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searching for West Slavic languages 18 found (92 total)

alternate case: west Slavic languages

Vltava (1,255 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article

The Vltava (/ˈvʊltəvə, ˈvʌl-/ VU(U)L-tə-və, Czech: [ˈvl̩tava] (listen); German: Moldau [ˈmɔldaʊ]) is the longest river within the Czech Republic, running
Syllabic consonant (1,803 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
A syllabic consonant or vocalic consonant is a consonant that forms a syllable on its own, like the m, n and l in the English words rhythm, button and
Hof, Bavaria (6,338 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Hof is a town on the banks of the Saale in the northeastern corner of the German state of Bavaria, in the Franconian region, at the Czech border and the
Slavicism (1,008 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Slavicism or slowenism, are words and expressions (lexical, grammatical, phonetic, etc.) borrowed or derived from Slavic languages Most languages of the
High German consonant shift (6,541 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
In historical linguistics, the High German consonant shift or second Germanic consonant shift is a phonological development (sound change) that took place
Lechites (1,337 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Speakers of Lechitic West Slavic languages in the region of Poland
Name of Poland (1,236 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
in other languages. Exonyms for Poland in Slavic languages. The West Slavic languages such as Czech and Slovak bear particular resemblance to the Polish
Russianism (591 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Contact: The Theory of the Adaptation of Russisms In South and West Slavic Languages", Foto Futura, Beograd, 2004, 364 pp. Giorgio Maria Nicolai. Dizionario
Bulgarian phonology (1,778 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
stress is also lexical rather than fixed as in French, Latin or the West Slavic languages. It may fall on any syllable of a polysyllabic word, and its position
Jovan Ajduković (1,266 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Contact: The Theory of the Adaptation of Russisms In South and West Slavic Languages. Београд: Фото Футура, 2004, 364 стр. (Table of Contents – Online)
Slovaks (4,304 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
ethnogenesis of Slovaks, but exclusively to linguistic changes in the West Slavic languages. The word Slovak was used also later as a common name for all Slavs
Slavs (6,336 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
West Slavic languages.   Polish   Kashubian   Silesian   Polabian †   Lower Sorbian   Upper Sorbian   Czech   Slovak
Continuous and progressive aspects (4,672 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
imperfective); napisał ("wrote", perfective) In at least the East Slavic and West Slavic languages, there is a three-way aspect differentiation for verbs of motion
Grammatical aspect (8,086 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
imperfective); napisał ("wrote", perfective) In at least the East Slavic and West Slavic languages, there is a three-way aspect differentiation for verbs of motion
Relationship of Cyrillic and Glagolitic scripts (3,058 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
designed to fit the sound system of Slavic speech. By comparison, the West Slavic languages, as well as Slovene and Croatian, took a longer time to adapt the
Slavic vocabulary (1,900 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
the palatalizations was uniform throughout Common Slavic and that West Slavic languages developed *š later on by analogy. In all dialects (except for Lechitic)
Slavic Native Faith's identity and political philosophy (5,107 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
predominate. Wood green represents East Slavic languages, pale green represents West Slavic languages, and sea green represents South Slavic languages.
Evolution of languages (14,165 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
"Istrian land survey" of 1275 or the Vinodol Codex. To the north, West Slavic languages began to appear around the 10th century. Polans tribes began to