, East Village, edge city, Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test, Frank Gehry, global village, Golden Gate Park, Haight Ashbury, haute couture, haute cuisine, illegal immigration, intermodal, Joan Didion, Kickstarter, Loma Prieta earthquake, Mahatma Gandhi, Mars Rover, Maui Hawaii, off grid, Silicon Valley, Silicon Valley startup, South of Market, San Francisco, starchitect, stealth mode startup, stem cell, Steve Jobs, Steve Wozniak, supervolcano, trade route, transcontinental railway, Upton Sinclair, urban planning, women in the workforce, Works Progress Administration, young professional, Zipcar

Based in San Francisco, the scene revolved around Jack Kerouac (On the Road), Allen Ginsberg (Howl) and Lawrence Ferlinghetti, the Beats’ patron and publisher. Joan Didion nailed contemporary California culture in Slouching Towards Bethlehem, a collection of essays that takes a caustic look at 1960s flower power and the Haight-Ashbury district. Tom Wolfe also put ’60s San Francisco in perspective with The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test, which follows Ken Kesey’s band of Merry Pranksters. In the 1970s, Charles Bukowski’s semi-autobiographical novel Post Office captured down-and-out downtown LA, while Richard Vasquez’s Chicano took a dramatic look at LA’s Latino barrio. Hunter S Thompson, who committed suicide in early 2005, wrote Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas, set in the temple of American excess in the desert; it’s the ultimate road-trip novel, in every sense of the word.


pages: 893 words: 282,706

The Great Shark Hunt: Strange Tales From a Strange Time by Hunter S. Thompson

anti-communist, back-to-the-land, buy low sell high, complexity theory, computer age, cuban missile crisis, desegregation, Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test, Francisco Pizarro, Golden Gate Park, Haight Ashbury, job automation, land reform, Mason jar, New Journalism, non-fiction novel, Norman Mailer, Ronald Reagan, urban decay, urban renewal, urban sprawl

Thompson, by Kihm Winship "What 'The Spire' Inspires Among Reviewers," National Observer, June 1, 1964, p. 17. Mentions Thompson's review of The Spire (NO, April 27, 1964 p. 16) "In and Out of Books," Lewis Nichols, The New York Times Book Review, March 5, 1967, p. 8. Brief discussion of Thompson's trip to NYC to promote Hell's Angels. "Thompson, Hunter," Contemporary Authors, Detroit: Gale, 1968, v. 19-20, p. 429-30. Standard bio. The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test, Tom Wolfe, New York: Bantam, 1969. 700 Chapter 13: The Hell's Angels pp. 150-51. Describes how Ken Kesey met the Angels through Thompson. " 'Freak Power' Candidate May Be the Next Sheriff in Placid Aspen, Colorado," Anthony Ripley, photo by David Hiser, The New York Times, October 19, 1970, p. 44. "Will Aspen's Hippies Elect a Sheriff?" Edwin A. Roberts, Jr., National Observer, November 2,1970, p. 6.


pages: 970 words: 302,110

A Man in Full: A Novel by Tom Wolfe

Albert Einstein, Bonfire of the Vanities, edge city, Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test, global village, hiring and firing, New Urbanism, plutocrats, Plutocrats, Ronald Reagan, Silicon Valley, Socratic dialogue, South of Market, San Francisco, walking around money

She was really quite lovely, beautiful, in fact, aglow with happiness and champagne and the presence of so many males, all of whom no doubt found her just as gorgeous as he did. "You can't leave without saying goodbye!" she said. "Wouldn't think of it," said Roger, "and thanks for everything." "Don't forget where we are, now!" "Oh, don't worry," said the man of the world, "I'll be back." About the Author Tom Wolfe is the author of a dozen books, among them such contemporary classics as The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test, The Right Stuff, and The Bonfire of the Vanities, A native of Richmond, Virginia, he earned his B.A. at Washington and Lee University and his Ph.D. in American studies at Yale. He lives in New York City. BY HRUNDI, IF YOU EVER PROOF THIS BOOK PLEASE LET ME KNOW; I’M ON THE EBOOKS CHANNEL Proofed by ansdell sept 09 ( I was scanning this book but you got there first) YOU CAN SEARCH THROUGH THE WHOLE BOOK ON BARNES AND NOBLE IF YOU’RE NOT SURE ABOUT A PARTICULAR WORD www.barnesandnoble.com <http://www.barnesandnoble.com> Table of Contents Table of Contents Untitled Untitled Untitled Untitled Table of Contents Table of Contents Untitled Untitled Untitled Untitled Table of Contents Table of Contents Untitled Untitled Untitled Untitled


Northern California Travel Guide by Lonely Planet

Airbnb, Apple II, Asilomar, back-to-the-land, Bay Area Rapid Transit, big-box store, Burning Man, buy and hold, California gold rush, call centre, car-free, carbon footprint, clean water, dark matter, Donald Trump, Donner party, East Village, El Camino Real, Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test, Frank Gehry, friendly fire, glass ceiling, Golden Gate Park, Google bus, Haight Ashbury, haute couture, haute cuisine, housing crisis, Joan Didion, Kickstarter, Loma Prieta earthquake, Lyft, Mahatma Gandhi, Mark Zuckerberg, Mason jar, McMansion, means of production, Port of Oakland, ride hailing / ride sharing, Ronald Reagan, Silicon Valley, Silicon Valley startup, South of Market, San Francisco, stealth mode startup, stem cell, Steve Jobs, Steve Wozniak, Stewart Brand, the built environment, trade route, transcontinental railway, uber lyft, Upton Sinclair, urban sprawl, white picket fence, Whole Earth Catalog, women in the workforce, working poor, Works Progress Administration, young professional

