El Camino Real

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pages: 474 words: 149,248

The Blood of Heroes: The 13-Day Struggle for the Alamo--And the Sacrifice That Forged a Nation by James Donovan

active measures, colonial rule, El Camino Real, financial independence, Francisco Pizarro, Hernando de Soto, illegal immigration, invention of gunpowder

As for the comparisons to Napoleon, he thought Santa Anna “as distant from him as our planet is from the sun.” On the last day of January, the main body of the Army of Operations began to leave Saltillo for Monclova, 150 miles to the north, winding its way along El Camino Real, the “Royal Road,” between imposing mountain peaks. Three hundred miles beyond that city—about halfway up the portion of El Camino Real that ran from Mexico City to Nacogdoches in far east Texas—lay Béxar. Santa Anna would lead a five-thousand-man army through the barren semidesert, where there was no forage and little water, in the deepest part of winter, and he would liberate Béxar from the barbarians.

By the early nineteenth century, they had become the finest horsemen on the continent, roaming the southern plains as far as the Rio Grande and beyond in search of the great herds of buffalo, their staff of life—and in search of more horses, as well as captive women and children to replenish their numbers. They had driven the less populous Apaches out of the south Texas area and terrorized the Spanish inhabitants for a century. For the most part, they remained north of El Camino Real, the “Royal Road” of the Spanish empire that belied its name: a simple cart path that arced from the Rio Grande through Béxar all the way to Nacogdoches in east Texas and beyond. If the Comanches had been better organized and their resistance better planned, colonization in Texas would have been impossible against ten thousand motivated horse soldiers.

“It would be a waste of men to put our brave little band against thousands,” he wrote. Indeed, it would be suicide. But, Bowie explained, they would hold the line at Béxar if need be. If they did not fight Santa Anna here, the Mexican army would drive into the colonies—including Bastrop, just a few days’ march up El Camino Real, where Neill lived with his family. His grown sons, Samuel and George, could fend for themselves—the previous summer, they had participated with their father and ninety other Texians in a grueling six-week Indian expedition, and had just signed up with Robert Williamson’s newly formed ranging company.


pages: 420 words: 219,075

Frommer's New Mexico by Lesley S. King

Albert Einstein, clean water, El Camino Real, place-making, post-work, Ronald Reagan, sustainable-tourism, trade route, X Prize

In subsequent centuries it continued to be the main road for travelers and traders carrying goods and ideas. Eventually it connected up with the Santa Fe Trail, which was the east-west route from Missouri. To find out more about this route, visit the El Camino Real International Heritage Center. See below for details. 309 SOUTHWESTERN NEW MEXICO Socorro & the VLA 11 Other Attractions El Camino Real International Heritage Center This museum, opened in 2005, tells the story of El Camino Real, the 1,500-mile international trade route from Mexico to San Juan Pueblo, near Santa Fe. The impressive $5-million, 20,000-square-foot structure, set in the middle of the desert, is an award-winning building perched like a ship above Sheep Canyon between Socorro and Truth or Consequences.

Lawrence Ranch (near Taos), 224–225 Dice Apartments (Las Vegas), 289 Dietary red flags, 48 Dinosaurs, 97, 251, 270, 274, 283, 300, 301 Dinosaur Trackway at Clayton Lake State Park, 300 Disabilities, travelers with, 49–50 Dixon, 196 Dog Canyon, 354 Dolan House (Lincoln), 364 Double E Guest Ranch, 72 Double E Guest Ranch (near Silver City), 308 Downhill skiing, 73 Albuquerque, 101 Pajarito Mountain ski area (Los Alamos), 190 Santa Fe, 169–170 Ski Apache (near Ruidoso), 352 Taos, 226–229 Downs at Albuquerque Racetrack and Casino, 103 Downtown Gallery District Association (Truth or Consequences), 320 Downtown Mall (Las Cruces), 324 Downtown Ramble (Las Cruces), 327 Dragonfly Recreation Area, 113 The Dragon Room (Santa Fe), 181 Drake Hotel (Gallup), 258 Drinking laws, 386 Dunes Drive (White Sands National Monument), 359 E Eagle Café (Gallup), 259 Eagle Nest, 242–243 Eagle Nest Lake State Park, 242–243 Eagle Ranch Pistachio Groves (near Alamogordo), 354 Eastern New Mexico University (Portales), 376 Easter Weekend Celebration, 36 Eating and drinking, 31–33 Echo Canyon Amphitheater, 282 Ecotourism, 51–52 E. E. Fogelson Visitor Center (Pecos National Historical Park), 188 Eight Northern Indian Pueblos Council (San Juan Pueblo), 187 Eight Northern Pueblos Artist and Craftsman Show, 38 El Calderon, 254 El Camino Real, 309 El Camino Real International Heritage Center (near Socorro), 310 El Chorro, 282 Eldorado Hotel (Santa Fe), 180 Electricity, 386 Elephant Butte Lake State Park, 69, 307–308, 316–317, 319 El Farol (Santa Fe), 180–181 Elizabethtown, 242 Ellis Tanner Trading Company (Gallup), 260 El Malpais National Monument, 248, 253–254 El Morro National Monument, 248, 254–256 El Morro Theater (Gallup), 259 El Nicho (Santa Fe), 175 El Paseo Bar and Grill (Santa Fe), 181 El Paso Import Company Albuquerque, 106 Santa Fe, 173 El Paso International Airport, 43 F Families with children, 50 Albuquerque restaurants, 90 sights and attractions, 96–99 best experiences for, 8–9 Ruidoso shopping, 360 Santa Fe accommodations, 136 restaurants, 148 shopping, 174 sights and activities, 164 suggested itinerary, 63–65 Taos restaurants, 218 shopping, 236 ski school, 227 Far Flung Adventures (El Prado), 233, 248 Farmer's markets Las Cruces, 324 Santa Fe, 176 Farmington, 269–278 accommodations, 274–275 nightlife, 278 restaurants, 276–277 shopping, 277–278 traveling to, 269 visitor information, 269 Farmington Aquatic Center, 273 Farmington Chamber of Commerce, 270 Farmington Convention and Visitors Bureau, 269–270 Farmington Museum at Gateway Park, 270 Fashion Outlets of Santa Fe, 176 Faust's Transportation, 45 Taos, 201, 203 Feast of San Geronimo (Taos Pueblo), 224 Feat of Clay (Aztec), 277 Fedex Kinko's (Albuquerque), 79 Festival of the Cranes (Bosque del Apache National Wildlife Refuge), 40 Fetishes, 258 Fiesta de Oñate (Española), 197 Fiestas de Las Vegas, 37 Fiestas de Santiago y Santa Ana (Taos), 38 Fifth Generation Trading Company (Farmington), 277 Films, 30–31 Fishing, 69 Albuquerque, 100 Jemez River, 113 Navajo Lake, 273 northeastern New Mexico, 286 northwestern New Mexico, 247–248 San Juan River, 273 San Juan Tribal Lakes, 187 Santa Fe, 167 southeastern New Mexico, 351 southwestern New Mexico, 307–308 Sugarite Canyon State Park, 297 Taos, 230–231 Flea markets Albuquerque, 106 Gallup, 257 Santa Fe, 176 Florence Hawley Ellis Museum of Anthropology (Ghost Ranch), 283 Flying J Ranch (Alto), 362 Folsom, 299–300 Folsom Museum, 299–300 Food and cuisine, 31–33 Chile Festival, 39 cooking classes, 53, 163 National Fiery Foods/ Barbecue Show, 36 Santa Fe Wine & Chile Fiesta, 40 stores and markets Albuquerque, 105 Santa Fe, 175 Taos, 237 Taste of Santa Fe, 38 The Whole Enchilada Fiesta (Las Cruces), 40 Football, Albuquerque, 102 Foothills Trail (Albuquerque), 99 Forest Service Building (Taos), 232 Fort Marcy Complex (Santa Fe), 170 Fort Selden State Monument, 328 Fort Sumner, 375–376 Fort Sumner State Monument, 375–376 Fort Union National Monument, 291–292 Four Corners Monument, 272 Four Corners Regional Airport (Farmington), 269 Fourth of July celebrations, 37 Frank Howell Gallery (Santa Fe), 172 Frontier Sports (Aztec), 248 Fullingim-Isenhour-Leard Gallery (Socorro), 309 Funtrackers Family Fun Center (Ruidoso), 361 INDEX El Rancho de las Golondrinas (Santa Fe), 162 El Rincón Trading Post (Taos), 237 El Rito, 197 El Santuario de Nuestro Señor de Esquipulas (Chimayo), 193 El Vado Lake, 279 El Vado Lake State Park, 282 Embassies and consulates, 386–387 Embudito Trail, 101 Embudo, 196 Emergencies, 387 The Enchanted Circle, 240–244 Enchanted Circle Century Bike Tour, 39 Enchanted Forest Cross Country Ski Area, 229 Enchanted Grounds (Raton), 296 Enchantment Dreams Walking Tours (Taos), 226 End of the Vine (Ruidoso), 360 Entry requirements, 41–43 Environmental issues, 15, 51 Envision Gallery (Taos), 235 E-Passport, 42 Ernest L.

You can wander through Taos Society artist Ernest Blumenschein’s home, which is a museum. It was built in 1797 and restored by Blumenschein in 1919. The Martinez Hacienda is an example of a hacienda stronghold. It has been developed into a living museum featuring weavers, blacksmiths, and woodcarvers. See p. 222. El Camino Real International Heritage Center (30 miles south of Socorro off I-25, exit 115; & 575/854-3600; www.nmmonuments.org): This museum traces the 1,500-mile historic route between Mexico City and the Española Valley north of Santa Fe. On view are artifacts, art, and devotional items used along the trail, along with state-of-the-art exhibits offering first-person stories of the trail.


pages: 394 words: 108,215

What the Dormouse Said: How the Sixties Counterculture Shaped the Personal Computer Industry by John Markoff

Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic, Apple II, back-to-the-land, beat the dealer, Bill Duvall, Bill Gates: Altair 8800, Buckminster Fuller, California gold rush, card file, computer age, computer vision, conceptual framework, cuban missile crisis, different worldview, Donald Knuth, Douglas Engelbart, Douglas Engelbart, Dynabook, Edward Thorp, El Camino Real, Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test, general-purpose programming language, Golden Gate Park, Hacker Ethic, hypertext link, informal economy, information retrieval, invention of the printing press, Jeff Rulifson, John Markoff, John Nash: game theory, John von Neumann, Kevin Kelly, knowledge worker, Mahatma Gandhi, Menlo Park, Mother of all demos, Norbert Wiener, packet switching, Paul Terrell, popular electronics, QWERTY keyboard, RAND corporation, RFC: Request For Comment, Richard Stallman, Robert X Cringely, Sand Hill Road, Silicon Valley, Silicon Valley startup, South of Market, San Francisco, speech recognition, Steve Crocker, Steve Jobs, Steve Wozniak, Steven Levy, Stewart Brand, Ted Nelson, The Hackers Conference, The Theory of the Leisure Class by Thorstein Veblen, Thorstein Veblen, Turing test, union organizing, Vannevar Bush, Whole Earth Catalog, William Shockley: the traitorous eight

The impact of the region’s heady mix of culture and technology can be seen clearly in the personal stories of many of these pioneers of the computer industry. Indeed, personal decisions frequently had historic consequences. If you put a stake in the ground at Kepler’s, an eclectic bookstore run by pacifist Roy Kepler that was located on El Camino Real in Menlo Park beginning in the 1950s, and drew a five-mile circle around it, you would have captured Engelbart’s Augment research group at SRI, McCarthy’s Stanford Artificial Intelligence Laboratory, and Xerox’s Palo Alto Research Center, as well as the hobbyists who made up the People’s Computer Company and the Homebrew Computer Club.

During the next four years, initially charging subjects five hundred dollars to participate in a study of LSD and creativity, the foundation ultimately led more than 350 people, including some of the Valley’s best engineers, through their first psychedelic experiences. On the San Francisco Midpeninsula, the late fifties and the early sixties were a bucolic time. Kepler’s bookstore on El Camino Real, just two miles north of the Stanford University campus, served as a beacon for an eclectic group of intellectuals who were outsiders in a community that was largely split in its economic dependence among Stanford, a fledgling electronics industry, and large military contractors like Lockheed.

It went from being a tiny group made up of fewer than one hundred members and several factions that wouldn’t talk to one another, to become almost overnight a vibrant organization with a catalog of more than one hundred courses, a newsletter, one thousand members, and a fifty-thousand-dollar annual budget. For the next three years, it became the heart of the Midpeninsula’s thriving counterculture. It spun off a medical center, a law commune, a tenant union, a grocery store, and a machine shop. The main office was moved to El Camino Real in Menlo Park, just up the street from Kepler’s, and doubled as an arts-and-crafts store and a print shop. The Free U attracted people from the entire community, ranging from the professors at SAIL to Palo Alto High School students. One of the first to join was a young Israeli named Marc Porat, whose father had been a refugee from the Nazis and had come to Stanford to get his Ph.D.


Frommer's San Diego 2011 by Mark Hiss

airport security, California gold rush, car-free, Charles Lindbergh, desegregation, Donald Trump, East Village, El Camino Real, glass ceiling, New Journalism, Norman Mailer, Skype, South of Market, San Francisco, sustainable-tourism, transcontinental railway, urban renewal, white picket fence, Works Progress Administration

BlueFire Grill, the stylish bar and signature restaurant, 248 14_626214-ch11.indd 24814_626214-ch11.indd 248 7/23/10 11:23 PM7/23/10 11:23 PM 2100 Costa del Mar Rd. (at El Camino Real), Carlsbad, CA 92009. & 800/854-5000 or 760/438-9111. Fax 760/931-7585. www.lacosta.com. 610 units. $279–$307 double; from $363 suite; from $398 villa with kitchen. Children 17 and under stay free in parent’s room. $22/day resort fee. Golf, spa, and tennis packages available. AE, DC, DISC, MC, V. Valet parking $25 overnight; self-parking $12. Bus: 309. From I-5 take La Costa Ave. east; left on El Camino Real. Amenities: 5 restaurants/cafes; 4 bars; bike rentals; children’s center and programs (age 6 months–16); concierge; 2 golf courses; health club; 5 Jacuzzis; 8 outdoor pools; room service; spa; 17 tennis courts (7 lit for night play); Wi-Fi (free in lobby and other spaces).

., Point Loma (& 619/223-1109; www.point lomaseafoods.com); South Beach Bar & Grill, 5059 Newport Ave., Ocean Beach (& 619/226-4577; www.southbeachob. com); and El Zarape , 4642 Park Blvd., University Heights (& 619/6921652). Another worthy chain is Wahoo’s Fish Taco (www.wahoos.com), with locations including La Jolla (639 Pearl St.; & 858/459-0027), Encinitas (1006 N. El Camino Real; & 760/753-5060), Mission Valley (2195 Station Village Way; & 619/299-4550), and the Sports Arena area (3944 W. Point Loma Blvd.; & 619/222-0020). Ocean fare takes precedence, and local fish and shellfish are featured in a chef ’s tasting menu. There’s also classic surf and turf or a selection of simply wood-roasted meats and seafood.

Artists spotlighted include Diego Rivera, whose room gives you the feeling of stepping into a warm Mexican painting; the Japanese Furo room features a soaking tub carved into the bathroom floor. Downstairs rooms in the two-story structure have tiny private garden decks. A sister B&B, the 5-room Secret Garden Inn, is located adjacent to the owner’s nearby Cafe Secret Bistro, 1140 El Camino Real (& 858/481-4239), a Euro-style bistro serving breakfast and lunch. 944 Camino del Mar (btw. 9th and 10th sts.), Del Mar, CA 92014. & 858/755-4646. www.lesartistesinn. com. 12 units. $105–$250 double. Rates include continental breakfast. DISC, MC, V. Free parking. From I-5 go west on Del Mar Heights Rd., and then left onto Camino Del Mar Rd.


pages: 135 words: 53,708

Top 10 San Diego by Pamela Barrus, Dk Publishing

California gold rush, centre right, Charles Lindbergh, East Village, El Camino Real, G4S, haute cuisine, illegal immigration, Silicon Valley, the market place, transcontinental railway, urban renewal

. • Map E3 • 10818 San Diego Mission Rd • (619) 283-7319 • www. missionsandiego.com • Open 9am–4:45pm daily • Adm $3 • Tote-a-Tape Tours $2 • Church: Mass 7am & 5:30 pm 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 La Casa del Padre Serra Church Campanario Cemetery Garden Statues Padre Luis Jayme Museum Chapel Gardens Father Luis Jayme Memorial El Camino Real La Casa del Padre Serra The original 1774 adobe walls and beams survived an Indian attack, a military occupation, earthquakes, and years of neglect. Padres lived simply and with few comforts. Campanario This 46-ft (14-m) belltower defines California mission architecture. Two of the bells are considered originals, and the crown atop one bell signifies it was cast in a royal foundry.

