Find link

language:

jump to random article

Find link is a tool written by Edward Betts.

Longer titles found: Zhang Han (Qin dynasty) (view), Dong Yi (Qin dynasty) (view), Timeline of the Warring States and the Qin dynasty (view), Song Yi (Qin dynasty) (view)

searching for Qin dynasty 97 found (1253 total)

alternate case: qin dynasty

Bai Qi (1,387 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article

Bai Qi (Chinese: 白起; c. 332 BC – 257 BC), also known as Gongsun Qi (公孫起), was a Chinese military general of the Qin state during the Warring States period
Southern Liang (Sixteen Kingdoms) (142 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
"Wang". In 414 Southern Liang was conquered by the Xianbei-led Western Qin dynasty. Dunhuang Wu Hu List of past Chinese ethnic groups Qinghai Sixteen Kingdoms
Gao Jianli (241 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Gao Jianli (Chinese: 高漸離) was a musician of the Chinese state of Yan, during the Warring States period, who played a struck zither called zhu (筑) or ji
Tianshui Commandery (252 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Tianshui Commandery (Chinese: 天水郡), known as Hanyang Commandery (Chinese: 漢陽郡) during the Eastern Han dynasty, was a historical commandery of China in
Later Zhao (231 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
languages. The Later Zhao was the second in territorial size to the Former Qin dynasty that once unified northern China under Fu Jiān. When Later Zhao was founded
Liaodong Commandery (310 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Liaodong Commandery (Chinese: 遼東郡) was a commandery in imperial China that existed from the Warring States period to the Northern dynasties. It was located
Yanmen Commandery (996 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Yanmen Commandery was an administrative subdivision (jùn) of the state of Zhao established c.  300 BC and of northern imperial Chinese dynasties until
Huan Yi (312 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Huan Yi was a general of the state of Qin in the late Warring States period (5th century – 221 BCE). General Pang Nuan of Zhao occupied several towns of
Anding Commandery (268 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Anding Commandery (Chinese: 安定郡; lit. 'Peaceful and Stable') was a historical commandery of China, located in what is now eastern Gansu and southern Ningxia
Zhang Liang (Western Han) (3,309 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
Er Shi, several uprisings erupted throughout China to overthrow the Qin dynasty. Many of these rebel forces claimed to be restoring the former states
Zitong County (245 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
(30 mi) from Mianyang. It was made a county as early as B.C. 285, in Qin Dynasty[citation needed]. Famous people include: Sima Xiangru, Pu Fuzhou, Hai
The First Emperor (1,090 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The First Emperor is an opera in two acts with music by Tan Dun and a libretto written in English by Tan Dun and Ha Jin. The opera received its world premiere
Dai (Sixteen Kingdoms) (179 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
duchy to a principality in 315. Dai was conquered in 376 by the Former Qin dynasty, and its descendants later established the Northern Wei dynasty in 386
Lord Changping (961 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Lord Changping (昌平君; died 223 BC) was an important military commander and lord of Qin, that later seceded from the state of Qin and died as the last king
Fan Kuai (744 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
to the latrine, with Fan Kuai accompanying him. After the fall of the Qin dynasty, Xiang Yu divided the former Qin Empire into the Eighteen Kingdoms, appointed
Youbeiping Commandery (253 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Youbeiping Commandery (Chinese: 右北平郡), or Beiping Commandery (Chinese: 北平郡) was a commandery in imperial China from the Warring States period to Tang dynasty