A mile in from San Gregorio State Beach ( GOOGLE MAP ; %650-726-8819; www.parks.ca.gov; Hwy 1, San Gregorio; per car $8; h8am-sunset) on Hwy 1, kick off your shoes and stomp your feet to live bluegrass, Celtic and folk music on the weekends at the San Gregorio General Store ( GOOGLE MAP ; %650-726-0565; www.sangregoriostore.com; 7615 Stage Rd, San Gregorio; hstore 10:30am-6pm Sun-Thu, to 7pm Fri, 10am-7pm Sat, to 6pm Sun). Check out the wooden bar singed by area branding irons. Eight miles further east is the tiny township of La Honda, former home to One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest author Ken Kesey and the launching spot for his 1964 psychedelic bus trip immortalized in Tom Wolfe’s The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test. Housed in a 19th-century blacksmith’s shop, Apple Jack’s ( GOOGLE MAP ; %650-747-0331; 8790 Hwy 84, La Honda; hnoon-2am) is a rustic, down-home country-and-western bar with motorcycles lined up in a row outside. To stretch your legs in the redwoods, Sam McDonald County Park ( GOOGLE MAP ; %650-879-0238; http://parks.smcgov.org/sam-mcdonald-park; 13435 Pescadero Creek Rd, Loma Mar; per car $6; h8am-8pm Apr-Aug, closes earlier Sep-Mar; pc), 2 miles south of La Honda, has forested hiking trails and a secluded hike-to cabin ( GOOGLE MAP ; %650-390-8411; www.sierraclub.org/loma-prieta/hikers-hut; per night adult $20-30, child $10; n).


pages: 769 words: 397,677

Frommer's California 2007 by Harry Basch, Mark Hiss, Erika Lenkert, Matthew Richard Poole

airport security, Asilomar, Bay Area Rapid Transit, car-free, Charles Lindbergh, Chuck Templeton: OpenTable:, clean water, Columbine, Donald Trump, Donner party, East Village, El Camino Real, Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test, Frank Gehry, Golden Gate Park, Guggenheim Bilbao, Haight Ashbury, indoor plumbing, Iridium satellite, Joan Didion, Maui Hawaii, Silicon Valley, South of Market, San Francisco, sustainable-tourism, transcontinental railway, upwardly mobile, urban sprawl, white picket fence, Works Progress Administration

California has always been a hotbed for alternative—and, more often than not, controversial—literary styles. Joan Didion, in her novel Slouching Towards Bethlehem, and Hunter S. Thompson, in his columns for the San Francisco Examiner (brought together in the collection Generation of Swine), both used a “new journalistic” approach in their studies of San Francisco in the 1960s. Tom Wolfe’s early work The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test follows the Hell’s Angels, the Grateful Dead, and Ken Kesey’s Merry Pranksters as they ride through the hallucinogenic 1960s. Meanwhile, in “Howl” and On the Road, Beat writers Allen Ginsberg and Jack Kerouac, respectively, were penning protests against political conservatism— and promoting their bohemian lifestyle. CONTEMPORARY FICTION If you’re interested in a contemporary look back at four generations in the life of an American family, you can do no better than Wallace Stegner’s Angle of Repose.


Central America by Carolyn McCarthy, Greg Benchwick, Joshua Samuel Brown, Alex Egerton, Matthew Firestone, Kevin Raub, Tom Spurling, Lucas Vidgen

airport security, Bartolomé de las Casas, California gold rush, call centre, centre right, clean water, cognitive dissonance, currency manipulation / currency intervention, digital map, Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test, failed state, Francisco Pizarro, Frank Gehry, haute cuisine, illegal immigration, Joan Didion, land reform, liberation theology, low cost airline, low cost carrier, Mahatma Gandhi, Monroe Doctrine, Ronald Reagan, Skype, sustainable-tourism, trade route, transcontinental railway, urban renewal, urban sprawl, women in the workforce

DRINKING Past the Mango Inn, the Bar in the Bush is popular, but can get rowdy. It usually is just open on Wednesday and Friday nights. Lone travelers should take care at night, since the pathway to the bar is unlit. Treetanic ( 8pm-midnight, to 1am Wed & Fri) Drinking at this psychedelic mango treetop bar feels a bit guilty, like drinking inside a children’s pop-up book, if the pop-up book was The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test, of course. You half expect to find Willy Wonka tending bar. It ranked number four in Singha and Lonely Planet’s 2009 Great Bars of the World. Tranquila Bar ( 4pm-1am Sun-Thu, to 3am Fri & Sat) Jutting out on a small jetty, this is a relaxed place to swap dive tales and travel stories. An eclectic music mix on the sound system adds to the easygoing vibe, but these days the new Wii sees most of the action.