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Longer titles found: Paratyphoid fever (view), History of typhoid fever (view)

searching for Typhoid fever 152 found (2504 total)

alternate case: typhoid fever

Carl C. Jeremiassen (378 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article

Carl C. Jeremiassen (Adopted Chinese name: 冶基善, 1847–1901) was a Danish sea captain. He is known today as the first Protestant missionary to Hainan island
Maganlal Gandhi (111 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Maganlal Khushalchand Gandhi (1883–1928) was a follower of Mahatma Gandhi. He was a grandson of an uncle of Mohandas [i.e., Mahatma Gandhi], and he died
Simon Brown (Massachusetts politician) (180 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
England Farmer, working in Boston. He died at Concord, Massachusetts of typhoid fever, in 1873. Proceedings at the Semi-centennial Celebration: Of the Organization
Leland Stanford Jr. (371 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Leland Stanford Jr. (May 14, 1868 – March 13, 1884), known as Leland DeWitt Stanford until he was nine, was the only son of American industrialist and
1899 VMI Keydets football team (523 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
September. The 1899 football season at VMI was cut short by an outbreak of typhoid fever on the campus. As reported by one account: "VMI had time to crush only
Frederick Holman (swimmer) (171 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
breaststroke event and did not compete in any other events. He died of typhoid fever in Exeter in January 1913 aged 29. He was married but had no children
Joe Nealon (184 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
James Joseph Nealon (December 15, 1884 – April 2, 1910) was a professional baseball player. He was born in San Francisco, and died in San Francisco, at
Princess Margaretha of Saxony (183 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Princess Margaretha of Saxony, Duchess of Saxony (German: Prinzessin Margaretha Karoline Friederike Cecilie Auguste Amalie Josephine Elisabeth Maria Johanna
Charles Young (American football) (259 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
captaining the team all three years. Young died at the age of 40, of typhoid fever, on March 21, 1909, at his home in St. Louis, Missouri. He was survived
Charles C. Stevenson (371 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Stevenson, was Governor of Idaho at the same time. Stevenson died of typhoid fever while in office on September 21, 1890 in Carson City, Nevada, at the
George A. Stewart (342 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
beginning of an organized coaching system at Harvard. Stewart died of typhoid fever in 1894. Transactions of the Society of Naval Architects and Marine
Nicol Smith (383 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Nicol Smith (25 December 1873 – 6 January 1905) was a Scottish footballer who played for Rangers. Born in Darvel, Ayrshire, Smith played as a fullback
John Acton Wroth (1,171 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
John Acton Wroth (1830–1876) was a convict transportee to the Swan River Colony, and later a clerk and storekeeper in Toodyay, Western Australia. He kept
John Hamilton Morgan (691 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
John Hamilton Morgan (August 8, 1842 – August 14, 1894), was an early educator in Utah Territory, an official of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day
Samuel J. Wilson (167 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Samuel Jennings Wilson (July 19, 1828 - August 17, 1883) was a clergyman and academic in Western Pennsylvania. Wilson was born in Washington County, Pennsylvania
Leo Hafford (95 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
1911. He served as head coach only briefly, however, as he died from typhoid fever three weeks after accepting the position. He ended up only coaching
Tancred, Prince of Galilee (1,233 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Tancred (1075 – December 5 or December 12, 1112) was an Italo-Norman leader of the First Crusade who later became Prince of Galilee and regent of the Principality
Arpad Viragh (246 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Arpad Viragh (12 January 1888 – 31 May 1930) was a Hungarian cinematographer. He began his career in his native Hungary going on to work in the film industries
Miles O. Noll (197 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
the Reformed Church, living in Carlisle, Pennsylvania. Noll died from typhoid fever, on November 27, 1905, in Carlisle. Franklin & Marshall College. Franklin
William Miller (Australian footballer) (106 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
