bike sharing scheme

27 results back to index


pages: 230 words: 71,834

Building the Cycling City: The Dutch Blueprint for Urban Vitality by Melissa Bruntlett, Chris Bruntlett

active transport: walking or cycling, ASML, autonomous vehicles, bike sharing scheme, car-free, crowdsourcing, en.wikipedia.org, Frank Gehry, Guggenheim Bilbao, intermodal, Jones Act, Loma Prieta earthquake, megacity, new economy, oil shale / tar sands, side project, Silicon Valley, Skype, smart cities, starchitect, the built environment, the High Line, transit-oriented development, urban planning, urban renewal, wikimedia commons

The city was, in fact, home to the country’s first underground bike-parking facility, built in 1938. Demand has since skyrocketed, and officials are currently building a number of large and ample fietsenstallingen (“bike parking lots”) in and around the city center. In 2001, Utrecht was the natural choice to serve as the pilot city for OV-Fiets, the national bike-rental scheme: a convenient service that has expanded exponentially to strengthen the powerful bike–train combination. Over a period of 30 years, officials in Utrecht have gone from believing the bike would become extinct to beginning to cater to cyclists, but Wagenbuur insists that it wasn’t until the early nineties that cycling found its rightful place near the top of the transportation hierarchy.

For her, it means taking the CROW design principles of cohesion, directness, safety, attractiveness, and comfort, and continuing to apply them through the door and onto the platform. While it is still early in the pilot project process, BiTiBi’s partners in Liverpool, Milan, Barcelona, and Ghent have seen some impressive results. For example, establishing secure bike-parking and rental schemes has resulted in fewer car trips, as 15–20 percent of bike-parking users who have stopped driving to the station, while 5 percent of rental-bike users left their cars at home. These pilot projects also managed to induce new cycling trips, with 40–50 percent of bike-parking users new to cycling, as were 70 percent of rental-bike users.

The Netherlands wasn’t always this way—it was created and evolved—and that was very inspiring to me.” To change the hearts and minds of residents, these upgrades couldn’t be a cut-and-paste duplicate of somewhere else—they had to be created in New York. Her department would install over 400 miles of “Made in New York” bike lanes, and later launch Citi Bike, the single largest public bike-sharing scheme on the continent. Figure 1-3: A protected bike lane along Brooklyn’s Prospect Park, once referred to as “the most contested piece of land outside the Gaza Strip.” (Credit: Doug Gordon) Many of these upgrades were made possible simply by unlocking the hidden potential found in most city streets.


France (Lonely Planet, 8th Edition) by Nicola Williams

active transport: walking or cycling, back-to-the-land, bike sharing scheme, British Empire, car-free, carbon footprint, centre right, Charles Lindbergh, Columbine, double helix, Guggenheim Bilbao, haute couture, haute cuisine, Henri Poincaré, Herbert Marcuse, Honoré de Balzac, illegal immigration, industrial robot, information trail, Jacquard loom, Joseph-Marie Jacquard, Kickstarter, Louis Blériot, Louis Pasteur, low cost airline, low cost carrier, Mahatma Gandhi, means of production, Murano, Venice glass, pension reform, post-work, QWERTY keyboard, ride hailing / ride sharing, Saturday Night Live, Silicon Valley, Skype, Sloane Ranger, supervolcano, trade route, urban renewal, urban sprawl, V2 rocket

Green-themed boxes in most chapters provide destination-specific pointers for travelling responsibly and a top-pick listing of green activities is on opposite. * * * TOP 10 GREEN PICKS Go slow, go green and buzz sustainable with our pick of environmentally sweet travel experiences; see destination chapters for more ideas on taking your foot off the accelerator. Try the self-service bike-rental schemes in Paris, Lyon, Marseille, Montpellier, Rouen, Caen, Dijon, Amiens, Toulouse and Orléans Build a castle using 13th-century technologies at the Chantier Médiéval de Guédelon Behave like a Breton: cycle past otherworldly megaliths Click here, hike on the Island of Terror or bask on Île de Batz Revel in ravishing gardens: Monet’s inspiration in Giverny, subterranean Jardin des Boves in Arras, Menton’s Mediterranean paradises Click here, Monaco’s Jardin Exotique and those at Villa Grecque Kérylos in Beaulieu-sur-Mer and Villa Rothschild in St-Jean Cap-Ferrat Experience France’s first organic village Click here Paddle along emerald-green waterways at the Maison Flore in France’s ‘Green Venice’ Follow the footsteps of pilgrims from Le Puy-en-Velay to St-Jean Pied de Port; or do it by donkey like Robert Louis Stevenson in the Parc National des Cévennes Bliss out in mud at a Biarritz spa Click here Celebrate traditional mountain life during the eco-festival, Les Phonies Bergères Retrace dinosaur steps at the Réserve Géologique in Digne-les-Bains A DIFFERENT PERSPECTIVE Forget the Louvre or the local musée des beaux arts (fine-arts museum).

The local public transport company, STAN ( 03 83 30 08 08; www.reseau-stan.com, in French; office 3 rue du Docteur Schmitt; 7am-7.30pm Mon-Sat), with offices next to the Nacy Gare tram stop, has its main transfer points at Nancy République and Point Central. One/10 tickets cost €1.20/8.70. In this section, tram stops 200m or less from sights, hotels etc are mentioned right after the street address and indicated with a tram icon . Vélostan (www.velostan.com, in French; per half-day/day/week €3/5/10) is not in Central Asia – it’s STAN’s bike-rental scheme, with rental sites inside the train station ( 03 83 32 50 85; 7.30am-7.30pm Mon-Fri, 9am-6pm weekends & holidays) and, near the Musée de l’École de Nancy, in Espace Thermal ( 03 83 90 20 96; 43bis rue du Sergent Blandan; 10am-1pm & 3-6pm Mon-Fri, 9am-6pm Sat). A taxi ( 03 83 37 65 37) is just a telephone call away.

By taxi, the 30-minute trip between the airport and the city centre costs around €40/55 during the day/between 7pm and 7am. BICYCLE Pick up a pair of red-and-silver wheels at one of 200-odd bike stations dotted around the city and drop them off at another with Lyon’s hugely successful vélo’v ( 08 00 08 35 68; www.velov.grandlyon.com, in French) bike-rental scheme. The first 30 minutes are free and the first/subsequent hours cost €1/2 with a carte courte durée (a short-duration card, costing €1 and valid for seven days) and €0.50/1 if you buy a carte longue durée (long-duration card, costing €5 and valid for one year). Buy either card with a credit card from machines installed at bike stations: central stations are located in front of the town hall on bd de la Croix Rousse, 4e (Map; metro Croix Rousse); beside the opera house (1er; Map; metro Hôtel de Ville); and opposite Cathédrale St-Jean on place St-Jean (5e; Map; metro Vieux Lyon).


pages: 411 words: 80,925

What's Mine Is Yours: How Collaborative Consumption Is Changing the Way We Live by Rachel Botsman, Roo Rogers

