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searching for Epenthesis 57 found (203 total)

alternate case: epenthesis

Oromo phonology (525 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article

This article describes the phonology of the Oromo language. The Oromo language has 24 to 28 consonant phonemes depending on the dialect. /ᶑ/ is a voiced
Maithili phonology (819 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
type of phonetic change is recently taking place in Maithili by way of epenthesis i.e. backward transposition of final i and u in all sort of words. Thus:
Panará language (1,883 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
word-final instances of [i] are epenthetic in Panará. Word-initial [i] epenthesis aligns with the following table where [T] refers to a singleton stop,
Somali phonology (940 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
This article describes the phonology of the Somali language. Common Somali has 23 consonant phonemes. Its consonants cover every place of articulation
Maithili grammar (837 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
type of phonetic change is recently taking place in Maithili by way of epenthesis i.e. backward transposition of final i and u in all sort of words. Thus:
Maithili language (3,035 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
type of phonetic change is recently taking place in Maithili by way of epenthesis i.e. backward transposition of final i and u in all sort of words. Thus:
Kómnzo language (456 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
one epenthetic vowel (ə̯). Komnzo phonology exhibits widespread vowel epenthesis. The epenthetic vowel is usually a short schwa (ə̯), sometimes a short
Pijin language (1,973 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Pijin (Solomons Pidgin or Neo-Solomonic) is a language spoken in the Solomon Islands. It is closely related to Tok Pisin of Papua New Guinea and Bislama
Axininca language (499 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
University of Massachusetts Amherst. Itô, Junko. (1989). A prosodic theory of epenthesis. Natural Language & Linguistic Theory, 7, 217–259. Levin, Juliette. (1985)
Portuguese phonology (8,802 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
syllables, e.g., magma [ˈmaɡimɐ]. In European Portuguese, similarly, epenthesis may occur with [ɨ], as in magma [ˈmaɣɨmɐ] and afta [ˈafɨtɐ]. For more
Yawelmani Yokuts (552 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Yawelmani Yokuts (also spelled Yowlumne and Yauelmani) is an endangered dialect of Southern Valley Yokuts historically spoken by the Yokuts living along
Pausa (693 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
consonants become ejectives pre-pausa. In Tapieté, epenthesis of [x] occurs when /ɨ/ is in pausa, while epenthesis of [ʔ] occurs when any other vowel is in pausa
Codex Suprasliensis (489 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Epiphanius' Homily on the Entombment). Vocalizations of yers, rarely occurring epenthesis, change of ъ to ь behind hardened č, ž, š and some other linguistic traits
Grand Manan Parish, New Brunswick (955 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
inhabitants. Confusion is sometimes caused by other uses of the name: epenthesis of Grand Manan Island to Grand Manan; the village of Grand Manan; the
Picard language (2,729 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Steele) “A constraint-based analysis of intraspeaker variation: Vocalic epenthesis in Vimeu Picard”. In Teresa Satterfield, Christina Tortora, & Diana Cresti
Northern Indo-Aryan languages (752 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
north-western India, are the tendency to shorten long vowels, the practice of epenthesis, or the modification of a vowel by the one which follows in the next syllable
Suyá language (1,321 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
consonant; that way, all utterances end in vowels on surface in Kĩsêdjê. Vowel epenthesis often causes the underlying coda to lenite. The resulting alternations
Western Ojibwa language (2,426 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
preceding vowel is given a nasalized sound. As found on Valentine (1994): t-Epenthesis: a /t/ is inserted between the personal prefix and the vowel when a stem
Phonological history of English consonant clusters (5,008 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
speech may involve the elision of the /d/ from /ndz/ rather than epenthesis in /nz/. Epenthesis of a stop between a nasal and a fricative can also occur in
Ait Seghrouchen Berber (520 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Tamazight schwa epenthesis Environment Realization Example Pronunciation Gloss #C(ː)# əC(ː) /ɡ/ [əɡ] 'to be, to do' #LC# əLC or LəC /ns/ [əns] ~ [nəs]
Hirt's law (1,389 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
onto a syllabic sonorant, showing that Hirt's law applied before the epenthesis of the high vowels *i and *u before syllabic sonorants. Hirt's law followed
Glossary of sound laws in the Indo-European languages (1,283 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
mobile-accented paradigms into end-stressed paradigms. It also applied before the epenthesis before syllabic sonorants. Pedersen's law In words with a (Balto-Slavic)
Classical Nahuatl (1,389 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
clusters are only allowed word-medially, Nahuatl uses processes of both epenthesis (usually of /i/) and deletion to deal with this constraint. For such purposes
Codex Assemanius (475 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
by frequent vocalizations of yers (ъ > o, ь > e), occasional loss of epenthesis, and ь is frequently replaced with hard ъ, esp. after r. These are the
Hamer language (853 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
a large number of (mostly very simple) rules governing metathesis and epenthesis when consonant clusters appear. In summary, there are three sorts of consonant
Portmanteau (3,662 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Retrieved 3 October 2013. Rosen, Eric. "Japanese loanword accentuation: epenthesis and foot form interacting through edge-interior alignment∗" (PDF). University
Irish orthography (3,608 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
additionally no epenthesis after long vowels and diphthongs: téarma /tʲeːɾˠmˠə/ "term" dualgas /ˈd̪ˠuəl̪ˠɡəsˠ/ "duty" The rules of epenthesis do not apply
Finno-Samic languages (914 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
of northern and southern Finnic (cf. Finnish otta-). (A complementary epenthesis of *w before initial long rounded vowels is accepted to not represent
Kwakʼwala (4,649 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
