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Longer titles found: Signals intelligence by alliances, nations and industries (view), Signals intelligence in modern history (view), Signals intelligence operational platforms by nation (view), Signals Intelligence Agency (view), Foreign instrumentation signals intelligence (view), Chatter (signals intelligence) (view), US signals intelligence in the Cold War (view)

searching for Signals intelligence 175 found (1727 total)

alternate case: signals intelligence

World War II cryptography (538 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article

secure Japanese diplomatic cipher, designated Purple by the US Army Signals Intelligence Service, started before the US entered the war. Product from this
Arlington Hall (1,466 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
possession of the facility under the War Powers Act for use by its Signals Intelligence Service. During World War II, Arlington Hall was in many respects
World War I cryptography (905 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Codes and ciphers were used extensively in World War I. The decoding by British Naval intelligence of the Zimmermann telegram helped bring the United States
Bill Weisband (1,062 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Corporation. After joining the U.S. Army's Signals Intelligence Service (SIS) in 1942, he performed signals intelligence and communications security duties in
U.S. Fleet Cyber Command (899 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
offensive and defensive cyber operations, space operations and signals intelligence. It was created in January 2010 "to deter and defeat aggression and
PC Bruno (713 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
PC Bruno was a Polish–French–Spanish signalsintelligence station near Paris during World War II, from October 1939 until June 1940. Its function was decryption
Far East Combined Bureau (1,498 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Far East Combined Bureau, an outstation of the British Government Code and Cypher School, was set up in Hong Kong in March 1935, to monitor Japanese
Camp Kohler (513 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Coordinates: 38°40′27″N 121°21′59″W / 38.674042°N 121.366481°W / 38.674042; -121.366481 Camp Kohler was located in the northeast corner of unincorporated
Ritchie Boys (2,862 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Ritchie Boys were the US special German-Austrian unit of Military Intelligence Service officers and enlisted men of World War II who were trained at
Tselina (satellite) (253 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Tselina (Russian: Целина) is a Russian, formerly Soviet, military space-based radio surveillance system. It is capable of determining the exact location
Siemens and Halske T52 (907 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Siemens & Halske T52, also known as the Geheimschreiber ("secret teleprinter"), or Schlüsselfernschreibmaschine (SFM), was a World War II German cipher
Rasterschlüssel 44 (387 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Rasterschlüssel 44 (abbr. RS 44) was a manual cipher system, used by the German Wehrmacht during the Second World War. The cipher was designed by the astronomer
William F. Friedman (2,740 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
became chief cryptanalyst for the War Department and later led the Signals Intelligence Service (SIS)—a position he kept for a quarter century. In 1929,
United States Army Intelligence and Security Command (1,403 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Army and the National Security Agency, the United States's unified signals intelligence (SIGINT) organization. Within the NSA, INSCOM and its counterparts
Military Intelligence Service (United States) (4,427 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
course focusing on the technical written language of the military for signals intelligence and psyops with strict entrance requirements for acceptance into
William F. Friedman (2,740 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
became chief cryptanalyst for the War Department and later led the Signals Intelligence Service (SIS)—a position he kept for a quarter century. In 1929,
Tony Randall (2,789 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Anthony Leonard Randall (born Aryeh Leonard Rosenberg; February 26, 1920 – May 17, 2004) was an American actor, comedian and singer. He is best known for
Genevieve Grotjan Feinstein (568 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
was an American mathematician and cryptanalyst. She worked for the Signals Intelligence Service throughout World War II, during which time she played an
United States Naval Computing Machine Laboratory (782 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
bombes which were then employed for code-breaking in the US Navy's signals intelligence and cryptanalysis group OP-20-G in Washington, D.C.. Construction
Reservehandverfahren (341 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Reservehandverfahren (RHV) (English: Reserve Hand Procedure) was a German Naval World War II hand-cipher system used as a backup method when no working
HSwMS Orion (A201) (364 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
HSwMS Orion (A201) is a signals intelligence gathering vessel of the Swedish Navy. HSwMS Orion was launched in 1984. She was built with extensive support
Schlüsselgerät 41 (785 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Schlüsselgerät 41 ("Cipher Machine 41"), also known as the SG-41 or Hitler mill, was a rotor cipher machine, first produced in 1941 in Nazi Germany
Zimmermann Telegram (4,197 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
ISBN 978-0-7110-3408-2. West, Nigel (1990). The Sigint Secrets: The Signals Intelligence War, 1990 to Today-Including the Persecution of Gordon Welchman.