A cross (below) marks the approximate spot where Kumeyaay Indians killed Jayme, California’s first martyr. San Diego’s Top 10 Four statues of St. Anthony of Padua (right), patron saint of the Indians, Father Serra, St. Joseph, saint of Serra’s expedition, and St. Francis oversee the inner garden. Padre Luis Jayme Museum El Camino Real Also called the Royal Road or the King’s Highway, this road linked the 21 California missions, each a day’s distance apart by horseback. Chapel Taken from a Carmelite monastery in Plasencia, Spain, this small chapel (below) features choir stalls, a throne, and an altar dating from the 1300s.

Common sealife includes lobsters and garibaldi – the official state marine fish. d San Diego Divers Supply: Map B4 • 4004 Sports Arena Blvd • (619) 224-3439 Petco Park hosts the National League Padres’ baseball team. d Map K6 • 100 Park Blvd • (877) 374-2784 San Diego State University Aztecs Take the San Diego Trolley out to Qualcomm Stadium. d Map E4 San Diego’s Top 10 Catch the American Football Conference team at Qualcomm Stadium. d Map D3 • (619) 280-2121 San Diego Gulls Ice Hockey The Gulls play in the West Coast Hockey League. d Map B4 • 3500 Sports Arena Blvd • (619) 225-9813 Del Mar Thoroughbred Club Celebrities and horseracing fans head here. d Map D2 • 2260 Jimmy Durante Blvd, Del Mar • (858) 755-1141 El Cajon Speedway Cars compete on the fastest 3/8-mile paved oval. d Map E2 • 1875 Joe Crosson Dr, El Cajon • (619) 448-8900 San Diego Polo Club Attend polo matches on Sundays. d Map E2 • 14555 El Camino Real, Rancho Santa Fe • (858) 481-9217 Golf Watch the annual golf tournaments at Torrey Pines and La Costa. Mission Bay Park Mission Bay hosts many boating events. d Map B3 Bullfights Check out the world’s leading toreros at Plaza Monumental. d Map E3 • Playas de Tijuana, Tijuana • (664) 680-1808 61 San Diego’s Top 10 Colorful entrance to Viejas Casino Offbeat San Diego Paragliding at Torrey Pines Soar off the spectacular cliffs of Torrey Pines (see p33).


Microserfs by Douglas Coupland

Biosphere 2, car-free, computer age, El Camino Real, game design, hive mind, Kevin Kelly, Maui Hawaii, means of production, Menlo Park, postindustrial economy, RAND corporation, Ronald Reagan, Sand Hill Road, Silicon Valley, Stephen Hawking, Steve Ballmer, Steve Jobs, telemarketer, Watson beat the top human players on Jeopardy!, white picket fence

* * * My brain is built of paths and slides and ladders and lasers and I have invited all of you to enter its pavilion. My brain, as you enter, will smell of tangerines and brand-new running shoes. HELLO My name is: UNIX Friend or Foe? * * * I went out shopping for memory this afternoon with Todd and Karla. I had to get a strip of 27512 EPROMs - at Fry's, the nerd superstore on El Camino Real near Page Mill Road. I had to grovel to Ethan for the petty cash; so degrading. The Fry's chain completely taps into MSE: Male Shopping Energy. This is to say that most guys have about 73 calories of shopping energy, and once these calories are gone, they're gone for the day - if not the week - and can't be regenerated simply by having an Orange Julius at the Food Fair.

"I always assumed that history was created by think tanks, the DOE and the RAND Corporation of Santa Monica, California. I assumed that history was something that happened to other people - out there. I never thought history was something my kid built in the basement. It's a shock." I told him about the new word I'd learned, deletia, and Dad laughed. "That's me!" We were soon down at El Camino Real. I had to go back to my car. I asked, "Are you guys driving? You need a ride anywhere?" "We'll walk," said Dad. "But thanks." "See you back in the Habitrail," said Michael. Yeah. Right. * * * Karla was outside the house watering the herb garden with a can when I drove up. I told Karla that it was really unChristmassy of me, but I wanted to kill Michael.

I think our e-mail correspondence has given us an intimacy that face-to-face contact never would have. Irony! * * * I almost made Dad a cardboard sign saying, "will manage for food" but then I felt like a bad, bad son, and then, like clockwork, I got to feeling depressed for fifty something's, imagining them standing at the corner of El Camino Real and Rengstorff Avenue holding up such a sign. And I can't believe Michael got Dad a nice tool kit for Christmas. How fucking thoughtful. SUNDAY December 26,1993 All family'ed out. Karla and I drove down the hill to Syntex, birthplace of the birth control pill, a little bit below Mom and Dad's house, down on Hillview Avenue - a 1970s Utopian, Andromeda Strainishly empty tech complex.


pages: 615 words: 168,775

Troublemakers: Silicon Valley's Coming of Age by Leslie Berlin

AltaVista, Apple II, Asilomar, Asilomar Conference on Recombinant DNA, Bear Stearns, beat the dealer, Bill Atkinson, Bill Gates: Altair 8800, Bob Noyce, Byte Shop, Clayton Christensen, cloud computing, computer age, discovery of DNA, don't be evil, Donald Knuth, double helix, Douglas Engelbart, Douglas Engelbart, Dynabook, Edward Thorp, El Camino Real, fear of failure, Fellow of the Royal Society, financial independence, game design, Haight Ashbury, hiring and firing, independent contractor, industrial robot, informal economy, Internet of things, inventory management, John Markoff, Kickstarter, Kitchen Debate, Leonard Kleinrock, manufacturing employment, Mark Zuckerberg, Menlo Park, Minecraft, Mother of all demos, packet switching, Ralph Nader, Robert Metcalfe, rolodex, Ronald Reagan, Sand Hill Road, Silicon Valley, Silicon Valley startup, Snapchat, software as a service, Steve Jobs, Steve Wozniak, Steven Levy, Stewart Brand, Ted Nelson, union organizing, upwardly mobile, William Shockley: the traitorous eight, women in the workforce

The advice (write the phone number of the legal defense committee on your skin for your call from the station; do not resist; yell your name so the group can track who has been hauled off) came in handy.4 The police arrested fifteen people—“six girls and nine young men,” according to one reporter.5 Within an hour, it was over. Police cleared the barricades and reopened the streets. The protesting students could have walked back to the Stanford campus via a few residential blocks, but a large group chose instead to wend their way along the main thoroughfare, El Camino Real. They sang, pumped fists, and accepted beers tossed to them by sympathetic drivers who believed, as one radical paper put it, that the protest had been “a total victory [that] had successfully shut down counterinsurgency work at SRI.”6 That assessment, however, was more wishful thinking than reality.III Back on campus, a group broke two windows in the president’s office before returning to the April Third Movement’s headquarters, a geodesic dome on White Plaza in front of the student union.7 Protests of this sort—rowdy and defiant, though not as violent as their counterparts at Berkeley—had flared at Stanford over the past few months.

A Forbes editor with responsibility for the West Coast stated unequivocally that the magazine was interested only in publicly held companies with sales of $50 million or more.3 Stanford’s reputation was on the rise—it was often called “the Harvard of the West”—but the university attracted mostly students from California. San Francisco was best known for its hippies. Palo Alto was fighting its reputation as “the Peninsula’s largest sex-shop center,” thanks to an eight-block stretch of El Camino Real near the city’s southern border that was home to multiple adult bookstores, an X-rated movie theater, and massage parlors with names such as “The Streaker” and “The Foxy Lady.”4 None of this pointed to a promising future as an economic powerhouse.II The rest of the business world might not have noticed, but inside the Valley, things were brewing in 1972.

He described how he wanted the game to look, specifying details down to the line dividing the screen and the rectangular paddles on either side. The game needed to be cheap, he said, and ideally, it would contain no more than twenty chips. It needed to use the clever video-positioning technique that Alcorn so admired. Alcorn, determined to impress General Electric, drove to a department store on El Camino Real and bought its best black-and-white television. Back at the office, he designed segmented paddles, with each segment sending the ball careening back at a different angle. The sync generator inside the television, he discovered, already contained certain tones, and with a bit of manipulation, he came up with a satisfying pong sound when the ball hit the paddle.12 He configured the game so that play would speed up after a few rallies.


Rough Guide to San Francisco and the Bay Area by Nick Edwards, Mark Ellwood

1960s counterculture, airport security, back-to-the-land, Bay Area Rapid Transit, British Empire, Burning Man, California gold rush, carbon footprint, City Beautiful movement, El Camino Real, Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test, glass ceiling, Golden Gate Park, Haight Ashbury, haute cuisine, Joan Didion, Kickstarter, Loma Prieta earthquake, Menlo Park, Nelson Mandela, period drama, pez dispenser, Port of Oakland, rent control, Ronald Reagan, Rosa Parks, San Francisco homelessness, Sand Hill Road, Silicon Valley, South of Market, San Francisco, Steve Jobs, Steve Wozniak, strikebreaker, transcontinental railway, unpaid internship, upwardly mobile, urban decay, urban planning, urban renewal, white picket fence, Works Progress Administration, young professional

Some visitors to San Francisco choose to stay further south up the Peninsula rather than in the city, a good way to save money if you have wheels: dozens of $50/night motels line Hwy-82 – “El Camino Real,” the old main highway. For hotels by the airport, see box, p.164. Just around the corner from lively California Ave, this friendly motel has the best prices for en-suite rooms. Very clean and there’s a pool. $90 Cowper Inn 705 Cowper St, Palo Alto t650/327-4475, wwww.cowperinn.com. Restored Victorian house with attractive rooms close to University Ave. The cheaper rooms have shared bathrooms. $105. Stanford Park Hotel 100 El Camino Real, Menlo Park t 650/322-1234 or 1-800/3682468, w www.stanfordparkhotel.com.

Essanay, the first studios on the West Coast, made more than seven hundred films in three years, including Charlie Chaplin’s The Tramp in 1914. Not much remains from those pre-Hollywood days, however, and the only real sight is the Mission San Jose de Guadalupe on Mission Boulevard, south of the I-680 freeway (daily 10am–5pm; donation). Built in 1797 as the fourteenth mission in the chain of 21 that run along El Camino Real, the structure was completely rebuilt in 1985 to look as it did in the early 1800s. One of the least-visited missions in the chain, it’s arguably the most striking of the five in the Bay Area, with crystal chandeliers suspended from its rustic wooden nave and trompe l’oeil balconies painted on its walls.

If you get tired of house-spotting walks and browsing in the overpriced designer furniture stores dotted around downtown – one of the town’s main preoccupations, apparently – try cycling around the many wellmarked bike routes; a range of bikes is available for $20–30 a day from Action Sports Limited at 1047 El Camino Real (t 650/328-3180). Be aware, however, that East Palo Alto, on the Bay side of US-101, has a well-deserved reputation for gang- and drug-related violence, with one of the highest per capita murder rates of any US city. Perhaps best known as the childhood home of the Grateful Dead’s Jerry Garcia, the area was founded in the 1920s as the utopian Runnymeade Colony, a poultry-raising co-operative, and the local preservation society (t 650/329-0294) can point out the surviving sites should you be interested.


Parks Directory of the United States by Darren L. Smith, Kay Gill

1919 Motor Transport Corps convoy, Asilomar, British Empire, California gold rush, clean water, cuban missile crisis, desegregation, Donner party, El Camino Real, global village, Golden Gate Park, Hernando de Soto, indoor plumbing, mass immigration, Maui Hawaii, oil shale / tar sands, Ronald Reagan, Sand Hill Road, Torches of Freedom, trade route, transcontinental railway, Works Progress Administration

While traveling the ‘‘Kanc,’’ visitors can complete their loop by taking the White Mountains Trail National Scenic Byway (see separate entry for description). Time to Allow: 1 hour. ★1210★ EL CAMINO REAL NATIONAL SCENIC BYWAY c/o El Camino Real International Heritage Center PO Box 175 Socorro, NM 87801 Web: www.byways.org/browse/byways/2065/ Phone: 505-854-3600 Length: 299 miles. Designation/Year: National Scenic Byway (2005). Description: Beginning in the 16th century and spanning more than 300 years of active use, El Camino Real (‘‘The Royal Highway’’) served as a major artery for travel and commerce from Mexico City through the provinces of New Spain to the Rio Grande Valley in the Santa Fe area, some 1500 miles to the north.

Forsythe National Wildlife Refuge (NJ). . . . . . . . . . . . . 724 Edwin Warner Park (TN) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4910 Eel Weir State Park (NY). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3444 Effigy Mounds National Monument (IA). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 101 Effigy Tumuli (IL). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2207 EGA (Environmental Grantmakers Association) (NY) . . . . . . . . 5085 Egmont Key National Wildlife Refuge (FL) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 725 Egmont Key State Park (FL) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1939 EIA (Environmental Information Association) (MD). . . . . . . . . . 5086 Eisenhower Birthplace State Historic Site (TX) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4315 Eisenhower Memorial Wayside Park (NH) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3242 Eisenhower National Historic Site (PA). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 102 Eisenhower State Park (KS). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2438 Eisenhower State Park (TX). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4316 El Camino Real de los Tejas National Historic Trail (TX). . . . . 1056 El Camino Real National Scenic Byway (NM). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1210 El Camino Real de Tierra Adentro National Historic Trail (NM) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1057 El Capitan State Beach (CA) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1577 El Dorado East Regional Park (CA). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4884 El Dorado Park West (CA) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4885 El Dorado State Park (KS). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2439 El Malpais National Monument (NM) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 103 El Morro National Monument (NM) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 104 El Presidio de Santa Barbara State Historic Park (CA) . . . . . . . . 1578 El Vado Lake State Park (NM) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3368 Eldon Hazlet State Recreation Area (IL) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2224 Eldorado Canyon State Park (CO) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1782 Eldorado National Forest (CA) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 489 Eleanor Roosevelt National Historic Site (NY). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105 Elena Gallegos Picnic Area and Albert G.

Trail provides spectacular backcountry travel and is the most rugged of the national scenic trails. ★1054★ CALIFORNIA NATIONAL HISTORIC TRAIL Oregon-California Trails Assn PO Box 1019 Independence, MO 64051 816-252-2276 - Phone 816-836-0989 - Fax Web: www.octa-trails.org ★1056★ EL CAMINO REAL DE LOS TEJAS NATIONAL HISTORIC TRAIL El Camino Real de los Tejas Association Web: www.elcaminorealtx.com Trail Administrator NPS National Trails System Office, Salt Lake City 324 S. State St, Suite 200 Salt Lake City, UT 84145 801-741-1012 - Phone 801-741-1102 - Fax Web: www.nps.gov/cali National Park Service PO Box 728 Santa Fe, NM 87504 505-988-6888 - Phone Web: www.elcaminorealtx.com Length: 2,600 miles.