William Robert Miller (29 December 1881 – 29 December 1912) was an Australian rules footballer who played for Norwood in the South Australian National
Rowland Griffiths (393 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Rowland Griffiths (4 March 1886 – 4 May 1914) was a Wales international rugby union player. He was selected for the 1908 British Lions tour to New Zealand
Johann Spurzheim (327 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Johann Gaspar Spurzheim (31 December 1776 – 10 November 1832) was a German physician who became one of the chief proponents of phrenology, which was developed
Edward Solomon (1,217 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Liverpool, on 10 September 1883.[citation needed] Solomon died in London of typhoid fever in 1895 at the age of 39. Billee Taylor (1880) Quite an Adventure (1881)
Edith Claypole (382 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Edith Jane Claypole (January 1, 1870 – March 27, 1915) was an English American physiologist and pathologist. Edith was born in Bristol with her twin sister
James Blackburn (architect) (1,408 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
James Blackburn (10 August 1803 – 3 March 1854) was an English civil engineer, surveyor and architect best known for his work in Australia, where he had
Evan Pugh (1,297 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
contributed to a weakened immune system unable to fend off an attack of typhoid fever. Pugh collapsed at his desk while penning a statement for Legislature
Thomas Fearnley (740 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Thomas Fearnley (27 December 1802 – 16 January 1842) was a Norwegian romantic painter, a pupil of Johan Christian Dahl and a leading representative of
Frida Lundell (64 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Frida Lundell (6 March 1899 – 19 August 1934) was a Swedish missionary. She served with the Swedish Missionary Society in Chinese Turkestan (present day
Ernest Wild (1,301 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Henry Ernest Wild AM (10 August 1879 – 10 March 1918), known as Ernest Wild, was a British Royal Naval seaman and Antarctic explorer, a younger brother
Charles Davis Jameson (337 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Jameson was wounded and subsequently disabled by "camp fever" (likely typhoid fever) and allowed to return to Maine. He died in Old Town on November 6,
Walter Raleigh (professor) (879 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Sir Walter Alexander Raleigh (/ˈrɔːli, ˈrɑː-/; 5 September 1861 – 13 May 1922) was an English scholar, poet, and author. Raleigh was also a Cambridge Apostle
Lev Chugaev (420 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Lev Aleksandrovich Chugaev (16 October 1873 – 26 September 1922) was a Russian chemist. At the height of his career, he was professor of chemistry at the
Hector McLean (252 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Theodore Barclay. McLean was Oxford president in 1887/8 but died of typhoid fever in the Guildford district at the age of 23. Sussex Battle War Memorial
John Buford (2,751 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
John Buford, Jr. (March 4, 1826 – December 16, 1863) was a United States Army cavalry officer. He fought for the Union as a brigadier general during the
Vladimir Yermolaev (131 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Vladimir Grigoryevich Yermolaev (Russian: Владимир Григорьевич Ермолаев; 29 August 1909 – 31 December 1944) was a Soviet aircraft designer, general-major
George J. Adams (1,943 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
George Jones Adams (ca. 1811 – May 11, 1880) was the leader of a schismatic Latter Day Saint sect who led an ill-fated effort to establish a colony of
Archduke Karl Ludwig of Austria (1,476 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Archduke Karl Ludwig Josef Maria of Austria (30 July 1833 – 19 May 1896) was the younger brother of both Franz Joseph I of Austria and Maximilian I of
Rene Morgan La Montagne Sr. (173 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Retrieved 2011-03-04. Polo Player, Prominent in Many Clubs, a Victim of Typhoid Fever. , Rene La Montagne, well known socially and in sport, died at his home
William Gambel (1,074 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
William Gambel (June 1823 – December 13, 1849) was an American naturalist, ornithologist, and botanist from Philadelphia. As a young man he worked closely
George Stevenson (priest) (249 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
George Stevenson, LL.D. (7 August 1763; 5 April 1825) was a 19th-century Anglican priest in Ireland. He was born in Egham and educated at King's College
Walter Griffiths (635 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