Kunia Regional SIGINT Operations Center (278 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
pronounced "Kay-ARSock"), also known as the Kunia Tunnel or the Regional Signals Intelligence Operations Center Kunia, was a United States National Security Agency
Station HYPO (1,530 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
unit in Hawaii during World War II. It was one of two major Allied signals intelligence units, called Fleet Radio Units in the Pacific theaters, along with
Ann Z. Caracristi (770 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Ann Caracristi (right) at work at the Signals Intelligence Service
Frank Rowlett (590 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
was hired by William Friedman as a "junior cryptanalyst" for the Signals Intelligence Service (SIS) on April Fools' Day 1930; shortly after, he was followed
11th Signal Regiment (Italy) (139 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
The 11th Signal Regiment (Italian: 11° Reggimento Trasmissioni) is a deployable signals regiment of the Italian Army based in Civitavecchia in Lazio. Today
Australian Cyber Security Centre (470 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Australian Cyber Security Centre (ACSC) is the Australian Government lead agency for cyber security. The ACSC is part of the Australian Signals Directorate
Australian Cyber Security Centre (470 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Australian Cyber Security Centre (ACSC) is the Australian Government lead agency for cyber security. The ACSC is part of the Australian Signals Directorate
Creslow (326 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
recently Creslow was the site of a Foreign and Commonwealth Office/MI6 signals intelligence station, which was closed down in 1998 and, now in private hands
SIGABA (2,668 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
during World War II. William Friedman, director of the US Army's Signals Intelligence Service, devised a system to correct for this attack by truly randomizing
11th Signal Regiment (Italy) (139 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
The 11th Signal Regiment (Italian: 11° Reggimento Trasmissioni) is a deployable signals regiment of the Italian Army based in Civitavecchia in Lazio. Today
Burum, Friesland (185 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
ground station of the Dutch Nationale SIGINT Organisatie (national signals intelligence service), which intercepts satellite communications. Burum also provides
Jack Rollins (producer) (751 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Jack Rollins (born Jacob Rabinowitz; March 23, 1915 – June 18, 2015) was an American film and television producer and talent manager of comedians and television
Telecommunications in Sweden (1,227 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
This article covers telecommunications in Sweden. Sweden liberalized its telecommunications industry starting in 1980s and being formally liberalized in
Zoutkamp (168 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
ground station of the Dutch Nationale SIGINT Organisatie (National Signals Intelligence Service), which intercepted satellite communications much like the
Fort Monmouth (2,640 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Fort Monmouth is a former installation of the Department of the Army in Monmouth County, New Jersey. The post is surrounded by the communities of Eatontown
Wireless Experimental Centre (598 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
four sections carried out administration, collating and evaluating signals intelligence, traffic analysis and radio interception. Colonel Aldridge headed
Fort Crowder (893 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Fort Crowder was a U.S. Army post located in Newton and McDonald counties in southwest Missouri, constructed and used during World War II. Camp Crowder
M-209 (2,628 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
In cryptography, the M-209, designated CSP-1500 by the United States Navy (C-38 by the manufacturer) is a portable, mechanical cipher machine used by the
HSwMS Artemis (254 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
a signals intelligence gathering vessel currently being constructed for the Swedish Navy. The ship is to replace Sweden's only signals intelligence vessel
Schlüsselgerät 39 (2,390 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Schlüsselgerät 39 (SG-39) was an electrically operated rotor cipher machine, invented by the German Fritz Menzer during World War II. The device was
Magic (cryptography) (5,319 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article
project during World War II. It involved the United States Army's Signals Intelligence Service (SIS) and the United States Navy's Communication Special
Meredith Gardner (776 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
German at the University of Akron when the United States Army's Signals Intelligence Service recruited him to work on breaking German codes. Soon after
Targeted surveillance (3,784 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