Airbnb, barriers to entry, Bernie Madoff, bike sharing scheme, Buckminster Fuller, buy and hold, carbon footprint, Cass Sunstein, collaborative consumption, collaborative economy, commoditize, Community Supported Agriculture, credit crunch, crowdsourcing, dematerialisation, disintermediation, en.wikipedia.org, experimental economics, Garrett Hardin, George Akerlof, global village, hedonic treadmill, Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall, information retrieval, iterative process, Kevin Kelly, Kickstarter, late fees, Mark Zuckerberg, market design, Menlo Park, Network effects, new economy, new new economy, out of africa, Parkinson's law, peer-to-peer, peer-to-peer lending, peer-to-peer rental, Ponzi scheme, pre–internet, recommendation engine, RFID, Richard Stallman, ride hailing / ride sharing, Robert Shiller, Robert Shiller, Ronald Coase, Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence, SETI@home, Simon Kuznets, Skype, slashdot, smart grid, South of Market, San Francisco, Stewart Brand, The Nature of the Firm, The Spirit Level, the strength of weak ties, The Theory of the Leisure Class by Thorstein Veblen, The Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith, The Wisdom of Crowds, Thorstein Veblen, Torches of Freedom, Tragedy of the Commons, transaction costs, traveling salesman, ultimatum game, Victor Gruen, web of trust, women in the workforce, Yochai Benkler, Zipcar

The Clothing Exchange is able to reach this point more quickly by hosting specific swaps for different clusters of clothing sizes or tastes—for example, teenagers, pregnant moms, and people over sixty-five—and an Excess Baggage Exchange just for shoes, accessories, and handbags. A similar dynamic is at work with the bike-sharing schemes growing in popularity around the world, such as SmartBike in D.C., B-cycle in Hawaii, and OYBike in London. One of the most recent bike-sharing schemes, launched in May 2009, is Montreal’s BIXI (coined from “bike,” plus “taxi”). On taking office, Mayor Delanoë set clear goals to reduce the city’s traffic and carbon emissions and to make the city more livable. He decided he could not just build more cycling paths (Montreal in fact already has a network of more than twenty miles of bike paths); he had to make enough bikes available (and make them cheap enough) so that cycling would become the convenient and attractive choice for people to get around the city.

More and more friends were selling stuff on craigslist and eBay; swapping books, DVDs, and games on sites such as Swaptree and OurSwaps; and giving unwanted items away on Freecycle and ReUseIt. On a trip to Paris, we saw cyclists pedaling around on sleek-looking bikes with the word “Vélib’” (Paris’s bike-sharing scheme) on their crossbars. A friend in London told us about her new favorite Channel 4 TV program called Landshare. And we kept hearing about the number of people joining Community Supported Agriculture (CSA) programs or local co-ops. We saw stats and stories about online cooperation and the growth in virtual communities.

While this app largely feeds the consumer engine, it’s only a matter of time before the same technology based on location signals will be used to pinpoint whatever we need to access and what is available to borrow, rent, or share. Real-time technologies will be able to predict what we need, where, and when; recommend the best options; and send special offers with sharing solutions. If you’re traveling, for example, from Sunny Side in Denver to Cherry Creek Mall, an app will send you a discount voucher for the bike sharing scheme B-Cycle, and tell you that the fastest way to get there is to go to 345 St. Arthur Street, where there are three bikes available, and then drop the bike off at 2900 Cherry Creek Drive, where there are four docks available. Idling capacity is related not just to physical products such as bikes, cars, and drills but to less tangible assets such as time, skills, space, or commodities like electricity.


Lonely Planet Andalucia: Chapter From Spain Travel Guide by Lonely Planet

bike sharing scheme, British Empire, car-free, carbon footprint, centre right, credit crunch, discovery of the americas, Francisco Pizarro, haute cuisine, Kickstarter, Skype, trade route, urban renewal

Two more leading lights are the Vía Verde del Aceite in Jaén province and the Vía Verde Subbética in Córdoba province, which join up at the spectacular Guadajoz viaduct to form an unbroken 111km path. Cycling In a country that has amassed ten Tour de France wins since 1991, pro cycling is a serious business, but there’s a decent infrastructure for amateurs as well. Andalucía has widespread bike hire opportunities, prescribed bike trails, and a growing number of urban bike-sharing schemes (Click here). Pockets of the cycling fraternity have even embraced that heretical American invention, mountain biking. Off-road bikes are well suited to the region’s rugged terrain. Hot-spots include the El Chorro region, Parque Natural Sierras de Cazorla, Segura y Las Villas, and Las Alpujarras.

Best Places to Eat »Vinería San Telmo (Click here) »Los Coloniales (Click here) »Bar-Restaurante Eslava (Click here) »Restaurante Egaña Oriza (Click here) Best Places to Stay »Hotel Casa 1800 (Click here) »Hotel Amadeus (Click here) »Hotel San Gil (Click here) »Hotel Sacristía de Santa Ana (Click here) Getting Around Seville offers a multitude of ways to get around, though walking still has to be the best option, especially in the centre. The Sevici bike-sharing scheme has made cycling easy and bike lanes are now almost as ubiquitous as pavements. The tram has recently been extended to the station of San Bernardo but its routes are still limited. Buses are more useful than the metro to link the main tourist sights. The recent ‘greening’ of the city has made driving increasingly difficult as whole roads in the city centre are now permanently closed to traffic; park on the periphery.

Keen to keep the ball rolling, Seville continued its march into the 21st century under the auspices of proactive city mayor Alfredo Sánchez Monteseirín (1999–2011), who reacted to the challenges of climate change and urban renewal with fiery aplomb. In the space of just five years, Monteseirín oversaw the opening of an overland tram, a subterranean metro, a bike-sharing scheme and an electric car-sharing project. At the same time, he helped launch two architectural icons that would rival the Gothic cathedral in their audacity: the controversial Metropol Parasol and the carefully revived El Pabellon de la Navegación. What next? Locals ask. As 2012 dawned, the home of flamenco and the spring feria was putting the finishing touches to its first skyscraper, the 180m Cajasol Tower – a new controversy and a prickly new talking point in a city that has always refused to stand still.


Lonely Planet Ireland by Lonely Planet

bank run, banking crisis, Berlin Wall, Bernie Sanders, bike sharing scheme, Bob Geldof, British Empire, carbon footprint, Celtic Tiger, credit crunch, G4S, glass ceiling, global village, haute cuisine, hydraulic fracturing, Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), Jacquard loom, Kickstarter, land reform, reserve currency, sustainable-tourism, young professional

It should take about 25 minutes to get into the city centre by taxi and should cost around €25, including an initial charge of €3.60 (€4 between 10pm and 8am and on Sundays and bank holidays). Make sure the meter is switched on. DUBLIN BY BIKE One of the most popular ways to get around the city is with the blue bikes of Dublinbikes (www.dublinbikes.ie), a public bicycle-rental scheme with more than 100 stations spread across the city centre. Purchase a €10 smart card (as well as pay a credit-card deposit of €150) or a three-day card online or at any station before 'freeing' a bike for use, which is then free of charge for the first 30 minutes and €0.50 for each half-hour thereafter.

There are plenty of spots to lock your bike throughout the city, but be sure to do so thoroughly as bike theft can be a problem – and never leave your bike on the street overnight as even the toughest lock can be broken. Dublin City Cycling (www.cycledublin.ie) is an excellent online resource. Bikes are only allowed on suburban trains (not the DART), either stowed in the guard's van or in a special compartment at the opposite end of the train from the engine. Bike rental has become tougher due to the Dublinbikes scheme. Typical rental for a hybrid or touring bike is around €25 a day or €140 per week. Cycleways ( GOOGLE MAP ; www.cycleways.com; 185-187 Parnell St; h8.30am-6.30pm Mon-Wed & Fri, to 8pm Thu, 9.30am-6pm Sat; gall city centre) An excellent bike shop that rents out hybrids and touring bikes during the summer months (May to September). 2Wheels ( GOOGLE MAP ; www.2wheels.ie; 57 S William St; h10am-6pm Mon, Tue & Sat, to 8pm Wed, Thu & Fri, noon-6pm Sun; gall city centre) New bikes, all the gear you could possibly need and a decent repair service; but be sure to book an appointment as it is generally quite busy.