arrival back in Adelaide in late June, Griffiths was diagnosed with typhoid fever. He died at Miss Tibbitt's Private Hospital in Adelaide on 4 September
Lancel Victor de Hamel (607 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Lancel Victor de Hamel (10 September 1849 – 25 November 1894) was a publisher, solicitor and politician who represented the people of Albany in the Great
Lemma Barkaloo (427 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Only a couple months after she was admitted to the bar, she died from typhoid fever on September 11, 1870. In 2000 Susan Frelich Appleton, J.D., was installed
Joseph Lucas (247 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Joseph Lucas (12 April 1834 – 27 December 1902) was a lamp manufacturer and the founder of electrical equipment manufacturer Lucas Industries. Born in
Leeman M. Brundage (66 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Democratic mayor of South Norwalk, Connecticut from 1909 to 1910. He died of typhoid fever while in office. He was the manager and treasurer of the Mutual Straw
Caylor, Virginia (202 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
years after building the house, Robert Ely went swimming and caught typhoid fever, and died in 1880. His widow remarried to Thomas A. Taylor in 1885,
Health in Somalia (300 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
diseases: bacterial and protozoal diarrhea, hepatitis A and E, and typhoid fever vectorborne diseases: dengue fever, malaria, and Rift Valley fever water
Steve Ladew (210 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Stephen Ladue dated January 10, 1895. The cause of death is listed as typhoid fever and various articles in the Trenton (MO) Evening Republican confirm
Rose spots (185 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
bacterial emboli to the skin and occur in approximately 1/3 of cases of typhoid fever. They are one of the classic signs of untreated disease, but can also
Yosef Yozel Horwitz (2,176 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Yosef Yozel Horowitz (Hebrew: יוסף יוזל הורוביץ), also Yosef Yoizel Hurwitz, known as the Alter of Novardok (1847–1919), was a student of Rabbi Yisroel
Hilary Paweł Januszewski (184 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Hilary Paweł Januszewski, O.Carm (June 11, 1907, in Krajenki – March 25, 1945, in Dachau concentration camp), was a Polish priest, Carmelite friar of the
Magnus Bäcklund (185 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Magnus Bäcklund (12 December 1866 – 26 June 1903) was a Swedish missionary to Chinese Turkestan with the Mission Covenant Church of Sweden. Magnus was
Thomas Firmin (1,583 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Firmin became consumptive, and was carried off in a couple of days by a typhoid fever, dying on 20 December 1697. Bishop Fowler attended him on his deathbed
Sandy McMillan (397 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Sgt. John "Sandy" McMillan (1869–1892) was a Scottish soldier who made one appearance at centre-half in the FA Cup for Southampton St. Mary's Football
Ivan Bubnov (229 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Ivan Grigoryevich Bubnov (Russian: Ива́н Григо́рьевич Бу́бнов; 18 January 1872 – 13 March 1919) was a Russian marine engineer and designer of submarines
Siegmund Glücksmann (663 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Siegmund Glücksmann (30 May 1884 – 6 October 1942) was a German-Jewish socialist politician. In the 1920s and 1930s, he was one of the most prominent figures
Claude Reignier Conder (870 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Battle of Tel el-Kebir, and the advance to Cairo, but then, seized with typhoid fever, he was invalided home. For his services he received the war medal with
Henry Ernest Searle (914 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
42s. While returning to Australia in the "Austral", Searle contracted typhoid fever; he left the ship at Melbourne, and died three weeks later on 10 December
Okeover Longcroft (196 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
died and the cause of his death was registered by the family doctor as typhoid fever. His life is recorded in the book which documents the entire history
Ioannis Miaoulis (100 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
to Athens, where the Acropolis was still held by an Ottoman garrison. There he was infected by typhoid fever and died in 1830 at the age of 27. v t e
Barry Yelverton, 5th Viscount Avonmore (176 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Captain Barry Nugent Yelverton, 5th Viscount Avonmore (11 February 1859 – 13 February 1885), was an Anglo-Irish peer and an officer in the 37th Foot, which