the security services and report on the democratic oversight of signals intelligence agencies, European Commission for Democracy Through Law The key to
Solomon Kullback (858 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Solomon Kullback (April 3, 1907 – August 5, 1994) was an American cryptanalyst and mathematician, who was one of the first three employees hired by William
Lorenz cipher (3,674 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Lorenz SZ40, SZ42a and SZ42b were German rotor stream cipher machines used by the German Army during World War II. They were developed by C. Lorenz
Chung Hom Kok (294 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Chung Hom Kok. Government Communications Headquarters established a signals intelligence centre at Chung Hom Kok in the late 1970s and consolidated operations
1943 BRUSA Agreement (437 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
procedures and protocols for co-operation formed the basis for all signals intelligence (SIGINT) activities of both the US National Security Agency and the
Sumner Redstone (5,041 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
in the United States Army during World War II with a team at the Signals Intelligence Service that decoded Japanese messages. After his military service
Leo Rosen (234 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Leo Rosen was a U.S. cryptanalyst who worked with Frank Rowlett at Signals Intelligence Service (S.I.S.) before the start of World War II on Japanese ciphers
Fish (cryptography) (1,298 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Fish (sometimes FISH) was the UK's GC&CS Bletchley Park codename for any of several German teleprinter stream ciphers used during World War II. Enciphered
Police Regiment North (316 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
reports were decrypted as part of the operation Ultra, the British signals intelligence program. Breitman 1998, p. 41. Smith 2004, pp. 112–119. Breitman
German code breaking in World War II (1,148 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
German code breaking in World War II achieved some notable successes cracking British naval ciphers until well into the fourth year of the war, but also
Ursula (156 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
cyclones, and a tropical depression, all in the Pacific Ocean Ursula, signals intelligence system used by the Finnish Defence Intelligence Agency Saint Ursula
Black (code) (504 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article
Washington that the "Cairo Code" was compromised and the U.S. Army Signals Intelligence Service promptly sent a SIGABA machine to Cairo. But some, like Colonel
Kurzsignale (607 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Short Signal Code, also known as the Short Signal Book (German: Kurzsignalbuch), was a short code system used by the Kriegsmarine (German Navy) during
Station CAST (779 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
FRUMEL. Some personnel also worked at the Central Bureau, supplying signals intelligence to MacArthur's South West Pacific Area (command). Parker, Frederick
Benhall, Cheltenham (355 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Headquarters (GCHQ), the British intelligence agency who specialise in signals intelligence and cryptography. "Cheltenham Ward population 2011". Retrieved 27
James Hall III (1,536 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
III (born 1958) is a former United States Army warrant officer and signals intelligence analyst in Germany who sold eavesdropping and code secrets to East
Nigel de Grey (389 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Nigel de Grey CMG OBE (27 March 1886 – 25 May 1951) was a British codebreaker. Son of the rector of Copdock, Suffolk, and grandson of the 5th Lord Walsingham
Bletchley Park (10,919 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
those who worked there. "Station X" (X = Roman numeral ten), "London Signals Intelligence Centre", and "Government Communications Headquarters" were all cover
Beaumanor Hall (2,385 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
been enciphered on Enigma machines. It was the most difficult of signals intelligence gathering, because the enciphering meant that no prediction was possible
National Cyber Security Centre (Ireland) (988 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
The National Cyber Security Centre (NCSC) is a government computer security organisation in Ireland, an operational arm of the Department of the Environment
Riverbank Laboratories (657 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Riverbank Acoustical Laboratories (RAL), (often referred to as Riverbank or Riverbank Labs), is a NVLAP accredited acoustical testing agency founded by
Gene Grabeel (666 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Gene Grabeel (June 5, 1920 – January 30, 2015) was an American mathematician and cryptanalyst who founded the Venona project. Grabeel was born on June
Cipher Bureau (Poland) (6,888 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