Car The most convenient way to explore Ireland's every nook and cranny. Cars can be hired in every major town and city; drive on the left. Bus An extensive network of public and private buses make them the most cost-effective way to get around; there's service to and from most inhabited areas. Bicycle Dublin operates a bike-share scheme with over 100 stations spread throughout the city. Train A limited (and expensive) network links Dublin to all major urban centres, including Belfast in Northern Ireland. For more information, see Survival Guide and Transport First Time Ireland Checklist AMake sure your passport is valid for at least six months past your arrival date AMake all necessary bookings (accommodation, events and travel) ACheck the airline baggage restrictions AInform your debit-/credit-card company AArrange appropriate travel insurance ACheck if your mobile phone is compatible What to Pack AGood walking shoes, as there's plenty of good walking to do ARaincoat – you will undoubtedly need it AUK/Ireland electrical adapter AFinely honed sense of humour AA hollow leg – all that beer has to go somewhere AIrish-themed Spotify playlist Top Tips for Your Trip AQuality rather than quantity should be your goal: instead of a hair-raising race to see everything, pick a handful of destinations and give yourself time to linger.


The Rough Guide to Norway by Phil Lee

banking crisis, bike sharing scheme, car-free, centre right, glass ceiling, Nelson Mandela, North Sea oil, out of africa, place-making, sensible shoes, sustainable-tourism, trade route, walkable city, white picket fence

BY BIKE Renting a bicycle is a pleasant way to get around Oslo, particularly as the city has a reasonable range of cycle tracks and many roads have cycle lanes – and, furthermore, central Oslo is not engulfed by traffic thanks to its network of motorway tunnels. Bike rental There is a municipal bike rental scheme (Easter to Nov; oslobysykkel.no) in which bikes are released like supermarket trolleys from racks all over the city. Visitors can join the scheme (and receive the appropriate smartcard) at the tourist office by paying 90kr for a 24hr cycling pass plus a substantial refundable deposit.


pages: 337 words: 101,440

Revolution Française: Emmanuel Macron and the Quest to Reinvent a Nation by Sophie Pedder

Airbnb, Berlin Wall, Bernie Sanders, bike sharing scheme, centre right, disruptive innovation, Donald Trump, Downton Abbey, Erik Brynjolfsson, eurozone crisis, failed state, Fall of the Berlin Wall, ghettoisation, haute couture, Jean Tirole, knowledge economy, liberal capitalism, mass immigration, mittelstand, new economy, post-industrial society, rent-seeking, ride hailing / ride sharing, Second Machine Age, sharing economy, Silicon Valley, Travis Kalanick, urban planning, éminence grise

The former capital of Roman Gaul, in the Rhône valley of south-eastern France, Lyon is a thriving, cosmopolitan regional city that feels broadly at ease with change. Between 2008 and 2015, a period when unemployment rose across the country, the net number of jobs there increased by 5 per cent. The city enjoys fast trains and slow food, and introduced a bike-sharing scheme long before Paris or London. Perched at the sharp point of the confluence of the Rhône and the Saône rivers is a futuristic new plate-glass museum, the Musée des Confluences, designed to represent a ‘crystal cloud of knowledge’. Along the nearby quay, an experimental driverless bus conveys passengers to and fro.

Once, the motorist would travel along the routes nationales that passed through such small towns, Michelin guide in hand, stopping perhaps for a plat du jour on the way to somewhere else. Today, these are regions that the TGV, fibre-optics and 4G mobile connection passes by, where people sense that globalization and automation have dealt them a blow. It is a world in which Uber, bike-share schemes, organic cafés and co-working spaces are nowhere to be found, where mobile reception is poor, and the young, and better educated, have left. As jobs and confidence have drained away, so has faith in the mainstream parties. This is where the FN has now taken hold. Few places better capture this sense of abandon, and the political forces that can thrive on it, than Hénin-Beaumont, a red-brick town in the mining basin of northern France.


pages: 362 words: 97,288

Ghost Road: Beyond the Driverless Car by Anthony M. Townsend

A Pattern Language, active measures, AI winter, algorithmic trading, asset-backed security, augmented reality, autonomous vehicles, backpropagation, big-box store, bike sharing scheme, business process, Captain Sullenberger Hudson, car-free, carbon footprint, computer vision, conceptual framework, congestion charging, connected car, creative destruction, crew resource management, crowdsourcing, DARPA: Urban Challenge, data is the new oil, Dean Kamen, deindustrialization, delayed gratification, deliberate practice, dematerialisation, deskilling, drive until you qualify, Edward Glaeser, Elon Musk, en.wikipedia.org, extreme commuting, financial innovation, Flash crash, gig economy, Google bus, haute couture, helicopter parent, independent contractor, inventory management, invisible hand, Jane Jacobs, Jeff Bezos, jitney, job automation, John Markoff, John von Neumann, Joseph Schumpeter, Kickstarter, loss aversion, Lyft, megacity, minimum viable product, mortgage debt, New Urbanism, North Sea oil, openstreetmap, pattern recognition, Peter Calthorpe, random walk, Ray Kurzweil, Ray Oldenburg, rent-seeking, ride hailing / ride sharing, Rodney Brooks, self-driving car, sharing economy, Shoshana Zuboff, Silicon Valley, Silicon Valley startup, Skype, smart cities, Smart Cities: Big Data, Civic Hackers, and the Quest for a New Utopia, software as a service, sovereign wealth fund, Stephen Hawking, Steve Jobs, surveillance capitalism, technological singularity, Tesla Model S, The Coming Technological Singularity, The Death and Life of Great American Cities, The future is already here, The Future of Employment, The Great Good Place, too big to fail, traffic fines, transit-oriented development, Travis Kalanick, Uber and Lyft, uber lyft, urban planning, urban sprawl, US Airways Flight 1549, Vernor Vinge

oid=41169541. 63deal with the diminutive nation-state of Andorra: “An Alternative Autonomous Revolution,” MIT Media Lab, accessed February 11, 2019, https://www.media.mit.edu/projects/pev/overview/. 63millions of shared bikes serve a thousand cities: Renate van der Zee, “Story of Cities #30: How This Amsterdam Inventor Gave Bike-Sharing to the World,” The Guardian, April 26, 2016, https://www.theguardian.com/cities/2016/apr/26/story-cities-amsterdam-bike-share-scheme. 63Provo launched an experiment: Van der Zee, “Story of Cities.” 64the number of dockless bikes in Shanghai: Felix Salmon, “Bring on the Bikocalypse,” Wired, February 1, 2018, https://www.wired.com/story/chinese-dockless-bikes-revolution/. 66this miniature AV is expected to offset its high initial cost: Yingzhi Zhang and Brenda Goh, “China’s Ninebot Unveils Scooters That Drive Themselves to Charging Stations,” Reuters, August 16, 2019, https://ca.reuters.com/article/technologyNews/idCAKCN1V60LJ-OCATC. 67the elderly and nonambulatory will be huge markets: “Autonomous Wheelchairs,” Hitachi, accessed May 19, 2018, http://www.hitachi.com/rd/portal/highlight/vision_design/future/autonomous_mobility/chair/index.html. 67Americans in wheelchairs grew by half between 2010 and 2014: Henry Claypool, “An Aging Population Could Increase Demand for Autonomous Vehicles,” Axios, July 12, 2019, https://www.axios.com/an-aging-population-could-increase-demand-for-autonomous-vehicles-b6a9b58e-b073-4151-98bf-5365a5e5ada0.html. 67Segway’s S-Pod: Sean O’Kane, “Segway’s S-Pod looks weird, but it’s a lot of fun to drive,” The Verge, January 8, 2020, https://www.theverge.com/2020/1/8/21056268/segway-s-pod-first-drive-hands-on-ces-2020. 67a self-balancing electric motorcycle: Scott C.

