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Longer titles found: The New Negro: The Life of Alain Locke (view)

searching for The New Negro 183 found (239 total)

alternate case: the New Negro

Archibald Motley (4,812 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article

considered one of the major contributors to the Harlem Renaissance, or the New Negro Movement, a time in which African-American art reached new heights not
Hubert Harrison (5,667 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Harrison provided a "race first" political perspective. He founded the "New Negro Movement," as a race-conscious, internationalist, mass-based, radical
Rashid Johnson (5,279 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Museum, New York The New Negro Escapist Social and Athletic Club (Emmett) (2008), National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C. The New Negro Escapist Social
Dox Thrash (2,840 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
to capture the personality, lives, and essence of their people in The New Negro. He explained “The Negro physiognomy must be freshly and objectively
We Speak: Black Artists in Philadelphia, 1920s–1970s (368 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
included paintings, photographs, prints, drawings and sculpture from the New Negro movement of the 1920s, the Works Progress Administration print works
William Edouard Scott (1,930 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
artist. Before Alain Locke asked African Americans to create and portray the New Negro that would thrust them into the future, artists like William Edouard
Benjamin Mays (6,984 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
in 1934 which elevated him to national prominence as a proponent of the New Negro movement. Six years later, Mays was tapped to lead Morehouse out of
Hemsley Winfield (1,369 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
1907 – January 15, 1934) was an African-American dancer who created the New Negro Art Theater Dance Group. He was born Osborne Hemsley Winfield to a middle-class
The Crisis (3,864 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Periodicals 20.2 (2010): 216–240. PDF. Stavney, Anne. "'Mothers of Tomorrow': The New Negro Renaissance and the Politics of Maternal Representation". African American
Cyril Briggs (1,688 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
founder and editor of The Crusader, a seminal New York magazine of the New Negro Movement of the 1920s, and as founder of the African Blood Brotherhood
Seven Songs for Malcolm X (1,933 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Seven Songs for Malcolm X is a British documentary film about the life of Malcolm X, the influential civil rights activist who was assassinated in 1965
Nashville Globe (210 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Tennessee Encyclopedia. Retrieved 2021-04-06. Briggs, Gabriel A. (2015). The New Negro in the Old South. Rutgers University Press. ISBN 9780813574806.
Within Our Gates (2,414 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
of blacks to cities of the North and Midwest, and the emergence of the "New Negro". It was part of a genre called race films. The plot features an African-American
Civil rights movement (1896–1954) (11,994 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
back when whites attacked them. A. Philip Randolph introduced the term the New Negro in 1917, becoming a catchphrase to describe the new spirit of militancy
List of figures from the Harlem Renaissance (402 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
The Harlem Renaissance, also known as the New Negro Movement, was a cultural, social, and artistic explosion centered in Harlem, New York, and spanning
Cincinnati Tigers (360 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
significantly less games than the rest of the league. The Tigers joined the new Negro American League as charter members in 1937, which elevated the club
Stony the Road (320 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
African-American history during the Reconstruction era, Redemption era, and the New Negro Movement. Stony the Road is a spiritual successor to Eric Foner's Reconstruction:
Black No More (2,109 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Madam C. J. Walker and others. The novel represents a cornerstone of the New Negro Movement in its transformative discussion of the aesthetic and cultural
Universal Negro Improvement Association and African Communities League (3,105 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
its temporary headquarters in New York to Cleveland. In October 1940 the New Negro World started publishing out of Cleveland. After the 1942 International
Andy Razaf (959 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
1917–18 in the Hubert Harrison-edited Voice, the first newspaper of the "New Negro Movement". Razaf collaborated with composers Eubie Blake, Don Redman
James Weldon Johnson (4,058 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Artistic Ambassadors: Literary and International Representation of the New Negro Era. Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press. p. 3. ISBN 978-0813933689
Chicago American Giants (856 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Cole's American Giants. The next season the American Giants joined the new Negro National League, losing the pennant to the Pittsburgh Crawfords in a