Tort Law in China (582 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The first Tort Law in China wasn't enacted until 2009, though ideas similar concepts about social obligations and duties can be found in Confucianism upon
Tuoba Shiyijian (292 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
China and ruled from 338 to 376 when Dai was conquered by the Former Qin dynasty. He was the son of Tuoba Yulü and the younger brother of Tuoba Yihuai
Li Xin (Qin) (1,430 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Li Xin (李信), courtesy name Youcheng (有成), was a general of Qin during the Warring States era. Alongside Wang Jian, Wang Ben and other generals, Li Xin
Liaoxi Commandery (251 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Liaoxi Commandery (Chinese: 遼西郡) was a commandery in imperial China from the Warring States period to Tang dynasty. It was located in modern eastern Hebei
Dai Commandery (903 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Dai Commandery was a commandery (jùn) of the state of Zhao established c.  300 BC and of northern imperial Chinese dynasties until the time of the Emperor
Dujiangyan (3,925 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Canal, one of "The Three Great Hydraulic Engineering Projects of the Qin Dynasty" (秦代三大水利工程之一:灵渠) (in Chinese), sina.com, July 26, 2005 "Dujiangyan Irrigation
Henan Commandery (358 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Henan Commandery (Chinese: 河南郡) was a commandery in China from Han dynasty to Tang dynasty, located in modern northern Henan province. During the reign
Shanggu Commandery (429 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Shanggu Commandery (Chinese: 上谷郡) was a commandery in imperial China from the Warring States period to Tang dynasty. It was located in present-day Hebei
Dong Commandery (457 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Dong Commandery (Chinese: 東郡) was a commandery in historical China from the Warring States period to Sui dynasty. Its territories were situated in present-day
Battle of Fei River (1,547 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
was a battle in AD 383 in China, where forces of the Di-led Former Qin dynasty was decisively defeated by the outnumbered army of the Eastern Jin dynasty
Chinese academic dress (1,048 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
black Xuanmian that would serve for sacrificial purposes. During the Qin dynasty everyone, from emperor to civilians, wore black for one very specific
Dali County (275 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
cotton and fruits, such as watermelon. Dali was a county dated back to Qin Dynasty. It used to be named as Linjin, Dali, Wuxiang, Fengyi, Tongzhou, etc
Changshan Commandery (450 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Changshan Commandery (常山郡), or Hengshan Commandery (恒山郡), was a historical commandery of China, located in present-day southern Hebei province. The commandery
Fu Chong (639 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Fu Chong (Chinese: 苻崇; died 394) was an emperor of the Di-led Former Qin dynasty of China. He assumed the throne in 394 after the death of his father
Yangshan County (177 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
of Qingyuan. A military camp was established in the area in the late Qin dynasty. It was Emperor Han Wu Di who formally recognized Yangshan as a county
The Emperor's Shadow (615 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Emperor's Shadow is a 1996 Chinese historical film directed by Zhou Xiaowen and starring Jiang Wen, Ge You, Xu Qing and Ge Zhijun. It was the most
Wang Ben (368 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Wang Ben 王賁, was a Chinese general of the state of Qin during the Warring States period. He was a son of the better known general Wang Jian. He played
Prince of Yan (478 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
in Liaodong. Zang Tu, (died 202 BC), a warlord who lived in the late Qin dynasty and early Han dynasty. Lu Wan, (256 BC – 194 BC), a military general
Guzheng (2,391 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
