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searching for Aorist 161 found (302 total)

alternate case: aorist

Proto-Indo-European verbs (7,772 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article

and imperfective are known as the perfect, aorist and present systems: Stative = Perfect Perfective = Aorist Imperfective = Present The present/imperfective
Proto-Italic language (4,363 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
to its aorist-derived perfects. The following stem formations for the aorist are known: The simple root aorist, formed by simply attaching aorist endings
Wichita language (4,457 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
conversation. The prefix is ti- with 3rd persons and ta- otherwise The aorist is used in narratives, stories, and in situations where something that happened
Georgian conjugation (2,867 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
in the aorist screeve, take the -o- nominal marker in the optative screeve, and verbs which take the strong suffixal nominal marker in the aorist screeve
Optative (Ancient Greek) (2,525 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
The optative mood in Greek is found in four different tenses (present, aorist, perfect and future) and in all three voices (active, middle and passive)
Bulgarian verbs (4,075 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
repetitive action, notice that the verb is in an independent clause) Past aorist imperfective verb: Вчера четох една книга = "Yesterday, I read a book" (but
Ancient Greek conditional clauses (5,413 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
bring that guest to my house?" The following uses the aorist indicative followed by an aorist imperative: εἰ ἤκουσάς τι τούτου τοῦ πράγματος τοῦ γενομένου
Jay Jasanoff (1,609 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
proto-middle *h2e-conjugation aorists with o/e-ablaut (later o/ø-ablaut) of the root, which gave rise to the Indo-Iranian passive aorist and the Tocharian subjunctive
Zenati languages (910 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Verbs whose original aorist forms end in -u while their perfect forms end in -a end up with -a in the aorist as well, leaving the aorist / perfect distinction
Molon labe (975 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
that Leonidas would have used. The form ἔμολον is recorded in Doric as the aorist for εἷρπον, "to go, come". The classical pronunciation is [mo.lɔ᷆ːn la.bé]
Proto-Slavic language (7,528 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
sigmatic aorist types (the former is generally termed the root aorist in Slavic studies), and a new productive aorist arose from the sigmatic aorist by various
Beja language (4,781 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
modifications. The negative is identical to that of the past continuous/aorist (above). The present or imperfective has two stems for positive strong verbs
Subjunctive (Ancient Greek) (2,692 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
only: the present, the aorist, and the perfect. The perfect is, however, rarely used. The difference between the present and aorist subjunctive is one of
Elteber (590 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
objects to Rásonyi's proposal: Erdal points out that "the Orkhon Turkic aorist of täp- would be täpär" and instead suggests a non-Turkic origin for the
Infinitive (4,473 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
it"). In Ancient Greek the infinitive has four tenses (present, future, aorist, perfect) and three voices (active, middle, passive). Present and perfect
Movable nu (205 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Ancient Greek grammar General Grammar Nouns Verbs Aorist Subjunctive Optative Participle Infinitive Genitive absolute Conditional clauses Phonology Phonology
Modern Greek grammar (5,855 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
imperfective non-past), the imperfect (i.e. imperfective past) and the aorist (i.e. perfective past). All four combinations can be used in subjunctive
Proto-Indo-European root word (69 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
may be: Proto-Indo-European root noun Root aspect (root present and root aorist) in a Proto-Indo-European verb Proto-Indo-European root This article includes
Ancient Greek accent (14,980 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
thematic verbs in the present tense or the weak or strong aorist tense is recessive, except for the aorist passive: λέγῃ légēi 'he may say' λέγωσι légōsi 'they
Tangale language (635 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