May Howard Jackson (4,205 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
July 12, 1931) was an African American sculptor and artist. Active in the New Negro Movement and prominent in Washington, D.C.'s African American intellectual
French Congo (1,160 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
(1925). "The Negro Mind Reaches Out". In Locke, Alain LeRoy (ed.). The New Negro: An Interpretation (1927 ed.). Albert and Charles Boni. p. 385. LCCN 25025228
Indianapolis ABCs (864 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
absence from baseball, Taylor reorganized the ABCs and entered them in the new Negro National League (NNL), finishing in fourth place with a 39–35 record
Richard Bruce Nugent (2,026 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
including Hemsley Winfield and Asadata Dafora, even dancing in drag with the New Negro Art Theatre Dance Troupe.[citation needed] Nugent's aggressive and honest
A Visit from the Old Mistress (1,515 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Houghton Mifflin. Bindman, David; Gates Jr., Henry Louis (2019-05-17), "4. The New Negro", The Image of the Black in Western Art, Volume IV: From the American
Charles C. Dawson (1,375 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Charles C. Dawson (June 12, 1889 – 1981) was an American painter, printmaker, illustrator, and graphic designer. Dawson was born in Georgia in 1889. He
Hipster (1940s subculture) (1,187 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
Artistic Ambassadors: Literary and International Representation of the New Negro Era (Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press, 2013), pp. 145–148
José Méndez (1,446 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
in 1920 as playing manager with Wilkinson's Kansas City Monarchs in the new Negro National League. He continued to split his time between shortstop and
African-American veterans lynched after World War I (3,056 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
lacked the ignition to cause real change. This change would be called the "New Negro Movement" and could be described as the radical political movement toward
East–West League (1,109 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
expelled part-way through the season after a dispute. Because initially the new Negro National League operated in both the Eastern and Midwestern regions
Safeway (6,899 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
until the move to Pleasanton, California in 1996. In the late 1930s, the New Negro Alliance boycotted the Sanitary Grocery Company (then a Safeway subsidiary)
1919 in jazz (716 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
mobs, a monumental step was made when the NAACP promoted the slogan "The new Negro has no fear", which helped the cause of jazz. The Original Dixieland
Mecklenburg Investment Company Building (129 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
measures 42 feet wide and 98 feet deep. The building is associated with the "New Negro" movement and is located in the historic African-American community
Harlem (12,836 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
around the time of the end of World War I, Harlem became associated with the New Negro movement, and then the artistic outpouring known as the Harlem Renaissance
Pan-African Congress (3,699 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Artistic Ambassadors: Literary and International Representation of the New Negro Era. Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press. pp. 121–22. Dunstan
Idabelle Yeiser (876 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
1954) was an American woman poet, writer, and educator, who was part of the New Negro Movement in Philadelphia. Yeiser was the daughter of John G. Yeiser
Barbara Clare Foley (2,674 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Making of the New Negro (Illinois, 2003), explores the radical origins of the Harlem Renaissance. Alain Locke's formulation of the New Negro as culture
African Blood Brotherhood (2,252 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Twentieth Century America. London: Verso Books, 1998. Shannon King, "Enter the New Negro: State Violence and Black Resistance during World War I and the 1920s
Chicago race riot of 1919 (4,559 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Jonathan S. (April 2012). "'Our Changed Attitude': Armed Defense and the New Negro in the 1919 Chicago Race Riot". Journal of the Gilded Age and Progressive
The Fire in the Flint (339 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
written during the Harlem Renaissance and contains themes consistent with the New Negro Movement as well as promoting anti-racist themes and shedding light
Daguerreotype (12,954 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Frederick Douglass and Sojourner Truth laid the groundwork for the idea of the "New Negro". Photographers would take daguerreotypes that would depict African
Chicago (23,959 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
immense cultural impact, called the Chicago Black Renaissance, part of the New Negro Movement, in art, literature, and music. Continuing racial tensions
1937 Cincinnati Tigers season (105 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Cincinnati Tigers season was their first season playing baseball in the new Negro American League, also in its first season. The Tigers were previously