Alemayehu Atomsa (809 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Regional States". "Alemayehu Atomsa dies at age 45 after battle with "typhoid fever"". Awramba Times. 6 March 2014. Archived from the original on 6 March
Henry Augustus DuBois (203 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
vaccine farm on the west coast. Henry A. Dubois died May 27, 1897 of the typhoid fever he contracted in Virginia. Marilyn L. Geary (7 December 2011). "History:
Vladimir Selivachyov (342 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Vladimir Ivanovich Selivachyov (Russian: Владимир Иванович Селивачёв; 14 June 1868 – 17 September 1919) was a lieutenant general of the Imperial Russian
Ruhi Khalidi (728 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Ruhi al-Khalidi (1864–1913) was a writer, teacher, activist and politician in the Ottoman Empire at the turn of the twentieth century. He was the nephew
Gustave A. Mueller (515 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Gustave Adolph Mueller (November 10, 1863 – February 9, 1912) was an American homeopath and surgeon at the Homeopathic Hospital of Pittsburgh. He was described
William Thompson Sedgwick (2,147 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
studies of typhoid fever. “In the Annual Report of the State Board of Health of Massachusetts for 1892, Sedgwick presented studies on typhoid fever epidemics
Prince Christian Victor of Schleswig-Holstein (1,232 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Prince Christian Victor Albert Louis Ernst Anton of Schleswig-Holstein GCB GCVO DSO KStJ (14 April 1867 – 29 October 1900) was a member of the British
Mary Kingsley (3,054 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Mary Henrietta Kingsley (13 October 1862 – 3 June 1900) was an English ethnographer, scientific writer, and explorer whose travels throughout West Africa
Karl Hoffmann (naturalist) (254 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Karl Hoffmann (7 December 1823 – 11 May 1859) was a German physician and naturalist. Hoffmann was born in Stettin and studied at Berlin University. In
George R. Cholwell (115 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
George Ring Cholwell (December 1, 1820 – April 10, 1883) was Warden of the Borough of Norwalk, Connecticut from 1861 to 1863. He was born in Norwalk, on
Irvin S. Pepper (466 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
of the gall bladder. He was recovering in Clinton County, Iowa, from typhoid fever, which had left him in a weakened state. In the Sixty-third Congresses
Harold Maclean (307 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Harold Maclean (14 May 1828 – 6 November 1889) was an Australian civil servant. Harold Maclean was born on 14 May 1828; his father was a captain. Described
Louis Napoleon George Filon (697 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Louis Napoleon George Filon, FRS (22 November 1875 – 29 December 1937) was an English applied mathematician, famous for his research on classical mechanics
Jerry Weir (94 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Queen's Park. A joiner to trade, he emigrated to Australia, and died of typhoid fever while working on a railway construction project. (Mitchell 2012, p. 136)
Thomas O. Larkin (2,560 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
needed] On October 27, 1858, while at Colusa, California, he contracted typhoid fever and died within a week. He was buried in what was the Laurel Hill Cemetery
Joel Reaman (147 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
and land agent for the York Farmers Colonization Company. He died of typhoid fever in 1892. 'The Canadian parliamentary companion, 1891, JA Gemmill "Historical
Alexander Hilferding (1,169 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Alexander Hilferding also spelled Aleksandar Fedorovich Giljferding (Russian: Александр Фёдорович Гильферди́нг; 14 July 1831 in Warsaw, Kingdom of Poland
Sadashiv Shinde (506 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Sadashiv Ganpatrao "Sadu" Shinde pronunciation (help·info) (18 August 1923, Bombay – 22 June 1955, Bombay) was an Indian cricketer who played in seven
James Ritchie (rugby union) (109 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
James McPhail Ritchie (10 July 1907 – 6 July 1942) was a Scottish international rugby union player, who died in World War II at Rawalpindi in British India
Henry Adoniram Swift (337 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Republican senatorial nomination in 1865. Four years later, he succumbed to typhoid fever at age 45. Swift County, Minnesota was named after him in 1870. Upham
William Leonard Carter (176 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
William Leonard Carter, R.E. (1877 – 4 July 1917) was a British businessman and army officer. He was born in Shanghai in 1877 was educated at St. Paul's