tense-aspect-mood (TAM) suffixes:: 39  Imperative-Subjunctive, Aorist-Intentional, Aorist-Subjunctive, Progressive I, Future, Perfect I, Perfect II (Dependent
Mingrelian grammar (913 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Indicates a command or request. The aorist form is used when addressing 2nd person (singular/plural) and aorist optative in all other cases. Subjunctive
Narten present (687 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
speculated to have been the original form of the Proto-Indo-European s-aorist, which had the root in the lengthened e-grade in Indo-Iranian, Italic and
Augment (Indo-European) (862 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
dissenting opinions have occasionally been voiced. In Homer, past-tense (aorist or imperfect) verbs appeared both with and without an augment. ὣς hṑs φάτο
Grammatical tense (5,460 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
with a three-way aspect contrast in the past: the aorist, the perfect and the imperfect. Both aorist and imperfect verbs can represent a past event: through
Ancient Greek present progressive markers (891 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
best guide to the true stem, which is often more clearly manifested in the aorist or future tense forms. Note that none of these markers was productive in
Stative verb (1,073 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
ebasíleuon "I was king") may use the aorist to express entrance into the state (e.g., ebasíleusa "I became king"). But the aorist can also simply express the state
Bulgarian language (12,970 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
'[have been] reading'); Past passive aorist participle' (минало свършено страдателно причастие) is formed from aorist/perfective stems with the addition
Participle (6,064 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
There is a form of the participle for every combination of aspect (present, aorist, perfect, future) and voice (active, middle, passive). All participles are
Genitive absolute (494 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
when spring was beginning. This example shows a genitive absolute with an aorist participle. Here, the two events do not happen simultaneously, as they do
Terpsimbrotos (281 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Dunkel (1992) compares the Vedic -si- imperatives, connected with the aorist system, apparently by haplology along the lines of vak-sa-si > vaksi. Bē-t-harmōn
Serbo-Croatian phonology (4,174 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
ending -u in aorist formation of some verbs: rȅći ('to say') – rèkoh ('I said' aorist), as opposed to rȅče (2nd/3rd person singular aorist) stȉći ('to
Spurious diphthong (484 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Ancient Greek grammar General Grammar Nouns Verbs Aorist Subjunctive Optative Participle Infinitive Genitive absolute Conditional clauses Phonology Phonology
Quenya grammar (3,544 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
were ambidexters". A mára. "A is good" or "A was good". The existential aorist/present form ëa is also used as a noun (with a capital E) as the Quenya
Ghadamès language (487 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
ənḍəβăd 42 to drink ăsw 43 black săṭṭăf "to be black" (perfective stem; aorist stem not attested) 44 navel tamet 45 to stand ăβdəd "to be standing", ăkkər
Indo-European ablaut (3,501 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
stress. Past participles; ending stress. Some verbs in the aorist (the Greek thematic "second aorist"). Oblique singular/dual/plural, accusative plural of
Nonfinite verb (1,263 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
identical to the third person of the dependent (or aorist subjunctive) and it is also called the aorist infinitive. It is used with the auxiliary verb έχω
Torres–Banks languages (803 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
languages grammaticalized a set of light personal pronouns into markers for “aorist” aspect; François (2011): How Torres–Banks languages tend to show structural
Principal parts (1,997 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
six principal parts: present (I), future (II), aorist (III), perfect (IV), perfect middle (V) and aorist passive (VI), each listed in its first-person
Indo-European copula (3,971 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Sanskrit «stʰā». Gujarati has a cognate verb «tʰavũ» "to happen"; cf. Bengali aorist «tʰā-» (to stay) as well. The Vedic Sanskrit root as (to be) is derived
Papyrus 95 (357 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
'shall hear' (future tense)) becomes ακουσαντες (akousantes, 'have heard' (aorist aspect, participle)). 5:36: omits second 'αυτα' (auta, these) through possible
