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searching for Ship 475 found (161397 total)

alternate case: ship

Titanic (21,876 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article

time one of the deadliest of a single ship and the deadliest peacetime sinking of a superliner or cruise ship to date. With much public attention in
Aircraft carrier (11,438 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
arming, deploying, and recovering aircraft. Typically, it is the capital ship of a fleet, as it allows a naval force to project air power worldwide without
USS Constitution (13,843 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
three-masted heavy frigate of the United States Navy. She is the world's oldest ship of any type still afloat. She was launched in 1797, one of six original frigates
Frigate (8,715 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
A frigate (/ˈfrɪɡət/) is a type of warship. In different eras, ships classified as frigates have had very varied roles and capabilities. In the 17th century
Corvette (3,173 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
class below was historically that of the sloop-of-war. The modern types of ship below a corvette are coastal patrol craft, missile boat and fast attack craft
List of current ships of the United States Navy (3,610 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
The United States Navy has approximately 480 ships in both active service and the reserve fleet, with approximately 90 more in either the planning and
Destroyer (7,450 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
classes of ships to bear the formal designation "torpedo boat destroyer" (TBD) were the Daring-class of two ships and Havock-class of two ships of the Royal
Schooner (1,127 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
ability to windward was useful for privateers, blockade runners, slave ships, smaller naval craft and opium clippers. Packet boats (built for the fast
Battleship (11,136 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
battleships remain in use today as museum ships. A ship of the line was a large, unarmored wooden sailing ship which mounted a battery of up to 120 smoothbore
COVID-19 pandemic on cruise ships (28,820 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
The COVID-19 pandemic spread to a number of cruise ships, with the nature of such ships – including crowded semi-enclosed areas, increased exposure to
Ship of the line (4,052 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
A ship of the line was a type of naval warship constructed during the Age of Sail from the 17th century to the mid-19th century. The ship of the line
U-boat (5,303 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
the Mediterranean. German submarines also destroyed Brazilian merchant ships during World War II, causing Brazil to declare war on both Germany and Italy
German battleship Bismarck (10,064 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Nazi Germany's Kriegsmarine. Named after Chancellor Otto von Bismarck, the ship was laid down at the Blohm & Voss shipyard in Hamburg in July 1936 and launched
Mayflower (7,306 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Mayflower was an English ship that transported a group of English families, known today as the Pilgrims, from England to the New World in 1620. After a
RMS Lusitania (14,052 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
fastest Atlantic crossing and was briefly the world's largest passenger ship until the completion of the Mauretania three months later. The Cunard Line
Draft (hull) (1,082 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
a ship's hull is the vertical distance between the waterline and the bottom of the hull (keel). Draft determines the minimum depth of water a ship or
HMHS Britannic (6,750 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
White Star Line's Olympic class of steamships and the second White Star ship to bear the name Britannic. She was the fleet mate of both the RMS Olympic
MS Estonia (5,237 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
to Nordström & Thulin for use on Estline's Tallinn–Stockholm route. The ship's sinking on 28 September 1994, in the Baltic Sea between Sweden, Åland,
Royal Navy (11,521 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
operational commissioned ships (including submarines as well as one historic ship, HMS Victory) in the Royal Navy, plus 11 ships of the Royal Fleet Auxiliary
Virgin Galactic (7,682 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
SpaceShipTwos and two WhiteKnightTwos Scaled Composites was contracted to develop and build the initial prototypes of WhiteKnightTwo and SpaceShipTwo,
Cargo ship (2,238 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
A cargo ship or freighter is a merchant ship that carries cargo, goods, and materials from one port to another. Thousands of cargo carriers ply the world's
Sinking of the Titanic (16,703 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
iceberg at around 23:40 (ship's time) on Sunday, 14 April 1912. Her sinking two hours and forty minutes later at 02:20 (ship's time; 05:18 GMT) on Monday
Ship of Theseus (1,654 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
In the metaphysics of identity, the ship of Theseus is a thought experiment that raises the question of whether an object that has had all of its components
RMS Queen Mary (8,300 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Elizabeth commenced the two-ship transatlantic passenger service for which the two ships were initially built. The two ships dominated the transatlantic
Shipwreck (4,142 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
A shipwreck is the wreckage of a ship that is located either beached on land or sunken to the bottom of a body of water. Shipwrecking may be intentional
Patrol boat (3,158 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
A patrol boat (also referred to as a patrol craft, patrol ship or patrol vessel) is a relatively small naval vessel generally designed for coastal defence
Vasa (ship) (9,991 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
pronunciation: [²vɑːsa] (listen)) is a Swedish warship built between 1626 and 1628. The ship sank after sailing roughly 1,300 m (1,400 yd) into her maiden voyage on 10
Liberty ship (6,105 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Liberty ships were a class of cargo ship built in the United States during World War II. Though British in concept, the design was adopted by the United
Titanic (1997 film) (18,295 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
Winslet as members of different social classes who fall in love aboard the ship during its ill-fated maiden voyage. Cameron's inspiration for the film came
Harpoon (missile) (4,048 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
The Harpoon is an all-weather, over-the-horizon, anti-ship missile, developed and manufactured by McDonnell Douglas (now Boeing Defense, Space & Security)
Sloop-of-war (2,612 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
capability. They performed similar duties to the American Destroyer Escort class ships, and also performed similar duties to the smaller Corvettes of the Royal
Panama Canal (12,218 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
ever undertaken, the Panama Canal shortcut greatly reduces the time for ships to travel between the Atlantic and Pacific oceans, enabling them to avoid
Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force (6,149 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Imperial Japanese Navy (IJN) after World War II. The JMSDF has a fleet of 154 ships and 346 aircraft and consists of approximately 45,800 personnel. Its main
USS Indianapolis (CA-35) (7,348 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
subsequently departed for the Philippines on training duty. At 0015 on 30 July, the ship was torpedoed by the Imperial Japanese Navy submarine I-58, and sank in 12
Boston Tea Party (5,682 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
shipment of tea sent by the East India Company. The demonstrators boarded the ships and threw the chests of tea into the Boston Harbor. The British government
Displacement (ship) (839 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
The displacement or displacement tonnage of a ship is its weight. As the term indicates, it is measured indirectly, using Archimedes' principle, by first
Ship commissioning (2,297 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Ship commissioning is the act or ceremony of placing a ship in active service, and may be regarded as a particular application of the general concepts
Flying Dutchman (5,925 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
The Flying Dutchman (Dutch: De Vliegende Hollander) is a legendary ghost ship which was said to never be able to make port, doomed to sail the oceans forever
United States Navy (12,468 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Congress had sold Alliance, the last ship remaining in the Continental Navy due to a lack of funds to maintain the ship or support a navy. In 1972, the Chief
Blackbeard (9,241 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
known about his early life, but he may have been a sailor on privateer ships during Queen Anne's War before he settled on the Bahamian island of New
Borg (6,221 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
to the specific frequencies on which these weapons are projected once a ship or an individual drone is struck down by them. Later attempts to modulate
Sutton Hoo (11,323 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
have been excavating the area since 1938. One cemetery had an undisturbed ship burial with a wealth of Anglo-Saxon artefacts. Most of these objects are
Ship breaking (5,323 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Ship-breaking (also known as ship recycling, ship demolition, ship dismantling, or ship cracking) is a type of ship disposal involving the breaking up
Royal Netherlands Navy (2,981 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
year. An international prefix for ships of the Royal Netherlands Navy is HNLMS (His/Her Netherlands Majesty's Ship). The Netherlands navy itself uses
Flying Dutchman (5,925 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
The Flying Dutchman (Dutch: De Vliegende Hollander) is a legendary ghost ship which was said to never be able to make port, doomed to sail the oceans forever
Beam (nautical) (573 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
a ship is its width at its widest point. The maximum beam (BMAX) is the distance between planes passing through the outer extremeties of the ship, beam
Minesweeper (1,431 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
II. Combatant nations quickly adapted ships to the task of minesweeping, including Australia's 35 civilian ships that became auxiliary minesweepers. Both
Ship breaking (5,323 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Ship-breaking (also known as ship recycling, ship demolition, ship dismantling, or ship cracking) is a type of ship disposal involving the breaking up
Ceremonial ship launching (3,851 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Ceremonial ship launching involves the performance of ceremonies associated with the process of transferring a vessel to the water. It is a nautical tradition
Cruiser (14,753 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Modern cruisers are generally the largest ships in a fleet after aircraft carriers and amphibious assault ships, and can usually perform several roles.