(Honolulu: University of Hawaii Press, 1991), 3–25. 206“bringing remote storage locations”: “Automated Trucking: A CBRE Research Perspective,” CBRE, November 17, 2017, http://www.cbre.us/real-estate-services/real-estate-industries/industrial-and-logistics/industrial-and-logistics-research/automated-trucking. 206“service firms should locate”: CBRE, “Automated Trucking.” 206“In order to feed, maintain, and entertain”: Rem Koolhaas, “The World in 2018,” The Economist, November 28, 2017, 153. 208“Rather than building AI”: Russell Brandom, “Self-Driving Cars Are Headed Toward an AI Roadblock,” The Verge, July 3, 2018, https://www.theverge.com/2018/7/3/17530232/self-driving-ai-winter-full-autonomy-waymo-tesla-uber. 209The term jaywalking: “Why Jaywalking Is Called Jaywalking,” Merriam-Webster, accessed May 23, 2019, https://www.merriam-webster.com/words-at-play/why-is-it-called-jaywalking. 209weaponized by automobile interests: Peter Norton, Fighting Traffic: The Dawn of the Motor Age in the American City (Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, 2011), 210. 209another separate guideway: Kiger, “Designing for the Driverless Age.” 209“argued for dense multilevel traffic”: “New York Modern,” The Skyscraper Museum, October 24, 2007, https://www.skyscraper.org/EXHIBITIONS/FUTURE_CITY/new_york_modern.htm. 210“the first place in the world”: Sidewalk Labs, RFP Submission for Waterfront Toronto (New York: Sidewalk Labs, 2017), 144. 210“Carriage squares”: Renate van der Zee, “Story of Cities #30: How This Amsterdam Inventor Gave Bike-Sharing to the World,” The Guardian, April 26, 2016, https://www.theguardian.com/cities/2016/apr/26/story-cities-amsterdam-bike-share-scheme. 210“a small zone that will serve”: Sidewalk Labs, RFP Submission for Waterfront Toronto, 144. 211the “beeping monster”: Shirley Zhao, “Tech Worries Throw Future of Hong Kong’s First Driverless Electric Bus Route into Doubt,” South China Morning Post, March 31, 2019, https://www.scmp.com/news/hong-kong/transport/article/3003944/driverless-electric-bus-fails-create-buzz-hong-kong. 211“Purchases are deposited at freight delivery centres”: Sustainable Urban Mobility Research Laboratory, “Shared World,” Singapore University of Technology and Design, accessed January 6, 2019, https://mobility. sutd.edu.sg/shared_world/. 211the unbuilt Minnesota Experimental City: David Grossman, “The Time Minnesota Almost Built a Doomed, Future City,” Popular Mechanics, March 31, 2018, https://www.popularmechanics.com/technology/infrastructure/a19642881/spilhaus-experimental-city-documentary/. 9.


pages: 428 words: 134,832

Straphanger by Taras Grescoe

active transport: walking or cycling, Affordable Care Act / Obamacare, airport security, Albert Einstein, big-box store, bike sharing scheme, Boris Johnson, British Empire, call centre, car-free, carbon footprint, City Beautiful movement, congestion charging, correlation does not imply causation, David Brooks, deindustrialization, East Village, edge city, Enrique Peñalosa, extreme commuting, financial deregulation, Frank Gehry, glass ceiling, Golden Gate Park, housing crisis, hydraulic fracturing, indoor plumbing, intermodal, invisible hand, Jane Jacobs, jitney, Joan Didion, Kickstarter, Kitchen Debate, laissez-faire capitalism, Marshall McLuhan, mass immigration, McMansion, megacity, mortgage tax deduction, Network effects, New Urbanism, obamacare, oil shale / tar sands, oil shock, Own Your Own Home, peak oil, pension reform, Peter Calthorpe, Ponzi scheme, Ronald Reagan, Rosa Parks, sensible shoes, Silicon Valley, Skype, the built environment, The Death and Life of Great American Cities, the High Line, transit-oriented development, union organizing, urban planning, urban renewal, urban sprawl, walkable city, white flight, working poor, young professional, Zipcar

Most households do have access to a car—Copenhageners just choose not to use them in their city. If we want to “Copenhagenize” our cities—to borrow the buzzword favored by Jan Gehl and Mikael Colville-Andersen—or build car-free communities like Vauban, a good way to start the process would be to introduce bike-share schemes and gradually limit downtown parking, while slowly pedestrianizing certain streets. The lesson of Freiburg, Strasbourg, and Copenhagen, however, is that no single initiative is enough to bring real change: it takes intelligent transport policy, linking streetcars, buses, and metros with bike lanes and intercity rail, to create a truly integrated transport network.

The lesson of Freiburg, Strasbourg, and Copenhagen, however, is that no single initiative is enough to bring real change: it takes intelligent transport policy, linking streetcars, buses, and metros with bike lanes and intercity rail, to create a truly integrated transport network. The biggest impediment to changing cities in the United States is not the physical realities of New World urban structure, but in our habits of thought. The communitarian traditions that made such co-housing projects as Freiburg’s Vauban and Copenhagen’s Potato Rows, bike-share schemes like City Bikes, and urban communes like Christiania natural developments in Northern Europe tend to be rare on the ground in North America—a continent founded, after all, by individualists who were often fleeing the demands of community in crowded, class-stratified, premodern cities. But times have changed, on both sides of the Atlantic, and there’s a lot we can learn from the way Europeans are making their cities more liveable.


Israel & the Palestinian Territories Travel Guide by Lonely Planet

active transport: walking or cycling, airport security, Albert Einstein, back-to-the-land, bike sharing scheme, carbon footprint, centre right, clean water, coronavirus, G4S, game design, illegal immigration, Khartoum Gordon, Louis Pasteur, sensible shoes, Silicon Valley, Skype, South China Sea, special economic zone, spice trade, trade route, urban planning, Yom Kippur War, zero-sum game

The city now has about 120km of dedicated bike paths running along many of the major thoroughfares, through Park HaYarkon and along the coastline from just north of Sde Dov airport southward, via Jaffa, to the suburb of Bat Yam. A free map of the bike-path network can be picked up at tourist information offices. In 2011, the municipality introduced Tel-O-Fun (%6070; www.tel-o-fun.co.il), a citywide bike-rental scheme similar to Paris’ Vélib’. Intended for commuters, it lets riders pick up and drop off the green bicycles at over 75 docking stations. A daily access card costs 17NIS (23NIS between 2pm Friday and 7pm Saturday) and a weekly card costs 70NIS. The first 30 minutes of usage are free; after that – to encourage quick turnover – there are fees that get progressive higher, starting at NIS5 per 30 minutes and quickly rising to 20NIS, 40NIS, 80NIS and then 100NIS an hour.