Laz grammar (1,473 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Old Georgian -a and Svan -ma/-mo/-mu. Indicates a command or request. The aorist form is used when addressing 2nd person (singular/plural) and aoristic optative
Eastern Armenian verb table (295 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
three distinct conjugations) Note that traditional Armenian grammars use Aorist for Preterite and Optative for Subjunctive. In Armenian, gerunds / gerundives
Imperative mood (4,062 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
root might take place). Ancient Greek has imperative forms for present, aorist, and perfect tenses for the active, middle, and passive voices. Within these
Takelma language (1,734 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
listed below with the first (aorist) being the basic tense which is equivalent to the immediate future, present, and past. Aorist Potential Future Inferential
Boundedness (linguistics) (386 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
Boundedness is characteristic of perfective aspects such as the Ancient Greek aorist and the Spanish preterite. The simple past of English commonly expresses
Teteven dialect (400 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Bulgarian дъж'дът Ending e instead of formal Bulgarian i for plural past active aorist participles (биле instead of били), as in the Northwestern Bulgarian dialects
Proto-Tocharian language (5,282 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
augment); sigmatic, reduplicated, thematic and possibly lengthened-grade aorists; optatives; imperatives; and possibly PIE subjunctives. In addition, most
Lipomatosis (410 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
disease," from Latin -osis and directly from Greek -osis, formed from the aorist of verbs ending in -o. It corresponds to Latin -atio. Pelvic lipomatosis
Northwestern Bulgarian dialects (283 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
(summit, sun) ending e instead of formal Bulgarian i for plural past active aorist participles (биле instead of били) The masculine definite article is (ə)
Moesian dialects (310 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
българи) ending e instead of formal Bulgarian i for plural past active aorist participles (биле instead of били) Preposition у instead of formal Bulgarian
Siwi language (3,368 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
imperfective+a i-takil-a 'while he is/was walking' ga+aorist g-(y)-ukəl 'he will walk, he would walk' ədda+aorist ədd-(y)-ukəl 'let him walk!' Unlike many Berber
Subbalkan dialect (424 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
formal Bulgarian гладна (hungry) Stress on the final syllable in past aorist tense of certain verbs: гли'дах (I watched) The masculine definite article
Homeric Greek (1,695 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
-σκ- before the ending. For example, φύγεσκον: 'they kept on running away' Aorist or imperfect: Both tenses can occasionally drop their augments. For example
Compensatory lengthening (1,005 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
v t e Ancient Greek grammar General Grammar Nouns Verbs Aorist Subjunctive Optative Participle Infinitive Genitive absolute Conditional clauses Phonology
Doric Greek (5,801 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
-ous (second-declension accusative plural) -ēn ~ -ein (present, second aorist infinitive active) Contraction: Proto-Greek *ae > Doric ē (eta) ~ Attic
Ancient Greek phonology (13,713 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
assimilate. Before an /s/ (future, aorist stem), velars become [k], labials become [p], and dentals disappear. Before a /tʰ/ (aorist passive stem), velars become
Bridget Drinka (214 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Book Award for 2018 by the Linguistic Society of America. The Sigmatic Aorist in Indo-European, 1995 Language Contact in Europe, 2017 Winfred P. Lehmann
Löyöp language (514 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Alexandre (2009), "Verbal aspect and personal pronouns: The history of aorist markers in north Vanuatu" (PDF), in Pawley, Andrew; Adelaar, Alexander (eds
Oxford spelling (1,589 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
and catalyse, which come from the Greek verb λύω, lyo, the perfective (aorist) stem of which is ‑lys-: for these, ‑lyse is the more etymological spelling
Mwesen language (606 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Alexandre (2009), "Verbal aspect and personal pronouns: The history of aorist markers in north Vanuatu", in Pawley, Andrew; Adelaar, Alexander (eds.)