Full-rigged ship (982 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
full-rigged ship or fully rigged ship is a sailing vessel's sail plan with three or more masts, all of them square-rigged. A full-rigged ship is said to
Port and starboard (1,037 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
and right halves if divided sagittally. One asymmetric feature is that on ships where access is at the side, this access is usually only provided on the
Container ship (7,448 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
A container ship (sometimes spelled containership) is a cargo ship that carries all of its load in truck-size intermodal containers, in a technique called
Dreadnought (13,095 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
ship over which the guns fired, and put great stress on the ship's frames. If all turrets were on the centreline of the vessel, stresses on the ship's
Brig (2,088 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
early 19th centuries. Brigs fell out of use with the arrival of the steam ship because they required a relatively large crew for their small size and were
RMS Olympic (8,607 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
British ocean liner and the lead ship of the White Star Line's trio of Olympic-class liners. Unlike the other ships in the class, Olympic had a long career
Indian Navy (15,058 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
252 active and 75,000 reserve personnel in service and has a fleet of 150 ships and submarines, and 300 aircraft. As of October 2020, the operational fleet
HMS Victory (5,897 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
HMS Victory is a 104-gun first-rate ship of the line of the Royal Navy, ordered in 1758, laid down in 1759 and launched in 1765. She is best known for
Ironclad warship (10,554 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
wooden ships and with one another) took place in 1862 during the American Civil War, it became clear that the ironclad had replaced the unarmored ship of
Macedonia (401 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Roberson MV Makedoniya, a Bulgarian small cargo ship in service 1932–41 MV Makedonia, a Greek passenger ship in service 1984–85 FK Makedonija Gjorče Petrov
Alien (film) (16,503 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
eponymous Alien, an aggressive and deadly extraterrestrial set loose on the ship. The film stars Tom Skerritt, Sigourney Weaver, Veronica Cartwright, Harry
Cutter (boat) (1,934 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
two people on board for its outward trip—the pilot to be delivered to a ship and an assistant who had to sail the cutter back to port single-handed. The
Georgia (485 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Georgia usually refers to: Georgia (country), a country in the Caucasus region of Eurasia Georgia (U.S. state), one of the states of the United States
Captain (naval) (2,366 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
the largest ships. The rank is equal to the army rank of colonel and airforce rank of group captain. Equivalent ranks worldwide include Ship-of-the-line
Deadweight tonnage (372 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
w.t., or dwt) or tons deadweight (DWT) is a measure of how much weight a ship can carry. It is the sum of the weights of cargo, fuel, fresh water, ballast
Anti-ship missile (2,691 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
An anti-ship missile (AShM) is a guided missile that is designed for use against ships and large boats. Most anti-ship missiles are of the sea skimming
Replenishment oiler (1,481 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
A replenishment oiler or replenishment tanker is a naval auxiliary ship with fuel tanks and dry cargo holds which can supply both fuel and dry stores during
Three Gorges Dam (9,875 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
capacity of the dam is 22,500 MW. The last major component of the project, the ship lift, was completed in December 2015. As well as producing electricity, the
Ocean liner (7,871 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
An ocean liner is a passenger ship primarily used as a form of transportation across seas or oceans. Liners may also carry cargo or mail, and may sometimes
Length overall (475 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
length is important while docking the ship. It is the most commonly used way of expressing the size of a ship, and is also used for calculating the cost
Light cruiser (1,671 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
is a shortening of the phrase "light armored cruiser", describing a small ship that carried armor in the same way as an armored cruiser: a protective belt
Cutty Sark (7,636 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Cutty Sark is a British clipper ship. Built on the River Leven, Dumbarton, Scotland in 1869 for the Jock Willis Shipping Line, she was one of the last
Keel laying (535 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
a ship's construction. It is often marked with a ceremony attended by dignitaries from the shipbuilding company and the ultimate owners of the ship. Keel
Battlecruiser (10,244 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
(also written as battle cruiser or battle-cruiser) was a type of capital ship of the first half of the 20th century. These were similar in displacement
Propeller (5,285 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
on a small ship that was manually driven. He was successful in using his bronze screw propeller on an adapted steamboat (1829). His ship, Civetta of
Airship (14,725 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
pioneer years of aeronautics, terms such as "airship", "air-ship", "air ship" and "ship of the air" meant any kind of navigable or dirigible flying machine
Maersk Alabama hijacking (2,446 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
on 8 April 2009, when four pirates in the Indian Ocean seized the cargo ship Maersk Alabama at a distance of 240 nautical miles (440 km; 280 mi) southeast
Flagship (2,218 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
group of naval ships, characteristically a flag officer entitled by custom to fly a distinguishing flag. Used more loosely, it is the lead ship in a fleet
SOS (2,395 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
usage it is associated with phrases such as "Save Our Souls" and "Save Our Ship". Moreover, due to its high profile use in emergencies, the phrase "SOS"
Amphibious transport dock (354 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
dock, also called a landing platform/dock (LPD), is an amphibious warfare ship, a warship that embarks, transports, and lands elements of a landing force
Suez Canal (13,442 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
ships along the much longer route around the Cape of Good Hope. The first container ship to do so was Ever Given's sister ship, Ever Greet. The ship was
The Love Boat (2,452 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
The series was set on luxury passenger cruise ship MS Pacific Princess, and revolved around the ship's captain Merrill Stubing (played by Gavin MacLeod)
Heavy cruiser (3,481 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
the London Naval Treaty of 1930. The heavy cruiser is part of a lineage of ship design from 1915 through the early 1950s, although the term "heavy cruiser"
Romance film (1,602 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Romance films, romance movies, ship movies or ship films are romantic love stories recorded in visual media for broadcast in theaters and on TV that focus
Ballistic missile submarine (3,371 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
missile submarines are SSB and SSBN – the SS denotes submarine (or submersible ship), the B denotes ballistic missile, and the N denotes that the submarine is
USS Arizona (BB-39) (6,312 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
in 1916, the ship remained stateside during World War I. Shortly after the end of the war, Arizona was one of a number of American ships that briefly
Steamship (4,783 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
steamers became less common, "SS" is assumed by many to stand for "steamship". Ships powered by internal combustion engines use a prefix such as "MV" for motor
IMO number (1,001 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
International Maritime Organization (IMO) number is a unique identifier for ships, registered ship owners and management companies. IMO numbers were introduced to
Cunard Line (7,100 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
and owned by Carnival Corporation & plc. Since 2011, Cunard and its three ships have been registered in Hamilton, Bermuda. In 1839, Samuel Cunard was awarded
Queen Elizabeth 2 (13,755 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Elizabeth 2 was operated by Cunard as both a transatlantic liner and a cruise ship from 1969 to 2008. She was then laid up until converted and since 18 April
Amphibious assault ship (1,806 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
An amphibious assault ship is a type of amphibious warfare ship employed to land and support ground forces on enemy territory by an amphibious assault
Auxiliary ship (965 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
An auxiliary ship is a naval ship designed to operate in support of combatant ships and other naval operations. Auxiliaries are not primary combatants
Jolly Roger (6,249 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
is the traditional English name for the flags flown to identify a pirate ship about to attack, during the early 18th century (the later part of the Golden
USS Missouri (BB-63) (8,361 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
USS Missouri (BB-63) is an Iowa-class battleship and was the third ship of the United States Navy to be named after the U.S. state of Missouri. Missouri
Gunboat (2,229 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
in shallow or restricted areas – such as rivers or lakes – where larger ships could sail only with difficulty. The gun that such boats carried could be
Slave ship (2,818 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Slave ships were large cargo ships specially built or converted from the 17th to the 19th century for transporting slaves. Such ships were also known
Amphibious warfare ship (4,881 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
An amphibious warfare ship (or amphib) is an amphibious vehicle warship employed to land and support ground forces, such as marines, on enemy territory
Clipper (4,902 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
clippers may be schooners, brigs, brigantines, etc., as well as full-rigged ships. Clippers were mostly constructed in British and American shipyards, though
Hull classification symbol (6,999 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
(sometimes called hull code or hull number) to identify their ships by type and by individual ship within a type. The system is analogous to the pennant number
Scuttling (3,348 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Scuttling is the deliberate sinking of a ship by allowing water to flow into the hull. This can be achieved in several ways—seacocks or hatches can be
Pre-dreadnought battleship (5,694 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
1905, before the launch of HMS Dreadnought in 1906. The pre-dreadnought ships replaced the ironclad battleships of the 1870s and 1880s. Built from steel
German battleship Tirpitz (5,981 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
von Tirpitz, the architect of the Kaiserliche Marine (Imperial Navy), the ship was laid down at the Kriegsmarinewerft Wilhelmshaven in November 1936 and
Republic of China Navy (4,314 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
branch of the Navy. The ship prefix for ROCN combatants is ROCS (Republic of China Ship); an older usage is CNS (Chinese Navy Ship). The Navy CHQs (中華民國國防部海軍司令部)
List of aircraft carriers of the United States Navy (2,092 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
for carrier-based aircraft. In the United States Navy, these consist of ships commissioned with hull classification symbols CV (aircraft carrier), CVA
Naval mine (13,806 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
self-contained explosive device placed in water to damage or destroy surface ships or submarines. Unlike depth charges, mines are deposited and left to wait
Bermuda Triangle (5,571 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
western part of the North Atlantic Ocean where a number of aircraft and ships are said to have disappeared under mysterious circumstances. Most reputable
Catamaran (4,390 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Catamarans range in size from small sailing or rowing vessels to large naval ships and roll-on/roll-off car ferries. The structure connecting a catamaran's
Barque (1,611 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Spanish, and Italian, the term barca refers to a small boat, not a full-sized ship. French influence in England led to the use in English of both words, although
Hindenburg disaster (12,684 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
was corrected as the ship stopped (after sending six men into the bow section of the ship). Additionally, the gas cells of the ship were not pressurized
Galleon (2,516 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Galleons were large, multi-decked sailing ships first used as armed cargo carriers by European states from the 16th to 18th centuries during the age of
Destroyer escort (2,549 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
designed with endurance to escort mid-ocean convoys of merchant marine ships. The Royal Navy and Commonwealth forces identified such warships as frigates
Navigation (5,771 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
navigatus, pp. of navigare "to sail, sail over, go by sea, steer a ship," from navis "ship" and the root of agere "to drive". Roughly, the latitude of a place
Gross tonnage (833 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Gross tonnage (GT, G.T. or gt) is a nonlinear measure of a ship's overall internal volume. Gross tonnage is different from gross register tonnage. Neither
Queen Anne's Revenge (3,673 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
early-18th-century ship, most famously used as a flagship by Edward Teach, better known by his nickname Blackbeard. Although the date and place of the ship's construction
Monitor (warship) (3,667 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
as coastal ships. The term also encompassed more flexible breastwork monitors, and was sometimes used as a generic term for any turreted ship. The term
People's Liberation Army Navy (9,632 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
number of missile-carrying ships grew from 20 to 200, and the production of larger surface ships, including support ships for oceangoing operations, increased
Military Sealift Command (4,633 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
an organization that controls the replenishment and military transport ships of the United States Navy. Military Sealift Command has the responsibility
Torpedo boat (3,523 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
and fast naval ship designed to carry torpedoes into battle. The first designs were steam-powered craft dedicated to ramming enemy ships with explosive
Bulk carrier (7,567 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
A bulk carrier, bulker is a merchant ship specially designed to transport unpackaged bulk cargo, such as grains, coal, ore, steel coils and cement, in
COVID-19 pandemic on Diamond Princess (7,295 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Diamond Princess is a cruise ship registered in Britain, and owned and operated by Princess Cruises. During a cruise that began on 20 January 2020, positive
