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searching for Sama-Bajau 11 found (101 total)

alternate case: sama-Bajau

Panguan Island (292 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article

kilometres (0.023 sq mi). It is also known as Malamanok, coming from the Sama-Bajau dialect which means eat chicken as locals who travel to Sabah usually
Pusô (3,327 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
patupat or pusú in Kapampangan, Pangasinan and Ilocano; and katumpat in Sama-Bajau. Pusô does not refer to a specific recipe, rather it is a way of packaging
List of water deities (5,365 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Dilaut, the Sama-Bajau god of the sea and one of the two supreme deities; married to Dayang Dayang Mangilai Umboh Kamun: the Sama-Bajau totem of mantis
Proto-Philippine language (861 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
two primary branches. Walton (1979) and McFarland (1980) included the Sama-Bajau group as the third branch, but such has been later disputed as entirely
List of Philippine mythological figures (25,238 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The following is a list of gods, goddesses, deities, and many other divine, semi-divine, and important figures from classical Philippine mythology and
Tawi-Tawi (2,993 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Hunter-Gatherers: Foraging Adaptations in the Indo-Malaysian Archipelago - The Sama-Bajau". In Peter Bellwood; James J. Fox; Darrell Tryon (eds.). The Austronesians:
Baijini (2,041 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
the past. It has been suggested that they may be identified with the Sama-Bajau, or Sea Gypsies, the fishing folk of South East Asia who traveled with
Lupah Sug (1,578 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Tausug banwas, the Digap of Malay, the Yakan of Basilan, and the nomadic Sama-Bajau. During the reign of Sipad the Younger, a mystic named Tuan Mashā′ikha
Culture of the Philippines (9,204 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
is geometric tapestries, and is associated with women. The Tausug and SamaBajau exhibit their okir on elaborate markings with boat-like imagery. The Marananaos
Sabah (29,274 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
divided into four language families of Dusunic, Murutic, Paitanic and SamaBajau. As the Hakka forms the majority of Chinese in Sabah, the Hakka dialect
History of Basilan (20,854 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Caraga (Agusan/Surigao), Manobo (Cotabato), Higaonon (Lanao/Misamis), Sama/Bajau (Sulu/Tawi-Tawi), and Yakan (Basilan) survived the southern branch invasion