Go (verb) (1,278 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
Sanskrit yā́ti 'he goes, travels' (cf. imperfect áyāt, perfect yayáu, and aorist áyāsam). The root is regarded as an iterative-intensive derivative of the
Liturgy of Saint Cyril (1,579 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
bread and wine into the Body and Blood of Christ. This epiclesis uses the aorist tense, thus simply narrating a conversion without stating whether it occurs
Hirt's law (1,399 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Proto-Slavic *sę̋detь (AP a), cf. *sěditь̀ (AP c); *bǫ̋detь (AP a), cf. *by̋ti and aorist *by̑ (AP c). Metatony acts only on the historical Early Balto-Slavic mobile
Vurës language (850 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Alexandre (2009), "Verbal aspect and personal pronouns: The history of aorist markers in north Vanuatu" (PDF), in Pawley, Andrew; Adelaar, Alexander (eds
Hittite phonology (2,264 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
irregular first-person aorist for an u-stem noun (ta-ru-uḫ-ḫu-un instead of *ta-ru-uḫ-ḫu-un-un) and an irregular first person-plural aorist (tar-ḫu-u-en instead
Voiceless retroflex plosive (637 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Alexandre (2009), "Verbal aspect and personal pronouns: The history of aorist markers in north Vanuatu" (PDF), in Pawley, Andrew; Adelaar, Alexander (eds
Afroasiatic languages (10,903 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
(preterite) ǎknəf (aorist) -dbil- (past) mot (perfective) kôt (infintive) iparras- (present) əknǎf (perfective) -i:-dbil- (aorist) mwaát (imperfective)
The Black Book (Durrell novel) (851 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
chronology is intentionally disrupted through ambiguous tense—the “gnomic aorist” is referenced—and “magical” facts. These surrealistic asides are woven
Proto-Armenian language (2,083 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
doi:10.2307/411956. JSTOR 411956. Bonfante, G. (June 1942). "The Armenian Aorist". Journal of the American Oriental Society. 62 (2): 102–105. doi:10.2307/594462
Ottoman Turkish (2,377 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
counted as a grammatical case in modern grammars. The conjugation for the aorist tense is as follows: Ottoman Turkish was highly influenced by Arabic and
Southern Pashto (574 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
gaḍā́ Direct Singular Feminine Noun dance راله rā́la راغله rā́ğla come: Aorist Past 3rd Person Feminine Singular [She] came سي si چې če that: Particle
Tatyana Elizarenkova (249 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
with the Padma Shri in 2004 for her contributions in the study of Vedas. Aorist v "Rigvede", 1950 I︠A︡zyk pali, 1965 Issledovanii︠a︡ po diakhronicheskoĭ
Sabir people (2,080 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
meaning, and related ethnogenesis. However, Golden notes that root *sap-'s aorist (ending in -ar) is sapar; according to Gerard Clauson, the meanings "to
Mwotlap language (1,443 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
 313–326 —— (2009), "Verbal aspect and personal pronouns: The history of aorist markers in north Vanuatu", in Pawley, Andrew; Adelaar, Alexander (eds.)
Solun-Voden dialect (1,206 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
молил бях + past participle – бях писал, бях молил имам + past passive aorist participle – имам пишано, имам молено бeх + past participle – бех писал
Codex Marianus (1,015 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Graz in 1960. Text of Codex especially abounds with the usage of asigmatic aorist, and very frequent is the assimilation of vowels in compound adjectival
Proto-Celtic language (4,931 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
from the PIE reduplicated stative) The t-preterite The root aorist The s-, t-, and root aorist preterites take Indo-European secondary endings, while the
Olivet Discourse (3,012 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
‘take place’ or ‘have happened’ [γένηται] is interpreted as an ingressive aorist: ‘to begin’ or ‘to have a beginning’. In other words, ‘all these things’
Proto-Greek language (6,758 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
including a future passive as well as an aorist passive. The suffix -ka- is attached to some perfects and aorists. Infinitives in -ehen, -enai and -men are
Jerba Berber (4,540 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
contexts. As a result, in Djerba (as also in Tamasheq), the themes of the aorist and the perfective of roots called "zero vocalism" are different (while
Kartvelian languages (1,948 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