States period (475–221 BCE). The guzheng became prominent during the Qin dynasty (221–206 BCE). By the Tang Dynasty (618–907 CE), the guzheng was perhaps
The Warrior and the Wolf (526 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Warrior and the Wolf (simplified Chinese: 狼灾记; traditional Chinese: 狼災記; pinyin: láng zāi jì) is a 2009 Chinese historical action film directed by
King Huai of Chu (396 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
captivity. One of his grandsons was later reinstated as King of Chu as the Qin dynasty descended into chaos, also under the name "King Huai of Chu"; this grandson
Qifu Guoren (398 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Wanchuan (苑川宣烈王), was the founding monarch of the Xianbei-led Western Qin dynasty of China. Qifu Guoren's father Qifu Sifan (乞伏司繁) was a Xianbei tribal
Queen Tufa (294 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
name unknown) (died 423) was a queen of the Xianbei-led Chinese Western Qin dynasty. Her husband was Qifu Chipan (Prince Wenzhao). She was the daughter of
Fu Jian (317–355) (1,525 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
Qin ((前)秦景明帝), was the founding emperor of the Di-led Chinese Former Qin dynasty. Pú Jiàn was born, as Pu Hong (蒲洪)'s third son, by Lady Jiang, in 317
Fu Sheng (Former Qin) (1,306 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
formally Prince Li of Yue (越厲王), was an emperor of the Di-led Former Qin dynasty of China. He was the son of Former Qin's founding emperor Fu Jiàn, and
Fu Pi (1,319 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Aiping of (Former) Qin ((前)秦哀平帝), was an emperor of the Di-led Former Qin dynasty of China. He was Fu Jiān's oldest son, although not his crown prince
Changzhi (1,240 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
one of the 36 administrative areas (see Administrative Divisions of Qin Dynasty) extant under the reign of the first emperor of a unified China (see
Yao Hong (1,433 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
courtesy name Yuanzi (元子), was the last emperor of the Qiang-led Later Qin dynasty of China. He was the oldest son and heir of Yao Xing (Emperor Wenzhao)
Changzhi (1,240 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
one of the 36 administrative areas (see Administrative Divisions of Qin Dynasty) extant under the reign of the first emperor of a unified China (see
Qifu Mumo (1,457 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
courtesy name Anshiba (安石跋), was the last prince of the Xianbei-led Western Qin dynasty of China. When he succeeded his father Qifu Chipan (Prince Wenzhao) in
Zhongruan (979 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
family of ruan (阮). In ancient China, the ruan was called Qin pipa (Qin [Dynasty] pipa, 秦琵琶) or Ruan xian (阮咸). Now the ruan has expanded to different
Meng Wu (363 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Meng Wu (Chinese: 蒙武, fl. 3rd century BC) was a general in the state of Qin during the Warring States period, who played a major role in the conquest of
List of Chinese writers (3,331 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
This is a list of Chinese writers. Gan De (fl. 4th century BC) Gongsun Long (c. 325–250 BC) Kong Qiu (551–479 BC) Li Kui (fl. 4th century BC) Lu Jia (d
Zheng (121 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
zither with bridges Qin Shi Huang (259 BC – 210 BC), emperor of the Qin Dynasty, whose name was Zheng (政) Zheng (state) (806 BC–375 BC), an ancient state
Liubo (5,062 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Liubo (Chinese: 六博 or 陸博; lit. 'six sticks') was an ancient Chinese board game played by two players. The rules have largely been lost, but it is believed
The Legend of Haolan (852 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Legend of Haolan (Chinese: 皓镧传) is a 2019 Chinese television series starring Wu Jinyan, Mao Zijun and Nie Yuan. It was broadcast on iQiyi from January
Queen Mother of the West (3,479 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
to benefit, and dies like any other mortal. The first emperor of the Qin dynasty, Qin Shi Huang, united the Warring States of China through brilliant