Rome by Lonely Planet

bike sharing scheme, call centre, car-free, carbon footprint, double helix, G4S, Index librorum prohibitorum, Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, low cost airline, Murano, Venice glass, Pier Paolo Pasolini, Skype, urban planning

➡ On Saturdays, Sundays and weekdays after 8pm, you can take your bike on the metro and the Lido di Ostia train. You have to use the front carriage and buy a separate ticket for the bike. ➡ On Sundays and holidays you can carry bikes on bus 791. ➡ On regional trains marked with a bike icon on the timetable, you can carry a bike on payment of a €3.50 supplement. ➡ Rome has a bike-sharing scheme. You can sign up at the ATAC ticket offices at Termini, Spagna and Lepanto metro stations. There’s a €5 signing on fee and a €5 minimum charge. On signing up you’re provided with a rechargeable smartcard that allows you to pick up a bike from one of the 27 stations across the city, and use it for up to 24 hours within a single day.

Archaeologia Card €23/12 7 days Entrance to the Colosseum, Palatino, Terme di Caracalla, Museo Nazionale Romano (Palazzo Altemps, Palazzo Massimo alle Terme, Terme di Diocleziano, Crypta Balbi), Mausoleo di Cecilia Metella and Villa dei Quintili. Roma Pass (www.romapass.it) €27 3 days Includes free admission to two museums or sites (you choose from a list of 38) as well as reduced entry to extra sites, unlimited public transport within Rome, access to the bike-sharing scheme, and reduced-price entry to other exhibitions and events. Roma & Più pass includes some of the surrounding province. Note that EU citizens aged between 18 and 25 generally qualify for a discount at most galleries and museums, while those under 18 and over 65 often get in free. In both cases you’ll need proof of your age, ideally a passport or ID card.


pages: 231 words: 69,673

How Cycling Can Save the World by Peter Walker

active transport: walking or cycling, bike sharing scheme, Boris Johnson, car-free, correlation does not imply causation, Enrique Peñalosa, Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), Kickstarter, meta-analysis, New Journalism, New Urbanism, post-work, publication bias, the built environment, traffic fines, transit-oriented development, urban planning

This is, of course, particularly the case for shorter distance travel, including trips that link up people to other forms of transport. Dr. John Zacharias, a Beijing-based academic and urban planner who has lived in China for decades, believes cycling could make a return in the country in part through bike-share schemes, allowing people to connect to urban rail stations. “I have this feeling it’s going to take off—bike sharing with metro systems,” he says. “Just now the walking distances don’t allow the metro systems to penetrate very far into residential districts. A bicycle-sharing system extends that by about three times.”11 Anand Babu, meanwhile, is imagining bikes having a key role to connect with a more high-tech transport system—high-speed driverless cars.


pages: 133 words: 36,528

Peak Car: The Future of Travel by David Metz

autonomous vehicles, bike sharing scheme, Clayton Christensen, congestion charging, crowdsourcing, David Attenborough, decarbonisation, disruptive innovation, edge city, Edward Glaeser, Just-in-time delivery, low cost airline, Network effects, Richard Florida, Robert Gordon, Silicon Valley, Skype, The future is already here, urban sprawl, yield management, young professional

Paying parking charges by mobile phone is common in developed cities and could be used in developing cities, given that nearly everyone who has a car also has a phone. Bicycles are the dominant mode of urban travel when incomes are low, but are subsequently replaced first by motorised two‑wheelers and then by cars. But cycling can be revived, by putting in place cycle lanes and low cost bike hire. Public cycle rental schemes are operating in more than 500 cities in 50 countries. The largest cycle hire scheme in the world is in the city of Hangzhou in south China. Cars will always be popular, but car sharing in its various forms is worth encouraging in preference to individual ownership, given that private cars are parked for 95 per cent of the time and that people who share cars drive substantially less those who own cars.


pages: 309 words: 84,038

Bike Boom: The Unexpected Resurgence of Cycling by Carlton Reid

1960s counterculture, autonomous vehicles, Beeching cuts, bike sharing scheme, California gold rush, car-free, cognitive dissonance, Haight Ashbury, Jane Jacobs, Kickstarter, peak oil, Ponzi scheme, Silicon Valley, Skype, Steve Jobs, Steven Pinker, the built environment, The Death and Life of Great American Cities, urban planning, urban renewal, Whole Earth Catalog, Yom Kippur War

Provo became most famous for their “White Bicycle Plan,” a proposal to close central Amsterdam to motorized traffic and create a free bicycle-sharing scheme, using bicycles that had been (poorly) painted white. “The asphalt terror of the motorized bourgeoisie has lasted long enough,” mused a Provo poster promoting the coming of the White Bicycles (the idea of which would later go on to inspire city bike-share schemes around the world). Every day, human sacrifice is made to the newest authority that the bourgeoisie are at the mercy of: the Auto-Authority. The smothering carbon monoxide is their incense…. Provo’s Bicycles Plan presents liberation from the car-monster…. The White Bicycle can be used by whomever needs it.


pages: 441 words: 96,534

Streetfight: Handbook for an Urban Revolution by Janette Sadik-Khan

autonomous vehicles, bike sharing scheme, Boris Johnson, business cycle, call centre, car-free, carbon footprint, clean water, congestion charging, crowdsourcing, digital map, edge city, Edward Glaeser, en.wikipedia.org, Enrique Peñalosa, Hyperloop, Induced demand, Jane Jacobs, Loma Prieta earthquake, Lyft, New Urbanism, place-making, self-driving car, sharing economy, the built environment, The Death and Life of Great American Cities, the High Line, transportation-network company, Uber and Lyft, uber lyft, urban decay, urban planning, urban renewal, urban sprawl, walkable city, white flight, Works Progress Administration, Zipcar

Also see Sonja Heikkilä Tekes, “Mobility as a Service,” The Finnish Funding Agency for Innovation, May 29, 2015, accessed August 13, 2015, www.eltis.org/sites/eltis/files/case-studies/documents/mobility_as_a_service_heikkila.pdf. Reetta Putkonen, the director: Reetta Putkonen in conversation with the author, May 31, 2015. Beijing was the bike: Patti Waldmeir, “Wheels Come Off China’s Bike-Share Schemes,” Financial Times, September 4, 2014, www.ft.com/intl/cms/s/0/815c5378-33e211e4-85f1-00144feabdc0.html#axzz3jwgfjjaA. “You could argue . . . pros and cons would be”: Jennifer Fermino, Rocco Parascandola, and Corky Siemaszko, “De Blasio Suggests Eliminating Times Square Pedestrian Plazas to Kick Out Topless Women, Costumed Characters,” Daily News, August 21, 2105, www.nydailynews.com/new-york/de-blasio-suggests-eliminating-times-square-pedestrian-plaza-article-1.2332127.