Joseph Marsh (Adventist) (1,264 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
his daughter's home in Tecumseh, Michigan on 13 September 1863, of typhoid fever. Marsh probably took opposition to the Trinity and the immortality of
Chiang Wei-shui (940 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Chiang Wei-shui (Chinese: 蔣渭水; Pe̍h-ōe-jī: Chiúⁿ Ūi-súi; 6 August 1890 – 5 August 1931) was a Taiwanese physician and activist. He was a founding member
Charlie Deal (324 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
65 games for the Terriers, due to being hospitalised with a bout of typhoid fever. In 1917 Deal led the National League in sacrifice hits with 29. He
Agustín Goovaerts (688 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Augustin Goovaerts was a Belgian architect and engineer, born in Schaerbeek, Brussels in 1885. Throughout his life, he designed a number of important urban
Zenker's degeneration (124 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
as rectus abdominis and diaphragm, and occurs in severe toxaemia as typhoid fever. It is also seen in electrical burns. Grossly the muscles appear pale
Jimmy Love (footballer) (563 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
James Love (17 March 1858 – 27 September 1882) was a Scottish footballer who is acknowledged as one of the first professional football players in England
Rozwadów (228 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Polish doctors, Eugene Lazowski and Stanisław Matulewicz created a fake typhoid fever epidemic in Rozwadów: "the quarantined area that Lazowski and Matulewicz
Ellen May Tower (521 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
not from warfare. After only 10 weeks of duty abroad, she died of typhoid fever "in a hospital tent" on December 9, 1898. She was 30 years old. The
G. W. Steevens (488 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
George Warrington "G. W." Steevens (10 December 1869 – 15 January 1900) was a British journalist and writer. Steevens was born in Sydenham, and educated
Hattie Leslie (175 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Hattie Leslie (allegedly born Libbie Spahn; November 14, 1868 – September 28, 1892) was an American female boxer who fought against Alice Leary in the
Edward Tootell (145 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Edward Tootell (22 November 1849 – 20 March 1878) was an English surgeon and amateur cricketer. He was born at Thurnham near Maidstone in Kent in 1849
Collins H. Johnston (810 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Medical Society, 1896. "Diagnosis of Typhoid Fever," The Clinical Review, November 1898. "The Diagnosis of Typhoid Fever," Physician and Surgeon: A Professional
Richard Johnson (cricketer, born 1829) (314 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
came in the match at Lord's. Johnson died suddenly at Cambridge from typhoid fever while still an undergraduate; his close friend Edmund Keble White, who
James Carroll (scientist) (501 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
Army Surgeon-General Robert Maitland O'Reilly, Carroll tested an oral typhoid fever vaccine on himself and 12 other volunteers from the military. Due to
Harry Frederick Whitchurch (427 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Harry Frederick Whitchurch VC (22 September 1866 – 16 August 1907) was an English recipient of the Victoria Cross, the highest and most prestigious award
Harry Mitchell (brewer) (260 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Captain Henry Mitchell Jr. (1862-1894) was managing director of a brewery company co-founded by his father Henry Mitchell. He was also superintendent of
Ephraim Anderson (155 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
for his work on the plasmids that render the bacteria responsible for typhoid fever and bacterial food poisoning insensitive to antibiotics. Anderson was
Larissa Reissner (2,483 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Larissa Mikhailovna Reissner (Russian: Лариса Михайловна Рейснер; 1 (13) May 1895 – 9 February 1926) was a Russian writer and revolutionary. She is best
George Prentiss (139 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Prentiss died in his hometown of Wilmington, Delaware, at age 26 from Typhoid Fever. https://www.thedeadballera.com/tooyoung.html Career statistics and
Arthur Fulton (engineer) (347 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
married Linda Marie Weber. In 1889, at the age of 35, Arthur died of typhoid fever in Wellington during an outbreak of the disease, leaving a widow and
John Kingston Jr. (167 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Spanish–American War. Soon after the war, Kingston died of peritonitis or typhoid fever on August 26, 1898, in Coamo, Puerto Rico and was buried there. "J.