Empress Zhang (Later Qin) (68 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
Zhang (張皇后, personal name unknown) was an empress of the Qiang-led Later Qin dynasty of China. Her husband was Yao Xing (Emperor Wenhuan). Very little is
The Legend of Mi Yue (4,545 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Legend of Mi Yue (Chinese: 羋月傳; pinyin: Mǐ Yuè Zhuàn; Wade–Giles: Mi3 Yüeh4 Chuan4) is a 2015 Chinese television series directed by Zheng Xiaolong
Qifu Chipan (1,864 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
(Western) Qin ((西)秦文昭王), was a prince of the Xianbei-led Chinese Western Qin dynasty. During his reign, Western Qin reached its prime after he destroyed and
Yao Hong's empress (111 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
417) was the wife of Yao Hong, the last emperor of the Qiang-led Later Qin dynasty of China. Very little is known about her other than her existence—not
Empress Gou (145 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Gou (苟皇后, personal name unknown) was an empress of the Di-led Former Qin dynasty of China. Her husband was Fu Jiān, who created her empress in 355 after
Fu Deng (2,090 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Deng (Chinese: 苻登; 343–394) was an emperor of the Di-led Chinese Former Qin dynasty. He assumed the throne in 386 after the deaths of Fu Jiān (Emperor Xuanzhao)
Yao Chang (2,394 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Qin ((後)秦武昭帝), was the founding emperor of the Qiang-led Chinese Later Qin dynasty. His father Yao Yizhong (姚弋仲) had been a powerful general and Qiang chieftain
Empress She (187 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
name unknown) (died 397) was an empress of the Qiang-led Chinese Later Qin dynasty. Her husband was the founding emperor Yao Chang (Emperor Wuzhao), and
Fu Rong (919 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
of Yangping (陽平哀公), was an official and general of the Di-led Former Qin dynasty of China. He was a younger brother of Fu Jiān, the third emperor of the
Qifu Gangui (2,429 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Wuyuan of Henan (河南武元王), was a prince of the Xianbei-led Chinese Western Qin dynasty. He was a brother of the founding prince, Qifu Guoren (Prince Xuanlie)
Empress Liang (149 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
dynasty Empress Liang (Former Qin) (died 355), empress of the Former Qin dynasty Empress Liang (Xia) (fl. 414), empress of the Xia state during the Sixteen
Qian shi (99 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Euryale ferox or fox nut Qin Shi Huang (259 BC–210 BC), founder of the Qin dynasty Qianshi hutong, a Beijing alleyway Qian Shizhen (1561–1642), Ming dynasty
Xiangping (1,522 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
of Yan established in 284 BC. After the unification of China by the Qin dynasty, Xiangping became the political and cultural center of what is now Northeastern
Empress Liang (Former Qin) (196 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
(梁皇后) (died 355) was briefly an empress of the Di-led Chinese Former Qin dynasty. Her husband was the violent and arbitrary Fu Sheng. In 355, after Fu
Dong Yi (72 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Yi may refer to: Dong Yi (TV series), a Korean drama Dong Yi (Qin Dynasty), a Qin Dynasty general Consort Suk of the Choe clan, King Sukjong's concubine
You River (Yuan River tributary) (384 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article
You River basin is one of the birthplaces of Chinese civilization: the Qin Dynasty Bamboo Slips of Liye and the Tusi Sites of Laosicheng and Tangya were
Classical Chinese grammar (2,111 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Qin Dynasty and entered Xianyang first would king him Semantic translation: (Fulfilling the agreement that) the person who defeated the Qin Dynasty and
Yao Xing (3,826 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
(Later) Qin ((後)秦文桓帝), was an emperor of the Qiang-led Chinese Later Qin dynasty. He was the son of the founding emperor Yao Chang (Emperor Wucheng).