the Present series (often termed Series I) and active alignment in the Aorist series (Series II). Laz has extended the case marking of Series II to Series
Dargwa language (1,045 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
reading) DERIVED FROM THE PRETERITE STEM ( BASIC STEM + -ib/-ub/-ur/-un): Aorist any completed action in the past PF - PERSON (–da/–di) negative auxiliary
Eteocretan language (1,690 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
suggested: inai = Dorian Cretan ἔϝαδε (= classical Greek ἅδε, third singular aorist of ἅνδάνω) "it pleased [the council, the people]", i. e. "it was decided
Turkish phonology (5,988 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
combination with -iyor: gelmiyor ('he/she/it does not come'). However, in the aorist tense the negative is stressed: sönmez ('it will never extinguish'). -le/-la
Kathlamet language (1,646 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
distinction: future: a- present (non-completive): zero immediate past (aorist): i- non- immediate: na-/qa- amckunā'xʟama "you will search for her" iō'stsX
Lamo language (945 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
ˊne-le: ‘come downwards/come down’ ˊthe-le: ‘(he) has arrived’ (perfect/aorist only) k-: (does not occur) ˊtə’-le: ‘arrive upwards/come here close to the
Negative raising (3,100 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
English) is paired with a verb in the aorist, the negation δεν (den) makes the clause grammatical (e.g. δεν aorist αkόmα) as it imperfectivises it. This
Pilar Zeta (2,766 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
that were auctioned off as NFTs through a collaboration with marketplace Aorist. In the following year, Zeta launched The Space of Variations (2022), her
Physis (2,216 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
1960: 174; Pfeifer 1993: 1273; Beekes 2010: 1598). In Greek itself, the aorist (a verbal aspect) of “to be” can be expressed with forms of phynai. With
Wanetsi (2,519 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
wyā́ṛa لاړه lā́ṛa She went go:Aorist:Past:3Person:Singular:Feminine وياړې wyā́re لاړې lā́re They [females] went go:Aorist:Past:3Person:Plural:Feminine
Ancient Greek nouns (2,945 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Ancient Greek grammar General Grammar Nouns Verbs Aorist Subjunctive Optative Participle Infinitive Genitive absolute Conditional clauses Phonology Phonology
Lord's Prayer (9,828 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
based on the Matthaean version. The majority percentage of the verbs are aorist imperatives. In the first part of the prayer there are third person passive
Ephesians 6 (1,027 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
of his might. "Be strong": the Greek word here is in present tense, not aorist, suggesting the 'maintenance' rather than the 'attainment' of strength,
Grassmann's law (1,401 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
/peúsomai/. However, only /tʰ/ dissimilates before aspirated affixes like the aorist passive in /-tʰɛː/ and the imperative in /-tʰi/; /pʰ/ and /kʰ/ do not, as
Modern Greek (3,241 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
distinction in future tense between imperfective (present) and perfective (aorist) Modern Greek has developed a simpler system of grammatical prefixes marking
Yurij Yakovlevitch Glazov (464 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
 79-95. Morftemy aorista v drievnietamiljskom yazykie (The Morphemes of Aorist in Ancient Tamil), NKYIPTN, p. 28-29. K probliemie tipologichieskogo shodstva
Balkan sprachbund (4,888 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
followed by the so-called απαρέμφατο ('invariant form', historically the aorist infinitive): έχω υποσχεθεί. However, a completely different construction
Macedonian language (10,309 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
имам гледано филмот, "I have seen that movie"). Another past form, the aorist is used to describe actions that have finished at a given moment in the
Roy Andrew Miller (1,035 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Orientalia Academiae Scientiarum Hungaricae 55.1–3: 179–205. 2008 "The Altaic Aorist in *-Ra in Old Korean". Lubotsky, Alexander, ed. Evidence and counter-evidence :
Latin tenses with modality (5,825 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
In old Latin, a form of the subjunctive with -s-, known as the sigmatic aorist subjunctive, is preserved (faxim, servāssim etc.). One use of this is for
Dative construction (2,345 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Bavshevebma tsqali da-li-es ("children drank water") perfective aspect-past (aorist) tense, ERG-NOM In Georgian, the -s suffix is the dative case marker. In