California by Sara Benson

airport security, Albert Einstein, Apple II, Asilomar, back-to-the-land, Bay Area Rapid Transit, Berlin Wall, Burning Man, buy and hold, California gold rush, call centre, car-free, carbon footprint, Columbine, dark matter, desegregation, Donald Trump, Donner party, East Village, El Camino Real, Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test, Frank Gehry, global village, Golden Gate Park, Haight Ashbury, haute cuisine, Joan Didion, Khyber Pass, Loma Prieta earthquake, low cost airline, McDonald's hot coffee lawsuit, McMansion, means of production, Menlo Park, planetary scale, RFID, ride hailing / ride sharing, Ronald Reagan, Silicon Valley, South of Market, San Francisco, stem cell, Steve Jobs, Steve Wozniak, Stewart Brand, the new new thing, trade route, transcontinental railway, Upton Sinclair, urban sprawl, Wall-E, white picket fence, Whole Earth Catalog, working poor, Works Progress Administration, young professional

An international mix of world-class academics and technology entrepreneurs gives the town an affluent and quasi-cosmopolitan air, its relaxed California affluence characterized by BMW convertibles and expensive sandals. Orientation Palo Alto is bordered by Hwy-101 on its northeast edge and I-280 to the southwest. In between it’s bisected by El Camino Real, which also divides the town from the campus. University Ave is Palo Alto’s main street and continues, with a name change to Palm Dr, straight into the heart of the Stanford campus. The extensive Stanford Shopping Center is on El Camino Real just north of campus. Information Chamber of Commerce ( 650-324-3121; www.paloaltochamber.com; 122 Hamilton Ave; 9am-5pm Mon-Fri) Palo Alto Weekly (www.paloaltoonline.com) A community newspaper (and website) with entertainment listings.

Cowper Inn B&B ( 650-327-4475; www.cowperinn.com; 705 Cowper St; r incl breakfast $175; wi-fi) On a shady street two blocks from University Ave, this homey B&B has 13 antique-filled rooms in two gorgeous Arts and Crafts and Victorian houses. Two rooms with shared bathroom cost $105 to $125. Creekside Inn ( 650-493-2411, 800-492-7335; www.creekside-inn.com; 3400 El Camino Real; r $229-279; wi-fi) Primarily serving business travelers, this lushly landscaped Arts and Crafts retreat has comfortable modern rooms – all with patio or balcony – and extensive amenities including a free limited car service, an on-site restaurant and a handy deli/store. Deluxe rooms overlook tranquil Matadero Creek, and all rates drop by $100 on Friday and Saturday.

Rose and Crown (547 Emerson St) Tucked away off to the side of a parking lot, this friendly ale house carries 21 fine beers on tap from a bar checkered with soccer team scarves. It’s a friendly spot for a fine Belgian brew or a British pint of Old Speckled Hen, and the pub food (including homemade curry on Mondays) and Tuesday trivia night reel in the regulars. Entertainment Palo Alto Bowl ( 650-948-1031; 4329 El Camino Real) This is the real deal if you’re hankering to knock a few back (meaning pins). Stop by on Friday and Saturday nights, when the sound system revs up, the disco lights and fog machine are turned on and you can go nuts until 1am. Stanford Theatre ( 650-324-3700; 221 University Ave) This restored 1925 movie house screens some vintage Hollywood gems and international classics, accompanied by a ‘mighty’ Wurlitzer organ.


Coastal California Travel Guide by Lonely Planet

1960s counterculture, Airbnb, airport security, Albert Einstein, anti-communist, Apple II, Asilomar, back-to-the-land, Bay Area Rapid Transit, Burning Man, buy and hold, California gold rush, call centre, car-free, carbon footprint, Donner party, East Village, El Camino Real, Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test, flex fuel, Frank Gehry, glass ceiling, Golden Gate Park, Haight Ashbury, haute couture, haute cuisine, income inequality, intermodal, Joan Didion, Kickstarter, Loma Prieta earthquake, low cost airline, Lyft, Mason jar, New Journalism, ride hailing / ride sharing, Ronald Reagan, Rosa Parks, Saturday Night Live, Silicon Valley, Silicon Valley startup, South of Market, San Francisco, starchitect, stealth mode startup, stem cell, Steve Jobs, Steve Wozniak, Stewart Brand, trade route, transcontinental railway, uber lyft, Upton Sinclair, upwardly mobile, urban sprawl, Wall-E, white picket fence, Whole Earth Catalog, women in the workforce, working poor, Works Progress Administration, young professional, Zipcar

Planktonwall ©, Exploratorium, San Francisco | WWW.EXPLORATORIUM.EDU © History Native American tribes, Spanish-colonial presidios (forts) and Catholic missions and Mexican pueblos (towns) have all left traces here for you to find. Mission San Juan Capistrano A painstakingly restored jewel along ‘El Camino Real,’ California’s mission trail. Old Town San Diego State Historic Park Time travel back to the late 19th century at California’s first civilian Spanish pueblo. Monterey State Historic Park Beautifully preserved brick and adobe buildings from California’s Spanish, Mexican and American periods.

Mission San Francisco SolanoHISTORIC BUILDING ( MAP GOOGLE MAP ; %707-938-9560; www.parks.ca.gov; 114 E Spain St; adult/child $3/2; h10am-5pm) At Sonoma Plaza’s northeast corner, the mission was built in 1823, partly to forestall Russians at Fort Ross from moving inland. This was the 21st and final California mission – the northernmost point on El Camino Real – and the only one built during the Mexican period (the rest were founded during the Spanish Colonial era). Five original rooms remain. The not-to-be-missed chapel dates to 1840. The wildfires of 2017 affected this attraction, and it is closed until further notice. Toscano HotelHISTORIC BUILDING ( MAP GOOGLE MAP ; %707-938-9560; www.parks.ca.gov; 20 E Spain St; adult/child $3/2; h10am-5pm) Toscano Hotel opened as a store and library in the 1850s, then became a hotel in 1886.

Flower-power Santa Cruz and the historic port town of Monterey are gateways to the rugged wilderness of the bohemian Big Sur coast. It’s an epic journey snaking down to vainglorious Hearst Castle, past lighthouses and edgy cliffs atop which endangered condors soar. Get acquainted with California’s agricultural heartland along inland Hwy 101, called El Camino Real (the King’s Highway) by Spanish conquistadors and Franciscan friars. Colonial missions still line the route, which passes through Paso Robles' flourishing wine and craft-beer country. Then soothe your nature-loving soul in collegiate San Luis Obispo, ringed by sunny beach towns and volcanic peaks.


Coastal California by Lonely Planet

1960s counterculture, airport security, Albert Einstein, Asilomar, back-to-the-land, Bay Area Rapid Transit, Berlin Wall, buy and hold, California gold rush, call centre, car-free, carbon footprint, centre right, Chuck Templeton: OpenTable:, Donner party, East Village, El Camino Real, Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test, Frank Gehry, global village, Golden Gate Park, Haight Ashbury, haute cuisine, illegal immigration, Joan Didion, Khyber Pass, Kickstarter, Loma Prieta earthquake, low cost airline, Mason jar, McMansion, Ronald Reagan, Silicon Valley, South of Market, San Francisco, stealth mode startup, Steve Wozniak, trade route, transcontinental railway, Upton Sinclair, urban sprawl, white picket fence, women in the workforce, working poor, Works Progress Administration, young professional, Zipcar

Monterey Bay Aquarium Watch otters and penguins cavort at feeding time, touch tidepool critters and get a big chill when sharks swim by (Click here) San Diego Zoo Safari Park Take a safari-style tram tour through an ‘open-range’ zoo where giraffes, lions and ostriches roam (Click here) Aquarium of the Pacific Meet more of coastal California’s denizens of the deep in LA (Click here) Los Angeles Zoo Originally a refuge for retired circus animals, this conservation-minded zoo is active in species recovery efforts, including for California condors (Click here) Marine Mammal Center Marin County’s wildlife hospital and marine education center has unbeatable eco-credentials; look in on the ‘patients’ out back (Click here) Historic Sites Gold is usually the reason given for the madcap course of California’s history, but Native American tribal villages, Spanish colonial presidios (forts), Catholic missions and Mexican pueblos (towns) have all left traces for you to dig into a little further. Mission San Juan Capistrano A painstakingly restored jewel along ‘El Camino Real,’ California’s mission trail (p) Old Town San Diego Time travel back to the late 19th century on the site of California’s first civilian Spanish colonial pueblo (Click here) El Pueblo de Los Angeles Get swept up by the atmosphere of LA’s earliest days along lively Olvera St (Click here) Monterey State Historic Park Tour an unmatched collection of brick and adobe buildings from California’s Spanish, Mexican and American periods (Click here) San Francisco Crawl along the back alleys of Chinatown, channel the Beats in North Beach or tour the flower-powered, hippie-psychedelic Haight (Click here) Nightlife You’ve seen the red carpet rolled out for movie-star premieres.

Sports HP Pavilion STADIUM ( 408-287-9200; www.hppsj.com; cnr Santa Clara & N Autumn Sts) The fanatically popular San Jose Sharks, the city’s NHL (National Hockey League) team, plays at the HP Pavilion, a massive glass-and-metal stadium. The NHL season runs from September to April. Buck Shaw Stadium STADIUM (www.sjearthquakes.com; 500 El Camino Real, Santa Clara) Located at Santa Clara University, this is the home of the San Jose Earthquakes Major League Soccer team; games run from February through October. Information To find out what’s happening and where, check out the free weekly Metro (www.metroactive.com) newspaper or the Friday ‘eye’ section of the daily San Jose Mercury News (www.mercurynews.com).

The Mission San Francisco Solano de Sonoma (E Spain St), at the plaza’s northeast corner, was built in 1823, in part to forestall the Russian coastal colony at Fort Ross from moving inland. The mission was the 21st and final California mission, and the only one built during the Mexican period (the rest were founded by the Spanish). It marks the northernmost point on El Camino Real. Five of the mission’s original rooms remain. The not-to-be-missed chapel dates from 1841. The adobe Sonoma Barracks (E Spain St; daily) was built by Vallejo between 1836 and 1840 to house Mexican troops, but it became the capital of a rogue nation on June 14, 1846, when American settlers, of varying sobriety, surprised the guards and declared an independent ‘California Republc’ [sic] with a homemade flag featuring a blotchy bear.


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The Last Black Unicorn by Tiffany Haddish

El Camino Real, Skype

I was doing something nasty. The good news is that she got it burnt off. She took me to the doctor to confirm it was a wart and then burnt that shit right off. That’s how the Dirty Ass Unicorn died and the Last Black Unicorn was born. • • • High school was way better for me. I went to a school called El Camino Real. It was 3 percent black. It was mostly white and Hispanic and Asian—and pretty much all of them were rich. I got bused from South Central LA. I woke up every morning about 5 a.m. to catch the bus at 6:15. I had to walk to the bus stop in the cold every morning. I mean, this is LA, so it’s not like there was snow.

I showed up at the school about three or four hours late and I was like, bam! Stomping through school in my Doc Martens boots. And then Audie still didn’t like me. He still didn’t want me. So I became the school mascot. My tenth-grade year, I became the Conquistador, the Spanish soldier mascot of El Camino Real High School. At first, I tried to join the cheerleading squad, but the cheerleaders had too many rules. Their rules were nonsense. Like you can’t cuss, you got to be on time, you have to wear mascara every day, you have to have your hair done pretty every day. All these rules. And you can’t just dance when you feel like it.


Lonely Planet Colombia (Travel Guide) by Lonely Planet, Alex Egerton, Tom Masters, Kevin Raub

airport security, call centre, car-free, carbon footprint, centre right, colonial rule, Columbian Exchange, Downton Abbey, El Camino Real, Francisco Pizarro, friendly fire, glass ceiling, haute couture, land reform, low cost airline, low cost carrier, race to the bottom, sustainable-tourism, urban sprawl

Fundación San LorenzoTOURS (Taller de Papel; MAP GOOGLE MAP ; www.fundacionsanlorenzo.wordpress.com; Carrera 5 No 2-88; tour COP$2000) This small paper factory offers visitors a fascinating glimpse into the four-month-long process of making artisanal paper from fique, a natural fiber that grows in the leaves of the Andean fique plant. The resulting stationery and paper products are great souvenirs. WORTH A TRIP EL CAMINO REAL TO GUANE Don't miss the spectacular hike to the tiny hamlet of Guane on the historic El Camino Real. This ancient stone-paved road was built by the indigenous Guane people and rebuilt continuously over the centuries. It was declared a national monument in 1988. From Barichara, the 9km easy hike takes about two hours to complete. The trail is mostly downhill, occasionally crossing over the modern highway to Guane.

Take a day or two in Bogotá, admiring La Candelaria (its colonial center), the best of myriad museums, and world-class food and nightlife. Shake off the hangover a few hours north in the calming colonial villages of Villa de Leyva and Barichara, both miraculously preserved and picturesque. Take a day to walk the historic El Camino Real to Guane. Bus to San Gil to pick up the long bus ride to Santa Marta, from where you can access Parque Nacional Natural (PNN) Tayrona – linger on the park's otherworldly beaches for a few days. Continue southwest along the Caribbean coast to Cartagena, Colombia's crown jewel – a postcard-perfect old city chock full of colonial romance.

The trail is mostly downhill, occasionally crossing over the modern highway to Guane. You'll begin the hike by climbing down the rim of a canyon and then traversing a valley filled with cacti and trees, occasionally encountering grazing goats or cows but rarely other humans. Notice the many fossils embedded in the stone road. El Camino Real begins at the north end of Calle 4, where a sign marks the beginning of the trail. In the sleepy town, the handsome main square features a fine rural church, the Santa Lucía Iglesia, built in 1720. Across the square is the unique Museum of Paleontology & Archaeology (Carrera 6 No 7-24; admission COP$2000; h8am-noon & 2-6pm), with a collection of more than 10,000 fossils, a 700-year-old mummy, a few conehead skulls, Guane artifacts and religious art.


The Big Score by Michael S. Malone

Apple II, Bob Noyce, Buckminster Fuller, Byte Shop, Claude Shannon: information theory, computer age, creative destruction, Donner party, Douglas Engelbart, Douglas Engelbart, El Camino Real, fear of failure, financial independence, game design, Isaac Newton, job-hopping, lone genius, market bubble, Menlo Park, packet switching, Plutocrats, plutocrats, RAND corporation, Ronald Reagan, Sand Hill Road, Silicon Valley, Silicon Valley startup, speech recognition, Steve Jobs, Steve Wozniak, transcontinental railway, Turing machine, union organizing, Upton Sinclair, upwardly mobile, William Shockley: the traitorous eight, Yom Kippur War

Finally, the combination of increased production and Lu’s desire to get her kitchen back led Hewlett and Packard to construct their own oven. They used an old refrigerator unit for its insulating capabilities. Unfortunately, the insulation was flammable kapok, and late one night it caught fire. Luckily, one of the lonely travelers along El Camino Real saw the flames and called the fire department. Orders continued to pour in, and Hewlett and Packard responded by adding production capacity and hiring employees. Unfortunately, some of the customers didn’t pay, and more than once, in the face of a dwindling bank balance, Harold Buttner of ITT came through with a check to help the young men meet their payroll.

To the southbound traveler from San Francisco, Santa Clara Valley would have seemed little different from how it was at the turn of the century. The towns were a little bigger. Palo Alto showed the advantage of being a university town, while San Jose, with its strong central banking district, was turning into a healthy metropolis. An increasing number of retail stores were opening up along El Camino Real, extending in each direction from the little towns—and one could imagine one day, if the Valley continued its constant growth, these business districts merging. At Santa Clara University, the Jesuits still pounded knowledge into thick-skulled young men, and San Jose State was heading toward being one of the largest schools in the state.

Now, tired of Bell gleaning the profits from his device, Shockley wanted a piece of the action. Santa Clara County, his boyhood home, seemed like the perfect place to build a transistor factory that could stay a technological jump ahead of the competition. The electronics industry watched anxiously as Shockley opened Shockley Laboratories Inc. near El Camino Real in Mountain View. They knew that the man was just brilliant enough to do anything. It was like Sir Isaac Newton announcing he was going to build a mill of his own design in seventeenth-century England. Shortly, Shockley announced that he was hiring—and the applications that poured into Mountain View represented the cream of electronics research.