Empress Yang (Former Qin) (342 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
personal name unknown; died 386) was an empress of the Di-led Former Qin dynasty of China. Her husband was Fu Pi (Emperor Aiping). She was already Fu
Fu Jian (337–385) (4,118 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
"Heavenly King" (Tian Wang) during his reign) of the Di-led Chinese Former Qin dynasty, under whose rule (assisted by his able prime minister Wang Meng) the
Empress Qiang (378 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
understanding and virtuous empress"), was an empress of the Di-led Former Qin dynasty of China. Her husband was Former Qin's founding emperor, Fu Jiàn (Emperor
Qun (1,739 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Qun (Chinese: 裙; pinyin: qún; lit. 'skirt'), referred as chang (Chinese: 裳; pinyin: cháng) prior to the Han dynasty, chang (Chinese: 常) and xiachang (Chinese:
Yao (surname) (375 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article
Sovereigns and Five Emperors. Yao Chang, founding emperor of the Later Qin Dynasty. Andrew Chi-Chih Yao, a Chinese computer scientist and A.M. Turing Award
Forensic medicine (523 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
evidence of some form of forensics as far back as 220B.C.E., in the Qin Dynasty, where evidence of linking medical and legal systems were written out
Xianbei (7,207 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Xianbei were at one point all defeated and conquered by the Di-led Former Qin dynasty before it fell apart not long after its defeat in the Battle of Fei River
Renhua County (1,372 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Feng Fort" (双峰寨), The "Chengkou Ancient City" (城口古秦城), was built in the Qin Dynasty. The "Yunlong Temple Tower" (云龙寺塔) was built in the Tang Dynasty. And
She (704 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
(surname) She (Qi) (died 613 BC), ruler Empress She (died 397), Later Qin dynasty All pages with titles beginning with She All pages with titles beginning
Chutai-class gunboat (360 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
imperial court, did not join the ICN until the next year.After the end of Qin dynasty, all ships joined the Republic of China Navy (RoCN). On December 12,
Guzhen County (217 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
called as the Nanchengzi Ruins is found in this county. At the end of the Qin Dynasty (202 BC), the battle of Chu and Han happened in Guzhen, leaving the "besieged
Pei County (290 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
one of the most well-known lords who helped Liu Bang to overthrow the Qin Dynasty and establish the Han Dynasty. Fan Kuai's descendants are still living
Seal carving (572 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
but mainly the dazhuan (大篆) or jinwen (金文) scripts were used. In the Qin dynasty the more regular and formal seal script called xiaozhuan (小篆) was formalized
Ying (141 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
the ancestral name of Qin Shi Huang, first Emperor of China in the Qin Dynasty, and some contemporary rival royal families such as the Zhaos Yīng (应)
Yao Yizhong (3,471 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
His twenty-fourth son, Yao Chang, would go on to establish the Later Qin dynasty in 384. Yao Yizhong was a Qiang chieftain from Chiting county, Nan'an
1066 (1,228 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Records"), chronicling Chinese history from 403 BCE to the end of the Qin Dynasty in 207 BCE. The emperor then issues an edict for the compilation of Guang's
Yongzhou (ancient China) (452 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
throughout the Three Kingdoms period and Western Jin dynasty. The Former Qin dynasty suddenly shifted Yongzhou to Anding Commandery (安定郡) in present-day Zhenyuan
Liu Yu's Northern Expeditions (502 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Liu Yu's Northern Expeditions Belligerents Eastern Jin dynasty Later Qin dynasty Southern Yan dynasty Hu Xia dynasty Northern Wei dynasty Commanders and
Zhou Tong (Water Margin) (893 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
nicknamed "Little Conqueror" as he resembles Xiang Yu, a warrior of the Qin dynasty called "The Conqueror", in appearance and with his domineering temperament
Li Chong (109 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
to: Li Chong (General) (李崇), Protector-General of the Western Regions, Qin Dynasty Li Chong (Daxun) [zh] (李充), courtesy name Daxun (大遜), Eastern Han dynasty
Swordstaff (347 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
were also commonly used in ancient China from the late Warring States/Qin Dynasty to the Han Dynasty era. These were known as the pi (鈹), translated into
Zuo Shuzhang (114 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Yu (1997). A Journey Into China's Antiquity: Warring States Period, Qin Dynasty, The Western and Eastern Han Dynasties, Three Kingdoms through Western
Sihui (313 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
population is 542,873 in 2010. Sihui was initially established during the Qin dynasty (221 bc—207 bc), some historians suggested Sihui first appeared during
Dangtu County (474 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
more than 2000 years as a county. It was called Danyang (丹阳) in the Qin Dynasty but during the Sui Dynasty, the county became known as "Dangtu" (当涂)
366 (363 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Galates, Roman emperor (d. 370) Yao Xing, Chinese emperor of the Later Qin Dynasty (d. 416) May 16 – Ajabel, Christian priest and martyr May 27 – Procopius
Yunmeng County (676 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Qin Dynasty Bamboo Slips unearthed in Shuihudi, Yunmeng in 1975