Data and the City by Rob Kitchin,Tracey P. Lauriault,Gavin McArdle

A Declaration of the Independence of Cyberspace, bike sharing scheme, bitcoin, blockchain, Bretton Woods, Chelsea Manning, citizen journalism, Claude Shannon: information theory, clean water, cloud computing, complexity theory, conceptual framework, corporate governance, correlation does not imply causation, create, read, update, delete, crowdsourcing, cryptocurrency, dematerialisation, digital map, distributed ledger, fault tolerance, fiat currency, Filter Bubble, floating exchange rates, functional programming, global value chain, Google Earth, hive mind, Internet of things, Kickstarter, knowledge economy, lifelogging, linked data, loose coupling, new economy, New Urbanism, Nicholas Carr, open economy, openstreetmap, packet switching, pattern recognition, performance metric, place-making, RAND corporation, RFID, Richard Florida, ride hailing / ride sharing, semantic web, sentiment analysis, sharing economy, Silicon Valley, Skype, smart cities, Smart Cities: Big Data, Civic Hackers, and the Quest for a New Utopia, smart contracts, smart grid, smart meter, social graph, software studies, statistical model, TaskRabbit, text mining, The Chicago School, The Death and Life of Great American Cities, the market place, the medium is the message, the scientific method, Toyota Production System, urban planning, urban sprawl, web application

Similarly, access to data within public–private partnerships and semistate agencies, or state agencies operating as trading funds (such as the Met Office and Ordnance Survey in the UK who generate significant operating costs by selling data and services), can be restricted or costly to purchase. Consequently, key framework datasets (e.g. detailed maps) can have limited access and data concerning transportation (e.g. bus, rail, bike share schemes, private tolls), energy and water be entirely black-boxed. Even within the public sector, data can be siloed within particular departments and not be shared with other units within the organization, or be open for other institutions or the public to use. As such, whilst there might be a data revolution underway, access to much of that data is limited, and there are a number of issues that need to be explored with respect to data ownership and data control, especially with respect to procurement and the outsourcing or privatization of city services.


pages: 300 words: 99,410

Why the Dutch Are Different: A Journey Into the Hidden Heart of the Netherlands: From Amsterdam to Zwarte Piet, the Acclaimed Guide to Travel in Holland by Ben Coates

Berlin Wall, Bernie Madoff, bike sharing scheme, British Empire, centre right, clean water, colonial rule, failed state, financial innovation, glass ceiling, invention of the printing press, joint-stock company, Kickstarter, megacity, Nelson Mandela, offshore financial centre, short selling, spice trade, starchitect, trade route, urban sprawl

While holding their bed-in, John and Yoko were given a white bicycle as a wedding present. The police continued to confiscate white bicycles whenever they found them and the movement eventually fizzled out, but its symbolism endured. Some thirty years later, activists in Oregon who heard about the White Bicycles were inspired to start their own bike-sharing scheme in Portland. Their scheme in turn provided the inspiration for public bike-sharing programmes in major cities around the world. Years later, the Dutch White Bicycles’ descendants could be borrowed from docking stations in London, Paris, Brussels and New York. Money for Nothing As a recent immigrant, to me one of the most striking consequences of the Dutch liberal approach was the generosity of the welfare and employment systems.


The Rough Guide to Ireland by Clements, Paul

Berlin Wall, bike sharing scheme, British Empire, Celtic Tiger, Columbine, digital map, East Village, haute couture, Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), Kickstarter, Murano, Venice glass, Plutocrats, plutocrats, Ronald Reagan, sustainable-tourism, the market place, trade route, urban planning, urban renewal, urban sprawl

Parking As for car parks, a good southside option is the Royal College of Surgeons multi-storey off the west side of St Stephen’s Green (open 24hr, €4/hr or €10 overnight). On-street spaces are hard to find, but Merrion Square and Fitzwilliam Square are usually good bets. BY BIKE Following the likes of Paris and Vienna, Dublin introduced its own city-wide bike rental scheme, Dublinbikes ( www.dublinbikes.ie), in 2009. A three-day ticket costs €5 (credit/debit card required) and can be purchased from fourteen of the city’s fifty bike stations, of which the most central are at St Stephen’s Green East and West, Merrion Square West, Dame St, High St, the Custom House, Jervis St and Parnell Square North.


Lonely Planet Best of Spain by Lonely Planet

augmented reality, bike sharing scheme, centre right, discovery of the americas, Frank Gehry, G4S, Guggenheim Bilbao, haute cuisine, illegal immigration, market design, place-making, trade route, young professional

Slower trains head to Cádiz (€16, 1¾ hours, 15 daily), Huelva (€12, 1½ hours, three daily), Granada (€30, three hours, four daily) and Málaga (€44, two hours, 11 daily). 8 GETTING AROUND Seville offers a multitude of ways to get around, though walking still has to be the best option, especially in the centre. The Sevici (%902 011032; www.sevici.es) bike-sharing scheme has made cycling easy and bike lanes are now almost as ubiquitous as pavements. The tram has recently been extended to the station of San Bernardo but its routes are still limited. Buses are more useful than the metro to link the main tourist sights. The recent ‘greening’ of the city has made driving increasingly difficult as whole roads in the city centre are now permanently closed to traffic; park on the periphery.


Italy by Damien Simonis

active transport: walking or cycling, airport security, bike sharing scheme, Bonfire of the Vanities, call centre, car-free, carbon footprint, centre right, clean water, congestion charging, discovery of the americas, Frank Gehry, haute couture, illegal immigration, Kickstarter, large denomination, low cost airline, low cost carrier, Murano, Venice glass, pension reform, period drama, Peter Eisenman, Pier Paolo Pasolini, Skype, spice trade, starchitect, sustainable-tourism, trade route, urban planning, urban sprawl, women in the workforce

While sulphur dioxide levels have been reduced in recent years, primarily by substituting natural gas for coal, much of the smog and poor air quality can be attributed to the fact that Italy has one of the highest per-capita levels of car ownership in the world. In an attempt to tackle this car-dependency, municipal authorities have introduced a series of initiatives. In January 2008, Milan introduced Italy’s first congestion charge, while several cities including Milan and Rome have initiated bike-sharing schemes. On a national level, in 2009 the Italian government committed itself to building four nuclear power plants in an attempt to reduce dependence on oil and gas and reduce greenhouse gas emissions. * * * The official parks website (www.parks.it) offers comprehensive information on Italy’s national and regional parks, marine reserves and designated wetlands, as well as details of local wildlife and educational initiatives

Archaeologia Card (€23.5, valid seven days) For entrance to the Colosseum, Palatine, Terme di Caracalla, Palazzo Altemps, Palazzo Massimo alle Terme, Terme di Diocleziano, Crypta Balbi, Mausoleo di Cecilia Metella and Villa Quintili. Roma Pass (www.romapass.it, €23, valid three days) Includes free admission to two museums or sites (choose from a list of 38) as well as reduced entry to extra sites, unlimited public transport within Rome, access to the bike-sharing scheme and reduced price entry to other exhibitions and events. If you use this for more-expensive sights such as the Capitoline Museums and the Colosseum you’ll save a considerable amount of money. You can buy the cards at any of the monuments or museums listed (or online at www.pierreci.it) and the Roma Pass is also available at Comune di Roma tourist information points.