Aristides Agramonte (456 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
research, he also studied plague, dengue, trachoma, malaria, tuberculosis, typhoid fever and more. After serving on the Yellow Fever Commission, he served as
Mary Brown (265 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Typhoid Mary (1869–1938), first identified asymptomatic carrier of typhoid fever in the United States Mary Brown (author) (1929–1999), British fantasy
Andrew Moir (anatomist) (652 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Andrew Moir (1806–1844) was a 19th-century Scottish anatomist linked to the body-snatching scandal which swept Scotland in the late 18th and early 19th
Wilhelm Diekamp (383 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Wilhelm Diekamp (13 May 1854 – 25 December 1885) was a German historian. Diekamp was born in Geldern. Soon after his birth, his parents moved to Münster
James Jamieson (Australian doctor) (176 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article
He also lectured at the University of Melbourne. Jamieson published Typhoid Fever in Melbourne in 1887 and Contributions to the Vital Statistics of Australia
William Williams (missionary) (1,552 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
William Williams (11 February 1859 – 22 April 1892) was a Welsh Presbyterian missionary to Khasi Hills, northeast India, in the late 19th century. He was
Lewis P. Olds (232 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
served in 1876 and 1877. Olds' first, Pauline Eugenia Olds, died of typhoid fever in 1864, at the age of 36. His second wife, Laura Haylander Olds, was
Dudley Forbes (cricketer) (477 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Captain Dudley Henry Forbes (13 January 1873 – 21 April 1901) played first-class cricket for Oxford University and the Marylebone Cricket Club (MCC). Born
Guido Fanconi (325 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
previously assumed, but rather follows a gastrointestinal pathway like typhoid fever. His understanding of pathophysiologic connections culminated in his
Asa Rogers (103 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Wisconsin State Assembly. Rogers died in Berlin, Wisconsin of pneumonia and typhoid fever. 'Wisconsin Blue Book 1875,' Biographical Sketch of Asa Rogers, pg.
Samuel Albert Cook (330 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Samuel Albert Cook (May 3, 1878 – February 10, 1915) was a medical doctor and member of the American Red Cross mission in Serbia during First World War
Heinrich Curschmann (234 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Fleckenfieber", was later translated into English and published as "Typhoid fever and typhus fever" (1901). Curschmann's name is lent to a number of eponymous
Health in Iraq (1,457 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
infrastructure in 2003 led to an increased incidence of cholera, dysentery, and typhoid fever. Malnutrition and childhood diseases, which had increased significantly
Gray baby syndrome (2,433 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
variety of bacteria infections like Streptococcus pneumoniae as well as typhoid fever, meningococcal sepsis, cholera, and eye infections. Chloramphenicol
Doña Joanna the Mad (212 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
gather with varied expressions. Philip I of Castile died suddenly of typhoid fever, and it was said she carried his casket around with her everywhere,
Leonidas Hubbard (746 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Island hospital. They met at the hospital when Hubbard was ill with typhoid fever. He became an assistant editor of Outing magazine and in 1903 led an
South Bay Phalanx (189 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
which were characterized as lazy, only added to the quick spread of typhoid fever in 1844. The final crack in the society occurred when "evangelical Protestants
Ong Kok Hai (204 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Research Sdn Bhd (MBDr), which develops a rapid diagnostic test for typhoid fever used in many typhoid endemic countries. He holds a BSc (Hons) in microbiology
Roman Frister (308 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Starachowice forced labor camp, where he witnessed his father die of typhoid fever; Mauthausen; Auschwitz; a death march to Mauthausen again, after which
The Lost Boy (novella) (383 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
family that suffers the loss of Grover, the 12-year-old son, who dies of typhoid fever during an extended family visit to the St. Louis World's Fair in 1904
Holger Hoiriis (831 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Holger Hoiriis or Højriis in Danish (1901–1942), was born in the Brabrand area, Denmark, but emigrated to the United States, where he became a recognized
William Lingan Gaither (162 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad between 1856 and 1857. Gaither caught typhoid fever at the Barnum's Hotel in Baltimore, Maryland and died a year later on
Hannah Primrose, Countess of Rosebery (9,440 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Hannah Primrose, Countess of Rosebery (née de Rothschild; 27 July 1851 – 19 November 1890) was the daughter of Baron Mayer de Rothschild and his wife Juliana
Nancy Talbot Clark (297 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
then bore a daughter who died within a year. Her husband succumbed to typhoid fever dying in March 1848. She found her way to Cleveland, where under the
Charles W. Roberts (602 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