Indian South Africans (4,832 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
(1925). "The Negro Mind Reaches Out". In Locke, Alain LeRoy (ed.). The New Negro: An Interpretation (1927 ed.). Albert and Charles Boni. p. 385. LCCN 25025228
Langston Hughes (8,469 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Rivers": first published in The Crisis (June 1921), p. 17. Included in The New Negro (1925), The Weary Blues, Langston Hughes Reader, and Selected Poems
African-American socialism (2,864 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Cite journal requires |journal= (help) Bynum, Cornelius L. (2011). "The New Negro and Social Democracy during the Harlem Renaissance, 1917–37". The Journal
Model (person) (10,300 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
profound need for black women to partake in the advertising process for the new "Negro Market". With the help of Branford Models, the first black agency, 1946
Mathew Ahmann (1,392 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
six children. Wikimedia Commons has media related to Mathew Ahmann. The New Negro (1961) Race: Challenge to Religion (1963) The Church and the Urban Racial
Carter G. Woodson (5,732 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
leaders who discovered their "lost history". Woodson's project for the "New Negro History" had a dual purpose of giving Black Americans a history to be
Washington race riot of 1919 (2,929 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Chicago Race Riot". Freeman 1973, pp. 67–131. Foley, Barbara (2003). "The New Negro and the Left". Spectres of 1919. University of Illinois Press. pp. 1–69
Bandung Conference (3,306 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Artistic Ambassadors: Literary and International Representation of the New Negro Era. Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press. pp. 146–172. ISBN 978-0813933689
Classified X (221 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
like doing something extra-stupid") gave way after World War II to "The New Negro" -- a put-upon "keeper of conscience" for the white protagonists. Pic
Marita Bonner (2,009 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
important meeting place for many of the writers and artists involved in the New Negro Renaissance. While living in Washington D.C., Bonner met William Almy
Claude McKay (5,835 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
American Poetry. McKay, Claude (1992). "The Tropics in New York" from The New Negro. New York: Simon & Schuster. p. 135. ISBN 0-684-83831-1. "Claude McKay:
Indians in Kenya (3,052 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
(1925). "The Negro Mind Reaches Out". In Locke, Alain LeRoy (ed.). The New Negro: An Interpretation (1927 ed.). Albert and Charles Boni. pp. 404–405
Negro Southern League (1920–1936) (1,451 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article
handful of the teams continued on. The Nashville Elite Giants excelled in the new Negro National League for years, while the Memphis Red Sox and Birmingham
Charles Sidney Gilpin (2,091 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
 0807826286. Robeson, Paul (2007). "Reflections on O'Neill's Plays" The New Negro. Princeton, NJ: Princeton UP. pp. 510–511. ISBN 9780691126517. Madden
Wallace Thurman (1,321 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
that black art should serve as propaganda for those ends. He said that the New Negro movement spent too much energy trying to show white Americans that blacks
Amaza Lee Meredith (2,130 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
modern design approach. During this time she also came in contact with the new negro movement and grew into it as a young, educated black woman who disagreed
Walter White (NAACP) (4,566 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Carl Van Vechten and Alfred A. Knopf, White was one of the founders of the "New Negro" cultural flowering. Popularly known as the Harlem Renaissance, the
1882 in poetry (1,279 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Spencer (died 1975), American Black poet and active participant in the New Negro Movement February 9 – James Stephens (died 1950), Irish novelist and
Dark Princess (764 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
(2013). Artistic Ambassadors: Literary and International Representation of the New Negro Era. Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press. pp. 121–145.
William Grant Still (2,861 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
(1994). ""Dean of Afro-American Composers" or "Harlem Renaissance Man": "The New Negro" and the Musical Poetics of William Grant Still". The Arkansas Historical
William Grant Still (2,861 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
(1994). ""Dean of Afro-American Composers" or "Harlem Renaissance Man": "The New Negro" and the Musical Poetics of William Grant Still". The Arkansas Historical
Die Freundschaft (461 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
pp. 74–75. ISBN 9780875863559. Pochmara, Anna (2011). The Making of the New Negro: Black Authorship, Masculinity, and Sexuality in the Harlem Renaissance
W. E. B. Du Bois (19,756 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
worth, and were representative of an emerging attitude referred to as the New Negro. In the editorial "Returning Soldiers" he wrote: "But, by the God of