Northern California Travel Guide by Lonely Planet

Airbnb, Apple II, Asilomar, back-to-the-land, Bay Area Rapid Transit, big-box store, Burning Man, buy and hold, California gold rush, call centre, car-free, carbon footprint, clean water, dark matter, Donald Trump, Donner party, East Village, El Camino Real, Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test, Frank Gehry, friendly fire, glass ceiling, Golden Gate Park, Google bus, Haight Ashbury, haute couture, haute cuisine, housing crisis, Joan Didion, Kickstarter, Loma Prieta earthquake, Lyft, Mahatma Gandhi, Mark Zuckerberg, Mason jar, McMansion, means of production, Port of Oakland, ride hailing / ride sharing, Ronald Reagan, San Francisco homelessness, Silicon Valley, Silicon Valley startup, South of Market, San Francisco, stealth mode startup, stem cell, Steve Jobs, Steve Wozniak, Stewart Brand, the built environment, trade route, transcontinental railway, uber lyft, Upton Sinclair, urban sprawl, white picket fence, Whole Earth Catalog, women in the workforce, working poor, Works Progress Administration, young professional

Mission San Francisco SolanoHISTORIC BUILDING ( MAP GOOGLE MAP ; %707-938-9560; www.parks.ca.gov; 114 E Spain St; adult/child $3/2; h10am-5pm) At Sonoma Plaza’s northeast corner, the mission was built in 1823, partly to forestall Russians at Fort Ross from moving inland. This was the 21st and final California mission – the northernmost point on El Camino Real – and the only one built during the Mexican period (the rest were founded during the Spanish Colonial era). Five original rooms remain. The not-to-be-missed chapel dates to 1840. The wildfires of 2017 affected this attraction, and it is closed until further notice. Toscano HotelHISTORIC BUILDING ( MAP GOOGLE MAP ; %707-938-9560; www.parks.ca.gov; 20 E Spain St; adult/child $3/2; h10am-5pm) Toscano Hotel opened as a store and library in the 1850s, then became a hotel in 1886.

Flower-power Santa Cruz and the historic port town of Monterey are gateways to the rugged wilderness of the bohemian Big Sur coast. It’s an epic journey snaking down to vainglorious Hearst Castle, past lighthouses and edgy cliffs atop which endangered condors soar. Get acquainted with California’s agricultural heartland along inland Hwy 101, called El Camino Real (the King’s Highway) by Spanish conquistadors and Franciscan friars. Colonial missions still line the route, which passes through Paso Robles' flourishing wine and craft-beer country. Then soothe your nature-loving soul in collegiate San Luis Obispo, ringed by sunny beach towns and volcanic peaks.

Mission RanchINN$$ ( MAP GOOGLE MAP ; %831-624-6436; www.missionranchcarmel.com; 26270 Dolores St; r $140-340; W) If woolly sheep grazing on green fields by the beach doesn't convince you to stay here, maybe knowing that Hollywood icon Clint Eastwood restored this historic ranch will. Accommodations are shabby-chic, even a tad rustic. Sea View InnB&B$$ ( MAP GOOGLE MAP ; %831-624-8778; www.seaviewinncarmel.com; El Camino Real, btwn 11th & 12th Aves; r $145-295; W) Retreat from downtown Carmel’s hustle to fireside nooks tailor-made for reading. The cheapest rooms with slanted ceilings are short on cat-swinging space. Rates include afternoon wine and noshes on the front porch. Lodge at Pebble BeachRESORT$$$ ( MAP GOOGLE MAP ; %831-624-3811; www.pebblebeach.com; 1700 17-Mile Drive; r from $815; aiWs) The luxurious Lodge at Pebble Beach includes a spa and designer shops where the most demanding of tastes are catered to.


pages: 359 words: 110,488

Bad Blood: Secrets and Lies in a Silicon Valley Startup by John Carreyrou

Affordable Care Act / Obamacare, bioinformatics, corporate governance, Donald Trump, El Camino Real, Elon Musk, Google Chrome, John Markoff, Jony Ive, Kickstarter, Marc Andreessen, Mark Zuckerberg, Mars Rover, medical malpractice, Menlo Park, obamacare, Ponzi scheme, ride hailing / ride sharing, Right to Buy, Sand Hill Road, Seymour Hersh, side project, Silicon Valley, Silicon Valley startup, stealth mode startup, Steve Jobs, supply-chain management, Travis Kalanick, ubercab

As they headed out to eat, Sunny and Elizabeth made them leave at staggered intervals. They didn’t want everyone to arrive at the restaurant at the same time on the grounds that it risked attracting notice. They also instructed Hunter and his colleagues not to use names. When Hunter got to the restaurant, a little sushi place on El Camino Real called Fuki Sushi, the hostess took him to a private room in the back with sliding doors where Elizabeth was waiting. The cloak-and-dagger theatrics struck Hunter as silly. It was four in the afternoon and the restaurant was empty. There was no one to conceal their presence from. What’s more, if there was anything likely to draw attention, it was Sunny’s Lamborghini in the parking lot.

After the move to the old Facebook building, Ian grew more sullen. He was relegated to a desk in the general population of employees with his back facing a wall. It was a symbol of how unimportant he’d become. One day, the engineer Tom Brumett ran into him at Fish Market, a seafood restaurant on El Camino Real where he was meeting a friend. As they stood in line waiting for a table, Ian asked if he could join them. Tom and Ian were both in their mid-sixties and had established a friendly rapport. The first time they’d interacted was shortly after Tom came to work at Theranos in 2010. Upset that Sunny and other managers were disregarding his opinion during a discussion about what sort of engineering personnel should be hired to assist him, Tom had walked out of the meeting in a huff with thoughts of quitting.


The Code: Silicon Valley and the Remaking of America by Margaret O'Mara

"side hustle", A Declaration of the Independence of Cyberspace, accounting loophole / creative accounting, affirmative action, Airbnb, AltaVista, Amazon Web Services, Apple II, Apple's 1984 Super Bowl advert, autonomous vehicles, back-to-the-land, barriers to entry, Ben Horowitz, Berlin Wall, Bob Noyce, Buckminster Fuller, Burning Man, business climate, Byte Shop, California gold rush, carried interest, clean water, cleantech, cloud computing, cognitive dissonance, commoditize, computer age, continuous integration, cuban missile crisis, Danny Hillis, DARPA: Urban Challenge, deindustrialization, different worldview, don't be evil, Donald Trump, Doomsday Clock, Douglas Engelbart, Dynabook, Edward Snowden, El Camino Real, Elon Musk, en.wikipedia.org, Erik Brynjolfsson, Frank Gehry, George Gilder, gig economy, Googley, Hacker Ethic, high net worth, hockey-stick growth, Hush-A-Phone, immigration reform, income inequality, informal economy, information retrieval, invention of movable type, invisible hand, Isaac Newton, Jeff Bezos, Joan Didion, job automation, job-hopping, John Markoff, Julian Assange, Kitchen Debate, knowledge economy, knowledge worker, Lyft, Marc Andreessen, Mark Zuckerberg, market bubble, mass immigration, means of production, mega-rich, Menlo Park, Mikhail Gorbachev, millennium bug, Mitch Kapor, Mother of all demos, move fast and break things, move fast and break things, mutually assured destruction, new economy, Norbert Wiener, old-boy network, pattern recognition, Paul Graham, Paul Terrell, paypal mafia, Peter Thiel, pets.com, pirate software, popular electronics, pre–internet, Ralph Nader, RAND corporation, Richard Florida, ride hailing / ride sharing, risk tolerance, Robert Metcalfe, Ronald Reagan, Sand Hill Road, Second Machine Age, self-driving car, shareholder value, side project, Silicon Valley, Silicon Valley ideology, Silicon Valley startup, skunkworks, Snapchat, social graph, software is eating the world, speech recognition, Steve Ballmer, Steve Jobs, Steve Wozniak, Steven Levy, Stewart Brand, supercomputer in your pocket, technoutopianism, Ted Nelson, the market place, the new new thing, There's no reason for any individual to have a computer in his home - Ken Olsen, Thomas L Friedman, Tim Cook: Apple, transcontinental railway, Uber and Lyft, uber lyft, Unsafe at Any Speed, upwardly mobile, Vannevar Bush, War on Poverty, We wanted flying cars, instead we got 140 characters, Whole Earth Catalog, WikiLeaks, William Shockley: the traitorous eight, Y Combinator, Y2K

Many students, like McMurtry, worked at electronics firms around town.5 The flow wasn’t about transfer of technology, it was about talent—about people who moved back and forth from the labs of Stanford to the offices of its research park to the ramshackle warehouses and prefab office buildings that began stretching southward down El Camino Real. Everywhere else in the 1950s, academia was a true ivory tower, surrounded by impregnable walls between town and gown, between “pure” research and business enterprise. At Stanford, those walls dissolved. BILL AND DAVE By the middle of the 1950s, the firm founded by two of Fred Terman’s favorite graduate students had become a potent example of how new industries could bloom in the Santa Clara Valley.

The second meeting moved from French’s garage to John McCarthy’s Stanford artificial-intelligence operation, then spilled out to the auditorium at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center on Sand Hill Road, attracting hundreds of people each month. Conversations that started in meetings continued over beers and burgers down the road at The Oasis (or “The O”), the well-worn college dive on El Camino Real. It took a while to settle on a name for the club. Steam Beer Computer Club, 8-Bit Byte Bangers, and Tiny Brains all got rejected before the group arrived at Homebrew.5 French ran the first two meetings, but his droning delivery wasn’t the right match for the restless crowd. So Lee Felsenstein took over, drawing on a skill set built up by years of antiwar protests and community organizing.

Their big customers were the old-school mainframe and minicomputer makers as well as the car companies, watch manufacturers, and other kinds of companies putting microchips in all sorts of consumer products. The general slowdown in the U.S. economy had forced layoffs and downsizing as well as more overseas deals with Japan. Plus, the semiconductor guys made “computers on a chip.” They didn’t make actual computers. Yet in the small and cozy world that ran along the spine of El Camino Real, most of the Homebrew hackers had personal and professional connections with the Silicon Valley establishment. A good portion of those at the first Homebrew meeting had day jobs at high-tech companies like HP and Intel; many others worked at Stanford. By the time the club moved over to a big auditorium, more employees from local companies started showing up to hear the buzz firsthand.


pages: 454 words: 122,612

In-N-Out Burger by Stacy Perman

anti-communist, British Empire, commoditize, corporate raider, El Camino Real, estate planning, forensic accounting, Haight Ashbury, Maui Hawaii, McJob, McMansion, new economy, Ronald Reagan, Silicon Valley, Upton Sinclair

“He was very much about problem solving before it became a problem.” When Harry was interested in opening one of his drive-throughs in Rancho Cucamonga, a dry, dusty city on the edge of the Mojave Desert in San Bernardino where the Mojave Trail, the old Spanish Trail, the Santa Fe Trail, Route 66, and El Camino Real met thirty-nine miles east of Los Angeles, he called Blewett for help. In Blewett’s version of the tale, at the time, Rancho Cucamonga was especially opposed to the idea of a new drive-through coming to town. “We had a meeting with the city’s planning staff,” he remembered. “And there was this planner just out of Cal Poly [College].

A year later in 1976, when McDonald’s posted $3 billion in sales and opened restaurant number 4,000 in Montreal, In-N-Out opened its eighteenth store in Woodland Hills, a suburb in the southwest San Fernando Valley near the 101 Freeway on Ventura Boulevard. It was another ace spot for the chain. Originally part of the El Camino Real (the Royal Highway) that linked twenty-one Spanish missions, Ventura Boulevard was also one of the main east-west thoroughfares in the Valley and was the original U.S. Route 101 before the freeway was built. The Woodland Hills location, like most In-N-Out Burgers, was positioned to take advantage of the maximum amount of traffic.


pages: 190 words: 46,977

Elon Musk: A Mission to Save the World by Anna Crowley Redding

Albert Einstein, artificial general intelligence, Burning Man, Colonization of Mars, El Camino Real, Elon Musk, energy security, Hyperloop, Internet Archive, Jeff Bezos, Khan Academy, Kim Stanley Robinson, low earth orbit, Menlo Park, orbital mechanics / astrodynamics, Peter Thiel, Silicon Valley, Silicon Valley startup, Stephen Hawking, Tesla Model S

Luckily it was walking distance to a YMCA where they could shower every day. It also meant they didn’t have to rely on their car—which could not be relied on! ROAD TRIP ALERT! Zip2’s office was at 430 Sherman Avenue, Palo Alto, California. Be sure to check out the corner of Page Mill Road and El Camino Real. This is where a wheel fell off Elon and Kimbal’s beat-up BMW. As in the axle actually dug into the road. “When we first started out, I think our ambitions were really quite low. It was really to make enough money to pay the rent,”47 Elon said. “For me the worst part,” Kimbal said, “was eating at Jack in the Box three times a day.”48 They tried to rotate which items they ordered from the menu to achieve some variety.


Southwest USA Travel Guide by Lonely Planet

1919 Motor Transport Corps convoy, Albert Einstein, Berlin Wall, Biosphere 2, Burning Man, carbon footprint, Columbine, Donner party, El Camino Real, friendly fire, G4S, haute couture, haute cuisine, housing crisis, illegal immigration, immigration reform, indoor plumbing, Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), low earth orbit, off grid, place-making, supervolcano, trade route, transcontinental railway, walkable city, Works Progress Administration, X Prize

The imposing stone and adobe San José Mission (9am-3pm Mon-Fri), visible from I-40, was completed in 1705 and houses fine examples of early Spanish-influenced religious art. It will beckon you off the interstate. Main feast days include San José (March 19 and September 19), San Juan (June 24) and San Lorenzo (August 10 and Christmas Eve). Contact Laguna Pueblo (505-552-6654; www.lagunapueblo.org) for more information. EL CAMINO REAL El Camino Real de Tierra Adentro – the Royal Road of the Interior Lands – was the Spanish colonial version of an interstate highway, linking Mexico City to the original capital of New Mexico at Ohkay Owingeh Pueblo. Later, the trail was extended to Taos. Merchants, soldiers, missionaries and immigrants followed the route up the Rio Grande Valley, usually covering about 20 miles a day, stopping at night in parajes (inns or campsites) along the way.

Some families were here before the signing of the Declaration of Independence, and many were here before New Mexico became part of the US. Thirty miles south of Socorro at Exit 115 on I-25, El Camino Real International Heritage Center (www.caminorealheritage.org; adult/child $5/free; 8:30am-5pm Wed-Sun) explores the history of the Royal Road with artifacts, bilingual visual displays and special events. You can drive El Camino Real de Tierra Adentro National Historic Trail through the desolate Jornada del Muerto – the notoriously dry 90-mile stretch that earned its name by claiming more than a few lives. Coming from the south, start at Exit 32 along I-25; from the north, begin at Exit 139 or 124; see the Heritage Center website for more details.


pages: 769 words: 397,677

Frommer's California 2007 by Harry Basch, Mark Hiss, Erika Lenkert, Matthew Richard Poole

airport security, Asilomar, Bay Area Rapid Transit, car-free, Charles Lindbergh, Chuck Templeton: OpenTable:, clean water, Columbine, Donald Trump, Donner party, East Village, El Camino Real, Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test, Frank Gehry, Golden Gate Park, Guggenheim Bilbao, Haight Ashbury, indoor plumbing, Iridium satellite, Joan Didion, Maui Hawaii, Silicon Valley, South of Market, San Francisco, sustainable-tourism, transcontinental railway, upwardly mobile, urban sprawl, white picket fence, Works Progress Administration

Save your film for the bottom; if you’re lucky, you’ll find a parking space where you can photograph the spectacle. You can also take straight staircases up or down either side of the street. Between Hyde and Leavenworth sts. This is the oldest structure in the city, dedicated in June 1776 at the northern terminus of El Camino Real, the Spanish missionary road that runs from Mexico to California. Founded by Father Francisco Palou, on the order of Franciscan Mission Dolores EXPLORING THE CITY 117 Father Junípero Serra, Mission Dolores was constructed from 36,000 sun-baked bricks. It’s a serene place to visit, with its cool, thick adobe walls and the cemetery and gardens where the early settlers are buried. 16th St.