Escort carrier (3,608 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
armed and armored. Escort carriers were most often built upon a commercial ship hull, so they were cheaper and could be built quickly. This was their principal
Steamboat (9,022 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Columbia River Lists of ships Motor ship or Motor vessel, a ship propelled by an engine, usually a diesel engine. The name of motor ships are often prefixed
Monitor (warship) (3,667 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
as coastal ships. The term also encompassed more flexible breastwork monitors, and was sometimes used as a generic term for any turreted ship. The term
Bulk carrier (7,567 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
A bulk carrier, bulker is a merchant ship specially designed to transport unpackaged bulk cargo, such as grains, coal, ore, steel coils and cement, in
Camel (9,652 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
night. Arthur, Rick (4 January 2012). "The Instant Expert: camels, the ships of the desert". The National. UAE: Abu Dhabi Media. As the meat can be dry
Whaler (1,190 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
A whaler or whaling ship is a specialized vessel, designed or adapted for whaling: the catching or processing of whales. The term whaler is mostly historic
Maritime Mobile Service Identity (1,499 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
form over a radio frequency channel in order to uniquely identify ship stations, ship earth stations, coast stations, coast earth stations, and group calls
Arleigh Burke-class destroyer (7,410 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
destroyer officer in World War II, and later Chief of Naval Operations. The lead ship, USS Arleigh Burke, was commissioned during Admiral Burke's lifetime. These
Forecastle (431 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
fo'c's'le) is the upper deck of a sailing ship forward of the foremast, or, historically, the forward part of a ship with the sailors' living quarters. Related
Barracks ship (591 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
A barracks ship or barracks barge or Berthing barges, or in civilian use accommodation vessel or accommodation ship, is a ship or a non-self-propelled
Phalanx CIWS (3,896 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
defense against incoming threats such as small boats, surface torpedoes, anti-ship missiles and helicopters. It was designed and manufactured by the General
USS Enterprise (CVN-65) (8,940 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
USS Gerald R. Ford. Enterprise had a crew of some 4,600 service members. The only ship of her class, Enterprise was, at the time of inactivation, the third-oldest
Steamboat (9,022 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Columbia River Lists of ships Motor ship or Motor vessel, a ship propelled by an engine, usually a diesel engine. The name of motor ships are often prefixed
Boba Fett (9,390 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Vader turns him over to Fett, who leaves to deliver him to Jabba in his ship, Slave I. Return of the Jedi features Boba Fett at Jabba's palace on Tatooine
Brigantine (766 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
both for sailing and rowing, swifter and more easily manœuvred than larger ships" and "(loosely) various kinds of foreign sailing and rowing vessels, as
The Last Ship (TV series) (1,789 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
The Last Ship is an American action-drama television series, loosely based on the 1988 novel of the same name by William Brinkley. The series premiered
List of United States Navy amphibious warfare ships (5,252 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
United States Navy amphibious warfare ships. This type of ship has been in use with the US Navy since World War I. Ship status is indicated as either currently
Roald Amundsen (4,154 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
planning for a South Pole expedition. He left Norway in June 1910 on the ship Fram and reached Antarctica in January 1911. His party established a camp
Submarine tender (452 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
A submarine tender is a type of depot ship that supplies and supports submarines. Submarines are small compared to most oceangoing vessels, and generally
Black rat (3,663 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
The black rat (Rattus rattus), also known as the roof rat, ship rat, or house rat, is a common long-tailed rodent of the stereotypical rat genus Rattus
Collier (ship) (1,561 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
A collier is a bulk cargo ship designed to carry coal. Coal has been moved by sea since the 13th century, when it was brought from the North of England
Protected cruiser (2,557 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
sides of a ship more and more difficult, as very thick, heavy armour plates were required. Even if armour dominated the design of the ship, it was likely
Republic of Korea Navy (10,915 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
including 29,000 Republic of Korea Marines. There are about 150 commissioned ships with the ROK Navy. The naval aviation force consists of about 70 fixed-wing
La Amistad (2,907 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
including four children, in Havana, Cuba and were transporting them on the ship to their plantations near Puerto Príncipe (modern Camagüey, Cuba). The revolt
Paddle steamer (5,961 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
wheels continue to be used by small, pedal-powered paddle boats and by some ships that operate tourist voyages. The latter are often powered by diesel engines
Conning tower (1,222 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
platform on a ship or submarine, often armored, from which an officer in charge can conn the vessel, controlling movements of the ship by giving orders
Gross register tonnage (341 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
register tonnage (GRT, grt, g.r.t., gt) or gross registered tonnage, is a ship's total internal volume expressed in "register tons", each of which is equal
Carrack (1,735 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Spanish: nao, Catalan: carraca) is a three- or four-masted ocean-going sailing ship that was developed in the 14th to 15th centuries in Europe, most notably
Pirates of the Caribbean: The Curse of the Black Pearl (5,556 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Captain Jack Sparrow, having just arrived in Port Royal to commandeer a ship, rescues Elizabeth. Norrington identifies Jack as a pirate, and a chase ensues
Littoral combat ship (13,065 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
The littoral combat ship (LCS) is a set of two classes of relatively small surface vessels designed for operations near shore by the United States Navy
Queen Mary 2 (7,833 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Queen Mary 2 was the only ocean liner (as opposed to a cruise ship) still in service. The ship was officially named Queen Mary 2 by Queen Elizabeth II in
Phoenix (1,816 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Phoenix (1809 ship), built in France in 1809; captured by the British Royal Navy in 1810; employed as a whaling ship from 1811 to 1829 Phoenix (1810 ship), a merchant
Victory ship (2,279 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
The Victory ship was a class of cargo ship produced in large numbers by North American shipyards during World War II to replace losses caused by German
Drive shaft (2,313 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Paralever, Moto Guzzi's CARC and Kawasaki's Tetra Lever. On a power-driven ship, the drive shaft, or propeller shaft, usually connects the propeller outside
Longship (8,216 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
ship with 13 rowing benches is the smallest ship suitable for military use. A ship with 6 to 16 benches would be classified as a Karvi. These ships were
Minelayer (1,120 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
carried out by ships, submarines and aircraft. Additionally, since World War I the term minelayer refers specifically to a naval ship used for deploying
Passenger ship (1,838 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
A passenger ship is a merchant ship whose primary function is to carry passengers on the sea. The category does not include cargo vessels which have accommodations
HMS Hermes (95) (5,260 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
first ship to be designed as an aircraft carrier, although the Imperial Japanese Navy's Hōshō was the first to be launched and commissioned. The ship's construction
Radiotelephone (1,554 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Service or HF ship-to-shore operates on shortwave radio frequencies, using single-sideband modulation. The usual method is that a ship calls a shore station
Intermodal container (8,131 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
these containers can be used across different modes of transport – from ship to rail to truck – without unloading and reloading their cargo. Intermodal
Junk (ship) (7,764 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
A junk is a type of Chinese sailing ship with fully battened sails. There are two types of junk in China: Northern junk, which developed from Chinese river
HMS Endeavour (7,784 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Heemskerck 127 years earlier. In April 1770, Endeavour became the first European ship to reach the east coast of Australia, with Cook going ashore at what is now
SpaceShipTwo (5,029 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
The Scaled Composites Model 339 SpaceShipTwo (SS2) is an air-launched suborbital spaceplane type designed for space tourism. It is manufactured by The
Incoterms (4,119 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
condition of the goods can be verified at the point of loading on board ship. They are therefore not to be used for containerized freight, other combined
Man-of-war (393 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
the term never acquired a specific meaning, it was usually reserved for a ship armed with cannon and propelled primarily by sails, as opposed to a galley
Drive shaft (2,313 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Paralever, Moto Guzzi's CARC and Kawasaki's Tetra Lever. On a power-driven ship, the drive shaft, or propeller shaft, usually connects the propeller outside
German battleship Scharnhorst (7,247 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
German capital ship, alternatively described as a battleship or battlecruiser, of Nazi Germany's Kriegsmarine. She was the lead ship of her class, which
Passenger ship (1,838 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
A passenger ship is a merchant ship whose primary function is to carry passengers on the sea. The category does not include cargo vessels which have accommodations
Costa Concordia (2,875 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
pronunciation: [ˈkɔsta konˈkɔrdja]) was a cruise ship operated by Costa Crociere. She was the first of her class, followed by sister ships Costa Serena, Costa Pacifica,
Armored cruiser (8,740 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
to operate as a long-range, independent warship, capable of defeating any ship apart from a battleship and fast enough to outrun any battleship it encountered
Dock landing ship (602 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
A dock landing ship (also called landing ship, dock or LSD) is an amphibious warfare ship with a well dock to transport and launch landing craft and amphibious
List of active Indian Navy ships (971 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
List of active Indian Navy ships is a list of ships in active service with the Indian Navy. In service ships are taken from the official Indian Navy website
Moby-Dick (15,986 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
of Ahab, captain of the whaling ship Pequod, for revenge on Moby Dick, the giant white sperm whale that on the ship's previous voyage bit off Ahab's
SpaceShipTwo (5,029 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
The Scaled Composites Model 339 SpaceShipTwo (SS2) is an air-launched suborbital spaceplane type designed for space tourism. It is manufactured by The
Jack Sparrow (6,828 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
to fight only when necessary. Sparrow is introduced seeking to regain his ship, the Black Pearl, from his mutinous first mate, Hector Barbossa. Later, he
Reserve fleet (736 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
prevent the ships from foundering at their moorings. When a ship is placed into reserve status, the various parts and weapon systems that the ship uses are
SS Great Britain (7,832 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Great Britain is a museum ship and former passenger steamship, which was advanced for her time. She was the longest passenger ship in the world from 1845
Firefly (TV series) (12,150 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
Out here, people struggle to get by with the most basic technologies. A ship would bring you work. A gun would help you keep it. A captain's goal was
Longship (8,216 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
ship with 13 rowing benches is the smallest ship suitable for military use. A ship with 6 to 16 benches would be classified as a Karvi. These ships were
Operation Crossroads (13,215 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
had developed nuclear weapons during World War II. A fleet of 95 target ships was assembled in Bikini Lagoon and hit with two detonations of Fat Man plutonium
HMS Hood (10,198 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
HMS Hood (pennant number 51) was the lead ship of her class of four battlecruisers built for the Royal Navy during World War I. Already under construction
Incoterms (4,119 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
condition of the goods can be verified at the point of loading on board ship. They are therefore not to be used for containerized freight, other combined
United States Coast Guard Cutter (591 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
have a permanently assigned crew with accommodations aboard. They carry the ship prefix USCGC. The Revenue Marine and the Revenue Cutter Service, as it was
Exocet (3,413 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
The Exocet (French pronunciation: ​[ɛɡzɔsɛ]) is a French-built anti-ship missile whose various versions can be launched from surface vessels, submarines
Attack submarine (2,369 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Skipjack-class boats, which entered service beginning in 1959. The lead ship of the class was declared the "world's fastest submarine" following trials
SS Andrea Doria (12,041 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
pride. Of all Italy's ships at the time, Andrea Doria was the largest, fastest and supposedly safest. Launched on 16 June 1951, the ship began her maiden voyage
Torpedo (10,648 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
improvised fishing boats or frogmen, and later light aircraft, to destroy large ships without the need of large guns, though sometimes at the risk of being hit
Sinking of MV Sewol (15,305 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Consequently, the ship herself listed twenty degrees into the water at 8:49:40, causing cargo to fall to one side of the ship. The impact caused the ship's gyroscope
Lists of ship commissionings and decommissionings (13 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
This is an index of lists of ship commissionings and decommissionings by year.