Paul Laurence Dunbar (3,950 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Artistic Ambassadors: Literary and International Representation of the New Negro Era. Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press. p. 83. ISBN 978-0813933689
Shaw (Washington, D.C.) (2,627 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
Furthermore, in 1925, Professor Alain LeRoy Locke advanced the idea of "The New Negro" while Langston Hughes descended from LeDroit Park to hear the "sad
William Pickens (2,124 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
"The Ultimate Effects of Segregation and Discrimination" (1915), "The New Negro" (1916), "The Kind of Democracy the Negro Race Expects" (1918), "The
Ball culture (7,026 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
where men dress as women and women dress as men. During the height of the New Negro era and the tourist invasion of Harlem, it was fashionable for the intelligentsia
Richard Wright (author) (7,059 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
Artistic Ambassadors: Literary and International Representation of the New Negro Era. Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press. pp. 153–153, 161
Military history of African Americans (12,841 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
ISBN 978-1-283-60011-8. Williams, Chad Louis (2007). Vanguards of the New Negro: African American Veterans and Post World 1 Racial Militancy. (Association
William Stanley Braithwaite (1,991 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Thought (1916) Poetry Review of America (1916-1917) In Alain Locke, The New Negro (1925) In James Weldon Johnson, The Book of American Negro Poetry (New
Joseph C. Hough Jr. (465 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
(1968). Black Power and White Protestants: a Christian response to the new Negro pluralism. New York: Oxford University Press. OCLC 312410. ———; Rhoades
Renaissance Ballroom & Casino (1,204 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
significant entertainment center during the Harlem Renaissance, and the New Negro Movement in Harlem. When African American culture and art flourished
Revolutionary integrationism (1,737 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Frederick Douglass and other abolitionists before the Civil War, and in the "New Negro" movement in the 1900s–1910s around the Crisis journal's 1919 articles
List of LGBT African Americans (1,362 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
letter indicating Lesbian, Gay, or Bisexual. Jeffrey C. Stewart (2017). The New Negro: The Life of Alain Locke. Oxford University Press. p. 877. ISBN 978-0-199-72331-7
East African campaign (World War I) (6,281 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
doi:10.13109/gege.2014.40.2.160. ISSN 0340-613X. Schneck, Peter (2008). "The New Negro from Germany". American Art. The University of Chicago Press. 22 (3):
Gorée (5,258 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
(1925). "The Negro Mind Reaches Out". In Locke, Alain LeRoy (ed.). The New Negro: An Interpretation (1927 ed.). Albert and Charles Boni. p. 385. LCCN 25025228
Frank Crosswaith (844 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
 62. LCCN 43002707. Retrieved 5 October 2020. Cornelius L. Bynum, "The New Negro and Social Democracy during the Harlem Renaissance, 1917-37," Journal
Belford Lawson Jr. (1,066 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
of Law, where he received his J.D. in 1932. In 1933, Lawson founded the New Negro Alliance (NNA) in Washington, D.C., along with John A. Davis Sr. and
List of Negro league baseball champions (2,182 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Negro National League became the "eastern" league and a year later the new Negro American League assumed the role of the "western" league. Both leagues
History of African Americans in Chicago (5,356 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
ISBN 978-0-7595-2427-9) Coit, Jonathan S., "'Our Changed Attitude': Armed Defense and the New Negro in the 1919 Chicago Race Riot", Journal of the Gilded Age and Progressive
Willis Nathaniel Huggins (498 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
teacher. During the Chicago Race Riot of 1919, Huggins became involved in the New Negro Movement, writing for a number of pro African-American journals. He
Abraham Grenthal (97 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Is This, Anyway?: Community Politics and Grassroots Activism During the New Negro Era. NYU Press. ISBN 9781479889082 – via Google Books. Wintz, Cary D
Encyclopedia of the Harlem Renaissance (767 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Barbara Meister (Indiana University Press, 2006) Political Aspects of “The New Negro” by Christoph Ellssel (GRIN Verlag Pub, 2008) Teaching the Harlem Renaissance:
Elizabeth Longford Prize (623 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Roberts for Churchill: Walking with Destiny Jeffrey C. Stewart for The New Negro: The Life of Alain Locke 2018 Giles Tremlett for Isabella of Castile:
Bronze Booklet series (748 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
meeting halls." Ira Reid, Adult Education Among Negroes. Alain Locke, The New Negro and his Music. Alain Locke, Negro Art: Past and Present. Ralph Bunche
Sargent Claude Johnson (1,187 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
member of the bohemian San Francisco Bay community and influenced by the New Negro Movement, Sargent Johnson's early work focused on racial identity. Sargent