If you’d prefer to cycle, be careful – Romans are not used to seeing bicycles on the roads. It’s worth bearing in mind that traffic is lighter on a Sunday, when much of central Rome is closed to motorised vehicles. For a traffic-free pedal try the pleasant cycle path along the Tiber. The new ATAC bike-sharing scheme ( 06 57003; www.atacbikesharing.com, in Italian) offers 150 bicycles for use at 19 stands across Rome. You can see their locations online, and even check how many bikes are currently available at each stop. To use the bikes you need to register at ATAC ticket offices ( 7am-8pm Mon-Sat, 8am-8pm Sun) at metro stations Lepanto, Spagna or Termini (€5).


pages: 501 words: 145,943

If Mayors Ruled the World: Dysfunctional Nations, Rising Cities by Benjamin R. Barber

Affordable Care Act / Obamacare, American Legislative Exchange Council, Berlin Wall, bike sharing scheme, borderless world, Boris Johnson, Bretton Woods, British Empire, car-free, carbon footprint, Cass Sunstein, Celebration, Florida, clean water, corporate governance, crowdsourcing, David Brooks, desegregation, Detroit bankruptcy, digital Maoism, disinformation, disintermediation, edge city, Edward Glaeser, Edward Snowden, Etonian, failed state, Fall of the Berlin Wall, feminist movement, Filter Bubble, George Gilder, ghettoisation, global pandemic, global village, Hernando de Soto, Howard Zinn, illegal immigration, In Cold Blood by Truman Capote, income inequality, informal economy, information retrieval, Jane Jacobs, Jaron Lanier, Jeff Bezos, London Interbank Offered Rate, Mark Zuckerberg, market fundamentalism, Marshall McLuhan, Masdar, megacity, microcredit, Mikhail Gorbachev, mortgage debt, mutually assured destruction, new economy, New Urbanism, Nicholas Carr, Norman Mailer, nuclear winter, obamacare, Occupy movement, Panopticon Jeremy Bentham, Peace of Westphalia, Pearl River Delta, peer-to-peer, planetary scale, Plutocrats, plutocrats, profit motive, Ralph Waldo Emerson, RFID, Richard Florida, Ronald Reagan, self-driving car, Silicon Valley, Skype, smart cities, smart meter, Steve Jobs, Stewart Brand, Telecommunications Act of 1996, The Death and Life of Great American Cities, The Fortune at the Bottom of the Pyramid, The future is already here, The Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith, Tobin tax, Tony Hsieh, trade route, UNCLOS, UNCLOS, unpaid internship, urban sprawl, War on Poverty, zero-sum game

In the early 1920s, the canton of Graubuenden in Switzerland imposed a brief cantonwide ban on the new-fangled automobile, less to protect large cities (of which it had none) than to protect its narrow-gauge Raetian railways system.23 Recently it has been citizens and civic NGOs that have taken the lead in the urban battle against the automobile, promoting pedestrian-only zones, encouraging bike-share schemes and bicycle lanes, organizing recycling campaigns, and campaigning for conversion to cleaner energy in public and private buildings. Cities also work together across borders one on one. When France sends troops to Mali, the whole world knows, but few will be aware that 4,806 French municipalities have been engaged in overseas cooperation in 147 countries over the past several decades; or that more than 500 German municipalities are cooperating with cities in Africa, Latin America, and Asia.24 Some of this city-to-city cooperation is facilitated by national networks such as VNG International; the International Cooperation Agency of the Association of Netherlands Municipalities; SKL International, a company owned by the Swedish association of local authorities and regions (SALAR); and the federation of Canadian municipalities.


pages: 344 words: 161,076

The Rough Guide to Barcelona 8 by Jules Brown, Rough Guides

active transport: walking or cycling, bike sharing scheme, centre right, Frank Gehry, glass ceiling, Guggenheim Bilbao, haute couture, Kickstarter, sustainable-tourism, trade route, urban planning, urban renewal

Esport Ciclista Barcelona Wwww.ecbarcelona .com. Founded in 1929, the cycle sports club organizes the Escalada a Montjuïc – details available on their website. SPORTS AND OUTDOOR ACTIVITIES Cycling is being heavily promoted by the city authorities as a means of transport. There’s a successful bike-sharing scheme (known as Bicing), while around 160km of cycle paths traverse the city, with plans to double the network in the future. All locals have yet to embrace the bike, and some cycle paths are still ignored by cars or are clogged with pedestrians, indignantly reluctant to give way to two-wheelers.


Germany Travel Guide by Lonely Planet

Airbnb, Albert Einstein, bank run, Berlin Wall, bike sharing scheme, British Empire, call centre, car-free, carbon footprint, centre right, double helix, eurozone crisis, Fall of the Berlin Wall, Frank Gehry, glass ceiling, haute couture, haute cuisine, Honoré de Balzac, Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, Johannes Kepler, Kickstarter, low cost airline, low cost carrier, Mikhail Gorbachev, New Urbanism, oil shale / tar sands, Peace of Westphalia, Peter Eisenman, post-work, ride hailing / ride sharing, Ronald Reagan, Ronald Reagan: Tear down this wall, sensible shoes, Skype, starchitect, trade route, upwardly mobile, urban planning, urban renewal, V2 rocket, white picket fence

A minimum deposit of €30 (more for fancier bikes) and/or ID are required. Some outfits also offer repair service or bicycle-storage facilities. Hotels, especially in resort areas, sometimes keep a stable of bicycles for their guests, often at no charge. Call a Bike (07000 522 5522; www.callabike.de) is an automated bike-rental scheme offered by Deutsche Bahn (www.bahn.com). It requires that you preregister with a credit card, either online for free or by phone for €5. Once you’ve located a bicycle, call the number listed on the lock and follow the instructions. The cost is €0.08 per minute or €15 per day. In Stuttgart and Hamburg, use is free for the first 30 minutes.


Lonely Planet France by Lonely Planet Publications

banking crisis, bike sharing scheme, British Empire, car-free, carbon footprint, centre right, Charles Lindbergh, Columbine, double helix, Frank Gehry, G4S, glass ceiling, haute couture, haute cuisine, Henri Poincaré, Herbert Marcuse, Honoré de Balzac, illegal immigration, Jacquard loom, Joseph-Marie Jacquard, Kickstarter, Louis Blériot, Louis Pasteur, low cost airline, low cost carrier, Mahatma Gandhi, mass immigration, Murano, Venice glass, ride hailing / ride sharing, sensible shoes, Silicon Valley, supervolcano, trade route, urban renewal, urban sprawl, V2 rocket

AÉROPORT PARIS-BEAUVAIS Navette Officielle (Official Shuttle Bus; 08 92 68 20 64, airport 08 92 68 20 66; adult €15) The Beauvais shuttle links the airport with the metro station Porte de Maillot in western Paris. See the airport website for details. Bicycle The Vélib’ Offline map Google map ( www.velib.paris.fr) bike-share scheme has revolutionised how Parisians get around. There are some 1800 stations throughout the city, each with anywhere from 20 to 70 bike stands. The bikes are accessible around the clock. To get a bike, you first need to purchase a daily/weekly subscription (€1.70/8). There are two ways to do this: either at the terminals (which require a credit card with an embedded smartchip) at docking stations or online.

Freescoot Offline map Google map ( 01 44 07 06 72; www.scooter-rental-paris.com; 63 quai de la Tournelle; bike/tandem half-day €10/22, day €15/32; 9am-1pm & 2-7pm Mon-Sat year-round, plus Sun mid-Apr–mid-Sep; Maubert-Mutualité) also rents scooters; no license is required for smaller scooters. AUTOLIB’ In December 2011 Paris launched the world’s first electric-car-share programme, Autolib’ (www.autolib.eu) . The premise is quite similar to Vélib’ (the bike-share scheme): you pay a subscription (day/week €10/15) and then rent a GPS-equipped car in 30-minute intervals and drop it off at one of the 1000 available stations when you’re done. Unfortunately, it’s really only good for short hops, because renting a car overnight would be exorbitant – the rates are €7 for the 1st half hour, €6 for the 2nd half-hour and €8 for subsequent intervals.