Linguistic typology (3,543 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Georgian behave this way, and, as a rule, only while using the perfective (aorist). Linguistic typology also seeks to identify patterns in the structure and
Sona (constructed language) (2,084 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
Conditional Probable va to ru "would have gone" Possible fa to ru "may, might have gone" Future Intention va ru "will go" Aorist Possible fa ru "may go"
Maleševo-Pirin dialect (1,439 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
(I) read, (I) write Formation of past perfect tense имам + past passive aorist participle — имам пишувано, имам молено бeх + past participle — бех писал
Tsakonian language (3,218 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
of the sentence Tsakonian has preserved the original inflection of the aorist indicative. ενέγκα (enéga)=I brought ενέντζερε (enédzere)=You brought ενέντζε
Aṣṭādhyāyī (2,883 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Ṅ-IT Ṅí   Causative Ṅii   ī-stems ṄīP ṄīN Ṅī’Ṣ tiṄ   verbal suffix lUṄ   Aorist lIṄ   Precative S-IT GHU   class of verbal stems (1.1.20) GHI   (1.4.7)
Elohim (6,310 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Whereas the Greek Septuagint (LXX) has a singular verb form (ἐξήγαγε(ν), aorist II), most English versions usually translate this as "God caused" (which
Calvert Watkins (2,638 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Harvard University, Indo-European Origins of the Celtic Verb I. The Sigmatic Aorist (Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies, 1962), which deeply reflected the
Koine Greek phonology (8,455 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
errors, the falling together of perfect and aorist tenses in the Koine could have created confusion between aorist ἧκα and perfect εἷκα, c.f. Horrocks (2010:168)
Mohawk language (3,898 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
certain affixes are forbidden from coexisting together. For example, the aorist and the future tense affix will not be found on the same well-formed sentence
Syllable (5,421 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
λαμβάνω lambánō "take". The noun uses the root λαβ-, which appears in the aorist tense; the present tense stem λαμβάν- is formed by adding a nasal infix
Punjabi grammar (2,027 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Imperatives. Sing. Pl. Present nacc naccō Aorist naccī̃ nacciō
Proto-Germanic language (12,145 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
other branches), followed by merging of the aspectual categories present-aorist and the mood categories indicative-subjunctive. (This assumption allows
Proto-Balto-Slavic language (10,709 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
except in the athematic verbs. The aspectual distinction between present and aorist was retained and still productive in Proto-Balto-Slavic. It was preserved
Defective verb (3,135 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
(eimi, 'I am') only has a present, a future and an imperfect – it lacks an aorist, a perfect, a pluperfect and a future perfect. In Hindustani (Hindi and
Diaspora (9,844 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
either. The verb used is the verb speírô (seed) conjugated in the passive aorist." The passage in Thucydides reads: καὶ οἱ μὲν αὐτῶν ἐνταῦθα ᾤκησαν, οἱ δ᾽
Cosmology of Tolkien's legendarium (4,804 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Ainur. The word comes from the Quenya word for the existential to be in its aorist form. Thus, Eä is 'that which is'. Eä was the word spoken by Eru Ilúvatar
Germanic languages (9,472 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
tenses (present and past), with three PIE past-tense aspects (imperfect, aorist, and perfect/stative) merged into one and no new tenses (future, pluperfect
Ādeśa (917 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
University Press. p. 179. ISBN 978-0-521-63188-4. Prasad P. Joshi (2008). Vedic Aorist and Panini. Eastern Book Linkers. p. 107. ISBN 9788178541501. V.R.Prabhu
Abkhaz language (6,020 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Present -уа-ит(-wá-jt’) -уа(-wa) дыргоит (dərgawájt’) "They are taking him." Aorist -ит(-jt’) -∅ дырге́ит (dərgájt’) "They took him." Future 1 -п (-p’) -ра
Torlakian dialects (3,716 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
in Bulgarian and Macedonian, present in Serbian. Full retention of the aorist and the imperfect, as in Bulgarian. Use of a definite article as in Bulgarian
Proto-Indo-European phonology (6,253 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