Pennant number (2,657 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Nations, ships are identified by pennant number (an internationalisation of pendant number, which it was called before 1948). Historically, naval ships flew
List of battleships of the United States (4,668 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
battle ships" which became the Indiana class. The Navy Act of July 19, 1892 authorized construction of a fourth "sea-going, coast-line battle ship", which
Third-rate (494 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
In the rating system of the Royal Navy, a third rate was a ship of the line which from the 1720s mounted between 64 and 80 guns, typically built with two
Missile boat (1,212 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
missile boat or missile cutter is a small, fast warship armed with anti-ship missiles. Being smaller than other warships such as destroyers and frigates
Carnival Cruise Line (4,924 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Corporation & plc. Its logo is the funnel, like the funnels found on its ships, with red, white, and blue colors. The funnels are shaped like a whale's
Lists of shipwrecks (163 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
This is an index of lists of shipwrecks (i.e. sunken or grounded ships whose remains have been located), sorted by region. List of shipwrecks of Africa
Japanese cruiser Naniwa (5,301 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Naniwa (浪速) was the lead ship of her class of two protected cruisers built for the Imperial Japanese Navy (IJN) in the 1880s. As Japan lacked the industrial
New York (780 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Many ships have been named after the city or state of New York. See: List of ships named New York List of ships named City of New York List of ships named
East Indiaman (1,677 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
East Indiaman was a general name for any sailing ship operating under charter or licence to any of the East India trading companies of the major European
Japanese battleship Nagato (5,939 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Completed in 1920 as the lead ship of her class, she carried supplies for the survivors of the Great Kantō earthquake in 1923. The ship was modernized in 1934–1936
Sting (musician) (11,030 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
a musical, The Last Ship, inspired by Sting's own childhood experiences and the shipbuilding industry in Wallsend. The Last Ship tells a story about the
Lady Elizabeth (1879) (1,479 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
The builders of the second Lady Elizabeth had also built the first ship. The ship had three masts and was just under average size compared to barques
Royal Caribbean International (6,189 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
four largest passenger ships in the world. As of January 2021, the line operates twenty-four ships and has six additional ships on order. Royal Caribbean
Isambard Kingdom Brunel (7,438 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
the first propeller-driven, ocean-going iron ship, which, when launched in 1843, was the largest ship ever built. On the GWR, Brunel set standards for
Coastal defence ship (1,743 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Coastal defence ships (sometimes called coastal battleships or coast defence ships) were warships built for the purpose of coastal defence, mostly during
Bulkhead (partition) (1,090 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
upright wall within the hull of a ship or within the fuselage of an aeroplane. Other kinds of partition elements within a ship are decks and deckheads. The
President (523 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
President (born 1971), American football player HMS President, a list of ships Mr. President (disambiguation) Präsident, an automobile manufactured by
USS Texas (BB-35) (11,009 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
total of five battle stars for service in World War II, and is now a museum ship near Houston, Texas. In addition to her combat service, Texas also served
Typhus (2,702 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
of quarantine, who had contracted the disease aboard the crowded coffin ships in fleeing the Great Irish Famine. Officials neither knew how to provide
Manchester Ship Canal (8,389 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
53°21′59″N 2°37′09″W / 53.3663°N 2.6192°W / 53.3663; -2.6192 The Manchester Ship Canal is a 36-mile-long (58 km) inland waterway in the North West of England
Submarine chaser (833 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Fighting Ships 1906–1921 Conway Maritime Press, 1985. ISBN 0-85177-245-5. Gardiner, Robert and Chesneau, Roger, Conway's All the World's Fighting Ships 1922–1946
Royal Caribbean International (6,189 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
four largest passenger ships in the world. As of January 2021, the line operates twenty-four ships and has six additional ships on order. Royal Caribbean
President (523 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
President (born 1971), American football player HMS President, a list of ships Mr. President (disambiguation) Präsident, an automobile manufactured by
Isambard Kingdom Brunel (7,438 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
the first propeller-driven, ocean-going iron ship, which, when launched in 1843, was the largest ship ever built. On the GWR, Brunel set standards for
Turkish Naval Forces (4,537 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Commando detachments. As of early 2021, the navy operates a wide variety of ships and 60 maritime aircraft. Following the demise of the Ottoman Empire in
Bulkhead (partition) (1,090 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
upright wall within the hull of a ship or within the fuselage of an aeroplane. Other kinds of partition elements within a ship are decks and deckheads. The
USS Saratoga (CV-3) (10,553 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
Treaty of 1922. The ship entered service in 1928 and was assigned to the Pacific Fleet for her entire career. Saratoga and her sister ship, Lexington, were
Starship Enterprise (4,503 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Trek: The Motion Picture (1979) among a series of illustrations depicting ships named Enterprise. It also appears as a model in Star Trek Into Darkness
USS Maine (1889) (11,877 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
USS Maine was a United States Navy ship that sank in Havana Harbor in February 1898, contributing to the outbreak of the Spanish–American War in April
Lists of ship launches (11 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
This is an index of lists of ship launches by year.
Japanese battleship Nagato (5,939 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Completed in 1920 as the lead ship of her class, she carried supplies for the survivors of the Great Kantō earthquake in 1923. The ship was modernized in 1934–1936
Japanese cruiser Naniwa (5,301 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Naniwa (浪速) was the lead ship of her class of two protected cruisers built for the Imperial Japanese Navy (IJN) in the 1880s. As Japan lacked the industrial
Lists of shipwrecks (163 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
This is an index of lists of shipwrecks (i.e. sunken or grounded ships whose remains have been located), sorted by region. List of shipwrecks of Africa
Sinking of the RMS Lusitania (15,509 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
around the UK, shortly after unrestricted submarine warfare against the ships of the United Kingdom had been announced by Germany following the Allied
Submarine chaser (833 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Fighting Ships 1906–1921 Conway Maritime Press, 1985. ISBN 0-85177-245-5. Gardiner, Robert and Chesneau, Roger, Conway's All the World's Fighting Ships 1922–1946
List of Star Wars spacecraft (8,456 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
individual lights in it. According to chief model maker Lorne Peterson, the ship was originally scaled to appear sixteen miles long, though later sources
Guided-missile destroyer (1,372 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Innominate 4th ship (Fitting out) Innominate 5th ship (Under construction) Innominate 6th ship (Under construction) Innominate 7th ship (Under construction)
White Star Line (15,802 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
chartered sailing ships RMS Tayleur, Blue Jacket, White Star, Red Jacket, Ellen, Ben Nevis, Emma, Mermaid and Iowa. Tayleur, the largest ship of its day, was
Vikings (20,989 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Ladby ship; Mammen chamber tomb and hoard. Estonia: Salme ships – The largest ship burial ground ever uncovered. Scotland: Port an Eilean Mhòir ship burial;
Reefer ship (2,768 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
A reefer ship is a refrigerated cargo ship typically used to transport perishable cargo, which require temperature-controlled handling, such as fruits
COVID-19 pandemic on naval ships (6,924 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
The COVID-19 pandemic spread to many military ships. The nature of these ships, which includes working with others in small enclosed areas and a lack of
Whydah Gally (3,510 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
as the Whydah) was a fully rigged galley ship that was originally built as a passenger, cargo, and slave ship. On the return leg of her maiden voyage of
Maritime call sign (775 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Maritime call signs are call signs assigned as unique identifiers to ships and boats. All radio transmissions must be individually identified by the call
Titanic II (4,155 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Olympic-class RMS Titanic. The new ship is planned to have a gross tonnage (GT) of 56,000, while the original ship measured about 46,000 gross register
Waterline (1,968 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
The waterline is the line where the hull of a ship meets the surface of the water. Specifically, it is also the name of a special marking, also known as
Yacht (4,501 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
and Japan. It described 8th-century Anglo-Saxon royal pleg-scips (play ships) that featured ornamented bows and sterns and which had the capability of
RRS Discovery (9,535 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
research. Launched in 1901, she was the last traditional wooden three-masted ship to be built in the United Kingdom. Her first mission was the British National
Zumwalt-class destroyer (9,783 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
States Navy guided missile destroyers designed as multi-mission stealth ships with a focus on land attack. It is a multi-role class that was designed
Eagle (ship) (329 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
Matecumbe Key, Florida, to become an artificial reef and diving spot. The ship was built in 1962 for Danish shipowners J. Lauritzen A/S at Bijkers Shipyard
Steam turbine (9,289 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
steam-powered ships thereafter. Since the 1980s, steam turbines have been replaced by gas turbines on fast ships and by diesel engines on other ships; exceptions
Paradox (2,611 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
system. Examples outside logic include the ship of Theseus from philosophy, a paradox which questions whether a ship repaired over time by replacing each and
List of Falcon 9 and Falcon Heavy launches (21,967 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
boosters, which land either on a ground pad near the launch site or on a drone ship at sea. In December 2015, Falcon 9 became the first rocket to land propulsively
Fast attack craft (1,039 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
craft (FAC) is a small, fast, agile and offensive warship armed with anti-ship missiles, gun or torpedoes. FACs are usually operated in close proximity
COVID-19 pandemic on USS Theodore Roosevelt (4,111 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
were evacuated and the ship was ordered to Guam. The captain, Brett Crozier, wanted most of the crew to be removed from the ship to prevent the spread
German cruiser Prinz Eugen (6,364 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
vessels. She served with Nazi Germany's Kriegsmarine during World War II. The ship was laid down in April 1936, launched in August 1938, and entered service
Royal Malaysian Navy (5,487 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Acacia-class sloop, HMS Laburnum, to serve as the Reserve's Headquarters and drill ship. It was berthed at the Telok Ayer Basin. HMS Laburnum was sunk in February
Torpedo tube (865 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
of torpedo tube: underwater tubes fitted to submarines and some surface ships, and deck-mounted units (also referred to as torpedo launchers) installed
Seventy-four (ship) (1,210 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
The "seventy-four" was a type of two-decked sailing ship of the line which nominally carried 74 guns. It was developed by the French navy in the 1740s
Edward Smith (sea captain) (4,411 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
Line vessels. He was the captain of the RMS Titanic, and perished when the ship sank on its maiden voyage. Raised in a working environment, he left school
