Find link

language:

jump to random article

Find link is a tool written by Edward Betts.

Longer titles found: Hurro-Urartian languages (view)

searching for Urartian language 8 found (42 total)

alternate case: urartian language

Nagorno-Karabakh (10,293 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article

Nagorno-Karabakh (/nəˌɡɔːrnoʊ kərəˈbɑːk/ nə-GOR-noh kər-ə-BAHK) is a region in Azerbaijan, covering the southeastern stretch of the Lesser Caucasus mountain
Paroyr Skayordi (1,995 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Paroyr Skayordi (also Paruyr, Old Armenian: Պարոյր Սկայորդի) or Paroyr, son of Skayordi, was an Armenian king mentioned in the history of Movses Khorenatsi
Mehmet Kusman (455 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
known. Mehmet Kuşman's learning of the Urartian language led to the emergence of the claim that the Urartian language is related to Chechen. The documentary
Rusa III (207 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Rusa III Urartian language stone.Erebuni museum,Yerevan King of Urartu Reign 629–615 BC or 590 BC Predecessor Erimena or Sarduri III Successor Sarduri
Black Speech (2,295 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Tolkien designed Black Speech "after some acquaintance with Hurrian-Urartian language(s)." The evidence that Nemirovski presented for this is entirely linguistic
Chechens (7,182 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Chechens. p. 28. doi:10.4324/9780203356432. ISBN 978-0-203-35643-2. "The Urartian language itself took several generations to decipher and is now believed to
Armenian national awakening (3,539 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
view must explain why Urartian epigraphy is in the non-Indo-European Urartian language. While there are reasonable scholarly scenarios that there was a Proto-Armenian
List of national capital city name etymologies (20,026 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
modern-day Yerevan in 782 B.C. by Argishti I. As elements of the Urartian language blended with that of the Armenian one, it eventually evolved into