singular of a noun ending on sonorant, in root syllables in the sigmatic aorist, etc.; compare Szemerényi's law, Stang's law) vowels *e and *o would lengthen
Eastern South Slavic (7,774 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
and the aorist active participle of the main verb, while in Macedonian it is formed with the unconjugated form 'би' (would), and the aorist active participle
Erotokritos (2,489 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
elimination of the -ι- after -σ- (να τσ' αξώση), as well as the passive aorist -θηκα, -θηκες, -θηκε (in place of -θη, -θης, -θη(ν),, for example, εχάθηκε
Celtiberian language (4,991 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Compare Umbrian ferest "he/she/it shall make" or Ancient Greek δείξῃ deiksēi (aorist subj.) / δείξει deiksei (future ind.) "(that) he/she/it shall show". Celtiberian
Frank Stagg (theologian) (2,616 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
the Johannine Epistles." Review & Expositor 67(1970)423-432. "The Abused Aorist." Journal of Biblical Literature 91 (1972) 222–231. "Salvation in Synoptic
Frank Stagg (theologian) (2,616 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
the Johannine Epistles." Review & Expositor 67(1970)423-432. "The Abused Aorist." Journal of Biblical Literature 91 (1972) 222–231. "Salvation in Synoptic
Glosa (3,229 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
is used instead): -os, -u become -o (fobo, orto). Occasionally the Greek aorist-root is taken instead of present-tense-root (gene). Greek verbs become -o
Ergative–absolutive alignment (4,505 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
marked with the ergative case in the perfective aspect (also known as the "aorist screeve"). Compare: K'aci vašls č'ams. (კაცი ვაშლს ჭამს) "The man is eating
Chakavian (6,513 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
specific prefixes: bin-, biš-, bimo-, bite-, bis contracted or lacking aorist tense; some subdialects on island of Pag have kept the archaic form of imperfect
Ser-Drama-Lagadin-Nevrokop dialect (1,924 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
бях молил бях + past participle—бях писал, бях молил имам + past passive aorist participle—имам пишано, имам молено бeх + past participle—бех писал, бех
Gaulish (9,146 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
voices. Verbs show a number of innovations as well. The Indo-European s-aorist became the Gaulish t-preterit, formed by merging an old third-person singular
Mark 16 (6,348 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
and in the creeds. (Greek distinguished passive from middle voice in the aorist tense used here.) Or, "does not allow the unclean things dominated by the
Chuvash language (7,344 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
distinctions of tense, mood and aspect: a verb can be progressive, necessitative, aorist, future, inferential, present, past, conditional, imperative or optative
Swampy Cree language (3,131 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
speech, it is possible to make indirect speech constructions by using the aorist marker /e-/ in addition to other aspect markers. The Changed Conjunct changes
Messapic language (6,727 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
other Indo-European languages are featured in the suffix of the sigmatic aorist), as in the 3rd sg. hipades/opades ('he dedicated' < *supo-dʰeh₁-s-t) and
Baptism (23,332 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Jesus ate, "was astonished to see that he did not first wash (ἐβαπτίσθη, aorist passive of βαπτίζω—literally, "was baptized") before dinner". This is the
Argonautica (8,576 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
("because Phoebus made it appear to them": Ἀνάφη is here derived from the aorist for make appear). To this day, women on Anaphe taunt their menfolk whenever
Nicholas of Methone (1,689 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
reference to his unfinished Anaptyxis. The questioner had read a work on the aorist position (a person's lifespan is undetermined) and wanted Nicholas to refute
Eduard Fraenkel (4,196 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
crippling flame, Or that it would appear In public that we could not name The Aorist of some unfamiliar verb... —Iris Murdoch Summarising Fraenkel's contributions
Southern Serbia (geographical region) (2,297 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
three grammatical cases instead of seven, as well as full retention of the aorist and the imperfect, loss of infinitive as in Bulgarian and Macedonian, frequent
Edith Hamilton (5,963 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Sophocles, it seemed that the important thing was their use of the second aorist." See Singer, 74–75. Hamilton, pp. 44–45. Weber, p. 38. Jayes, p. 730. Weber