Attack transport (1,520 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Attack transport is a United States Navy ship classification for a variant of ocean-going troopship adapted to transporting invasion forces ashore. Unlike
Shizuoka Prefecture (1,074 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Hamamatsu Public Information Building) Shimizu Sushi Museum Shimoda Black Ship Festival, held in May Shimizu Port Festival, held on August 5 to 7 Shizuoka
Q-ship (3,024 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Q-ships, also known as Q-boats, decoy vessels, special service ships, or mystery ships, were heavily armed merchant ships with concealed weaponry, designed
USS Iowa (BB-61) (8,952 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
USS Iowa (BB-61) is a retired battleship, the lead ship of her class, and the fourth in the United States Navy to be named after the state of Iowa. Owing
Repair ship (469 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
A repair ship is a naval auxiliary ship designed to provide maintenance support to warships. Repair ships provide similar services to destroyer, submarine
Deep-submergence rescue vehicle (1,105 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
of China has three Type 925 Dajiang class and three Type 926 class. Each ship is equipped with either two Type 7103 DSRV or one LR7 manned submersible
Attack transport (1,520 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Attack transport is a United States Navy ship classification for a variant of ocean-going troopship adapted to transporting invasion forces ashore. Unlike
Torpedo tube (865 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
of torpedo tube: underwater tubes fitted to submarines and some surface ships, and deck-mounted units (also referred to as torpedo launchers) installed
USS Iowa (BB-61) (8,952 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
USS Iowa (BB-61) is a retired battleship, the lead ship of her class, and the fourth in the United States Navy to be named after the state of Iowa. Owing
HMS Beagle (3,802 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Cherokee-class 10-gun brig-sloop of the Royal Navy, one of more than 100 ships of this class. The vessel, constructed at a cost of £7,803 (roughly equivalent
List of submarines of the United States Navy (262 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Submarine SSBN - United States Nuclear Forces". fas.org. Retrieved 2021-02-04. "Ship Hull Classification Symbols". Naval Vessel Registry. Archived from the original
Q-ship (3,024 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Q-ships, also known as Q-boats, decoy vessels, special service ships, or mystery ships, were heavily armed merchant ships with concealed weaponry, designed
Deep-submergence rescue vehicle (1,105 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
of China has three Type 925 Dajiang class and three Type 926 class. Each ship is equipped with either two Type 7103 DSRV or one LR7 manned submersible
Nave (755 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
navis, the Latin word for ship, an early Christian symbol of the Church as a whole, with a possible connection to the "Ship of St. Peter" or the Ark of
Swedish warship Mars (406 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Swedish warship that was built between 1563 and 1564. She was the leading ship of King Eric XIV of Sweden's fleet, and at 70 meters and equipped with 173
Mary Celeste (7,887 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
many times in documentaries, novels, plays, and films, and the name of the ship has become a byword for unexplained desertion. In 1884, Arthur Conan Doyle
Missile (2,824 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
surface-to-surface and air-to-surface missiles (ballistic, cruise, anti-ship, anti-tank, etc.), surface-to-air missiles (and anti-ballistic), air-to-air
Landing craft (6,248 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
sea to the shore during an amphibious assault. The term excludes landing ships, which are larger. Production of landing craft peaked during World War II
Kriegsmarine (7,329 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
the German navy and prohibited the building of submarines. Kriegsmarine ships were deployed to the waters around Spain during the Spanish Civil War (1936–1939)
La Belle (ship) (4,061 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
La Belle was one of Robert de La Salle's four ships when he explored the Gulf of Mexico with the ill-fated mission of starting a French colony at the
Preussen (ship) (1,815 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
the vessel) (PROY-sin) was a German steel-hulled, five-masted, ship-rigged sailing ship built in 1902 for the F. Laeisz shipping company and named after
HMS Warrior (1860) (5,334 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
Royal Navy in 1859–1861. She was the name ship of the Warrior-class ironclads. Warrior and her sister ship HMS Black Prince were the first armour-plated
Guard ship (463 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
eighteenth century, peacetime guard ships were usually third-rate or fourth-rate ships of the line. The larger ships in the fleet would be laid up "in ordinary"
SS Benwood (655 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
SS Benwood was a steam cargo ship of the early twentieth century. Built by Craig, Taylor & Co Ltd., Stockton on Tees, she entered service with Joseph Hoult
Quarterdeck (975 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
behind the main mast of a sailing ship. Traditionally it was where the captain commanded his vessel and where the ship's colours were kept. This led to
Middle Passage (3,697 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
forcibly transported to the New World as part of the Atlantic slave trade. Ships departed Europe for West African markets with manufactured goods (first
Sailboat (1,519 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
entirely by sails and is smaller than a sailing ship. Distinctions in what constitutes a sailing boat and ship vary by region and maritime culture. Although
Captain (623 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Captain is a title for the commander of a military unit, the commander of a ship, aeroplane, spacecraft, or other vessel, or the commander of a port, fire
Waterline length (446 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
A vessel's waterline length (abbreviated to L.W.L) is the length of a ship or boat at the level where it sits in the water (the waterline). The LWL will
USS West Virginia (BB-48) (6,686 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
battleship series built for the United States Navy in the 1910s and 1920s; the ships were essentially repeats of the earlier Tennessee design, but with a significantly
Motor torpedo boat (2,030 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
surprise and agility at high speed to avoid being hit by gunfire from bigger ships. The Royal Navy started developing particularly small, agile, and fast petrol-powered
Japanese battleship Mikasa (3,014 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
and sank the ship. She was salvaged and her repairs took over two years to complete. Afterwards, the ship served as a coast-defence ship during World
Royal Fleet Auxiliary (3,222 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Aviation Training ship/Hospital Ship and landing vessels amongst its assets. The RFA was first established in 1905 to provide coaling ships for the Navy in
Oseberg Ship (1,859 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
The Oseberg ship (Norwegian: Osebergskipet) is a well-preserved Viking ship discovered in a large burial mound at the Oseberg farm near Tønsberg in Vestfold
Piracy off the coast of Somalia (11,198 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
navies of Asian and European nations began to more actively rescue hijacked ships, including the bulk carrier OS35. In the early 1980s, prior to the outbreak
Combat stores ship (434 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Combat stores ships, or storeships, were originally a designation given to ships in the Age of Sail and immediately afterward that navies used to stow
Kang the Conqueror (5,451 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
they want to help Kang, but double-cross him once they gain access to his ship, and the Avengers are freed. In an attempt to stop them, Kang releases radiation
Ferry (5,284 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
transit between points at a capital cost much lower than bridges or tunnels. Ship connections of much larger distances (such as over long distances in water
Naval Vessel Register (569 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
official inventory of ships and service craft in custody of or titled by the United States Navy. It contains information on ships and service craft that
MV Dania (409 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
The Dania was a cargo ship that was scuttled on 27 October 2002 at Nyali Reef, just off Bamburi, Kenya. The MV Dania was built in Ulsteinvik (Norway) for
USS Monitor (15,200 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
during the American Civil War and completed in early 1862, the first such ship commissioned by the Navy. Monitor played a central role in the Battle of
International maritime signal flags (721 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
International maritime signal flags are various flags used to communicate with ships. The principal system of flags and associated codes is the International
HMS Belfast (7,872 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
moored as a museum ship on the River Thames in London and is operated by the Imperial War Museum. Construction of Belfast, the first ship in the Royal Navy
Smack (ship) (449 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
1950s. Smacks were used in British coastal waters during World War I as Q ships. Actions involving smacks include the action of 15 August 1917, when the
E-boat (3,320 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
three landing ships, one repair ship, one naval tug, and numerous other merchant vessels. Sea mines laid by the E-boats sank 37 merchant ships totalling 148
Hospital ships designated for the COVID-19 pandemic (1,695 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
hospital ships have been deployed— USNS Mercy to the Port of Los Angeles and Comfort to New York Harbor. The Indonesian Navy hospital ship KRI Dr Soeharso
Funnel (ship) (854 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
chimney on a ship used to expel boiler steam and smoke or engine exhaust. They are also commonly referred to as stacks. The primary purpose of a ship's funnel(s)
Swedish Navy (1,572 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
majestäts skepp (His/Her Majesty's Ship). In English, this is sometimes changed to "HSwMS" ("His Swedish Majesty's Ship") to differentiate Swedish vessels
List of ships attacked by Somali pirates (1,020 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
pirate attacks had by October 2012 dropped to a six-year low, with only one ship attacked in the third quarter compared to thirty-six during the same period
Midget submarine (3,836 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
little or no on-board living accommodation. They normally work with mother ships, from which they are launched and recovered and which provide living accommodation
Batavia (1628 ship) (3,137 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
Batavia ([baːˈtaːviaː] (listen)) was a ship of the Dutch East India Company. Built in Amsterdam in 1628 as the company's new flagship, she sailed that
Fire ship (2,723 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
A fire ship or fireship, used in the days of wooden rowed or sailing ships, was a ship filled with combustibles, or gunpowder deliberately set on fire
First-rate (1,256 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
largest ships of the line, equivalent to the 'super-dreadnought' of more recent times. Originating in the Jacobean era with the designation of Ships Royal
Ketch (220 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Ketch, Yawl, Schooner, Cat". Jordan Yacht Brokerage. Retrieved 17 May 2019. "Ship Model, Ketch". National Museum of American History. Retrieved 17 May 2019
Naval trawler (1,775 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
one knew these waters as well as local fishermen, and the trawler was the ship type these fishermen understood and could operate effectively without further
Lifeboat (shipboard) (3,021 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
evacuation in the event of a disaster aboard a ship. Lifeboat drills are required by law on larger commercial ships. Rafts (liferafts) are also used. In the
Lost in Space (2018 TV series) (2,219 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
Robinson, Maureen and John's younger daughter Ignacio Serricchio as Don West, a ship mechanic and smuggler of luxury goods. He is accompanied by his lucky chicken
HMAS Tobruk (L 50) (6,337 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
HMAS Tobruk (L 50) was a Landing Ship Heavy (LSH) of the Royal Australian Navy (RAN), based on the design of the Round Table-class of the British Royal
SS Edmund Fitzgerald (13,277 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
entire crew of 29 men. When launched on June 7, 1958, she was the largest ship on North America's Great Lakes, and she remains the largest to have sunk
Sloop (614 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Association. Retrieved 12 May 2019. "Sailboat Rig Types: Sloop, Cutter, Ketch, Yawl, Schooner, Cat". Jordan Yacht and Ship Co. Retrieved 12 May 2019.
