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Longer titles found: Sennacherib's Annals (view), Sennacherib's campaign in the Levant (view), The Defeat of Sennacherib (view), The Destruction of Sennacherib (view), The Destruction of Sennacherib (choral work) (view)

searching for Sennacherib 25 found (1053 total)

alternate case: sennacherib

Tablet of Destinies (mythic item) (568 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article

Tablet of Destinies is referenced in Text B (a copy of an inscription of Sennacherib in Neo-Babylonian script) on the tablet K 6177 + 8869, now in the British
Senekerim-Hovhannes Artsruni (636 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Սենեքերիմ-Հովհաննես Արծրունի), also known variously as Senekerim-John, Sennecherim or Sennacherib-John, known in Byzantine sources simply as Senachereim (Greek: Σεναχηρείμ)
Assyrian calendar (424 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Journal of Assyrian Academic Studies. 13 (2): 35. ISSN 1055-6982. Daniel, Sennacherib (2001). "Modern Festival, Ancient Tradition" (PDF). Nakosha. 39: 3. OCLC 49885037
Tanzio da Varallo (972 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
gruesome David with Goliath (1620). His animated and crowded Battle of Sennacherib (1627–28) for the Basilica of San Gaudenzio reflects the influence of
Mullissu (370 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Mandaic magical corpus of late antiquity. Simo Parpola, The Murderer of Sennacherib," in Death in Mesopotamia, CRRA 26 (= Mesopotamia 8; Copenhagen, 1984)
Ten city-kingdoms of Cyprus (107 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Ernest Alfred Wallis Budge 1880, “The history of Esarhaddon (son of Sennacherib) king of Assyria” (The Names of the Twenty-two Kings, p. 104-108) v t
Chedorlaomer (1,616 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Tadmor found the correct solution by equating him with the Assyrian king Sennacherib (see Tidal). Astour (1966) identified the remaining two kings of the
Chedorlaomer (1,616 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Tadmor found the correct solution by equating him with the Assyrian king Sennacherib (see Tidal). Astour (1966) identified the remaining two kings of the
Ḫilakku (4,655 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
this rebellion, although Sennacherib appears to have failed at subduing them due to their greater mobility. Although Sennacherib's son and successor Esarhaddon
George Smith (Assyriologist) (1,301 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
Account of Genesis George Smith (1878), Sayce, A.H (ed.), History of Sennacherib: Translated from the Cuneiform Inscriptions, London: Williams & Norgate
Book of Micah (2,553 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
of the lesser towns of Judah (referring to the invasion of Judah by Sennacherib, 701 BCE). For these passages of doom on the various cities, paronomasia
Carnelian (1,322 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Dalley, Stephanie (29 November 2007). Esther's Revenge at Susa: From Sennacherib to Ahasuerus. Oxford University Press. ISBN 9780199216635. Retrieved
Neo-Assyrian Text Corpus Project (94 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Van Buylaere 2002 XVII The Neo-Babylonian Correspondence of Sargon and Sennacherib M. Dietrich 2003 XVIII The Babylonian Correspondence of Esarhaddon and
Ramat Rachel (1,097 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
2015. Grabbe, Lester L. (2003). Like a Bird in a Cage: The Invasion of Sennacherib in 701 BCE. A&C Black. p. 9. ISBN 9780826462152. Retrieved 1 May 2019
Vaspurakan (1,081 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
monastery on the slopes of Mt. Varag (9 km. east of Van), founded by King Sennacherib-John early in his reign (1003–1024). It became the richest and most celebrated
Tiamat (2,121 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Penn State University. Retrieved 2023-06-30. George, Andrew (1986). "Sennacherib and the Tablet of Destinies". Iraq. 48: 133–146. doi:10.2307/4200258
Poetry analysis (4,882 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Consider, for example, the first stanza of Byron's "The Destruction of Sennacherib": The Assyrian came down like the wolf on the fold, And his cohorts were
Opis (1,790 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
excavated at Assur is dated at Opis. In one of annals of Neo-Assyrian ruler Sennacherib (705–681 BC) it states: "… I gave orders to sailors of the cities of
Mesopotamia (9,827 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
to a recent hypothesis, the Archimedes' screw may have been used by Sennacherib, King of Assyria, for the water systems at the Hanging Gardens of Babylon
Ekron Royal Dedicatory Inscription (2,117 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
7th century B.C.E. (Gitin 1995: 62). Padi is known from the Annals of Sennacherib in the context of the Assyrian king's 701 B.C.E. campaign, at the end
Ḫiyawa (6,335 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
rebellion, although Sennacherib appears to have failed at subduing them due to their greater mobility. In 679 BC, Sennacherib's son and successor, Esarhaddon
Bezalel (776 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Centre for Jewish art, 1998). "Bezalel" - Jewish Encyclopedia article Sennacherib Prism B, ORACC Beseleel, Catholic Encyclopedia "Bezalel" - Jewish Encyclopedia
Bilge pump (723 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
University Press. ISBN 0-691-03536-9. Dalley, Stephanie; Oleson, John Peter. "Sennacherib, Archimedes, and the Water Screw: The Context of Invention in the Ancient
Simo Parpola (1,865 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Literary, Ideological and Historical Analysis. Rome, 1981. "The Murderer of Sennacherib", pp. 171–182 in Bendt Alster (ed.), Death in Mesopotamia. Copenhagen
Archibald Sayce (4,204 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
part), Sardanapalus, Sargon, Sennacherib, Shalmaneser, Sippara, and Susa. Smith (1878), Sayce (ed.), History of Sennacherib: Translated from the Cuneiform