Birth of Ultra", in Andrew, Christopher M. (ed.), Codebreaking and signals intelligence: Volume 1 of Intelligence and national security, The University of
William Montgomery (cryptographer) (156 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Rev. William Montgomery (1871–1930) was a Presbyterian minister and a British codebreaker who worked in Room 40 during World War I. Montgomery and Nigel
Joseph V. Charyk (476 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
States imagery satellite, CORONA, into operation and demonstrated signals intelligence technology from space. During his tenure, the NRO operated the U-2
Virginia Dare Aderholdt (739 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
7; MIS Nisei Serving in the Continental United States, 1943–1945; Signals Intelligence" (PDF). Nisei Linguists : Japanese Americans in the Military Intelligence
Peter Marychurch (241 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Marychurch KCMG (13 June 1927 – 21 May 2017) was Director of the British signals intelligence agency, GCHQ, a post he held from 1983 to 1989. Educated at The John
Urim SIGINT Base (399 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Urim SIGINT Base is an Israeli intelligence-gathering installation, supposedly part of the Unit 8200, the signal intelligence unit of the Intelligence
A-1 (code) (76 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
A-1 was the designation for a code used by the United States Navy during World War I that replaced the Secret Code of 1887, SIGCODE and another system
Camp Murphy (Florida) (755 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
The United States Army Signal Corps established Camp Murphy, a top-secret radar training school in 1942. Camp Murphy was located between Stuart and Jupiter
Project SHAMROCK (932 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
and judicial review. Another internal safeguard, was United States Signals Intelligence Directive 18 (USSID 18), an internal NSA and intelligence community
John R. Redman (510 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
States Navy. A naval communications officer, he played key roles in signals intelligence during World War II in Washington, D.C., and on the staff of Admiral
Michael Wertheimer (332 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Acquisition Office in the NSA's Signals Intelligence Directorate. He is the co-author of the 2001 Signals Intelligence Strategy and the 2002 SIGINT architecture
Woodhouse, Leicestershire (464 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
was used as a listening station during the war, and intercepted signals intelligence for Bletchley Park. The Hall is now owned by Leicestershire County
James Q. Reber (293 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Reber became the chairman of the United States Intelligence Board's Signals Intelligence Committee, retiring from government service in July 1972. Reber was
Australian Defence Satellite Communications Station (429 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
east of Geraldton, Western Australia. The ADSCS is part of the US signals intelligence and analysis network ECHELON. The station has four satellite tracking
Monitoring Station Designator (263 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Monitoring Station Designators were used by the United States Army Signals Intelligence Service to designate a specific signal intelligence monitoring station
International Liaison Department (Comintern) (2,179 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
The OMS (Russian: Отдел международной связи, otdel mezhdunarodnoy svyazi or ОМС), also known in English as the International Liaison Department (1921-1939)
Irene Dixon (482 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Irene Dixon (1924-2021), Bletchley Park codebreaker was born in East London and in 1943 was one of the first women sent to the top secret unit decoding
Navy Information Operations Command, Hawaii (279 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
than 2,000 sailors and civilians in support of cyber operations and signals intelligence ("SIGINT"). It was originally formed on 30 September 2004, after
U.S. Navy Cyber Forces (272 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Virginia. CYBERFOR provided forces and equipment in cryptology/signals intelligence, cyber, electronic warfare, information operations, intelligence
Joseph Redman (491 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
States Navy. A naval communications officer, he played key roles in signals intelligence during World War II, while he served as Director of Naval Communications
Sis (646 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
intelligence agency operating in South America during World War II Signals Intelligence Service, the former United States Army codebreaking division Information
Code Girls (717 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
U.S. Army Signals Intelligence Service cryptologists at work at Arlington Hall, Virginia circa 1943