Deep-submergence vehicle (2,287 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
maintenance considerations. All DSVs are dependent upon a surface support ship or a mother submarine, that can piggyback or tow them (in case of the NR-1)
Russian Navy (12,274 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
participating ships (69 ships, including 49 warships and 20 support ships) in the independent Russia and took place in the Baltic Sea. The 22 known ships of the
Millennium Falcon (3,984 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
and games; James Luceno's novel Millennium Falcon focuses on the titular ship. It also appears in the 2014 animated film The Lego Movie in Lego form. Solo:
USS John F. Kennedy (CV-67) (4,138 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
USS John F. Kennedy (CV-67) (formerly CVA-67) is the only ship of her class (a variant of the Kitty Hawk class of aircraft carrier) and the last conventionally
COVID-19 pandemic on Grand Princess (3,932 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
passengers of the cruise ship Grand Princess who had tested positive for SARS-CoV-2 were being linked to cruises they had taken on the ship while it traveled
Landing Ship Medium (2,279 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Landing Ship Medium (LSM) were amphibious assault ships of the United States Navy in World War II. Of a size between that of Landing Ships Tank (LST) and
Galiot (500 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Historically, a galiot was a type of ship with oars, also known as a half-galley, then, from the 17th century forward, a ship with sails and oars. As used by
Minehunter (424 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Exploitation of a Ship's Magnetic Field Signatures. Morgan & Claypool Publishers. ISBN 9781598290745. Holmes, John J. (2008). Reduction of a Ship's Magnetic
Media (398 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
thriller film directed by Craig Ross Jr. Media (AK-83), a World War II US Navy ship that was never commissioned Media (automobile company) RMS Media, a Cunard
Stem (ship) (310 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
most forward part of a boat or ship's bow and is an extension of the keel itself. It is often found on wooden boats or ships, but not exclusively. The stem
German cruiser Admiral Graf Spee (3,792 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Admiral Graf Spee was a Deutschland-class "Panzerschiff" (armored ship), nicknamed a "pocket battleship" by the British, which served with the Kriegsmarine
Theseus (4,891 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
the ship Theseus used on his return from Minoan Crete to Athens was kept in the Athenian harbor as a memorial for several centuries. "The ship wherein
Target ship (1,143 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
A target ship is a vessel — typically an obsolete or captured warship — used as a seaborne target for naval gunnery practice or for weapons testing. Targets
Northwest Passage (12,197 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
complete the passage solely by ship, from Greenland to Alaska in the sloop Gjøa. Since that date, several fortified ships have made the journey. From east
HMS Vanguard (23) (5,469 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
She was the biggest and fastest of the Royal Navy's battleships, the only ship of her class, and the last battleship to be built by the Royal Navy. The
USS Enterprise (CV-6) (6,072 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
more major actions of the war against Japan than any other United States ship. These actions included the attack on Pearl Harbor — 18 Douglas SBD Dauntless
Tall ship (1,266 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
A tall ship is a large, traditionally-rigged sailing vessel. Popular modern tall ship rigs include topsail schooners, brigantines, brigs and barques. "Tall
Sailor (2,653 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
maintenance of a ship. The profession of the sailor is old, and the term sailor has its etymological roots in a time when sailing ships were the main mode
Net register tonnage (302 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Net register tonnage (NRT, nrt, n.r.t.) is a ship's cargo volume capacity expressed in "register tons", one of which equals to a volume of 100 cubic feet
Singapore dollar (3,330 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
embedded security thread, while the $1,000 and $10,000 notes have two. The Ship Series of currency notes is the third set of notes to be issued for circulation
War of 1812 (32,457 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
causes of the war involved the Royal Navy stopping and seizing American ships on the open sea and impressing men believed to be British subjects, even
INS Vikrant (R11) (3,984 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
"courageous") was a Majestic-class aircraft carrier of the Indian Navy. The ship was laid down as HMS Hercules for the British Royal Navy during World War
Cargo liner (654 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
A cargo liner, also known as a passenger-cargo ship or passenger-cargoman, is a type of merchant ship which carries general cargo and often passengers
Depot ship (2,159 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
A depot ship is an auxiliary ship used as a mobile or fixed base for submarines, destroyers, minesweepers, fast attack craft, landing craft, or other
Net laying ship (473 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
A net laying ship, also known as a net layer, net tender, gate ship or boom defence vessel was a type of small auxiliary ship. A net layer's primary function
RMS Carpathia (4,283 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
after the Titanic had sunk, and the crew rescued 705 survivors from the ship's lifeboats. The Carpathia was sunk on 17 July 1918 after being torpedoed
Tomahawk (missile) (6,121 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
missile that is primarily used by the United States Navy and Royal Navy in ship- and submarine-based land-attack operations. Designed at APL/JHU, it was
RV Calypso (1,427 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
1996 and was planned to undergo a complete refurbishment in 2009–2011. The ship is named after the Greek mythological figure Calypso. Calypso was originally
Ernest Shackleton (9,674 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Trans-Antarctic Expedition, 1914–1917. Disaster struck this expedition when its ship, Endurance, became trapped in pack ice and was slowly crushed before the
Battleship (game) (1,504 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
played on ruled grids (paper or board) on which each player's fleet of ships (including battleships) are marked. The locations of the fleets are concealed
William Kidd (5,699 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
executed in London in 1701 for murder and piracy. He had captured a French ship, commanded by an English captain, as a prize. He had been commissioned by
Trireme (6,743 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
"It must be assumed the term pentekontor covered the two-level type". As a ship it was fast and agile, and it was the dominant warship in the Mediterranean
Mine countermeasures vessel (80 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
A mine countermeasures vessel or MCMV is a type of naval ship designed for the location of and destruction of naval mines which combines the role of a
SS Great Eastern (5,869 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Millwall Iron Works on the River Thames, London. She was by far the largest ship ever built at the time of her 1858 launch, and had the capacity to carry
James Cook (8,990 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
would need one day to command his own ship. His three-year apprenticeship completed, Cook began working on trading ships in the Baltic Sea. After passing his
List of boat types (453 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
sailing ships, see: List of sailing boat types. Contents A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z See also References Airboat Auxiliary ship Top
Midshipman (8,097 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
the word derives from the area aboard a ship, amidships, either where the original rating worked on the ship, or where he was berthed. Beginning in the
Landing craft tank (1,930 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
different designations in the Korean and Vietnam Wars. Let there be built great ships which can cast upon a beach, in any weather, large numbers of the heaviest
Ship grounding (917 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Ship grounding or ship stranding is the impact of a ship on seabed or waterway side. It may be intentional, as in beaching to land crew or cargo, and careening
Viking ships (2,623 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Viking ships were marine vessels of unique structure, used in Scandinavia from the Viking Age throughout the Middle Ages. The boat-types were quite varied
3M22 Zircon (1,630 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Циркон, NATO reporting name: SS-N-33) is a scramjet powered maneuvering anti-ship hypersonic cruise missile currently in testing by Russia. The missile represents
Destroyer tender (714 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
A destroyer tender or destroyer depot ship is a type of depot ship: an auxiliary ship designed to provide maintenance support to a flotilla of destroyers
Imperial German Navy (8,286 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
The Imperial Navy's main ships were turned over to the Allies, but were scuttled at Scapa Flow in 1919 by German crews. All ships of the Imperial Navy were
Islamic Republic of Iran Navy (3,529 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
establish a presence in the Atlantic Ocean, and as of May 2021 has sent ships into the region. NEDAJA shares many functions and responsibilities with
HMNZS Tui (1970) (457 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
Charles H. Davis (T-AGOR-5), was one of nine Conrad class oceanographic ships built for the United States Navy (USN), that later saw service in the Royal
Vehicle simulation game (1,946 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
old-fashioned submarine activities such as firing torpedoes at surface ships. Simulations of warships are more rare. Due to their slow speed, games such
USS Nautilus (SSN-571) (3,159 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
Historic Landmark in 1982. The submarine has been preserved as a museum ship at the Submarine Force Library and Museum in Groton, Connecticut, where the
Aviso (391 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
patrol frigates until 2012, when the remaining ships of the class were reclassified as offshore patrol ships. It is equivalent to the modern use of "sloop"
Seal (519 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
British carrier-borne torpedo bomber aircraft HMS Seal, two Royal Navy ships and one submarine USS Seal, two American submarines United States Navy SEALs
German submarine U-47 (1938) (2,972 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
fired an additional four rounds of which three hit the ship, prompting its crew to abandon ship. U-47 rendered assistance to the crew of Bosnia, bringing
Australian Army ship Crusader (AV 2767) (1,502 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
Crusader (AV2767) was an Australian Army amphibious operations support ship of World War II. She was launched shortly before the war ended and entered
Eve Online (14,429 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
almost all of the ships and ship modules in the game. NPC ships can be looted and salvaged for items and materials. Non-player created ships and equipment
Fancy (ship) (492 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
Fancy was Henry Every's ship, and was commanded by him between May 1694 to late 1695, when he retired from piracy and the fate of Fancy becomes unknown
Titanic conspiracy theories (3,024 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
disaster. One such hypothesis is that the sunken ship was actually the Titanic's near-identical sister-ship Olympic, which was the subject of a large insurance
Fletcher-class destroyer (2,495 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Gearing classes were Fletcher derivatives. The long-range Fletcher-class ships performed every task asked of a destroyer, from anti-submarine warfare and
List of Pirates of the Caribbean characters (14,850 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
commandeers the Black Pearl, but it is revealed that Sparrow has stolen the ship's charts which point the way towards the Fountain of Youth. In the fourth
