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Longer titles found: 2,500-year celebration of the Persian Empire (view)

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alternate case: persian Empire

Safavid dynasty (2,750 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article

"The History of the Idea of Iran", in Vesta Curtis ed., Birth of the Persian Empire, IB Tauris, London, p. 108: "Similarly the collapse of Sassanian Eranshahr
Tahirid dynasty (1,533 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Tahirid dynasty (Persian: طاهریان‎, romanized: Tâheriyân, pronounced [t̪ʰɒːheɾiˈjɒːn]) was a dynasty, of Persian dehqan origin, that effectively ruled
Achaemenid Assyria (5,247 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Empire, created in the Babylonian War, retained control of much of the Persian Empire. The Babylonian Chronicles now show the vitality of Greek culture in
Immortals (Achaemenid Empire) (1,162 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
2143/IA.46.0.2084423. Hicks 1975, p. 61. John Manuel Cook (1983). The Persian Empire. Schocken Books. p. 105. ISBN 978-0-8052-3846-4. Kaveh Farrokh (24 April
Sasanian Armenia (1,720 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Sasanian Armenia, also known as Persian Armenia and Persarmenia (Armenian: Պարսկահայաստան – Parskahayastan), may either refer to the periods where Armenia
Issus (Cilicia) (345 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
Issus, owing to the importance of Alexander's victory over the First Persian Empire and its impact on subsequent history of the region, including all the
6th century BC (2,161 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
rule was ended in the 540s by Cyrus, who founded the Persian Empire in its stead. The Persian Empire continued to expand and grew into the greatest empire
Samaritan script (409 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
which they adopted from the Persian Empire (which in turn adopted it from the Arameans). After the fall of the Persian Empire, Judaism used both scripts
Darius III (1,972 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
subjects. In 334 BC, Alexander the Great began his invasion of the Persian Empire and subsequently defeated the Persians in a number of battles before
Histories (Herodotus) (3,196 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
accounts of the rise of the Persian Empire, as well as the events and causes of the Greco-Persian Wars between the Persian Empire and the Greek city-states
Limyra (541 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
capital of the Lycian League; subsequently it came under control of the Persian Empire. After Alexander the Great ended Persian rule, most of Lycia was ruled
Panyassis (247 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Πανύασις), was a 5th-century BC Greek epic poet from Halicarnassus in the Persian Empire (modern-day Bodrum, Turkey). Panyassis was the son of Polyarchus (Ancient
Tushpa (1,357 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
ISBN 978-0520964952.CS1 maint: ref=harv (link) Kuhrt, Amélie (2007). The Persian Empire: A Corpus of Sources from the Achaemenid Period. Routledge. ISBN 978-0415552790
Muslim conquest of Persia (9,569 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
conquest of the Persian Empire. Again Umar sent simultaneous expeditions to the far north-east and north-west of the Persian Empire, one to Khurasan
List of monarchs of Persia (1,518 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
monarchy Monarchism in Iran Supreme Leader of Iran History of Iran Persian Empire List of ancient Persians Shah Shahbanu Behistun Inscription: This is
Achaemenid family tree (50 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
The Achaemenid Empire was the first Persian empire, founded in 550 BC by Cyrus the Great. This article contains the Achaemenid family tree. Template:Cyrus-tree
Ahel (128 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
families. There are documents show that this town back to sasanid or Neo-Persian Empire of ancient Iran. the Sorez Castle, Water Mill, Qanat and Aqueduct are
Lydia (5,179 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
western Anatolia. In 546 BC, it became a province of the Achaemenid Persian Empire, known as the satrapy of Lydia or Sparda in Old Persian. In 133 BC,
350s BC (2,321 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
This article concerns the period 359 BC – 350 BC. The Macedonian King Perdiccas III is killed while defending his country against an Illyrian attack led
Samanid Empire (5,614 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Samanid Empire (Persian: سامانیان‎, Sāmāniyān, also known as the Samanian Empire, Samanid dynasty, Samanid Emirate, or simply Samanids) was a Sunni
480s BC (2,368 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Persia, dies and is succeeded by his son, Xerxes I. During this time the Persian empire extends as far west as Macedonia and Libya and as far east as the Hyphasis
Battle of Chains (1,208 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
first battle fought between the Rashidun Caliphate and the Sasanian Persian Empire. The battle was fought in Kuwait (Kazima) soon after the Ridda Wars
340s BC (2,180 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Persians collapses, and Egypt is once again reduced to a satrapy of the Persian Empire. A Persian satrap is put in place in Egypt. The walls of the country's
Timeline of ancient Greece (8,032 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Persian Empire 512 Persian vassalization of Naxos 511 Piraeus is founded and annexed by Athens 511 Thracian Chernessos is annexed by Persian Empire 510
390s BC (2,189 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
This article concerns the period 399 BC – 390 BC. February 15 – The Greek philosopher Socrates is sentenced to death by Athenian authorities, condemned
Xanthos (1,395 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Appian describe the conquest of the city by Harpagus on behalf of the Persian Empire, in approximately 540 BC. According to Herodotus, the Persians met and
Ottoman–Safavid relations (781 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The history of Ottoman–Safavid relations started with the establishment of Safavid dynasty in Persia (Iran) in the early 16th century. The initial Ottoman–Safavid