Château de Pignerolle (1,018 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Chateau de Pignerolle is located to the east of Angers in the commune of Saint-Barthélemy-d'Anjou in the department of Maine-et-Loire in France. Constructed
Benson House (Wading River, New York) (698 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
The Benson House, listed on the National Register of Historic Places as the Wading River Radio Station, is a three-story, red-shingled wood-frame home
Alexander H. Flax (1,690 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
oversaw major growth in NRO funding and personnel, the development of signals intelligence collectors from space, and the development of electro-optical imaging
Earl E. Stone (1,593 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Earl Everett Stone (December 2, 1895 – September 24, 1989) was a rear admiral in the United States Navy. He is most noted for being the first director
Burning Wind (96 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Burning Wind is a codename for signals intelligence (SIGINT) missions by the United States Air Force. The missions are undertaken by RC-135 Rivet Joint
Convoy OB 318 (1,890 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Aubrietia captured U-110 with an intact Enigma machine and a wealth of signals intelligence, which led to the Allied breakthrough into cracking the German naval
Château de Pignerolle (1,018 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Chateau de Pignerolle is located to the east of Angers in the commune of Saint-Barthélemy-d'Anjou in the department of Maine-et-Loire in France. Constructed
Earl E. Stone (1,593 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Earl Everett Stone (December 2, 1895 – September 24, 1989) was a rear admiral in the United States Navy. He is most noted for being the first director
William Coffee (313 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
group of African-American cryptographers in the United States Army's Signals Intelligence Service. He began his career in public service with the Civilian
List of accidents and incidents involving the Avro Lincoln (1,460 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
involving the Avro Lincoln four-engined heavy-bomber and later used for signals intelligence, radar research and as an-engine test bed. 1946 20 February 1946
Radio fingerprinting (305 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
same callsign is easily detected. Such systems are used in military signals intelligence and by radio regulatory agencies such as the U.S. Federal Communications
Arnold Dumey (291 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Signal Corps and at Arlington Hall, headquarters of the US Army's Signals Intelligence Service (SIS) cryptography, under William and Elizabeth Friedman
Discriminant Book (1,021 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Discriminant Book (German: Kenngruppenbuch; literally: Groups to identify the key to the receiver) shortened to K-Book (K. Buch), and also known as
Short Weather Cipher (1,370 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Short Weather Cipher (German: Wetterkurzschlüssel, abbreviated WKS), also known as the weather short signal book, was a cipher, presented as a codebook
Combat support (945 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
signal (communications battalions), as well as radio battalions (signals intelligence and electronic warfare), air naval gunfire liaison, force reconnaissance
Trench code (812 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Trench codes (a form of cryptography) were codes used for secrecy by field armies in World War I. Originally, the most commonly used codes were simple
Enigma machine (11,538 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Enigma machine is a cipher device developed and used in the early- to mid-20th century to protect commercial, diplomatic, and military communication
Naval Communications Station Irirangi (304 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Government Communications Security Bureau (GCSB) is now responsible for signals intelligence, with a radio communications intercept station at Tangimoana and
Mary Louise Prather (718 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Mary Louise Prather (1913 – 23 December 1996) was an American spy and one of the pioneering women within the field of cryptography. Most of her work in
Operation FB (2,862 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
raiders. The convoy could still be routed north of Bear Island and signals intelligence had revealed the transfer of the Luftwaffe bombers and torpedo-bombers
Colonel Tomb (475 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
S. obtained about the North Vietnamese air force came from radio signals intelligence or "SigInt", which monitored enemy radio transmissions. Though Tuân
Naval Support Facility Kamiseya (503 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
torpedo manufacturing facility was used by the United States Navy as a Signals intelligence - radio communications intercept station until it ceased such operations