Shakedown (testing) (647 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
A shakedown is a period of testing or a trial journey undergone by a ship, aircraft or other craft and its crew before being declared operational. Statistically
Ground-effect vehicle (4,428 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
such benefits. Low altitude brings high speed craft into conflict with ships, buildings and rising land, which may not be sufficiently visible in poor
Navy Directory (395 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Register is an official list of naval officers, their ranks and seniority, the ships which they command or to which they are appointed, etc., that is published
Jack of the United States (1,138 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
non-naval vessels such as ships of the U.S. Coast Guard, the predominantly civilian-crewed replenishment and support ships of the U.S. Navy's Military
Commodore (rank) (2,129 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
command more than one ship, even temporarily, much as "captain" is the traditional title for the commanding officer of a single ship even if the officer's
Francis Drake (8,946 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
he was purser of a ship which sailed to the Bay of Biscay. At twenty (c. 1563–1564) he made a voyage to the coast of Guinea in a ship owned by William and
Finnish Navy (3,075 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
trained each year. Finnish Navy vessels are given the ship prefix "FNS", short for "Finnish Navy ship", but this is not used in Finnish language contexts
Sail plan (6,703 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
aftmost mast help a ship steer and turn. A five-masted square-rigged ship. All the masts bear square sails. A three-masted junk ship, an 800-ton trading
Naval Sea Systems Command (1,624 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
oversee design, construction and repair of ships and ordnance. Established in 1940, Bureau of Ships (BuShips) succeeded the Bureau of Construction and
USS Olympia (C-6) (5,041 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
at the Battle of Manila Bay during the Spanish–American War in 1898. The ship was decommissioned after returning to the U.S. in 1899, but was returned
Thomas Andrews (2,050 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
RMS Titanic, and for being on board the ship during her maiden voyage. He perished along with more than 1500 others when the ship sank after hitting an iceberg
Brainiac (character) (15,512 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
tendrils, often referred to by fans and comic creators as the "skull ship." The ship acts as an extension of Brainiac himself. Brainiac retains this robotic
USS Nevada (BB-36) (7,679 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
Nevada (BB-36), the second United States Navy ship to be named after the 36th state, was the lead ship of the two Nevada-class battleships. Launched in
Carronade (3,503 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
century. Its main function was to serve as a powerful, short-range, anti-ship and anti-crew weapon. The technology behind the carronade was greater dimensional
Battle of Okinawa (9,302 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
intensity of Japanese kamikaze attacks and the sheer numbers of Allied ships and armored vehicles that assaulted the island. The battle was one of the
Naval artillery (14,728 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
and naval mines. The idea of ship-borne artillery dates back to the classical era. Julius Caesar indicates the use of ship-borne catapults against Britons
Interstellar travel (8,945 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
(ship time), then stopping its engines and coasting for the next 17.3 years (ship time) at a constant speed, then decelerating again for 1.32 ship-years
List of missiles by country (4,551 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
short-range exploratory development based on the Condor I program) AS-25K anti-ship missile (AShM), air-to-surface missile (ASM) Cóndor I (with major contributions
Fourth-rate (789 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
the 18th century, a fourth-rate was a ship of the line with 46 to 60 guns mounted. They were phased out of ship of the line service during the French
Newport News Shipbuilding (2,212 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Newport News Shipbuilding has built more than 800 ships, including both naval and commercial ships. Located in the city of Newport News, its facilities
Francis Drake (8,946 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
he was purser of a ship which sailed to the Bay of Biscay. At twenty (c. 1563–1564) he made a voyage to the coast of Guinea in a ship owned by William and
Lighter (barge) (451 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
flat-bottomed barge used to transfer goods and passengers to and from moored ships. Lighters were traditionally unpowered and were moved and steered using
Aviso (391 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
patrol frigates until 2012, when the remaining ships of the class were reclassified as offshore patrol ships. It is equivalent to the modern use of "sloop"
Viking ships (2,623 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Viking ships were marine vessels of unique structure, used in Scandinavia from the Viking Age throughout the Middle Ages. The boat-types were quite varied
MV Wilhelm Gustloff (3,902 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
MV Wilhelm Gustloff was a German armed military transport ship which was sunk on 30 January 1945 by Soviet submarine S-13 in the Baltic Sea while evacuating
Henry Jennings (3,479 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
"Black Sam" Bellamy. Author Colin Woodard describes Jennings as "an educated ship captain with a comfortable estate" on Bermuda, and he had estates on both
Brainiac (character) (15,512 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
tendrils, often referred to by fans and comic creators as the "skull ship." The ship acts as an extension of Brainiac himself. Brainiac retains this robotic
HMS Ark Royal (91) (8,137 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
design differed from previous aircraft carriers. Ark Royal was the first ship on which the hangars and flight deck were an integral part of the hull, instead
VSS Unity (2,208 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
VSS Unity (Virgin Space Ship Unity, Registration: N202VG), previously referred to as VSS Voyager, is a SpaceShipTwo-class suborbital rocket-powered crewed
Kiwi (334 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Kiwi, a chalk hill carving in Wiltshire, England HMNZS Kiwi, a list of ships Kiwikiwi (Blechnum fluviatile), a fern species All pages with titles beginning
Buffalo (905 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
locomotives HMS Buffalo, any of several Royal Navy ships USS Buffalo, any of several U.S. Navy ships Landing Vehicle Tracked, a WWII-era amphibious vehicle
Spacecraft (3,516 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Prize. The Spaceship Company will build its successor SpaceShipTwo. A fleet of SpaceShipTwos operated by Virgin Galactic was planned to begin reusable
USS Nevada (BB-36) (7,679 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
Nevada (BB-36), the second United States Navy ship to be named after the 36th state, was the lead ship of the two Nevada-class battleships. Launched in
RIM-116 Rolling Airframe Missile (1,711 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
intended originally and used primarily as a point-defense weapon against anti-ship cruise missiles. As its name indicates, RAM rolls as it flies. The missile
RMS Aquitania (5,970 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
during this period of time as one of the most attractive ships, Aquitania earned the nickname "the Ship Beautiful" from her passengers. She continued in service
List of ships of the line of the Royal Navy (14,501 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
This is a list of ships of the line of the Royal Navy of England, and later (from 1707) of Great Britain, and the United Kingdom. The list starts from
Star Trek (film) (15,394 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
Kirk, Kelvin's first officer, orders the ship's personnel, including his pregnant wife Winona, to abandon ship while he pilots the Kelvin on a collision
Unprotected cruiser (747 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
pre-dreadnought era (about 1880 to 1905). The name was meant to distinguish these ships from “protected cruisers” which had become accepted in the 1880s. A protected
Eric Dane (1,251 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
since played Captain Tom Chandler in the post-apocalyptic drama The Last Ship and currently stars as Cal Jacobs in the HBO series, Euphoria. Dane was born
Nimitz-class aircraft carrier (6,500 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
nuclear-powered aircraft carriers in service with the United States Navy. The lead ship of the class is named after World War II United States Pacific Fleet commander
Calico Jack (2,103 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
if they captured the ship, it would place a much larger ship at their disposal. Of the approximately ninety-one men on the ship, only fifteen supported
Chinese aircraft carrier Liaoning (4,268 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Liberation Army Navy Surface Force, she was originally classified as a training ship, intended to allow the Navy to experiment, train and gain familiarity with
USS Yancey (AKA-93) (3,527 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
Andromeda-class attack cargo ship built by the Moore Dry Dock Company of Oakland, California for the United States Navy during World War II. The ship was named in honor
South Dakota-class battleship (1939) (7,779 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
through the summer of 1942, the four ships served in both the Atlantic, ready to intercept possible German capital ship sorties, and the Pacific, in carrier
MV Bianca C. (734 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
The Bianca C. was a passenger ship that sank on two occasions, the first time in France before being completed, and the second time after an explosion
HMS Dreadnought (1906) (5,764 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
was a Royal Navy battleship whose design revolutionised naval power. The ship's entry into service in 1906 represented such an advance in naval technology
Royal Canadian Navy (5,851 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
HMCS Oriole, a historic sailing ship commissioned in 1952 as a sail-training ship. Oriole is the oldest commissioned ship in the RCN. The RCN's ceremonial
Air draft (452 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
limits which ships can traverse the Panama Canal due to its height at 61.3 m (201 ft) above the water. The world's largest cruise ships, Oasis of the
Flag of convenience (7,115 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
practice whereby a ship's owners register a merchant ship in a ship register of a country other than that of the ship's owners, and the ship flies the civil
Disney Cruise Line (3,980 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
four ships: Disney Magic, Disney Wonder, Disney Dream, and Disney Fantasy. Three ships will join the fleet in 2022, 2024, and 2025. The first ship was
Battle of the Nile (13,250 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
vanguard and centre defeated, but only two ships of the line and two frigates escaped from a total of 17 ships engaged. The battle reversed the strategic
Panamax (2,165 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Panamax and New Panamax (or Neopanamax) are terms for the size limits for ships travelling through the Panama Canal. The limits and requirements are published
Naval ram (2,961 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
fitted to varied types of ships, dating back to antiquity. The weapon comprised an underwater prolongation of the bow of the ship to form an armoured beak
City of Adelaide (1864) (8,006 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
841633°S 138.508736°E / -34.841633; 138.508736 City of Adelaide is a clipper ship, built in Sunderland, England, and launched on 7 May 1864. It was built by
Port (3,064 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
maritime facility comprising one or more wharves or loading areas, where ships load and discharge cargo and passengers. Although usually situated on a
Hector Barbossa (2,710 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
of Eight and his ship. However, before Barbossa can claim his new vessel, the rogue pirates break out of prison and escape on his ship. After that, he