460s BC (1,713 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
monarchy falls, with the installation of a democracy. King Xerxes I of the Persian Empire, together with his eldest son, is murdered by one of his Ministers,
Battle of Opis (3,092 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
of Babylon and incorporating the Babylonian Empire into the greater Persian Empire. The site of the battle was at the city of Opis on the river Tigris
Haman (1,800 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Book of Esther, who according to the Hebrew Bible was a vizier in the Persian empire under King Ahasuerus, commonly identified as Xerxes I (died 465 BCE)
Pissuthnes (332 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
king. Briant, Pierre (2002). From Cyrus to Alexander: A History of the Persian Empire. Eisenbrauns. p. 581. ISBN 9781575061207. Delphi Complete Works of Thucydides
Late Period of ancient Egypt (902 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
ruling as their vassal. The period ended with the conquests of the Persian Empire by Alexander the Great and establishment of the Ptolemaic dynasty by
330s BC (3,667 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
time he offers a large ransom for his family, the ceding of all of the Persian Empire west of the Euphrates River, and the hand of his daughter in return
The Anabasis of Alexander (1,172 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
campaigns of Alexander the Great, specifically his conquest of the Persian Empire between 336 and 323 BC. Both the unusual title "Anabasis" (literally
Behistun Inscription (3,058 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
by Darius the Great sometime between his coronation as king of the Persian Empire in the summer of 522 BC and his death in autumn of 486 BC, the inscription
380s BC (2,005 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
supporting the Egyptian Pharaohs in maintaining their independence from the Persian Empire. The Egyptian Pharaoh Hakor dies and is succeeded by his son Nepherites
360s BC (2,365 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Wei loses, whereupon Qin captures the prime minister of Wei. With the Persian empire weakening, revolts occur in many parts of the empire, including Sidon
Siren of Bagdad (463 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
produced by Sam Katzman and directed by Richard Quine set in the medieval Persian Empire. It stars Paul Henreid as a travelling Master magician who seeks to
Gershasp (Shahnameh) (172 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
according to Shahnameh. He was a descendant of Zaav, ruling over the Persian Empire for about nine years. Garshasp or Garshasb was a king who ruled over
Aramaic alphabet (1,978 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
for written communication between the different regions of the vast Persian empire with its different peoples and languages. The use of a single official
Persian daric (890 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
monetary standard of the Achaemenid Persian Empire. Cyrus the Great (550–530 BC) introduced coins to the Persian Empire after 546 BC, following his conquest
400s BC (decade) (2,707 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
towns across the Aegean Sea in Ionia are again the subjects of the Persian Empire. The Spartan general, Lysander, puts in place a puppet government in
List of political entities in the 6th century BC (108 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
1550 - 146BC Macrobia c. 8th - 4th centuries BC Mauri 580 - 285 BC Nok 1000 BC - 300 AD Persian Empire 525 - 330 BC Sao 6th century BC - 6th century AD
Iran–Libya relations (454 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
the two nations date back thousands of years, with the origins of the Persian Empire beginning in the modern day state of Iran and the modern day Libyan
Adiabene (2,487 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
kings, Adiabene seems for a time to have been a vassal state of the Persian Empire. At times the throne of Adiabene was held by a member of the Achaemenid
Battle of the Uxian Defile (734 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Defile was fought by Alexander the Great against the Uxian tribe of the Persian Empire. The battle raged on the mountain range between the key Persian cities
Artaxerxes III (3,280 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
after his conquest of Egypt, the Persian Empire was firmly under his control. Egypt remained a part of the Persian Empire until Alexander the Great's conquest
House of Mihran (499 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
noble family (šahrdārān), one of the Seven Great Houses of the Sassanid Persian Empire which claimed descent from the earlier Arsacid dynasty. A branch of
Cyrus Cylinder (11,706 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Neo-Babylonian Empire was invaded by Cyrus and incorporated into his Persian Empire. The text on the Cylinder praises Cyrus, sets out his genealogy and
Mazares (506 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
when the latter overthrew his grandfather, Astyages and formed the Persian Empire. Mazares is mentioned by Herodotus as a Median general in the service
Darius II (900 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
called Darius II Nothus or Darius II Ochus, was king of kings of the Persian Empire from 423 BC to 404 or 405 BC. Artaxerxes I, who died in 424 BC, was
370s BC (1,524 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
This article concerns the period 379 BC – 370 BC. Sparta suppresses the Chalcidian League and imposes terms favourable to King Amyntas III of Macedonia
Delian League (3,079 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
the leadership of Athens, whose purpose was to continue fighting the Persian Empire after the Greek victory in the Battle of Plataea at the end of the Second
Fratricide (1,651 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Fratricide (from the Latin words frater "brother" and cida "killer," or cidum "a killing," both from caedere "to kill, to cut down") is the act of killing