If We Must Die (1,609 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Renaissance. Wallace Thurman considered the poem as embodying the essence of the New Negro movement as it was not aimed at arousing sympathy, but rather consisted
Brenda Ray Moryck (986 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Renaissance and have been included in several recent anthologies, among them The new Negro: Readings on race, representation, and African American culture, 1892-1938
Student activism (9,154 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
ends with 153 arrests". BBC News. 2010-12-01. Wolters, Raymond (1975). The New Negro on Campus: Black College Rebellions of the 1920s. pp. 29–69. ISBN 069104628X
A'Lelia Walker (1,744 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
site. Langston Hughes called her death "The end of the gay times of the New Negro era in Harlem." He later wrote in his book, The Big Sea, that, fittingly
Blaise Diagne (1,055 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
(1925). "The Negro Mind Reaches Out". In Locke, Alain LeRoy (ed.). The New Negro: An Interpretation (1927 ed.). Albert and Charles Boni. p. 385. LCCN 25025228
Alpha Phi Alpha (14,130 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
of humanity. In 1933 fraternity brother Belford Lawson Jr. founded the New Negro Alliance (NNA) in Washington D.C. to combat white-run business in black
Elizabeth Williams (photographer) (432 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Americans. Within and outside of the military, Williams photographed the "New Negro" that changed the stereotypical narrative of African Africans. Williams
Omaha Monitor (468 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
of Illinois Press. ISBN 9780252026188. Breaux, Richard M. (2012). "The new negro renaissance in Omaha and Lincoln, 1910–1940". In Glasrud, Bruce A.;
Waring Cuney (557 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
It has been widely anthologized and is considered a minor classic of the New Negro Movement. At Lincoln University, Cuney was a classmate and friend of
Nella Larsen (4,671 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
have been some arguments that Larsen’s work did not well represent theNew Negro” movement because of the main characters in her novels being confused
Charles Young (United States Army officer) (5,073 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
Charles Young. Praeger. p. 159. ISBN 978-0275980054. Locke, Alain (1997). The New Negro: Voices of the Harlem Renaissance. New York: Simon & Schuster. p. 133
Charles Young (United States Army officer) (5,073 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
Charles Young. Praeger. p. 159. ISBN 978-0275980054. Locke, Alain (1997). The New Negro: Voices of the Harlem Renaissance. New York: Simon & Schuster. p. 133
Gertrude Schalk (634 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
ISBN 9780674372696 Ann Allen Shockley, "Afro-American Women Writers: The New Negro Movement, 1924-1933" in Lisa Rado, ed., Rereading Modernism: New Directions
National Congress of British West Africa (3,107 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
(1925). "The Negro Mind Reaches Out". In Locke, Alain LeRoy (ed.). The New Negro: An Interpretation (1927 ed.). Albert and Charles Boni. p. 400. LCCN 25025228
Ellen Gallagher (3,178 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
having a more subtle undercurrent related to race. She was inspired by the New Negro movement as well as modernist abstraction. Gallagher also uses found
The Negro in Art (576 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
one for the NAACP's leader, W. E. B. Du Bois, as what became known as the New Negro Movement (or Harlem Renaissance) began to take off. Black artists found
Allison Davis (anthropologist) (1,746 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
actively in the explosion of black literature and culture known as the New Negro Renaissance. After graduation, the reality of finding a job in academics
Daisy Elizabeth Adams Lampkin (1,380 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
involved in the local leadership of the suffragist movement. She joined the New Negro Women's Equal Franchise Federation, which would later be renamed the
Addison N. Scurlock (506 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Scurlock Studio was affiliated with ideas about pride and progress of the New Negro. The location of the studio in Scurlock's home community and its location
George Washington Ellis (237 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Artistic Ambassadors: Literary and International Representation of the New Negro Era. Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press. pp. 2–3, 181. ISBN 0813933684
Jessie Redmon Fauset (3,019 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Crisis. December 1921: 60–69. "The Gift of Laughter." In Locke, Alaine. The New Negro: An Interpretation. New York: A. and C. Boni, 1925. "Dark Algiers the
Peter H. Clark (1,063 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Blood Brotherhood, Black Radicalism, and Pan-African Liberation in the New Negro Movement, 1917-1936" (PDF). Marxist-Nkrumaist Forum. Centre for Consciencist
FESTAC 77 (2,775 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