Convoy PQ 18 (8,530 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
ships and the aircraft of the escort carrier HMS Avenger which used signals intelligence gleaned from Ultra and Luftwaffe wireless frequencies to provide
RAF Little Sai Wan (105 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
RAF Little Sai Wan was a signals intelligence station in the Siu Sai Wan area of Hong Kong. The station was established by the Royal Air Force as base
Royal Army Physical Training Corps (961 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Combat Support Arms Royal Artillery Royal Engineers Royal Corps of Signals Intelligence Corps Combat Services Royal Army Chaplains' Department Royal Logistic
All India Radio Monitoring Service (96 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
27 January 2013. Retrieved 31 January 2013. Ball, Desmond (1996). Signals intelligence (SIGINT) in South Asia : India, Pakistan, Sri Lanka (Ceylon). Canberra
Samuel Simon Snyder (683 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Samuel Simon Snyder (August 18, 1911 – December 28, 2007) was a cryptographer for the United States Government. His pioneering work in early computers
All India Radio Monitoring Service (96 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
27 January 2013. Retrieved 31 January 2013. Ball, Desmond (1996). Signals intelligence (SIGINT) in South Asia : India, Pakistan, Sri Lanka (Ceylon). Canberra
Type B Cipher Machine (3,987 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Office. The sixes and twenties division was familiar to U.S. Army Signals Intelligence Service (SIS) cryptographers from their work on the Type A cipher
United States Air Force Security Service (1,577 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Program (ACRP) was initiated in 1955, engaging in flights collecting Signals Intelligence (SIGINT) along the coasts of China, North Korea, and the Soviet Far
Hugh Johnstone (126 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Hugh Anthony Johnstone OBE was the administrative head of SIGINT (Signals Intelligence) in the British Army during the 1970s. He became known when he was
C-52 (cipher machine) (659 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
some speculation that the CX-52 might have been broken by communist signals intelligence services of East Germany, Czechoslovakia and Poland. Many of the
USS Palm Beach (AGER-3) (456 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
Army Auxiliary Aircraft Repair Ship converted to an electronic and signals intelligence ship of the United States Navy. She was laid down as FS-217 one of
Adjutant General's Corps (761 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Combat Support Arms Royal Artillery Royal Engineers Royal Corps of Signals Intelligence Corps Combat Services Royal Army Chaplains' Department Royal Logistic
Poundon (133 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
recorded as Paundon. Poundon Hill wireless station was a FCO/MI6 signals intelligence station just outside the hamlet. The site is now Tower Hill Business
Shoal Bay Receiving Station (456 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Shoal Bay Receiving Station is a signals intelligence-gathering facility in the Northern Territory of Australia located on the shores of Shoal Bay about
Milton Schwartz (spy) (116 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article
during World War II. A 1943 message, later decrypted by the Army Signals Intelligence Corp, revealed Schwartz's activity on behalf of the GRU to be of
14 Signal Regiment (United Kingdom) (971 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article
Squadron (Electronic Warfare and Signals Intelligence, supports 3rd (UK) Division) Army Element, Joint Signals Intelligence Unit (Troop sized), at RAF Digby
HSwMS Orion (74 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Orion, HSwMS Orion (1903), a torpedo boat HSwMS Orion (A201), a signals intelligence gathering vessel launched in 1984 HMS Orion This article includes
List of British Army regiments and corps (505 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Regiments Corps of Royal Engineers 15 + 7 Regiments Royal Corps of Signals Intelligence Corps Honourable Artillery Company 0 + 1 Regiment Royal Monmouthshire
Royal Corps of Army Music (1,238 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Combat Support Arms Royal Artillery Royal Engineers Royal Corps of Signals Intelligence Corps Combat Services Royal Army Chaplains' Department Royal Logistic
James A. Riedel (980 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
v t e James A. Riedel (1921-2006) was a 20th-century American professor of political science at the State University of New York at Albany (SUNY Albany)
2182 kHz (785 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
ca/rrp/distress.html Distress Communications, RADIO COMMUNICATIONS AND SIGNALS INTELLIGENCE IN THE CANADIAN NAVY Bartlett, Tim (2009). Alison Noyce (ed.). VHF