The Rough Guide to Brussels 4 (Rough Guide Travel Guides) by Dunford, Martin.; Lee, Phil; Summer, Suzy.; Dal Molin, Loik

Berlin Wall, bike sharing scheme, British Empire, car-free, Fall of the Berlin Wall, glass ceiling, low cost airline, Peace of Westphalia, sustainable-tourism, trade route, urban planning


Eastern USA by Lonely Planet

1960s counterculture, active transport: walking or cycling, Affordable Care Act / Obamacare, Albert Einstein, Bear Stearns, Bear Stearns, Berlin Wall, bike sharing scheme, Bretton Woods, British Empire, car-free, carbon footprint, centre right, Charles Lindbergh, collective bargaining, cuban missile crisis, desegregation, Donald Trump, East Village, Fall of the Berlin Wall, Frank Gehry, glass ceiling, Guggenheim Bilbao, haute cuisine, Hernando de Soto, illegal immigration, immigration reform, information trail, interchangeable parts, jitney, Kickstarter, license plate recognition, Mason jar, mass immigration, McMansion, megacity, Menlo Park, new economy, New Urbanism, obamacare, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Ronald Reagan, Rosa Parks, Saturday Night Live, Silicon Valley, Skype, the built environment, the High Line, the payments system, transcontinental railway, union organizing, Upton Sinclair, upwardly mobile, urban decay, urban planning, urban renewal, urban sprawl, walkable city, white flight, Works Progress Administration, young professional

Thompson Boat Center BOAT RENTAL ( 202-333-9543; www.thompsonboatcenter.com; cnr Virginia Ave & Rock Creek Pkwy NW; 8am-5pm) At the Potomac River end of Rock Creek Park, it rents canoes (per hour $12), kayaks (per hour single/double $10/17) and bikes (per hour/day $7/28). Big Wheel Bikes BICYCLE RENTAL ( 202-337-0254; www.bigwheelbikes.com; 1034 33rd St NW; per hr/day $7/35; 11am-7pm Tue-Fri, 10am-6pm Sat & Sun) A good bike-rental outfitter. Capitol Bikeshare BICYCLE RENTAL ( 877-430-2453; www.capitolbikeshare.com) Modeled on bike-sharing schemes in Europe, Capitol Bikeshare has a network of 1000-plus bicycles scattered at 100-odd stations around DC. To check out a bike, select the membership (24 hours is $5, five days is $15), insert credit card, and off you go. The first 30 minutes are free; after that, rates rise exponentially ($1.50/3/6 per extra 30/60/90 minutes).


pages: 3,292 words: 537,795

Lonely Planet China (Travel Guide) by Lonely Planet, Shawn Low

Albert Einstein, anti-communist, bike sharing scheme, carbon footprint, clean water, colonial rule, credit crunch, Deng Xiaoping, G4S, haute couture, haute cuisine, income inequality, indoor plumbing, Kickstarter, land reform, mass immigration, Pearl River Delta, place-making, Rubik’s Cube, Shenzhen special economic zone , Skype, South China Sea, special economic zone, sustainable-tourism, trade route, upwardly mobile, urban planning, urban renewal, urban sprawl, women in the workforce, Xiaogang Anhui farmers, young professional

At the time of writing it was expected that sometime after 2015 the subway will extend here via the Summer Palace and Botanic Gardens. 2Activities Cycling Beijing is flat as a pancake and almost every road has a dedicated cycle lane, meaning cycling is easily the best way to see the city; it’s especially fun to explore hutong areas by bike. Most hostels rent bikes. There are also bike rental depots around the Houhai Lakes. Look out too for the city's bike-sharing scheme. Details of how to use it can be found on the very useful, independently created website www.beijingbikeshare.com. Essentially, you need to take your passport, a ¥400 deposit and an ordinary Beijing travel card (with at least ¥30 credit on it) to one of five bike-share kiosks (open 9.30 to 11.30am and 1.30pm to 4pm, Monday to Friday) in order to register.


The Rough Guide to England by Rough Guides

active transport: walking or cycling, Airbnb, Albert Einstein, bike sharing scheme, Bob Geldof, Boris Johnson, British Empire, car-free, Columbine, congestion charging, Corn Laws, deindustrialization, Downton Abbey, Edmond Halley, Etonian, food miles, haute cuisine, housing crisis, Isaac Newton, James Watt: steam engine, John Harrison: Longitude, Kickstarter, low cost airline, Neil Kinnock, offshore financial centre, period drama, Plutocrats, plutocrats, the market place, trade route, transatlantic slave trade, University of East Anglia, upwardly mobile, urban sprawl

Minicabs and apps Private minicabs are much cheaper than black cabs, but cannot be hailed from the street. They must be licensed and able to produce a TfL ID on demand. Apps like Hailo and Uber can come in handy, too, though at the time of going to print TfL had decided not to renew Uber's licence to operate in London; check for updates before you travel. BY bike Boris bikes The city’s cycle rental scheme – or Boris bikes, as they’re universally known, after former Mayor of London Boris Johnson – has over 700 docking stations across central London. With a credit or debit card, you can buy 24hr access for just £2. You then get the first 30min on a bike free, so if you hop from docking station to docking station you don’t pay another penny.



USA Travel Guide by Lonely, Planet

1960s counterculture, active transport: walking or cycling, Affordable Care Act / Obamacare, Albert Einstein, Asilomar, Bay Area Rapid Transit, Bear Stearns, Bear Stearns, Berlin Wall, Big bang: deregulation of the City of London, big-box store, bike sharing scheme, Biosphere 2, Bretton Woods, British Empire, Burning Man, California gold rush, call centre, car-free, carbon footprint, centre right, Charles Lindbergh, Chuck Templeton: OpenTable:, cuban missile crisis, desegregation, Donald Trump, Donner party, East Village, edge city, El Camino Real, Fall of the Berlin Wall, feminist movement, Frank Gehry, glass ceiling, global village, Golden Gate Park, Guggenheim Bilbao, Haight Ashbury, haute couture, haute cuisine, Hernando de Soto, Howard Zinn, illegal immigration, immigration reform, information trail, interchangeable parts, intermodal, jitney, Kickstarter, license plate recognition, Mars Rover, Mason jar, mass immigration, Maui Hawaii, McMansion, Menlo Park, Monroe Doctrine, new economy, New Urbanism, obamacare, off grid, Ralph Nader, Ralph Waldo Emerson, RFID, ride hailing / ride sharing, Ronald Reagan, Rosa Parks, Saturday Night Live, Silicon Valley, South of Market, San Francisco, starchitect, stealth mode startup, stem cell, supervolcano, the built environment, The Chicago School, the High Line, the payments system, trade route, transcontinental railway, union organizing, Upton Sinclair, upwardly mobile, urban decay, urban planning, urban renewal, urban sprawl, walkable city, white flight, working poor, Works Progress Administration, young professional, Zipcar

Thompson Boat Center BOAT RENTAL Offline map Google map ( 202-333-9543; www.thompsonboatcenter.com; cnr Virginia Ave & Rock Creek Pkwy NW; 8am-5pm) At the Potomac River end of Rock Creek Park, it rents canoes (per hour $12), kayaks (per hour single/double $10/17) and bikes (per hour/day $7/28). Big Wheel Bikes BICYCLE RENTAL ( 202-337-0254; www.bigwheelbikes.com; 1034 33rd St NW; per hr/day $7/35; 11am-7pm Tue-Fri, 10am-6pm Sat & Sun) A good bike-rental outfitter. Capitol Bikeshare BICYCLE RENTAL ( 877-430-2453; www.capitolbikeshare.com) Modeled on bike-sharing schemes in Europe, Capitol Bikeshare has a network of 1000-plus bicycles scattered at 100-odd stations around DC. To check out a bike, select the membership (24 hours is $5, five days is $15), insert credit card, and off you go. The first 30 minutes are free; after that, rates rise exponentially ($1.50/3/6 per extra 30/60/90 minutes).