Pentecostal Collegiate Institute (Rhode Island) (2,518 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
Testament, Especially in the Figures Emphasized, and in the Use of the Aorist Tense, edited by Ross E. Price (Kansas City, MO: Beacon Hill Press, 1953;
Relationship of Cyrillic and Glagolitic scripts (3,135 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
-šeta, -šete as opposed to the -sta, -ste in Cyrillic monuments; sigmatic aorist is not attested in Glagolitic monuments, which otherwise preserve more morphological
Proto-Torres–Banks language (1,187 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Alexandre (2009), "Verbal aspect and personal pronouns: The history of aorist markers in north Vanuatu" (PDF), in Pawley, Andrew; Adelaar, Alexander (eds
Ojibwe grammar (4,880 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
subjects. These are the main classes: Verbs mark tenses with prefixes (a'-, aorist past, gii'-, simple past, ga(d)- and da-, future, and wii'-, desiderative
Conditional preservation of the saints (53,569 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
[participle] ὁ πιστεύων [the one believing] seems to be in contrast with [the aorist participle] ὁ πιστεύσας [the one having believed]. ... The present [participle
History of the Slavic languages (7,582 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Indo-European[citation needed] aspectual system consisting of synthetic aorist and imperfect tenses (largely eliminated elsewhere in favor of the new Slavic
Nancy Baker Cahill (2,983 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Artsy. Retrieved 2019-11-18. Durón, Maximilíano (2021-12-01). "At Faena, Aorist Auctions Newly Minted NFTs to Save Miami's Endangered Reefs". ARTnews.com
Immersion baptism (12,134 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
see that he did not first "wash himself" (literally, "baptize himself", aorist passive of baptizo) before dinner". Some commentaries claim that these two
Bible prophecy (17,771 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
make in his instructions to these preachers. The use of ἑως [heōs] with aorist subjunctive for a future event is a good Greek idiom. Preterist scholars
List of The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy characters (21,867 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Civil Reassurance Administration and an empty spacesuit, as they search for aorist rods and a Sirius Cybernetics Corporation Designer Person (babbling gently
1 Timothy 2:12 (9,270 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
 20  Spencer notes that rather than using the imperative mood or even an aorist or future indicative to express that prohibition, Paul quite significantly
Johannes P. Louw (1,773 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
a dissertation entitled "A study of μἠ with the Present Imperative and Aorist Subjunctive". From 1973 to 1992 he was head of the department of Greek at
Paeanius (2,886 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
own age. — Paeanius, Metaphrasis book 9, chapter 24 Paeanius's use of the aorist participle has since his first editor Sylburg been taken as a sign that
Textual variants in the Book of Judges (5,120 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
LXXSwete Brenton. εἰσήνεγκεν = εἰς ("into" or "to(wards)") + φέρω ("to bring") aorist third person singular και επορεύθη έως οίκου (and he went/travelled unto/until
Index of ancient Greece-related articles (13,183 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Antonius of Argos Antorides Anyte of Tegea Anytos Anytus Aoede Aoidos Aon Aorist Aorist (Ancient Greek) Aornum Apanchomene Apate Apatheia Apaturia Apaturia
Latin tenses (27,200 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
In old Latin, a form of the subjunctive with -s-, known as the sigmatic aorist subjunctive, is preserved (faxim, servāssim etc.). One use of this is for
Textual variants in the Hebrew Bible (24,184 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
LXXSwete Brenton. εἰσήνεγκεν = εἰς ("into" or "to(wards)") + φέρω ("to bring") aorist third person singular και επορεύθη έως οίκου (and he went/travelled unto/until
Early translations of the New Testament (10,942 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
ἑκατονταρχης/κεντυριων → centurio). Due to the limitations of Latin grammar, the aorist and perfectum tenses cannot be distinguished. Both ελαλησα and λελαληκα
Slovincian grammar (11,029 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Polish and Kashubian, Slovincian has lost the Proto-Slavic imperfect and the aorist forms. The l-participle has taken its place as the past tense form. The