Mission San Juan Bautista is open daily year-round from 9:30am to 4:45pm. The suggested donation is $1 per person. For more information, call & 831/623-4528 or see www.oldmissionsjb.org or www.sanjuan-bautista.ca.us. East of the church, at the edge of an abrupt drop created by the San Andreas Fault, a marker notes the path of the old El Camino Real. Seismographic measuring equipment and an earthquake science exhibit accompany the marker. There’s much to see on the restored city plaza as well. The San Juan Bautista State Historic Park comprises the old Plaza Hotel with its frontier barroom and furnished rooms; the Plaza Hall, its adjoining stables and blacksmith shop; and the Castro House, where the Breen family lived after traveling here with the ill-fated Donner Party in 1846.

Come summer, you’ll feast on a plate of ravishing heirloom tomatoes lightly garnished with pickled corn and warm goat cheese. Patrons can also sample four-, five- and seven-course chef’s tasting meals with wine pairings. The breakfast, by the way, is superlative, and worth the trip in itself. 11966 El Camino Real (next to I-5 in the Marriott Del Mar), Carmel Valley. & 858/369-6032. www.arterrarestaurant.com. Main courses $25–$37 dinner, $16–$23 lunch, $8–$17 breakfast. AE, DC, DISC, MC, V. Daily 5:30–9:30pm; Mon–Fri 6:30–10:30am and 11:30am–2pm; Sat–Sun 7–11:30am; bar menu 11:30am–midnight. Free parking with validation, or $3 for valet parking.


pages: 464 words: 155,696

Becoming Steve Jobs: The Evolution of a Reckless Upstart Into a Visionary Leader by Brent Schlender, Rick Tetzeli

Albert Einstein, Apple II, Apple's 1984 Super Bowl advert, Bill Atkinson, Bill Gates: Altair 8800, Bob Noyce, Byte Shop, Charles Lindbergh, computer age, corporate governance, El Camino Real, Isaac Newton, John Markoff, Jony Ive, Kickstarter, Marc Andreessen, market design, McMansion, Menlo Park, Paul Terrell, popular electronics, QWERTY keyboard, Ronald Reagan, Sand Hill Road, side project, Silicon Valley, Silicon Valley startup, skunkworks, Steve Ballmer, Steve Jobs, Steve Wozniak, Steven Levy, Stewart Brand, Tim Cook: Apple, Wall-E, Watson beat the top human players on Jeopardy!, Whole Earth Catalog

So when Paul Terrell, the owner of the Byte Shop computer store in nearby Mountain View, introduced himself to Steve and Woz after the presentation and let them know he was impressed enough to want to talk about doing some business together, Steve knew exactly what to do. The very next day he borrowed a car and drove over to the Byte Shop, Terrell’s humble little store on El Camino Real, Silicon Valley’s main thoroughfare. Terrell surprised him, saying that if the two Steves could deliver fifty fully assembled circuit boards with all the chips soldered into place by a certain date, he would pay them $500 a pop—in other words, ten times what Steve and Woz had been charging club members for the printed circuit boards alone.

As they made their way toward the campus, Steve and Laurene fumbled through their pockets and Laurene’s handbag, looking for the VIP parking pass they’d been sent. They couldn’t find it anywhere. As they neared Stanford, it became apparent that they should have built in more time—twenty-three thousand people were descending on the stadium that morning. The stadium is usually easy to get to, since it sits just off El Camino Real, but many roads were blocked off to accommodate the heavy pedestrian traffic of graduates and their families. When they finally got into the eucalyptus grove on the outskirts of the campus that doubled as a parking lot for the stadium, Laurene had to navigate around one roadblock after another.


pages: 199 words: 56,243

Trillion Dollar Coach: The Leadership Playbook of Silicon Valley's Bill Campbell by Eric Schmidt, Jonathan Rosenberg, Alan Eagle

Apple's 1984 Super Bowl advert, augmented reality, Ben Horowitz, cloud computing, El Camino Real, Erik Brynjolfsson, fear of failure, Jeff Bezos, longitudinal study, Marc Andreessen, Mark Zuckerberg, Menlo Park, meta-analysis, Sand Hill Road, shareholder value, Silicon Valley, speech recognition, Steve Ballmer, Steve Jobs, Tim Cook: Apple

The common thread with all these trips? Community. Bill built community instinctively. He knew that a place was much stronger when people were connected. He cared so much about community that he invested in a place for people to gather. The Old Pro was a sports bar that opened in 1964 at the corner of El Camino Real and Page Mill Road in Palo Alto in a funky steel Quonset hut of unknown provenance. Bill started going there with his Intuit team in the 1990s, and when the bar was forced to move in the mid-2000s, he helped its owners Steve and Lisa Sinchek set up at a new, swankier location in downtown Palo Alto.


pages: 192 words: 72,822

Freedom Without Borders by Hoyt L. Barber

accounting loophole / creative accounting, Affordable Care Act / Obamacare, Albert Einstein, banking crisis, diversification, El Camino Real, estate planning, fiat currency, financial independence, fixed income, high net worth, illegal immigration, interest rate swap, money market fund, obamacare, offshore financial centre, passive income, quantitative easing, reserve currency, road to serfdom, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI), too big to fail

E-mail: taxman@batelnet.bs. Author of Tax Havens of the World, Tom is an international tax planner and investment adviser registered with the SEC. Michael Chatzky, Chatzky and Associates, 6540 Lusk Blvd., Suite C121, San Diego, CA 92121. Telephone (858) 457-1000. Rick Rule, Global Resource Investments Ltd., 7770 El Camino Real, Carlsbad, CA 92009. Telephone (760) 943-3939; Toll-free (800) 477-7853. Website: www. gril.net. Refer to Hoyt Barber’s book, Tax Havens Today, John Wiley & Sons, Hoboken, NJ, for a comprehensive list of international financial planners worldwide and their contact information. FINANCIAL AND INVESTMENT SERVICES American Precious Metals Exchange.


pages: 598 words: 183,531

Hackers: Heroes of the Computer Revolution - 25th Anniversary Edition by Steven Levy

air freight, Apple II, Bill Gates: Altair 8800, Buckminster Fuller, Byte Shop, computer age, computer vision, corporate governance, Donald Knuth, El Camino Real, game design, Hacker Ethic, hacker house, Haight Ashbury, John Conway, John Markoff, Mark Zuckerberg, Menlo Park, Mondo 2000, non-fiction novel, Norman Mailer, Paul Graham, popular electronics, RAND corporation, reversible computing, Richard Stallman, Silicon Valley, software patent, speech recognition, Steve Jobs, Steve Wozniak, Steven Levy, Stewart Brand, Ted Nelson, The Hackers Conference, Whole Earth Catalog, Y Combinator

People who owned them would want to know where they went wrong in assembling the monster. People who owned MITS memory boards would want to know why they didn’t work. And people who’d ordered Altair BASIC would complain that they hadn’t gotten it. The Homebrew Computer Club crowd was out in force when the Caravan met at the Rickeys Hyatt on El Camino Real in Palo Alto in early June, and were amazed when they found that the Altair on display was running BASIC. It was connected to a teletype which had a paper-tape reader, and once it was loaded anyone could type in commands and get responses instantly. It looked like a godsend to those hackers who had already sent in several hundred dollars to MITS and were impatiently waiting for BASIC.

Though Gosper worked for the Symbolics company and realized that he had sold out, in a sense, by hacking in the commercial sector, he was still very much the Bill Gosper who once sat at the ninth-floor PDP-6 like some gregarious alchemist of code. You could find him in the wee hours in a second-floor room near El Camino Real in Palo Alto, his beat-up Volvo the only car in the small lot outside the nondescript two-story building that housed Symbolics’ West Coast research center. Gosper, now forty, his sharp features hidden behind large wireframe glasses and his hair knotted in a ponytail which came halfway down his back, still hacked LIFE, watching with rollicking amusement as the terminal of his LISP machine cranked through billions of generations of LIFE colonies.


Microchip: An Idea, Its Genesis, and the Revolution It Created by Jeffrey Zygmont

Albert Einstein, Bob Noyce, business intelligence, computer age, El Camino Real, invisible hand, popular electronics, side project, Silicon Valley, Silicon Valley startup, William Shockley: the traitorous eight

Communicating at Shockley's with winks, nods, nudges, and wisecracks; huddling furtively behind vats and furnaces to whisper low-toned with excitement about sudden findings; smirking over their employer's latest outrage; comparing lab notes while sipping frosty beers at Dinah's Shack-up on the El Camino Real, the group had acquired conviction enough to support their bold resolve. Instead of running off individually to find separate jobs, the defectors stuck together because they believed they could accomplish the work that Bulldog had impeded. None of the insurrectionists had much business experience.


pages: 269 words: 70,543

Tech Titans of China: How China's Tech Sector Is Challenging the World by Innovating Faster, Working Harder, and Going Global by Rebecca Fannin

Adam Neumann (WeWork), Airbnb, augmented reality, autonomous vehicles, blockchain, call centre, cashless society, Chuck Templeton: OpenTable:, cloud computing, computer vision, connected car, corporate governance, cryptocurrency, data is the new oil, Deng Xiaoping, digital map, disruptive innovation, Donald Trump, El Camino Real, Elon Musk, family office, fear of failure, glass ceiling, global supply chain, income inequality, industrial robot, Internet of things, invention of movable type, Jeff Bezos, Kickstarter, knowledge worker, Lyft, Mark Zuckerberg, megacity, Menlo Park, money market fund, Network effects, new economy, peer-to-peer lending, personalized medicine, Peter Thiel, QR code, RFID, ride hailing / ride sharing, Sand Hill Road, self-driving car, sharing economy, Shenzhen was a fishing village, Silicon Valley, Silicon Valley startup, Skype, smart cities, smart transportation, Snapchat, social graph, software as a service, South China Sea, sovereign wealth fund, speech recognition, stealth mode startup, Steve Jobs, supply-chain management, Tim Cook: Apple, Travis Kalanick, Uber and Lyft, Uber for X, uber lyft, urban planning, WeWork, winner-take-all economy, Y Combinator, young professional

They’ve scoured the Valley for promising startups and based their operations not far from Menlo Park’s storied Sand Hill Road firms that backed winners Google, Facebook, and eBay. Tencent opened an office in a converted church in tech-wealthy Palo Alto, home to Stanford University, and has expanded nearby to a much larger California base. Alibaba keeps an office in San Mateo on California byway El Camino Real, in sight of venture capitalist Tim Draper’s entrepreneurial school Draper University. Baidu has established two research and AI labs in high-tech Sunnyvale, Silicon Valley central. China’s tech titans have co-invested in the United States with many hot-shot Silicon Valley venture firms, including influential Andreessen Horowitz, whose lead partners founded once-dominant web browser Netscape, which was acquired by AOL for $4.2 billion.


pages: 271 words: 83,944

The Sellout: A Novel by Paul Beatty

affirmative action, cognitive dissonance, conceptual framework, desegregation, El Camino Real, haute couture, illegal immigration, Lao Tzu, late fees, mass incarceration, p-value, publish or perish, rolodex, Ronald Reagan, Rosa Parks, telemarketer, theory of mind, War on Poverty, white flight, yellow journalism

But not to worry, Lost City of White Male Privilege, real or imagined, me and Hominy had your backs and were proud to make you a sister city of Dickens, aka the Last Bastion of Blackness. TOO MANY MEXICANS Eleven “Too many Mexicans,” Charisma Molina muttered. Speaking through her perfect French manicure so she wouldn’t be overheard. It wasn’t the first time I’d heard the racist sentiment expressed in public. Ever since the Native Americans trod up and down El Camino Real in their moccasins, seeking the source of those annoying fucking bells that rang at daybreak every Sunday morning, scaring away the bighorn sheep and ruining many a mescaline-tripping spirit walk, Californians have been cursing the Mexicans. The Indians, who were looking for peace and quiet, ended up finding Jesus, forced labor, the whip, and the rhythm method.


pages: 249 words: 81,217

The Art of Rest: How to Find Respite in the Modern Age by Claudia Hammond

Anton Chekhov, conceptual framework, correlation does not imply causation, Desert Island Discs, Donald Trump, El Camino Real, iterative process, Kickstarter, lifelogging, longitudinal study, Menlo Park, meta-analysis, Milgram experiment, moral panic, Stephen Hawking, The Spirit Level, The Theory of the Leisure Class by Thorstein Veblen, The Wisdom of Crowds, theory of mind, Thorstein Veblen

It’s not quite what I could call a countryside walk. But still, it’s quite nice. Likewise, the urban walk was the most urban the team could find in the vicinity, but we’re not talking downtown San Francisco with its panhandlers and other reminders of inner-city deprivation. The road the volunteers walked along is called El Camino Real. Admittedly it’s a highway with at least three lanes of traffic in each direction, but most buildings are only one or two storeys high, so there’s a big sky, and the verges are planted with hundreds of trees and vast bright blue agapanthus (so vast that they make the agapanthus in my garden look like seedlings).


pages: 304 words: 91,566

Bitcoin Billionaires: A True Story of Genius, Betrayal, and Redemption by Ben Mezrich

"side hustle", airport security, Albert Einstein, bank run, Ben Horowitz, bitcoin, Bitcoin Ponzi scheme, blockchain, Burning Man, buttonwood tree, cryptocurrency, East Village, El Camino Real, Elon Musk, family office, fault tolerance, fiat currency, financial innovation, game design, Isaac Newton, Marc Andreessen, Mark Zuckerberg, Menlo Park, Metcalfe’s law, new economy, offshore financial centre, paypal mafia, peer-to-peer, Peter Thiel, Ponzi scheme, QR code, Ronald Reagan, Ross Ulbricht, Sand Hill Road, Satoshi Nakamoto, Savings and loan crisis, Schrödinger's Cat, self-driving car, side project, Silicon Valley, Skype, smart contracts, South of Market, San Francisco, Steve Jobs, transaction costs, zero-sum game

Charlie helped the girls back on top of each other; it was a good thing that both of them were small—even smaller than Charlie—because when Ver had first told him they were stopping to pick up a couple of friends on the way to Omogari, he had thought the guy was joking. No way four people could fit in the front of a Porsche 911, and there was no backseat. When he and Ver had pulled up to the girls’ apartment on the edge of Santa Clara’s Koreatown—a stretch of the El Camino Real roadway dubbed “Soon Dubu Row” after the famous tofu stew in Korean cuisine and lined with Korean restaurants, supermarkets, dry cleaners, and other Korean businesses—Charlie had been relieved to see that neither of the girls was over five feet. Both were decked out in silk skirts and midriff-baring tops.


pages: 359 words: 96,019

How to Turn Down a Billion Dollars: The Snapchat Story by Billy Gallagher

Airbnb, Albert Einstein, Amazon Web Services, Apple's 1984 Super Bowl advert, augmented reality, Bernie Sanders, Black Swan, citizen journalism, Clayton Christensen, computer vision, disruptive innovation, Donald Trump, El Camino Real, Elon Musk, Frank Gehry, Google Glasses, Hyperloop, information asymmetry, Jeff Bezos, Justin.tv, Lean Startup, Long Term Capital Management, Mark Zuckerberg, Menlo Park, minimum viable product, Nelson Mandela, Oculus Rift, paypal mafia, Peter Thiel, QR code, Sand Hill Road, Saturday Night Live, side project, Silicon Valley, Silicon Valley startup, Snapchat, social graph, sorting algorithm, speech recognition, stealth mode startup, Steve Jobs, too big to fail, Y Combinator, young professional

A group of a dozen Clinkle employees stayed up all night eating doughnuts and working like they were back in college until the article came out at 6 AM. For most, the college vibe felt familiar, as Clinkle was their first job after graduating from or dropping out of Stanford. Clinkle’s office at the time was only a short drive down El Camino Real from Stanford, in Mountain View, in Google’s complex of buildings known as the Googleplex. In the summer of 2013, Clinkle’s public relations staff reached out to over a dozen publications, from The New York Times to TechCrunch,3 asking them to cover “the largest seed round in Silicon Valley history.”


pages: 342 words: 101,370

Test Gods: Virgin Galactic and the Making of a Modern Astronaut by Nicholas Schmidle

bitcoin, Boeing 737 MAX, Charles Lindbergh, Colonization of Mars, crew resource management, Donald Trump, El Camino Real, Elon Musk, game design, Jeff Bezos, low earth orbit, Norman Mailer, Ralph Waldo Emerson, risk tolerance, Ronald Reagan, Silicon Valley, Stephen Hawking, Tacoma Narrows Bridge, trade route, twin studies, X Prize