the Pan-Africanism of W. E. B. Du Bois and Alain Locke's concept of the New Negro, started a journal and publishing house in Paris called Présence Africaine;
Chicago Black Renaissance (2,677 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
ISSN 0002-7359. JSTOR 1594621. Wolfskill, Phoebe (2009). "Caricature and the New Negro in the Work of Archibald Motley Jr. and Palmer Hayden". The Art Bulletin
Red Perkins (627 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
FamilySearch. Retrieved 20 February 2016. Breaux, Richard M. (2012). "The New Negro Renaissance in Omaha and Lincoln, 1910-1940". In Glasrud, Bruce A.;
William Henry Hunt (diplomat) (637 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
Artistic Ambassadors: Literary and International Representation of the New Negro Era. Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press. pp. 66–67. "A Black
Post-black art (671 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Self-portrait as the black Jimmy Connors in the finals of the New Negro Escapist Social and Athletic Club Summer Tennis Tournament, 2008
Racial uplift (1,251 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
(1991). Uplifting the Race: Black middle-class ideology in the era of the "New Negro" 1890-1935. Barrett, D (2004). "Globalizing social movement theory:
The 1619 Project: A New Origin Story (684 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Hamer "Greenwood", poem by Jasmine Mans "Inheritance" by Trymaine Lee "The New Negro", poem by A. Van Jordan "Bad Blood", fiction by Yaa Gyasi "Medicine"
Harry McAlpin (570 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
1929 to 1933. When the New Deal got underway in 1933, McAlpin joined the New Negro Alliance to "protect employment of Negroes under the [National Recovery
Beulah Woodard (888 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Retrieved 2019-02-27. Farrington, Lisa (2006). "The Harlem Renaissance and the New Negro" in Creating their own Image: The History of African-American Women
Julius Waties Waring (1,747 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
New York: Oxford University Press US. A film clip "The Open Mind - The New Negro (1957)" is available at the Internet Archive American Experience: the
J. Augustus Smith (613 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Smith. The stage production featured an all-Black cast, members of the New Negro Repertory Theater Group, founded by Smith. The cast members reprised
Asbury Park High School (4,895 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Yeiser (c. 1900-1954), poet, writer, and educator, who was part of the New Negro Movement in Philadelphia. Principal's Corner, Asbury Park School District
Lulu Johnson (742 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Rockefeller Archive Center. Retrieved September 17, 2015. Breaux, Richard M. "The New Negro Arts and Letters Movement among Black University Students in the Midwest
The Voice of the Negro (book) (462 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article
almost three hundred weekly papers. He grouped them into topics such as "the new negro and the old", black reactions to World War I, reactions to riots, lynchings
A Study of Negro Artists (468 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
African-American arts scene developing in New York City. The film is an example of the New Negro Arts movement associated with the Harlem Renaissance. It also exemplifies
Lonne Elder III (2,043 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Expo ’67 World’s Fair in Montreal, Canada. Elder served as director of the new Negro Ensemble Company’s playwrights’ division from 1967 until 1969, and when
Palmer Hayden (2,339 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
22 (1): 102–115. Wolfskill, Phoebe (September 2009). "Caricature and the New Negro in the Work of Archibald Motley Jr. and Palmer Hayden". Art Bulletin
Alice McGrath (1,332 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
dropped out during her first semester. She became friends with members of the New Negro Theater where she once performed a reading of Langston Hughes' poetry
A. Lawrence Lowell (7,451 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
quotes, 204–205. Pages 195–202 are excerpted from Raymond Wolters, The New Negro on Campus: Black College Rebellions of the 1920s (Princeton, NJ: Princeton
Wilmer Fields (2,215 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
mid-1980s, worked briefly as a security guard and then became part of the new Negro League Baseball Players Association, which helped raise money for income-strapped
Willis Patterson (380 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
was the music director of the University of Michigan Men's Glee Club. The New Negro Spiritual Collection (2002) The Unlikely Saga of a Singer from Ann Arbor
Thelma Myrtle Duncan (331 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
"Black Magic" Stephens, Judith L. (1999). The Harlem Renaissance and the New Negro Movement. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. pp. 115–116. "Thelma
Living Between Two Worlds (485 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
the contemporary problems facing the 'Old Negro' and the emergence of the 'New Negro...'". Seidebaum, Art (February 17, 1964). "A Negro's Sermon on Film"
And Yet They Paused (486 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
and Robert E. Williams. The Plays of Georgia Douglas Johnson from the New Negro Renaissance to the Civil Rights Movement. Urbana-Champlain, IL: U of