Small Arms School Corps (1,206 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Combat Support Arms Royal Artillery Royal Engineers Royal Corps of Signals Intelligence Corps Combat Services Royal Army Chaplains' Department Royal Logistic
525th Expeditionary Military Intelligence Brigade (3,390 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
intelligence collection that includes counterintelligence, aerial signals intelligence, and Tactical Exploitation of National Capabilities (TENCAP). Its
Fred Wright (researcher) (277 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
electronic warfare, communications systems, signal processing, signals intelligence, and radar systems. Wright is also an adjunct professor of computer
Funkspiel (377 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
original channel. Nigel West (31 August 2012). Historical Dictionary of Signals Intelligence. Scarecrow Press. p. 102. ISBN 978-0-8108-7187-8. Retrieved 26 May
Army Medical Services (890 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Combat Support Arms Royal Artillery Royal Engineers Royal Corps of Signals Intelligence Corps Combat Services Royal Army Chaplains' Department Royal Logistic
Fred Wright (researcher) (277 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
electronic warfare, communications systems, signal processing, signals intelligence, and radar systems. Wright is also an adjunct professor of computer
Zircon affair (1,664 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
of a television programme about the ultimately cancelled Zircon signals intelligence satellite, as part of the six-part Secret Society series. It raised
Directorate General of Income Tax Investigation (61 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Intelligence Image Processing and Analysis Centre Directorate of Signals Intelligence Joint Cipher Bureau Information Management and Analysis Centre Economic
Radio Research Laboratory (Harvard) (405 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
very-high and ultra-high frequencies for radio systems, particularly in signals intelligence gear and statistical communications techniques. However, unlike the
Army Board (326 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Combat Support Arms Royal Artillery Royal Engineers Royal Corps of Signals Intelligence Corps Honourable Artillery Company Combat Services Royal Army Chaplains'
HMS Scylla (98) (937 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
carried a signals intelligence team headed by F/O R. E. Gunn and on at least one trip to the Kola Peninsula she is reported as having collected Signals Intelligence
Gawcott (252 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
the east of the village is Signal Hill, which was a former FCO/MI6 signals intelligence station. Sefton Delmer Neighbourhood Statistics 2011 Census, Accessed
Royal Armoured Corps (1,671 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Combat Support Arms Royal Artillery Royal Engineers Royal Corps of Signals Intelligence Corps Combat Services Royal Army Chaplains' Department Royal Logistic
Royal Logistic Corps (851 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Combat Support Arms Royal Artillery Royal Engineers Royal Corps of Signals Intelligence Corps Combat Services Royal Army Chaplains' Department Royal Logistic
Kamov Ka-27 (2,269 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
system that combines several other systems: acoustic, magnetometric, signals intelligence and radar. All the information on them is displayed on the display
Leo Hepp (737 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
by the U.S. Office of Strategic Services, serving as the head of signals intelligence from 1946 to 1956. Under Hepp's leadership, West Germany's first
CFS Mill Cove (306 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Military History Jerry Proc, "CFS Mill Cove", Radio Communications and Signals Intelligence in the Royal Canadian Navy Coordinates: 44°35′23″N 64°04′06″W /
Matthew Aid (1,494 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
and journal articles authored by Aid are listed below. Secrets of Signals Intelligence during the Cold War and Beyond, Matthew M. Aid and Cees Wiebes, Frank
Hartmann's wolfpack (687 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Hartmann’s command took station in the Western Approaches. The German signals intelligence branch, B-Dienst, which had penetrated British naval codes, was able
Cyberwarfare by Russia (5,219 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Soldatov, some of these activities were coordinated by the Russian signals intelligence, which was part of the FSB and formerly a part of the 16th KGB department
List of Soviet Union military bases abroad (208 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
1944—1956 Signals intelligence facility Rostock East Germany 1949—1990 Signals intelligence facility Swinoujscie Poland 1949—1991 Signals intelligence facility
FA (606 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
manufacturer Forschungsamt (Research Office of the Reich Air Ministry), the signals intelligence and cryptanalytic agency of the German Nazi Party Frankford Arsenal