“Business as usual”: Alicia Chang, “Publicity-Seeking Virgin Galactic Keeps Low Profile After Mojave Desert Explosion,” Associated Press, August 26, 2007. “a Chevrolet’s functional reliability”: Rich and Janos, Skunk Works. “One bolt falls off and you die”: Higginbotham, “Up: The Story Behind Richard Branson’s Goal to Make Virgin a Galactic Success.” Jornada del Muerto: “The Dead Man of the Jornada: El Hombre Muerto de La Jornada,” El Camino Real de Tierro Adentro National Historic Trail, Bureau of Land Management, nps.gov. “New Mexico will be known around the world … a chance to go home”: Leonard David, “Virgin Galactic Partners with New Mexico on Spaceport,” Space.com, December 14, 2005. “definitely one of the coolest”: “Governor’s Remarks at Virgin Galactic’s Unveiling of SpaceShipTwo,” States News Service, December 7, 2009.


pages: 1,540 words: 400,759

Fodor's California 2014 by Fodor's

1960s counterculture, active transport: walking or cycling, affirmative action, Asilomar, Bay Area Rapid Transit, big-box store, California gold rush, car-free, centre right, Charles Lindbergh, Chuck Templeton: OpenTable:, Donner party, Downton Abbey, East Village, El Camino Real, Frank Gehry, Golden Gate Park, Haight Ashbury, housing crisis, Kickstarter, Maui Hawaii, Mikhail Gorbachev, Ronald Reagan, Saturday Night Live, Silicon Valley, South of Market, San Francisco, trade route, transcontinental railway, urban renewal, urban sprawl, white picket fence, Works Progress Administration, young professional

Free one-hour walking tours of the campus leave daily at 11 and 3:15 from the visitor center in the front hall of Memorial Auditorium. | Main Quad,450 Serra Mall, at Palm Dr., south off El Camino Real, | Stanford | 94305 | 650/723–2300 | www.stanford.edu. Mission Santa Clara de Asis. In the center of Santa Clara University’s campus is the Mission Santa Clara. The roof tiles of the current building, a reproduction of the original, were salvaged from earlier structures, which dated from the 1790s and 1820s. Early adobe walls and a spectacular garden with 4,500 roses remain intact as well. | 500 El Camino Real, | Pescadero | 408/554–4023 | www.scu.edu/visitors/missionchurch | Free | Self-guided tours daily 6 am–8 pm.

Sports and the Outdoors Windhaven Glider. The scenic rides operated by Windhaven Glider cost between $135 and $265 and last up to 30 minutes. | Santa Ynez Airport, Hwy. 246 | 93460 | 805/688–2517 | www.gliderrides.com. Los Olivos 4 miles north of Santa Ynez. This pretty village was once on Spanish-built El Camino Real (Royal Road) and later a stop on major stagecoach and rail routes. It’s so sleepy today, though, that the movie Return to Mayberry was filmed here. Tasting rooms, art galleries, antiques stores, and country markets line Grand Avenue and intersecting streets for several blocks. Getting Here and Around From U.S. 101 north or south, exit at Highway 154 and drive east about 8 miles.


Love's Executioner by Irvin D. Yalom

El Camino Real, Golden Gate Park, New Journalism, sexual politics

The true impact of that robbery was to shatter illusion and to confirm, in brutal fashion, her husband’s death. Of course, she knew that Albert was dead. Dead and in his grave for over a year and a half. She had taken the ritualized widow walk—through the cancer diagnosis; the awful, toxic, gut-wrenching chemotherapy; their last visit together to Carmel; their last drive down El Camino Real; the hospital bed at home; the funeral; the paperwork; the ever-dwindling dinner invitations; the widow and widower’s clubs; the long, lonely nights. The whole dreadful catastrophe. Yet, despite all this, Elva had retained her feeling of Albert’s continued existence and thereby of her persisting safety and specialness.


pages: 361 words: 107,461

How I Built This: The Unexpected Paths to Success From the World's Most Inspiring Entrepreneurs by Guy Raz

"side hustle", Airbnb, Apple II, barriers to entry, Bear Stearns, Ben Horowitz, big-box store, call centre, Clayton Christensen, commoditize, Credit Default Swap, crowdsourcing, East Village, El Camino Real, Elon Musk, fear of failure, glass ceiling, housing crisis, inventory management, iterative process, James Dyson, Jeff Bezos, Justin.tv, Kickstarter, low cost airline, Lyft, Marc Andreessen, Mark Zuckerberg, move fast and break things, move fast and break things, Nate Silver, Paul Graham, Peter Thiel, pets.com, rolodex, Ronald Reagan, Ruby on Rails, Sam Altman, Sand Hill Road, Silicon Valley, software as a service, South of Market, San Francisco, Steve Jobs, Steve Wozniak, The Signal and the Noise by Nate Silver, Tony Hsieh, Uber for X, uber lyft, Y Combinator, Zipcar

Which means it needs your partner—your co-founder—too. 6 Fund the Business, Part 1: Bootstrapping Adam Lowry and Eric Ryan found their first retailer for Method in February 2001, with a chain of family-owned grocery stores along the San Francisco peninsula called Mollie Stone’s Markets. The first location was in Burlingame, just off El Camino Real, which runs like an artery down the peninsula, through two of the richest counties in California and into Silicon Valley, crossing Sand Hill Road along the way. That road’s famous concentration of venture capital firms had all basically snubbed Adam and Eric when they first went out looking for investors.


Common Stocks and Uncommon Profits and Other Writings by Philip A. Fisher

business climate, business cycle, buy and hold, El Camino Real, estate planning, fixed income, index fund, market bubble, market fundamentalism, profit motive, RAND corporation, the market place, transaction costs

In the early 1980's, Father had some bad experiences walking from the San Francisco depot to his office and back, including not watching where he was going and bonking his head on a metal post once, pass-ing out once, and getting accosted by a wanna-be mugger once. And, so, mother and I convinced him to follow my lead by letting me move his office down the peninsula, something I had done in 1977. I moved him and set up his office in San Mateo in a little office building on Fifth and El Camino Real. He continued to walk from home to work every day and loved it. Gardens. No muggers. Few stop lights or crazy taxi drivers to dodge. Beautiful flowers. No worries. As mentioned earlier, late in his life, my father started falling down in his garden on Sundays. It was an early warning of dementia's onset, but no one saw it as such at the time.


pages: 480 words: 123,979

Dawn of the New Everything: Encounters With Reality and Virtual Reality by Jaron Lanier

4chan, augmented reality, back-to-the-land, Bill Atkinson, Buckminster Fuller, Burning Man, carbon footprint, cloud computing, collaborative editing, commoditize, cosmological constant, creative destruction, crowdsourcing, Donald Trump, Douglas Engelbart, Douglas Hofstadter, El Camino Real, Elon Musk, Firefox, game design, general-purpose programming language, gig economy, Google Glasses, Grace Hopper, Gödel, Escher, Bach, Hacker Ethic, Howard Rheingold, impulse control, information asymmetry, invisible hand, Jaron Lanier, John von Neumann, Kevin Kelly, Kickstarter, Kuiper Belt, lifelogging, mandelbrot fractal, Mark Zuckerberg, Marshall McLuhan, Menlo Park, Minecraft, Mitch Kapor, Mondo 2000, Mother of all demos, Murray Gell-Mann, Netflix Prize, Network effects, new economy, Norbert Wiener, Oculus Rift, pattern recognition, Paul Erdős, profit motive, Ray Kurzweil, recommendation engine, Richard Feynman, Richard Stallman, Ronald Reagan, self-driving car, Silicon Valley, Silicon Valley startup, Skype, Snapchat, stem cell, Stephen Hawking, Steve Bannon, Steve Jobs, Steven Levy, Stewart Brand, technoutopianism, Ted Nelson, telemarketer, telepresence, telepresence robot, Thorstein Veblen, Turing test, Vernor Vinge, Whole Earth Catalog, Whole Earth Review, WikiLeaks, wikimedia commons

Rusty signs with missing blinking lights offered live sex shows just north of Menlo Park, and beleaguered streetwalkers crowded the corners. And yet this was our gathering place. We needed to stay close together, as there was not yet an Internet, but we needed network effects. I remember playing pool at a rough dive bar on El Camino Real, the main drag, and thinking that a hacker in Palo Alto was like a cue ball that spins in a fixed spot after knocking another ball into faraway action. We spun in place in our new home while our momentum was transferred outward, reformatting the whole rest of the world. Coding all night long, all the next day, coding until your brain absorbed a big abstract structure and perfected it.


pages: 474 words: 130,575

Surveillance Valley: The Rise of the Military-Digital Complex by Yasha Levine

23andMe, activist fund / activist shareholder / activist investor, Airbnb, AltaVista, Amazon Web Services, Anne Wojcicki, anti-communist, Apple's 1984 Super Bowl advert, bitcoin, borderless world, British Empire, call centre, Chelsea Manning, cloud computing, collaborative editing, colonial rule, computer age, computerized markets, corporate governance, crowdsourcing, cryptocurrency, digital map, disinformation, don't be evil, Donald Trump, Douglas Engelbart, Douglas Engelbart, drone strike, Edward Snowden, El Camino Real, Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test, Elon Musk, fault tolerance, George Gilder, ghettoisation, global village, Google Chrome, Google Earth, Google Hangouts, Hacker Conference 1984, Howard Zinn, hypertext link, IBM and the Holocaust, index card, Jacob Appelbaum, Jeff Bezos, jimmy wales, John Markoff, John von Neumann, Julian Assange, Kevin Kelly, Kickstarter, life extension, Lyft, Mark Zuckerberg, market bubble, Menlo Park, Mitch Kapor, natural language processing, Network effects, new economy, Norbert Wiener, packet switching, PageRank, Paul Buchheit, peer-to-peer, Peter Thiel, Philip Mirowski, Plutocrats, plutocrats, private military company, RAND corporation, Ronald Reagan, Ross Ulbricht, Satoshi Nakamoto, self-driving car, sentiment analysis, shareholder value, side project, Silicon Valley, Silicon Valley startup, Skype, slashdot, Snapchat, speech recognition, Steve Jobs, Steve Wozniak, Steven Levy, Stewart Brand, Telecommunications Act of 1996, telepresence, telepresence robot, The Bell Curve by Richard Herrnstein and Charles Murray, The Hackers Conference, uber lyft, Whole Earth Catalog, Whole Earth Review, WikiLeaks

A few weeks after Cooke’s testimony, the ARPANET was officially absorbed by the Defense Communications Agency, which ran the communications systems for the entire Pentagon. In other words, even if still somewhat experimental, the ARPANET was the definition of an operational military network.60 Military Internet In the summer of 1973, Robert Kahn and Vint Cerf locked themselves in a conference room at the upscale Hyatt Cabana El Camino Real just a mile south of Stanford. The Cabana was the most glamorous hotel in Palo Alto, having hosted the Beatles in 1965, among other celebrities. Kahn was stocky and had thick black hair and sideburns. Cerf was tall and lanky, with an unkempt beard. The two could have been a folk music duo passing through on tour.


pages: 370 words: 129,096

Elon Musk: Tesla, SpaceX, and the Quest for a Fantastic Future by Ashlee Vance

addicted to oil, Burning Man, cleantech, digital map, El Camino Real, Elon Musk, global supply chain, Hyperloop, industrial robot, Jeff Bezos, Kickstarter, low earth orbit, Mark Zuckerberg, Maui Hawaii, Menlo Park, Mercator projection, money market fund, multiplanetary species, optical character recognition, orbital mechanics / astrodynamics, paypal mafia, performance metric, Peter Thiel, pre–internet, risk tolerance, Ronald Reagan, Sand Hill Road, self-driving car, side project, Silicon Valley, Silicon Valley startup, Steve Jobs, technoutopianism, Tesla Model S, transaction costs, Tyler Cowen: Great Stagnation, We wanted flying cars, instead we got 140 characters, X Prize

“This poor kid thought he was coming over for a job at a big company,” Kimbal said. “He ended up living with us and had no idea what he was getting into.” One day, the intern drove the Musks’ battered BMW 320i to work, and a wheel came off en route. The axle dug into the street at the intersection of Page Mill Road and El Camino Real, and the groove it carved out remained visible for years. Zip2 may have been a go-go Internet enterprise aimed at the Information Age, but getting it off the ground required old-fashioned door-to-door salesmanship. Businesses needed to be persuaded of the Web’s benefits and charmed into paying for the unknown.


pages: 460 words: 130,053

Red Notice: A True Story of High Finance, Murder, and One Man's Fight for Justice by Bill Browder

Berlin Wall, British Empire, corporate governance, El Camino Real, Gordon Gekko, half of the world's population has never made a phone call, index card, rolodex, Ronald Reagan, transfer pricing, union organizing

I applied to two schools, Harvard and Stanford, and told them my grandfather’s story. Harvard was quick to reject me, but amazingly, Stanford said yes. I was one of only three Bain employees accepted to Stanford that year. In late August 1987, I packed up my Toyota Tercel and drove across the country to California. When I got to Palo Alto, I turned right off El Camino Real onto Palm Drive, which led up to Stanford’s main campus. The road was lined with twin rows of palm trees ending at Spanish-style buildings with terra-cotta roofs. The sun was shining, and the sky was blue. This was California, and I felt as if I were arriving in heaven. I soon learned that it was heaven.


Frommer's California 2009 by Matthew Poole, Harry Basch, Mark Hiss, Erika Lenkert

airport security, Asilomar, Bay Area Rapid Transit, California gold rush, call centre, car-free, Charles Lindbergh, clean water, Columbine, Donald Trump, Donner party, East Village, El Camino Real, European colonialism, Frank Gehry, Golden Gate Park, Haight Ashbury, housing crisis, indoor plumbing, Joan Didion, Mason jar, mass immigration, Maui Hawaii, post-work, Saturday Night Live, Silicon Valley, Skype, South of Market, San Francisco, sustainable-tourism, transcontinental railway, urban sprawl, white picket fence, Works Progress Administration, Y Combinator

Mission San Juan Bautista is open daily year-round from 9:30am to 4:45pm. The suggested donation is $1 per person. For more information, call & 831/623-4528 or see www.oldmissionsjb.org or www.san-juan-bautista.ca.us. East of the church, at the edge of an abr upt drop created by the San Andreas Fault, a marker notes the path of the old El Camino Real. Seismographic measuring equipment and an earthquake science exhibit accompany the mar ker. There’s much to see on the r estored city plaza as w ell. The San Juan Bautista State Historic Park comprises the old P laza Hotel with its fr ontier barr oom and furnished rooms; the Plaza Hall, its adjoining stables, and blacksmith shop; and the Castro House, where the Breen family lived after traveling here with the ill-fated Donner Party in 1846.

A 2-block stretch is lined with many of San Diego County’s best furniture and home-design shops, antiques stores, art dealers, and boutiques selling imported goods. The Belly Up Tavern, 143 S. Cedr os Ave. (& 858/4819022; www.bellyup.com), is one of San Diego’s most appealing concert venues. If you’ve ever wanted to get a glimpse into the ar tistic process, get y ourself to the Lux Art Institute in Encinitas, 1550 S. El Camino Real (& 760/436-6611; www.luxartinstitute. com). This unique facility—a work of art in itself—allows visitors to watch as an artist-inresidence paints, sculpts, or draws in a studio environment. It’s open to the public Thursday and Friday, 1 to 5pm, and S aturday from 11am to 5pm ($10). E very third Wednesday of the month is Lux@night, a free wine and cheese reception from 7 to 9pm.