Philadelphia Experiment (3,311 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
invisible, but the ship inexplicably teleported to Norfolk, Virginia for several minutes, and then reappeared in the Philadelphia yard. The ship's crew was supposed
Weather ship (3,603 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
A weather ship, or ocean station vessel, was a ship stationed in the ocean for surface and upper air meteorological observations for use in weather forecasting
Empire ship (6,917 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
templates for discussion to help reach a consensus. › An Empire ship is a merchant ship that was given a name beginning with "Empire" in the service of
Monohull (337 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Phoenicians and Vikings. Modern ships carry tons of ballast in order to maintain their stability; even heavily laden cargo ships use ballast to optimize the
Dispatch boat (608 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
were small boats, and sometimes large ships, tasked to carry military dispatches from ship to ship or from ship to shore or, in some cases from shore
Wreck of the Titanic (13,000 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
around the wreck contains hundreds of thousands of items spilled from the ship as she sank. The bodies of the passengers and crew would have also been distributed
Prison ship (2,968 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
A prison ship, often more accurately described as a prison hulk, is a current or former seagoing vessel that has been modified to become a place of substantive
Hector Barbossa (2,710 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
of Eight and his ship. However, before Barbossa can claim his new vessel, the rogue pirates break out of prison and escape on his ship. After that, he
MV Wilhelm Gustloff (3,902 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
MV Wilhelm Gustloff was a German armed military transport ship which was sunk on 30 January 1945 by Soviet submarine S-13 in the Baltic Sea while evacuating
Wreck of the Titanic (13,000 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
around the wreck contains hundreds of thousands of items spilled from the ship as she sank. The bodies of the passengers and crew would have also been distributed
SS Regina (1907) (1,092 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
The SS Regina was a cargo ship built for the Merchant Mutual Line and home ported in Montreal, Quebec. Named after Regina, Saskatchewan, Regina had a tonnage
List of frigate classes of the Royal Navy (10,961 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
frigate classes of the Royal Navy of the United Kingdom (and the individual ships composed within those classes) in chronological order from the formal creation
Disney Cruise Line (3,980 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
four ships: Disney Magic, Disney Wonder, Disney Dream, and Disney Fantasy. Three ships will join the fleet in 2022, 2024, and 2025. The first ship was
Māori (152 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Tribal-class destroyer, launched 1936 and sunk 1942 TEV Maori III, a Union Steam Ship Company inter-island ferry, 1952–74 New Zealand Māori cricket team New Zealand
Sinking of the Rainbow Warrior (3,711 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
test in Moruroa. Fernando Pereira, a photographer, drowned on the sinking ship. France initially denied responsibility, but two French agents were captured
Prison ship (2,968 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
A prison ship, often more accurately described as a prison hulk, is a current or former seagoing vessel that has been modified to become a place of substantive
Ship's cat (3,847 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
The ship's cat has been a common feature on many trading, exploration, and naval ships dating to ancient times. Cats have been carried on ships for many
USS Theodore Roosevelt (CVN-71) (5,872 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
fourth ship named in honor of Theodore Roosevelt, three bearing his full name and a fourth with just his last name. Another three U.S. Navy ships have "Roosevelt"
Samus Aran (5,399 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Samus Aran (Japanese: サムス・アラン, Hepburn: Samusu Aran) is a fictional character and the protagonist of the video game series Metroid by Nintendo. She was
Maud (ship) (816 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
Maud, named for Queen Maud of Norway, was a ship built for Roald Amundsen for his second expedition to the Arctic. Designed for his intended voyage through
Star Trek: First Contact (12,840 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
surviving ships to concentrate their firepower on a seemingly unimportant point on the Borg ship. The Cube is destroyed but launches a smaller sphere ship towards
German battleship Gneisenau (5,007 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Gneisenau was a German capital ship, alternatively described as a battleship and battlecruiser, of Nazi Germany's Kriegsmarine. She was the second vessel
List of ships of the line of the Royal Navy (14,501 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
This is a list of ships of the line of the Royal Navy of England, and later (from 1707) of Great Britain, and the United Kingdom. The list starts from
Marguerite (ship) (158 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
Marguerite was a 1544-ton French ship built by Osbourne, Graham & Co. Ltd. of North Hylton in Sunderland in 1912. On 28 June 1917 she was sailing from
Factory ship (1,517 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
A factory ship, also known as a fish processing vessel, is a large ocean-going vessel with extensive on-board facilities for processing and freezing caught
Attack on Pearl Harbor (13,353 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
the ships that could be refloated. They patched holes, cleared debris, and pumped water out of ships. Navy divers worked inside the damaged ships. Within
Black Sea Fleet (8,479 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Most of the ships became part of the "Russian Squadron" of Wrangl's armed forces and after the evacuation sailed to Tunisia. Out of those ships, some were
MS Mikhail Lermontov (1,846 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Mathias-Thesen Werft, Wismar, East Germany. It was later converted into a cruise ship. On 16 February 1986 she collided with rocks near Port Gore in the Marlborough
The Most Dangerous Game (1,148 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
so after escaping the Russian Revolution he moved to Ship-Trap Island and set it up to trick ships into wrecking themselves on the jagged rocks that surround
Weather ship (3,603 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
A weather ship, or ocean station vessel, was a ship stationed in the ocean for surface and upper air meteorological observations for use in weather forecasting
Gerald R. Ford-class aircraft carrier (5,152 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
with a planned total of ten ships, will replace the Navy's current carriers on a one-for-one basis, starting with the lead ship, Gerald R. Ford replacing
USS Ronald Reagan (7,296 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
nuclear-powered supercarrier in the service of the United States Navy. As the ninth ship of her class, she is named in honor of Ronald W. Reagan, President of the
River-class frigate (1,050 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Colledge, J. J.; Warlow, Ben (2006) [1969]. Ships of the Royal Navy: The Complete Record of all Fighting Ships of the Royal Navy (Rev. ed.). London: Chatham
Ship's wheel (854 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
A ship's wheel or boat's wheel is a device used aboard a water vessel to steer that vessel and control its course. Together with the rest of the steering
Samuel Bellamy (3,206 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
captain lasted little more than a year, he and his crew captured at least 53 ships. Called "Black Sam" in Cape Cod folklore because he eschewed the fashionable
Bungsberg (ship) (221 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
number 646) was a cargo ship built in 1924 at Howaldtswerke in Hamburg, Germany, for China Reederei AG. She had three sister ships: Troja - hull no 643 (Deutsche
Jura (ship, 1854) (867 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
For its transportation to Lake Constance, the ship was dismantled and moved on horse-drawn carts. The ship had a total length of 46.30 metres; its length
Salvage tug (576 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
type of tugboat which is used to rescue ships which are in distress or in danger of sinking, or to salvage ships which have already sunk or run aground
HMS Terror (1813) (3,217 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
bombardment of Fort McHenry. She was converted into a polar exploration ship two decades later, and participated in George Back's Arctic expedition of
British Pacific Fleet (4,221 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
The BPF formally came into being on 22 November 1944 from the remaining ships of the former Eastern Fleet then being re-named the East Indies Fleet and
Flag of convenience (7,115 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
practice whereby a ship's owners register a merchant ship in a ship register of a country other than that of the ship's owners, and the ship flies the civil
RMS Empress of Ireland (8,542 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Norwegian collier Storstad in the early hours of 29 May 1914. Although the ship was equipped with watertight compartments and, in the aftermath of the Titanic
National Defense Reserve Fleet (1,507 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
The National Defense Reserve Fleet (NDRF) consists of "mothballed" ships, mostly merchant vessels, that can be activated within 20 to 120 days to provide
Harland and Wolff (2,807 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Harland & Wolff is a shipyard, specialising in ship repair, conversion, and offshore construction, located in Belfast, Northern Ireland. Harland & Wolff
MV Delight (279 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Retrieved 2008-11-18. "Hong Kong ship hijacked by pirates". tvnz.co.nz. 19 November 2008. Retrieved 2008-11-19. "Hong Kong cargo ship hijacked off Yemen coast"
Chief mate (2,237 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
merchant ship. The chief mate is customarily a watchstander and is in charge of the ship's cargo and deck crew. The actual title used will vary by ship's employment
Blue-water navy (5,452 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
discourse, blue-water capability is identified with the operation of capital ships such as battleships/battlecruisers, aircraft carriers, and nuclear submarines
Human torpedo (3,522 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
larger version) Britain, deployed in the Mediterranean and used to attack ships in enemy harbours. The human torpedo concept has occasionally been used
HMS Repulse (1916) (4,344 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
and the builders agreed to deliver the ship in 15 months. They did not quite meet that ambitious goal, but the ship was delivered a few months after the
Kronan (ship) (8,145 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
Francis Sheldon and the Swedish admiralty. After four years of service, the ship foundered in rough weather at the Battle of Öland on 1 June 1676: while making
North Carolina-class battleship (11,779 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
new capital ships have a standard displacement of under 35,000 LT (35,600 t). This restriction meant that the navy could not construct a ship with the firepower
Courtship (3,276 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Courtship is the period of development towards a sexual relationship wherein a couple get to know each other and decide whether there will be an engagement
The Downs (ship anchorage) (524 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
century, it was equipped with its own telegraph and timeball tower to enable ships to set their marine chronometers. The anchorage has depths down to 12 fathoms
Her Majesty's Ship (1,350 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
His or Her Majesty's Ship, abbreviated HMS and H.M.S., is the ship prefix used for ships of the navy in some monarchies. Derived terms such as "HMAS"
SS Albert C. Field (328 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
SS Albert C. Field was a Canadian cargo ship, sunk during World War II. The ship was built by the Furness Shipbuilding Company of Haverton Hill, and launched