Zircon (disambiguation) (128 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
(satellite), a British signals intelligence satellite Zircon affair, an incident surrounding the British signals intelligence satellite USS Zircon (PY-16)
Badges of the United States Space Force (955 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
intelligence analysts, 1N1 geospatial intelligence analysts, 1N2 signals intelligence analysts, 1N4 fusion analysts, and 1N8 targeting analysts. It is
BS (539 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
company Biuro Szyfrów ("Cipher Bureau"), a Polish cryptography and signals intelligence agency known for its work on German Enigma ciphers in the 1930s Boy
Zircon (disambiguation) (128 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
(satellite), a British signals intelligence satellite Zircon affair, an incident surrounding the British signals intelligence satellite USS Zircon (PY-16)
Royal Electrical and Mechanical Engineers (1,545 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Combat Support Arms Royal Artillery Royal Engineers Royal Corps of Signals Intelligence Corps Combat Services Royal Army Chaplains' Department Royal Logistic
Royal Montserrat Defence Force (179 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Combat Support Arms Royal Artillery Royal Engineers Royal Corps of Signals Intelligence Corps Honourable Artillery Company Combat Services Royal Army Chaplains'
Lustre (225 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
between France and members of the UKUSA Agreement for cooperation in signals intelligence Lusterware, ceramics with lustre glazes Lustral (disambiguation)
Marsh Gibbon (494 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Park. This was previously Poundon Hill Wireless Station, a FCO/MI6 signals intelligence station. Marsh Gibbon Church of England School is a mixed, voluntary
Intelligence services in Canada (3,100 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Communications Security Establishment, which is responsible for the signals intelligence aspects of military intelligence and the Intelligence Branch which
Scottish, Welsh and Irish Division (318 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Combat Support Arms Royal Artillery Royal Engineers Royal Corps of Signals Intelligence Corps Combat Services Royal Army Chaplains' Department Royal Logistic
Grab (217 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Galactic Radiation and Background, or GRAB, a series of electronic signals intelligence satellites operated by the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory Grab (surname)
Scottish Division (544 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Combat Support Arms Royal Artillery Royal Engineers Royal Corps of Signals Intelligence Corps Combat Services Royal Army Chaplains' Department Royal Logistic
Naval Radio Section Newport Corner (457 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
History Jerry Proc, "Newport Corner Station", Radio Communications and Signals Intelligence in the Royal Canadian Navy Coordinates: 44°58′4.09″N 63°59′3.44″W
Guards Division (811 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Combat Support Arms Royal Artillery Royal Engineers Royal Corps of Signals Intelligence Corps Combat Services Royal Army Chaplains' Department Royal Logistic
Restricted line officer (1,036 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
by the Chief of Naval Operations afloat and ashore, and National Signals Intelligence tasks assigned by the Director, National Security Agency at NSA facilities
Army Headquarters (United Kingdom) (445 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article
Combat Support Arms Royal Artillery Royal Engineers Royal Corps of Signals Intelligence Corps Honourable Artillery Company Combat Services Royal Army Chaplains'
Enforcement Directorate (588 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Intelligence Image Processing and Analysis Centre Directorate of Signals Intelligence Joint Cipher Bureau Information Management and Analysis Centre Economic
General Service Corps (577 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Combat Support Arms Royal Artillery Royal Engineers Royal Corps of Signals Intelligence Corps Honourable Artillery Company Combat Services Royal Army Chaplains'
Matthew John Heath (353 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
a former member of the U.S. Marine Corps where he specialized in signals intelligence and had previously worked for a MVM, Inc., a Virginia-based private
Directorate of Naval Intelligence (India) (37 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article
Intelligence Image Processing and Analysis Centre Directorate of Signals Intelligence Joint Cipher Bureau Information Management and Analysis Centre Economic
Army Air Corps (United Kingdom) (2,845 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article
Combat Support Arms Royal Artillery Royal Engineers Royal Corps of Signals Intelligence Corps Combat Services Royal Army Chaplains' Department Royal Logistic