Hurston/Wright Legacy Award (3,911 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
(Alfred A. Knopf) Heavy: An American Memoir, Kiese Laymon (Scribner) The New Negro: The Life of Alain Locke, Jeffrey C. Stewart (Oxford University Press)
G. David Houston (1,123 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Louisiana Digital Library. Retrieved 2021-02-01. Relerford, Jimisha I., "The New Negro Teaches Writing: G. David Houston's Activist Rhetoric at Howard University
Malcolm Boyd (1,601 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
referred to Boyd at the conference in his 1963 speech, "The Old Negro and the New Negro." Malcolm X said, "Rev. Boyd believes that the conference might have
History of Harlem (10,615 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
around the time of the end of World War I, Harlem became associated with the New Negro movement, and then the artistic outpouring known as the Harlem Renaissance
Joe Cambria (1,455 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
the gate receipts with the players. In 1933 the Black Sox played in the new Negro National League. Cambria's team faced competition from two other Baltimore-based
James R. Stewart (456 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
new ones. He held a series of Conferences and Conventions, launched the New Negro World Newspaper and resumed offering the Course of African Philosophy
Robert W. Bagnall (350 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
his position because the organization had to cut staff and salaries. "The New Negro Movement". Library of Congress. Shelton, Bernice (November 1943). "Robert
Olivia Ward Bush-Banks (1,139 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
contributor to Colored American magazine and a strong supporter of the "New Negro Movement." She helped sculptor Richmond Barthé and author/poet Langston
John Aubrey Davis Sr. (731 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
University. Davis had become active in civil rights in 1933, when he formed the New Negro Alliance with Belford Lawson Jr. and M. Franklin Thorne. They challenged
Passing (novel) (6,443 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
early as 1925, Nella Larsen had decided that she wanted to be among the "New Negro" writers receiving considerable attention at the time. Initially writing
Elise Forrest Harleston (1,154 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
stereotypes of African Americans, and her works reflected the image of the "New Negro". Soon, Edwin and Elise both returned to Charleston. In 1922, when becoming
African Americans in foreign policy (9,897 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
influenced the ways in which they approached racial diplomacy during the New Negro era and the Harlem Renaissance. Between Bassett's appointment in 1869
Omaha Guide (950 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
et al. 2007, p. 276. Paz 1996, p. 239. Breaux, Richard M. (2012). "The new negro renaissance in Omaha and Lincoln, 1910–1940". In Glasrud, Bruce A.;
Esther Popel (1,214 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Poems". Beltway Poetry Quarterly. 14 (3). Shockley, Ann Allen (2012). "The New Negro Movement 1924-193?". Rereading Modernism RLE: New Directions in Feminist
Adelaide Lawson (5,838 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
American but supported the rights of African Americans and participated in the New Negro movement of her time. In 1923 her work appeared for the first time at
Sadie Peterson Delaney (2,498 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
1978:122-124. McDougald EJ. The Task of Negro Womanhood. In: Locke A, ed. The New Negro. New York: Johnson Reprint Corporation, 1968: 369-384. Oppenheim G.
To the White Fiends (343 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
 105. ISBN 978-0-7391-2029-3. Cooper, Wayne (1964). "Claude McKay and the New Negro of the 1920's". Phylon. 25 (3): 297–306. doi:10.2307/273789. ISSN 0031-8906
1926 Colored World Series (6,820 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Birmingham teams, which had played in the NNL in 1925, left to join the new Negro Southern League and did not renew their franchises, which were returned
Cane (novel) (3,518 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
could understand instead of vaguely guess at." In his 1939 review "The New Negro", Sanders Redding wrote: "Cane was experimental, a potpourri of poetry
Martha Gruening (1,943 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Hill House. Gates, Henry Louis & Jarrett, Gene Andrew, 1975- (2007). The new Negro : readings on race, representation, and African American culture, 1892-1938
Edna Guy (1,315 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
to start her own company, but by March 1931 she was performing with the New Negro Art Theatre as a featured artist alongside Winfield. For this show,
James Purdy (4,929 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
literature. The influence of Chicago's jazz scene and the experience of the "New Negro Renaissance" is reflected in all his early work. It begins with the
Gratien Candace (828 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
(1925). "The Negro Mind Reaches Out". In Locke, Alain LeRoy (ed.). The New Negro: An Interpretation (1927 ed.). Albert and Charles Boni. p. 385. LCCN 25025228