Bliss State Park, 269, 273 Dodger Stadium (Los Angeles), 575 Dog Beach, 740 Doheny State Beach, 644 Domaine Chandon (Yountville), 187 Doo Dah Parade (Pasadena), 44 Doran Beach (Bodega Bay), 227 Dorothy Chandler Pavilion (Los Angeles), 589 Downs Mansion (Sutter Creek), 363 Downtown Disney District (Disneyland), 627–628 Drake’s Bay Oyster Farm (near Inverness), 222 Drake’s Beach, 220 The Dresden Room (Los Angeles), 593 Drinking laws, 769–770 Driving rules, 46–47 Drury Trail, 245 Duarte, 656 Duck Lake Trail, 328 Dunes Center interpretative facility (Pismo Beach), 441 Eagle Falls, 273 Eagle Lake, 273 Earthquakes, 49, 76, 769 Earthquake Trail, 218 East Beach (Santa Barbara), 458 East West Players (Los Angeles), 589 Eberle Winery (Paso Robles), 444 The Egyptian Theatre (Los Angeles), 552, 597 El Camino Real, 386 El Capitan, 316 Electricity, 770 El Floridita (Los Angeles), 592 Elk (town), 232 Elkhorn Slough Wildlife Reserve, 392 El Matador Beach, 565 El Pescador Beach, 565 El Pueblo de Los Angeles Historic District, 488 El Rancho Escondido (Santa Catalina Island), 606 Elverhoj Museum (Solvang), 451 The Embarcadero (San Francisco), 70 restaurants, 102–104 Embassies, 770 Emerald Bay, 273 Empire Mine State Historic Park (Grass Valley), 361 Enchanted Loop Trail, 615 Encinitas, 762–764 Endert’s Beach, 258 The Endup (San Francisco), 143 Entry requirements, 36–37 EOS Estate Winery at Arciero Vineyards (Paso Robles), 444 Equinox (San Francisco), 147 ESPN’s West Coast broadcast headquarters (Los Angeles), 541 Eureka, 247–250 Everitt Vista, 294 The Exploratorium (San Francisco), 129 Exposition Park (Los Angeles), 492 Fair Oaks Pharmacy (Pasa- dena), 654 Fairytale Town (Sacramento), 351 Fallen Monarch, 343 Families with children, 12–13, 17–18, 51 Fanny Bridge, 267, 273 Fantasyland (Disneyland), 625 Farmers’ markets Julian, 767 Los Angeles, 537 San Francisco, 121, 137 San Luis Obispo, 436 Fern Canyon, 259 Ferndale, 246–247 Ferrari-Carano Vineyards & Winery (Healdsburg), 211 Ferris wheel, solar-powered (Los Angeles), 541 Ferry Building Marketplace (San Francisco), 121, 122, 137 Fess Parker Winery & Vineyard (Los Olivos), 449 Festival of Arts & Pageant of the Masters (Laguna Beach), 42 Festival of Whales (Dana Point), 39 Fiesta Village (Knott’s Berry Farm), 637 Filbert Street Steps (San Francisco), 135 Film Independent’s Los Angeles Film Festival, 597 First Crush (San Francisco), 147 Fisherman’s Festival (Bodega Bay), 227 Fisherman’s Wharf Monterey, 390 San Francisco.


pages: 469 words: 145,094

Endgame: Bobby Fischer's Remarkable Rise and Fall - From America's Brightest Prodigy to the Edge of Madness by Frank Brady

anti-communist, Charles Lindbergh, El Camino Real, illegal immigration, index card, long peace, offshore financial centre, Ponzi scheme, Socratic dialogue

Their agreement had been made, however, and from that time on Bobby went home by himself. The only untoward incident he had was that someone once stepped on his newly polished shoes—on purpose, he said. “Me llamo Robert Fischer.” During his first weeks in high school, right after he returned from Montreal, Bobby had not studied the introduction to his Spanish text, El Camino Real, had failed to attend two of his classes, and now was faced with his first ten-question quiz. Despite his trip to Cuba and his attempt to speak pidgin Spanish, he couldn’t translate or come up with the answers to such questions as “Where is the train station?” or “How much does the banana cost?”


pages: 559 words: 155,372

Chaos Monkeys: Obscene Fortune and Random Failure in Silicon Valley by Antonio Garcia Martinez

Airbnb, airport security, always be closing, Amazon Web Services, Burning Man, Celtic Tiger, centralized clearinghouse, cognitive dissonance, collective bargaining, corporate governance, Credit Default Swap, crowdsourcing, death of newspapers, disruptive innovation, drone strike, El Camino Real, Elon Musk, Emanuel Derman, financial independence, global supply chain, Goldman Sachs: Vampire Squid, hive mind, How many piano tuners are there in Chicago?, income inequality, information asymmetry, interest rate swap, intermodal, Jeff Bezos, Kickstarter, Malcom McLean invented shipping containers, Marc Andreessen, Mark Zuckerberg, Maui Hawaii, means of production, Menlo Park, minimum viable product, MITM: man-in-the-middle, move fast and break things, move fast and break things, Network effects, orbital mechanics / astrodynamics, Paul Graham, performance metric, Peter Thiel, Ponzi scheme, pre–internet, Ralph Waldo Emerson, random walk, Ruby on Rails, Sam Altman, Sand Hill Road, Scientific racism, second-price auction, self-driving car, Silicon Valley, Silicon Valley startup, Skype, Snapchat, social graph, social web, Socratic dialogue, source of truth, Steve Jobs, telemarketer, undersea cable, urban renewal, Y Combinator, zero-sum game, éminence grise

It’s the people who took their MBA classes seriously and thought that the content actually meant something rather than assuming that the entire point of an elite MBA was the curated network and jump-starting of a new career direction (which is what you’re actually paying $70K/year for, in Stanford’s case). Such people often end up in venture capital, the final redoubt of individuals with discipline and ambition but no actual talent. * Palo Alto means “tall stick” in Spanish, and it refers to a thousand-year-old redwood tree that served as a landmark along El Camino Real, the royal road the Spanish built when colonizing Alta California, and which now serves as a major artery running through all the former missions (now cities) they founded. The tree still stands a few blocks from downtown Palo Alto, and a stone’s throw away from the Stanford campus. * The women analogy breaks down in that, unlike with women, the more investors you seduce into your moresome, the more likely others are to join.


pages: 449 words: 123,459

The Infinity Puzzle by Frank Close

Albert Einstein, Andrew Wiles, Arthur Eddington, dark matter, El Camino Real, en.wikipedia.org, Ernest Rutherford, Isaac Newton, Murray Gell-Mann, Richard Feynman, Ronald Reagan, Simon Singh

Paschos’s more sober version has an aura of truth: “After seeing the data Feynman found the results very exciting and expressed the wish to stay longer. This is the first time that he saw the data.” It seems likely that Feynman then visited the actual experimentalists, meeting with Friedman as his notebook records. A room was booked at the Flamingo Motor Lodge, on El Camino Real in Palo Alto. Paschos and his wife dined with Feynman, departing after dinner “with a promise to meet him in the morning and bring him to SLAC. Up to this moment there was no mention of partons or any other interpretation for the data.” Next morning, when Paschos met him at the motel, Feynman “was all excited and mentioned that he understood the phenomena as originating from the scattering of the electron on bare constituents without structure.


pages: 559 words: 157,112

Dealers of Lightning by Michael A. Hiltzik

Apple II, Apple's 1984 Super Bowl advert, beat the dealer, Bill Atkinson, Bill Duvall, Bill Gates: Altair 8800, business cycle, computer age, creative destruction, Douglas Engelbart, Dynabook, Edward Thorp, El Camino Real, index card, Jeff Rulifson, John Markoff, Joseph Schumpeter, Marshall McLuhan, Menlo Park, oil shock, popular electronics, Robert Metcalfe, Ronald Reagan, Silicon Valley, speech recognition, Steve Ballmer, Steve Crocker, Steve Jobs, Steve Wozniak, Steven Levy, Stewart Brand, the medium is the message, Vannevar Bush, Whole Earth Catalog, zero-sum game

And at a total of 25,000 square feet, the two buildings together were the roomiest they had seen. They gave the real estate agent a hand-shake deal and flew home to Rochester to pack up. In mid-May Jones returned with his wife and infant son as Pake’s advance guard. He temporarily parked his family a mile or two from the site at Rickey’s Hyatt House, a motel on El Camino Real that would serve as a transitional home for scores of PARC recruits over the next dozen years. After picking up the keys to his new workplace from the rental agent, he headed over to the property. As he coasted up the long driveway he could make out a stranger peering through one of the big windows.


pages: 559 words: 169,094

The Unwinding: An Inner History of the New America by George Packer

Affordable Care Act / Obamacare, Apple's 1984 Super Bowl advert, bank run, Bear Stearns, big-box store, citizen journalism, cleantech, collateralized debt obligation, collective bargaining, corporate raider, Credit Default Swap, credit default swaps / collateralized debt obligations, deindustrialization, diversified portfolio, East Village, El Camino Real, Elon Musk, family office, financial independence, financial innovation, fixed income, Flash crash, Henry Ford's grandson gave labor union leader Walter Reuther a tour of the company’s new, automated factory…, housing crisis, income inequality, independent contractor, informal economy, Jane Jacobs, life extension, Long Term Capital Management, low skilled workers, Marc Andreessen, margin call, Mark Zuckerberg, market bubble, market fundamentalism, Maui Hawaii, Menlo Park, Neil Kinnock, new economy, New Journalism, obamacare, Occupy movement, oil shock, paypal mafia, peak oil, Peter Thiel, Ponzi scheme, Richard Florida, Robert Bork, Ronald Reagan, Ronald Reagan: Tear down this wall, Savings and loan crisis, shareholder value, side project, Silicon Valley, Silicon Valley startup, single-payer health, smart grid, Steve Jobs, strikebreaker, The Death and Life of Great American Cities, the scientific method, too big to fail, union organizing, urban planning, We are the 99%, We wanted flying cars, instead we got 140 characters, white flight, white picket fence, zero-sum game

Residential streets around the Valley were lined with modest two-thousand-square-foot midcentury Eichlers built on quarter-acre lots. The average house in Palo Alto cost $125,000. Commerce in downtown Palo Alto consisted of variety stores, sports shops, several movie theaters, and a pizza parlor. Across El Camino Real, the Stanford Shopping Center was dominated by Macy’s, Emporium, and Woolworth’s; in 1977 Victoria’s Secret opened a shop, but there was no Williams-Sonoma or Burberry, no upscale boutiques at all. The parking lot was full of Pintos and Datsuns. Almost all the children in the Valley, even ones from the few wealthy families, went to local public schools, and they were good schools—California was ranked number one in the country.


pages: 579 words: 164,339

Countdown: Our Last, Best Hope for a Future on Earth? by Alan Weisman

air freight, Albert Einstein, anti-communist, Ayatollah Khomeini, Berlin Wall, Bretton Woods, British Empire, call centre, carbon footprint, clean water, colonial rule, David Attenborough, demographic transition, Deng Xiaoping, El Camino Real, epigenetics, Filipino sailors, Garrett Hardin, Haber-Bosch Process, happiness index / gross national happiness, haute couture, housing crisis, ice-free Arctic, Ignaz Semmelweis: hand washing, illegal immigration, immigration reform, Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), land reform, liberation theology, load shedding, Louis Pasteur, Mahatma Gandhi, Mahbub ul Haq, megacity, Menlo Park, Money creation, new economy, oil shale / tar sands, out of africa, Pearl River Delta, planetary scale, Ponzi scheme, race to the bottom, Ronald Reagan, Satyajit Das, Seymour Hersh, Silicon Valley, South China Sea, stem cell, Stephen Hawking, Stewart Brand, unemployed young men, upwardly mobile, urban sprawl, Whole Earth Catalog, WikiLeaks

It was no shock to Paul Ehrlich that Rio+20, billed as the United Nations Conference on Sustainable Development, ignored the question of population, for much the same reasons that the Earth Summit did. As in 1992, the Vatican courted support from human rights and feminist groups, contending that population programs unfairly blame poor women for the world’s environmental ills. But as he drives his pickup back into Palo Alto, down six-lane El Camino Real, which formerly passed through orchards, not miles of commerce, Paul Ehrlich has no doubt that the most overpopulated country on Earth is his own. “There is no condom for consumption,” he says, sorrowing at the unabashed displays of Silicon Valley purchasing power. How to curb human acquisitiveness is more vexing a mystery than finding a unified theory of physics.


pages: 684 words: 188,584

The Age of Radiance: The Epic Rise and Dramatic Fall of the Atomic Era by Craig Nelson

Albert Einstein, Brownian motion, Charles Lindbergh, cognitive dissonance, Columbine, continuation of politics by other means, corporate governance, cuban missile crisis, dark matter, Doomsday Clock, El Camino Real, Ernest Rutherford, failed state, Henri Poincaré, hive mind, Isaac Newton, John von Neumann, Louis Pasteur, low earth orbit, Menlo Park, Mikhail Gorbachev, music of the spheres, mutually assured destruction, nuclear winter, oil shale / tar sands, Project Plowshare, Ralph Nader, Richard Feynman, Ronald Reagan, Skype, Stuxnet, technoutopianism, too big to fail, uranium enrichment, William Langewiesche, éminence grise

All over the world men have looked to him for guidance and have seen symbolized in him their hope that the evils of this time would not be repeated; that the terrible sacrifices which have been made, and those that still have to be made, would lead to a world more fit for human habitation. . . . It is right that we should dedicate ourselves to the hope that his good works will not have ended with his death.” Three weeks later, on May 2, 1945, Berlin surrendered. 7 The First Cry of a Newborn World AS El Camino Real followed the Rio Grande across the American Southwest, the river curved in a 120-mile bend, lengthening and complicating the journey with deep canyons, Apache assaults, and patches of quicksand—the original badlands. A well-known shortcut, well-known for being bleak and harsh, required at least three days of forced twenty-four-hour marching with no water.


pages: 666 words: 181,495

In the Plex: How Google Thinks, Works, and Shapes Our Lives by Steven Levy

23andMe, AltaVista, Anne Wojcicki, Apple's 1984 Super Bowl advert, autonomous vehicles, Bill Atkinson, book scanning, Brewster Kahle, Burning Man, business process, clean water, cloud computing, crowdsourcing, Dean Kamen, discounted cash flows, don't be evil, Donald Knuth, Douglas Engelbart, Douglas Engelbart, El Camino Real, fault tolerance, Firefox, Gerard Salton, Gerard Salton, Google bus, Google Chrome, Google Earth, Googley, HyperCard, hypertext link, IBM and the Holocaust, informal economy, information retrieval, Internet Archive, Jeff Bezos, John Markoff, Kevin Kelly, Kickstarter, Mark Zuckerberg, Menlo Park, one-China policy, optical character recognition, PageRank, Paul Buchheit, Potemkin village, prediction markets, recommendation engine, risk tolerance, Rubik’s Cube, Sand Hill Road, Saturday Night Live, search inside the book, second-price auction, selection bias, Silicon Valley, skunkworks, Skype, slashdot, social graph, social software, social web, spectrum auction, speech recognition, statistical model, Steve Ballmer, Steve Jobs, Steven Levy, Ted Nelson, telemarketer, The future is already here, trade route, traveling salesman, turn-by-turn navigation, undersea cable, Vannevar Bush, web application, WikiLeaks, Y Combinator

Cutts went back to his thesis, but a couple of days later, he got another message: “Would you like to be in active negotiation?” Clearly, he’d been Googled. After some phone screeners, he flew out to California, getting a taste for the company’s frugality when Google put him up in one of the funky clapboard motels on El Camino Real. Visiting the Google headquarters, he was taken aback by the scene: people working at haphazardly placed sawhorse desks and the director of engineering, Urs Hölzle, playing a high-tech game of fetch with his huge dog, making the floppy beast chase the beam of a laser pointer. In the whirl of interviews, Cutts would remember one question: “How’s your UNIX kung fu?”