consonants are devoiced word-finally but surface faithfully with following epenthesis when they are word-internal. Glottalized consonants remain glottalized
Kimbundu (524 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
palatalized to [ʃ], [ʒ] and [ɲ], respectively, before [i]. There may be an epenthesis of [g] after /ŋ/ in word medial positions, thus creating a phonetic cluster
Middle Indo-Aryan languages (1,455 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
(deletion if the output would violate phonotactics) or were split by vowel epenthesis. Initially, intervocalic aspirated stops spirantized. Later, all other
Pashto grammar (10,043 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Syncope I Back vowel lowering Monophthongization Lengthening Syncope II Epenthesis V2 → Ø/ V́1_ V́1 → Ø/ _V́2 If suffixation results in two adjacent vowels
Chukchi language (2,171 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
group. Initial and final consonant clusters are not tolerated, and schwa epenthesis is pervasive. Stress tends to: 1. be penultimate; 2. stay within the stem;
Guttural (1,626 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Department of Linguistics. "Vowels in Mongolian speech: deletions and epenthesis". Retrieved 2014-07-26.CS1 maint: multiple names: authors list (link)
Desano language (2,389 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
features in Desano, namely nasal assimilation, vowel coalescence, and epenthesis . Years after, Chacon (2007) carried out a phonological comparison project
Colloquial Finnish (3,697 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
/l/ or /h/ (in Savo, also /n/) as the first consonant are subject to epenthesis; other clusters or geminates are not. However, a strong epenthetic vowel
Salish-Spokane-Kalispel language (2,039 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
between two unlike sonorants. (Differences in glottalization do not cause epenthesis, and in long sequences not all pairs are separated, for example in /sqllú/
Kanoê language (1,119 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Maximally complex syllable is CGVG, where G is a glide /j w/, or, due to epenthesis in certain morphological situations or to elision, the final consonant
Aymara language (4,190 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
phonological/morphophonological processes observed include syllabic reduction, epenthesis, deletion, and reduplication. Beginning with Spanish missionary efforts
Biblical Hebrew (13,119 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
if אֵ‎ were being inserted. See Blau (2010:83) It is evident that this epenthesis must have been a late phenomenon, since a short vowel preceding a guttural
Middle Dutch (4,421 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Dutch already, but becomes more frequent in some Middle Dutch areas. Epenthesis of /d/ in various clusters of sonorants. E.g. donre > donder, solre >
Etruscan civilization (8,994 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
turskum is *Tursci, which would, through metathesis and a word-initial epenthesis, be likely to lead to the form, E-trus-ci. As for the original meaning
List of children's speech corpora (711 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
2003. Demuth, K., Culbertson, J. & Alter, J. 2006. Word-minimality, epenthesis, and coda licensing in the acquisition of English. Language & Speech,
Masbateño language (4,494 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
deletion; contraction of particles san and sin, assimilation, metathesis, epenthesis and degemination. Masbatenyo provides support for the claim that root
Thomas Menino (5,208 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
The examples here also include substitution; deletion; and addition, or epenthesis—which mean that, respectively, whole words are used in place of the intended
Grammaticalization (5,148 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
I'll do) and tendré (not *teneré, I'll have, the loss of e followed by epenthesis of d is especially common)] and even regular forms (the change the a in
Junko Itō (1,641 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Cruz (PASC) 1. Santa Cruz, 61-69. 1989 Ito, Junko. A Prosodic Theory of Epenthesis, Natural Language and Linguistics Theory 7, 217-260. 1989 Ito, Junko,
Spanish phonology (8,871 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Slim is pronounced /esˈlin/). While Spanish words undergo word-initial epenthesis, cognates in Latin and Italian do not: Lat. status /ˈsta.tus/ ('state')
Martha Young-Scholten (1,980 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
'Focus on form in phonology: orthographic exposure as a promoter of epenthesis.' In Robinson P & Jungheim NO (eds) Pragmatics and Pedagogy: Proceedings
Ancient Greek nouns (2,867 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
1453)-language text]]). Smyth. A Greek grammar for colleges. §§ 111: epenthesis of ι̯[[Category:Articles containing Ancient Greek (to 1453)-language text]]
Egyptian Arabic (7,941 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
grew" → (makbírʃ). The addition of /-ʃ/ may result in vowel shortening or epenthesis: A final long vowel preceding a single consonant shortens: (ixtáːr) "he
Phonological history of English consonants (3,370 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
certain stops in medial clusters, such as the /t/ in postman. Insertion (epenthesis) of stops after nasals in certain clusters, for example making prince
Navajo phonology (4,996 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
dissertation, University of Massachusetts Amherst). McDonough, Joyce. (1996). Epenthesis in Navajo. In E. Jelinek, S. Midgette, L. Saxon, & K. Rice (Eds.), Athabaskan
List of Greek and Latin roots in English/T (211 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
athematic, Bibliotheca, bodega, boutique, deem, doom, enthesis, enthetic, epenthesis, epenthetic, epitheca, epithet, hypothec, hypothesis, monothematic, nomothetic
Phonological history of English (7,898 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
tríh₂s >! petwṓr >! pémpe >! sepḿ̥d >! meh₂tḗr >! kérdō pṓdes Sonorant epenthesis sepúmd Final overlong vowels kérdô Laryngeal loss trī́s mātḗr kowsyónom
Proto-Tocharian language (5,191 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
loss of all absolutely final vowels, loss of ä in open syllables, and epenthesis of ä to break up difficult clusters (esp. word-finally) that resulted
List of Greek and Latin roots in English/P–Z (1,428 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
athematic, Bibliotheca, bodega, boutique, deem, doom, enthesis, enthetic, epenthesis, epenthetic, epitheca, epithet, hypothec, hypothesis, monothematic, nomothetic