Osceola McKaine (521 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Retrieved February 16, 2021. Williams, Chad L. (Summer 2007). "Vanguards of the New Negro: African American Veterans and Post-World War I Racial Militancy". The
Zanzye H.A. Hill (657 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Retrieved 2023-01-14 – via Newspapers.com. Breaux, Richard M. (2004). "The New Negro Arts and Letters Movement among Black University Students in the Midwest
Donald Spivey (634 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
and his presentation on “The Historical Richness of Black Baseball in the New Negro Movement, 1919-1941,” at the National Endowment for the Humanities,
Lee D. Baker (2,201 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
culture, through such examples as world's fairs, popular monthlies, and the 'New Negro' movement, on political trends." Leonard Lieberman, writing in Social
The Color Curtain (1,660 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Artistic Ambassadors: Literary and International Representation of the New Negro Era. University of Virginia Press. pp. 148–149. Fabre, Michel (1973)
Edith Renfrow Smith (1,584 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
graduated as valedictorian of his class at Hampton and was a part of the New Negro Alliance in Washington, D.C. in the 1930s. Evanel Renfrow (1908-1994)
Paulette Nardal (3,477 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
inspiration. Senghor acknowledged Nardal's involvement in founding the "New Negro Movement" in a speech delivered at Howard University in 1966. The Clamart
Bessie Woodson Yancey (747 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
S2CID 146641392. Kory, Fern (2005-06-13). "Children's Literature and the "New Negro"". Children's Literature. 33 (1): 258–262. doi:10.1353/chl.2005.0017
Maud E. Craig Sampson Williams (3,028 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Prairie View A&M University). In many respects, Williams epitomized the "New Negro Woman" of the early twentieth century, an image which emphasized respectability
Raymond Wolters (696 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
economic policies of President Franklin D. Roosevelt's New Deal. 1975. The New Negro on Campus: Black College Rebellions of the 1920s. Princeton University
Chocolate Kiddies 1925 European tour (3,725 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Great Migration: The Chocolate Kiddies and the German Experience of the New Negro Renaissance," by Paul J. Edwards, Modernism/modernity (Johns Hopkins
List of Delta Sigma Theta sisters (5,038 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Project; one of the most revered poets of the New Negro Era (Harlem Renaissance); poetry reflected themes of the New Negro Era – racial pride, rediscovery of
Ed Rile (1,514 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
eight games for Dayton in 1919. Rile joined the Indianapolis ABCs of the new Negro National League for the start of the 1920 season. However by late August
Joseph Forer (5,091 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
District of Columbia. (Belford Lawson Jr. (1901-1985), co-founder of the New Negro Alliance (NNA), filed an amicus curiae for the National Lawyers Guild
Blues People (5,130 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
predominant urban population in the North, and there was the emergence of the "New Negro". This was the catalyst for the beginning of the "Negro Renaissance"
Gene Andrew Jarrett (2,556 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
2009, 2012); co-edited with Herbert Woodward Martin and Ronald Primeau The New Negro: Readings on Race, Representation, and African American Culture (Princeton
Tenement housing in Chicago (1,945 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Coit, Jonathan S. (2012). ""Our Changed Attitude": Armed Defense and the New Negro in the 1919 Chicago Race Riot". The Journal of the Gilded Age and Progressive
On the Trail of Negro Folk-songs (763 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
J. Rosamond Johnson; Negro Poets and Their Poems by Robert Kerlin; The New Negro: An Interpretation. by Alain Locke". American Journal of Sociology.
Mythology of Benjamin Banneker (41,712 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Reprinted in Gates, Jr., Henry Louis; Garrett, Gene Andrew (2007). The New Negro: Readings on Race, Representation, and African American Culture, 1892–1938
Howard School of International Relations (2,822 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
visible in his involvement with the Harlem Renaissance, which he labeled the New Negro movement. In this new movement, Locke gave voice to a Black America
Byron Lewis (3,572 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Urbanite, was conceived as a sophisticated literary magazine for theNew Negro.” Featuring stories by Langston Hughes, Lorraine Hansberry and LeRoi
Baháʼí Faith in South Carolina (12,679 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
essential stage on welding humanity "into a single organism".: p.279  See "The New Negro". The Baháʼís produced a documentary about this The Invisible Soldiers
List of films based on actual events (before 2000) (38,590 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
of blacks to cities of the North and Midwest, and the emergence of the "New Negro" The Gunsaulus Mystery (1921) – silent race film inspired by events