Frommer's San Francisco 2012 by Matthew Poole, Erika Lenkert, Kristin Luna

airport security, Albert Einstein, Bay Area Rapid Transit, California gold rush, car-free, centre right, Chuck Templeton: OpenTable:, El Camino Real, glass ceiling, Golden Gate Park, Haight Ashbury, Loma Prieta earthquake, Mason jar, Maui Hawaii, McDonald's hot coffee lawsuit, place-making, Port of Oakland, post-work, San Francisco homelessness, sensible shoes, Silicon Valley, South of Market, San Francisco, Torches of Freedom, transcontinental railway, urban renewal, Works Progress Administration, young professional

Mission Dolores San Francisco’s oldest standing structure, the Mission San Francisco de Asís (also known as Mission Dolores), has withstood the test of time, as well as two major earthquakes, relatively intact. In 1776, at the behest of Franciscan missionary Junípero Serra, Father Francisco Palou came to the Bay Area to found the sixth in a series of 21 missions along El Camino Real (the King’s Highway). From these humble beginnings grew what was to become the city of San Francisco. The mission’s small, simple chapel, built solidly by Native Americans who were converted to Christianity, is a curious mixture of native construction methods and Spanish-colonial style. A statue of Father Serra stands in the mission garden, although the portrait looks somewhat more contemplative, and less energetic, than he must have been in real life.


pages: 721 words: 197,134

Data Mining: Concepts, Models, Methods, and Algorithms by Mehmed Kantardzić

Albert Einstein, algorithmic bias, backpropagation, bioinformatics, business cycle, business intelligence, business process, butter production in bangladesh, combinatorial explosion, computer vision, conceptual framework, correlation coefficient, correlation does not imply causation, data acquisition, discrete time, El Camino Real, fault tolerance, finite state, Gini coefficient, information retrieval, Internet Archive, inventory management, iterative process, knowledge worker, linked data, loose coupling, Menlo Park, natural language processing, Netflix Prize, NP-complete, PageRank, pattern recognition, peer-to-peer, phenotype, random walk, RFID, semantic web, speech recognition, statistical model, Telecommunications Act of 1996, telemarketer, text mining, traveling salesman, web application

Patrick Street, Suite 200, Toronto, Ontario, Canada M5T 1V1 www.angoss.com Attar Software USA Two Deerfoot Trial on Partridge Hill, Harward, MA 01451, USA www.attar.com Business Objects, Inc. 20813 Stevens Creek Blvd., Suite 100, Cupertino, CA 95014, USA www.businessobjects.com Cognos Corp. 67 S. Bedford St., Suite 200 W., Burlington, MA 01803, USA www.cognos.com DataMind Corp. 2121 S. El Camino Real, Suite 1200, San Mateo, CA 94403, USA www.datamindcorp.com HNC Software Inc. 5930 Cornerstone Court West, San Diego, CA 92121, USA www.hnc.com HyperParallel 282 Second Street, 3rd Floor, San Francisco, CA 94105, USA www.hyperparallel.com IBM Corp. Old Orchard Road, Armonk, NY 10504, USA www.ibm.com Integral Solutions Ltd.


pages: 720 words: 197,129

The Innovators: How a Group of Inventors, Hackers, Geniuses and Geeks Created the Digital Revolution by Walter Isaacson

1960s counterculture, Ada Lovelace, AI winter, Alan Turing: On Computable Numbers, with an Application to the Entscheidungsproblem, Albert Einstein, AltaVista, Apple II, augmented reality, back-to-the-land, beat the dealer, Bill Atkinson, Bill Gates: Altair 8800, bitcoin, Bob Noyce, Buckminster Fuller, Byte Shop, c2.com, call centre, citizen journalism, Claude Shannon: information theory, Clayton Christensen, commoditize, computer age, crowdsourcing, cryptocurrency, Debian, desegregation, Donald Davies, Douglas Engelbart, Douglas Engelbart, Douglas Hofstadter, Dynabook, El Camino Real, Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test, en.wikipedia.org, Firefox, Google Glasses, Grace Hopper, Gödel, Escher, Bach, Hacker Ethic, Haight Ashbury, Howard Rheingold, Hush-A-Phone, HyperCard, hypertext link, index card, Internet Archive, Jacquard loom, Jaron Lanier, Jeff Bezos, jimmy wales, John Markoff, John von Neumann, Joseph-Marie Jacquard, Leonard Kleinrock, linear model of innovation, Marc Andreessen, Mark Zuckerberg, Marshall McLuhan, Menlo Park, Mitch Kapor, Mother of all demos, new economy, New Journalism, Norbert Wiener, Norman Macrae, packet switching, PageRank, Paul Terrell, pirate software, popular electronics, pre–internet, RAND corporation, Ray Kurzweil, RFC: Request For Comment, Richard Feynman, Richard Stallman, Robert Metcalfe, Rubik’s Cube, Sand Hill Road, Saturday Night Live, self-driving car, Silicon Valley, Silicon Valley startup, Skype, slashdot, speech recognition, Steve Ballmer, Steve Crocker, Steve Jobs, Steve Wozniak, Steven Levy, Steven Pinker, Stewart Brand, technological singularity, technoutopianism, Ted Nelson, The Coming Technological Singularity, The Nature of the Firm, The Wisdom of Crowds, Turing complete, Turing machine, Turing test, Vannevar Bush, Vernor Vinge, Von Neumann architecture, Watson beat the top human players on Jeopardy!, Whole Earth Catalog, Whole Earth Review, wikimedia commons, William Shockley: the traitorous eight, Yochai Benkler

Intel not only developed the leading-edge chips; it also created the culture that inspired venture-funded startups to transform the economy and uproot the apricot orchards of Santa Clara Valley, the forty-mile stretch of flat land from south San Francisco through Palo Alto to San Jose. The valley’s main artery, a bustling highway named El Camino Real, was once the royal road that connected California’s twenty-one mission churches. By the early 1970s—thanks to Hewlett-Packard, Fred Terman’s Stanford Industrial Park, William Shockley, Fairchild and its Fairchildren—it connected a bustling corridor of tech companies. In 1971 the region got a new moniker.


pages: 706 words: 202,591

Facebook: The Inside Story by Steven Levy

active measures, Airbnb, Airbus A320, Amazon Mechanical Turk, Apple's 1984 Super Bowl advert, augmented reality, Ben Horowitz, blockchain, Burning Man, business intelligence, cloud computing, computer vision, crowdsourcing, cryptocurrency, disinformation, don't be evil, Donald Trump, East Village, Edward Snowden, El Camino Real, Elon Musk, Firefox, Frank Gehry, glass ceiling, indoor plumbing, Jeff Bezos, John Markoff, Jony Ive, Kevin Kelly, Kickstarter, Lyft, Mahatma Gandhi, Marc Andreessen, Mark Zuckerberg, Menlo Park, Metcalfe’s law, MITM: man-in-the-middle, move fast and break things, move fast and break things, natural language processing, Network effects, Oculus Rift, PageRank, Paul Buchheit, paypal mafia, Peter Thiel, pets.com, post-work, Ray Kurzweil, recommendation engine, Robert Mercer, Robert Metcalfe, rolodex, Sam Altman, Sand Hill Road, self-driving car, sexual politics, Shoshana Zuboff, side project, Silicon Valley, Silicon Valley startup, slashdot, Snapchat, social graph, social software, South of Market, San Francisco, Startup school, Steve Ballmer, Steve Bannon, Steve Jobs, Steven Levy, Steven Pinker, surveillance capitalism, Tim Cook: Apple, Tragedy of the Commons, web application, WeWork, WikiLeaks, women in the workforce, Y Combinator, Y2K, you are the product

“He would have to leave the room because he was making himself sick, just in his own head.” Mostly, though, it was fast food, video games, and work, preparing Thefacebook for another campus and then another. A typical outing was like the one on that night in June when Zuckerberg, Moskovitz, and a couple of others were on foot, starting the half-mile trek down Matadero Lane toward El Camino Real, where there was a Happy Donuts store. They had hardly started when Zuckerberg spotted Sean Parker’s familiar face. As they conversed, Parker made a brash call to move out of his current situation and couch-surf with Zuckerberg and his team, placing himself smack in the eye of the Facebook hurricane.


pages: 356 words: 186,629

Frommer's Los Angeles 2010 by Matthew Richard Poole

call centre, car-free, carbon footprint, Charles Lindbergh, clean water, Donald Trump, El Camino Real, Frank Gehry, Guggenheim Bilbao, Haight Ashbury, Joan Didion, Maui Hawaii, Saturday Night Live, sustainable-tourism, upwardly mobile

Tours $10 adults, $7 students and seniors 65 and o ver, free for children 11 and under. Tours Thurs–Sun noon–3pm. Closed holidays. Mission San Fernando In the late 18th century, Franciscan missionaries established 21 missions along the California coast from San Diego to Sonoma. Each uniquely beautiful mission was built 1 day’s trek from the next, along a path known as El Camino Real (“the Royal Road”), remnants of which still exist. The missions’ construction marked the beginning of E uropean settlement of California and the displacement of the N ative American population. The two L.A.-ar ea missions ar e located in the v alleys that took their names: the S an Fernando Valley and the S an Gabriel Valley (see belo w).


pages: 915 words: 232,883

Steve Jobs by Walter Isaacson

air freight, Albert Einstein, Apple II, Apple's 1984 Super Bowl advert, big-box store, Bill Atkinson, Bob Noyce, Buckminster Fuller, Byte Shop, centre right, Clayton Christensen, cloud computing, commoditize, computer age, computer vision, corporate governance, death of newspapers, don't be evil, Douglas Engelbart, Dynabook, El Camino Real, Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test, fixed income, game design, Golden Gate Park, Hacker Ethic, hiring and firing, Jeff Bezos, Johannes Kepler, John Markoff, Jony Ive, lateral thinking, Mark Zuckerberg, Menlo Park, Mitch Kapor, Mother of all demos, Paul Terrell, profit maximization, publish or perish, Richard Feynman, Robert Metcalfe, Robert X Cringely, Ronald Reagan, Silicon Valley, skunkworks, Steve Ballmer, Steve Jobs, Steve Wozniak, Steven Levy, Stewart Brand, supply-chain management, thinkpad, Tim Cook: Apple, Wall-E, Whole Earth Catalog

The chip industry gave the region a new name when Don Hoefler, a columnist for the weekly trade paper Electronic News, began a series in January 1971 entitled “Silicon Valley USA.” The forty-mile Santa Clara Valley, which stretches from South San Francisco through Palo Alto to San Jose, has as its commercial backbone El Camino Real, the royal road that once connected California’s twenty-one mission churches and is now a bustling avenue that connects companies and startups accounting for a third of the venture capital investment in the United States each year. “Growing up, I got inspired by the history of the place,” Jobs said.


pages: 2,323 words: 550,739

1,000 Places to See in the United States and Canada Before You Die, Updated Ed. by Patricia Schultz

Albert Einstein, Alfred Russel Wallace, American Society of Civil Engineers: Report Card, Bretton Woods, Burning Man, California gold rush, car-free, Charles Lindbergh, Columbine, Donald Trump, East Village, El Camino Real, estate planning, Frank Gehry, glass ceiling, Golden Gate Park, Guggenheim Bilbao, Haight Ashbury, haute cuisine, indoor plumbing, interchangeable parts, Mars Rover, Mason jar, Maui Hawaii, Mikhail Gorbachev, Murano, Venice glass, Nelson Mandela, new economy, New Urbanism, Norman Mailer, out of africa, Pepto Bismol, place-making, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Ronald Reagan, Rosa Parks, Saturday Night Live, sexual politics, South of Market, San Francisco, The Chicago School, transcontinental railway, traveling salesman, upwardly mobile, urban decay, urban planning, urban renewal, urban sprawl, wage slave, white picket fence, Works Progress Administration, Yogi Berra, éminence grise

When: closed Mon–Tues. NATE & AL’S: Tel 310-274-0101. Cost: lunch $20. BEST TIME: May for blooming jacaranda trees. Along El Camino Real CALIFORNIA MISSION TRAIL California On July 16, 1769, Father Junipero Serra, accompanied by a scraggly, depleted band of Spanish soldiers and missionaries, erected a brushwood shelter and founded the Mission San Diego de Alcala. It was the first of 21 Franciscan missions established along the coastal route dubbed El Camino Real (Spanish for “The Royal Road”), extending from what we now know as San Diego north to Sonoma. Combining spiritual and military ends, these outposts, designed to convert and conquer the natives, are a cornerstone of California history, culture, and architecture.


USA Travel Guide by Lonely, Planet

1960s counterculture, active transport: walking or cycling, Affordable Care Act / Obamacare, Albert Einstein, Asilomar, Bay Area Rapid Transit, Bear Stearns, Berlin Wall, Big bang: deregulation of the City of London, big-box store, bike sharing scheme, Biosphere 2, Bretton Woods, British Empire, Burning Man, California gold rush, call centre, car-free, carbon footprint, centre right, Charles Lindbergh, Chuck Templeton: OpenTable:, cuban missile crisis, desegregation, Donald Trump, Donner party, East Village, edge city, El Camino Real, Fall of the Berlin Wall, feminist movement, Frank Gehry, glass ceiling, global village, Golden Gate Park, Guggenheim Bilbao, Haight Ashbury, haute couture, haute cuisine, Hernando de Soto, Howard Zinn, illegal immigration, immigration reform, information trail, interchangeable parts, intermodal, jitney, Kickstarter, license plate recognition, Mars Rover, Mason jar, mass immigration, Maui Hawaii, McMansion, Menlo Park, Monroe Doctrine, new economy, New Urbanism, obamacare, off grid, Ralph Nader, Ralph Waldo Emerson, RFID, ride hailing / ride sharing, Ronald Reagan, Rosa Parks, Saturday Night Live, Silicon Valley, South of Market, San Francisco, starchitect, stealth mode startup, stem cell, supervolcano, the built environment, The Chicago School, the High Line, the payments system, trade route, transcontinental railway, union organizing, Upton Sinclair, upwardly mobile, urban decay, urban planning, urban renewal, urban sprawl, walkable city, white flight, working poor, Works Progress Administration, young professional, Zipcar

OTHER GREAT ROAD TRIPS ROUTE STATE(S) START/END SIGHTS & ACTIVITIES BEST TIME MORE INFO Rte 28 NY Stony Hollow/Arkville Catskills mountains, lakes, rivers, hiking, leaf-peeping, tubing May-Sep Click here Old Kings Hwy MA Sagamore/Provincetown historic districts, period homes, coastal scenery Apr-Oct Click here Natchez Trace Hwy AL/MS/TN Nashville/Natchez ‘Old South’ history, archaeological sites, scenic waterways, biking, camping, hiking, Mar-Nov Click here Beartooth Hwy MT Red Lodge/Yellowstone wildflowers, mountains, alpine scenery, camping Jun-Sep Click here Alpine Loop Backcountry Byway CO Ouray/Lake City Mountains, views, valleys, abandoned mines Jun-Sep Click here Maui’s Road to Hana HI Paia/Hana jungle waterfalls, beaches, hiking, swimming, surfing year-round Click here Hwy 13 WI Bayfield/Superior lakeside beaches, forests, farmlands, nature walks May-Sep Click here Hwy 61 IA Duluth/Canadian Border state parks, waterfalls, quaint towns, hiking May-Sep Click here Hwy 2 NE I-80/Alliance grass-covered sand-dunes, open vistas May-Sep Click here El Camino Real TX Lajitas/Presidio vast desert & mountain landscapes, hot springs, hiking, horseback riding Feb-Apr & Oct-Nov Click here Sawtooth Scenic Byway ID Ketchum/Stanley jagged mountains, verdant forests, backpacking, hiking, wildlife watching May-Sep Click here Turquoise Trail NM Albuquerque/Santa Fe mining towns, quirky museums & folk art, cycling, hiking Mar-May & Sep-Nov Click here US 50 NV Fernley/Baker ‘Loneliest Road in America’, epic wilderness, biking, hiking, spelunking May-Sep Click here Historic Columbia River Hwy OR Portland/Portland scenery, waterfalls, wildflowers, cycling, hiking Apr-Sep Click here Monument Valley UT Monument Valley iconic buttes, movie-set locations; 4WD tours, horseback riding year-round Click here VT 100 VT Stamford/Newport rolling pastures, green mountains, hiking, skiing Jun-Sep Click here Kancamagus Hwy VT Conway/Lincoln craggy mountains, streams & waterfalls, camping, hiking, swimming May-Sep Click here When the urban streets start to make you feel claustrophobic, just head out back on the open road and hit the coast again, heading north or south.