commanded the 1st Brigade while General John H. Martindale suffered from typhoid fever. Roberts retired due to ill health in 1863 and was succeeded on January
John Harsh (184 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Saint Louis, Missouri. While in the Union Army, Harsh was stricken with typhoid fever and was sent home. He tried to reenlist in the army but was rejected
Arthur Scoullar (242 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
furniture warehousemen. In 1882, Scoullar's 17-year-old daughter died of typhoid fever. Scoullar was elected to the city council, and served a term as Mayor
Elmer Lee (1,085 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Principles in the Treatment of Typhoid Fever". Medical Record. New York. 53 (9). 1891-02-26. "The Treatment of Typhoid Fever". The American Journal of Dental
Commiphora africana (531 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Tree parts are used to treat a wide range of ailments - fruits for typhoid fever and stomach problems, bark for malaria, resin for convulsions and for
First Unitarian Church (Berkeley, California) (406 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
two-year European tour with his wife and daughter. He came down with typhoid fever and died in September 1900. In 1908 the congregation built an adjacent
Mary Darling (Civil War nurse) (317 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
serve the soldiers. In December 1861, Darling's husband fell ill with typhoid fever. He was transported to Mound City Hospital in Illinois until March 1863
George Heist (473 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Heist was 36 years of age. His father had died at the age of 24 of typhoid fever, the course of which presented many points of similarity to the fatal
Julien Reverchon (284 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
married Marie Henri on 24 July 1864; they had two sons who died of typhoid fever in 1884. After abandoning botany for a few years, he started collecting
David Stow Adam (366 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Christianity in Asia first hand. While in Canton, China, he contracted typhoid fever and pneumonia, dying on 31 January 1925. A Roll of the Graduates of
William Barraud (457 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Margaret Harrison. William died in Kensington, London from dysentery and typhoid fever on 1 October 1850, in his fortieth year. Stephen, Leslie, ed. (1885)
Isabella Ayuk (1,129 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
late sister who died of typhoid fever. VMMF was committed to the protection of rural dwellers against the spread of typhoid fever, malaria, HIV\AIDS, tuberculosis
Firdausi Qadri (1,018 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
pylori infected people in Bangladesh and the responses in patients with typhoid fever as well as vaccinees. Qadri got her BSc and MSc degree in biochemistry
David Wykes (372 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
for Wolves, scoring 69 goals. He died in a Wolverhampton hospital of typhoid fever and pneumonia on 7 October 1895, aged 28, the day after playing against
Hans Delmotte (488 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
entitled "Contributions to pathological physiology of gastric secretion in typhoid fever" was already completed in 1944. After the evacuation of Auschwitz in
Joseph Pawelka (557 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
way to the North Island city of Palmerston North, where he contracted typhoid fever and was hospitalised for five months. On 29 September 1909, he married
Roger Montgomerie (419 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
wood, and in painting in oil and water colours. Montgomerie died of typhoid fever, unmarried on 25 October 1880 at Annick Lodge, Ayrshire, the family
John S. Harris (horticulturalist) (432 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
propagation at the 1893 Chicago World’s Fair. Harris died of influenza and typhoid fever at age 74, in 1901, in La Crescent, after a long illness. He is buried
George Ash (Australian politician) (775 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
a South Terrace private hospital of haemorrhage following a bout of typhoid fever. Tributes were paid to his memory by Sir John Downer, S. J. Way and
Health in the Philippines (542 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS), Sore Eyes, Tuberculosis, Typhoid Fever Health care in the Philippines HIV/AIDS in the Philippines Smoking in
John Wombacher (562 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
his teammates as the captain of the 1897 team. However, he contracted typhoid fever and was unable to report to the university in September 1897. Wombacher
Fresh Start (comics) (2,202 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article
Annual #1 Secret Warps: Iron Hammer Annual #1 Typhoid Fever: Spider-Man #1 Typhoid Fever: X-Men #1 Typhoid Fever: Iron Fist #1 Amazing Spider-Man: Wakanda
Samuel Lewis (politician) (524 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
increasing his vote total to 50,346. He died on July 28, 1854, of a typhoid fever, at the age of 55. Theodore Clarke Smith (1895). The Free Soil Party
Charles Edward Page (583 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
(Fowler & Wells, 1884) Pneumonia and Typhoid Fever: A Study (Damrell & Upham, 1891) The Successful Treatment of Typhoid Fever. (Arena, 1892) What is Man's Natural
Josiah Brewer (436 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
first wife, survived him, except for his youngest son, who died of typhoid fever contracted in the American Civil War.  This article incorporates public