Nader's Dagestan campaign (1,365 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Nader's Dagestan campaign, refers to the campaigns conducted by the Persian Empire (under the Safavid and Afsharid dynasty) under the ruling king Nader
Xerxes II of Persia (311 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
was killed a few months later. Darius II became the sole ruler of the Persian Empire and reigned until 404 BC. S. Zawadzki, "The Circumstances of Darius
Parmenion (1,330 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Parmenion (also Parmenio; Greek: Παρμενίων; c. 400 – Ecbatana, 330 BC) was an ancient Macedonian general in the service of Philip II of Macedon and Alexander
Halicarnassus (2,323 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Halicarnassus remained loyal to the Persians and formed part of the Persian Empire until Alexander the Great captured it at the siege of Halicarnassus
Cambyses I (1,297 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
the Great who would go on to depose his grandfather, and to begin the Persian Empire. Though numerous scholars link Cambyses to the Sanskrit tribal name
Afsharid Conquests in the Persian Gulf & Oman (136 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Afsharid Conquest of the Persian Gulf was an imperial venture by the Persian Empire, ruled by Nader Shah, to establish Persia as the hegemon of the Persian
Classical Greece (8,933 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Classical period saw the annexation of much of modern-day Greece by the Persian Empire and its subsequent independence. Classical Greece had a powerful influence
1679 Armenia earthquake (203 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
place on June 4 in the Yerevan region of Armenia, then part of the Persian Empire. Numerous buildings were destroyed as a result of the earthquake. In
Judeo-Tat (925 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
though the languages probably originated in the same region of the Persian empire. The words Juvuri and Juvuro literally translate as "Jewish" and "Jews"
Media (communication) (3,242 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
longer-distance communication systems such as mail, including in the Persian Empire (Chapar Khaneh and Angarium) and Roman Empire, which can be interpreted
Tangeh Bolaghi (826 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
connecting Pasargadae to Persepolis, Susa and other regions of the Persian Empire up to Sardis. Excavations have provided archaeologists with a unique
4th century BC (1,045 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
conquests of Alexander, bringing about the collapse of the once formidable Persian Empire and spreading Greek culture far into the east. Alexander dreamed of
450s BC (1,932 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
This article concerns the period 459 BC – 450 BC. The Jewish priest Ezra assembled and lead a band of approximately 5,000 Jews from Babylon to Jerusalem
Ionia (2,889 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
The cities within the region figured large in the strife between the Persian Empire and the Greeks. According to Greek tradition, the cities of Ionia were
United States Postal Service creed (249 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Herodotus' Histories, referring to the courier service of the ancient Persian Empire: It is said that as many days as there are in the whole journey, so
Shabuhragan (250 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
to Shapur I (c. 215–272 CE), the contemporary king of the Sassanid Persian Empire. The book was designed to present to Shapur an outline of Mani's new
Persian units of measurement (432 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
weights and measures was established[citation needed] in the ancient Persian Empire under the Achaemenid dynasty (550-350 BCE). The shekel and mina ("profane"
Ionia (satrapy) (578 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
the satrapy of Lydia, with its capital at Sardis, within the First Persian Empire. The first mention of the Yauna is at the Behistun inscription. Achaemenid
Ariaramnes (341 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
the Great, this line ultimately absorbs the Dynasty and dominates the Persian Empire. Sometime in the first half of the 20th Century two gold tablets relating
First Persian invasion of Greece (5,338 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
island-hopped between the rest of the Cycladic Islands, annexing each into the Persian empire. Reaching Greece, the expedition landed at Eretria, which it besieged
Arsames (317 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
would live to see his grandson, Darius I, become the Great King of the Persian Empire, though he would die during his reign. In any case, he would seem to
Xerxes I (4,704 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
sophomoric humour and deliberate anachronisms. Other works dealing with the Persian Empire or the Biblical story of Esther have also featured or alluded to Xerxes
Second Empire (95 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Empire of Haiti (1849–1859) Second Mexican Empire (1864–1867) Second Persian Empire, sometimes used to describe the Parthian Empire (ca. 247 BC – 224 AD)
Achaemenid dynasty (95 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
has led to the dynasty and its empire being referred to as the Medo-Persian Empire, though this term is most often used in biblical texts. Achaemenid Empire
Nereid Monument (2,050 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
sculptured tomb from Xanthos in Lycia (then part of the Achaemenid Persian Empire), close to present-day Fethiye in Mugla Province, Turkey. It took the
Oroetus (518 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
When Cambyses (530-522 BC), who succeeded his father Cyrus, died, the Persian Empire was in chaos prior to Darius the Great (522-486) finally securing control
Hydarnes II (348 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
century BC. His. Hidarnes II was the son of Hidarnes I, satrap of the Persian empire and one of the seven conspirators against Gaumata. During the reign
873 (427 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Year 873 (DCCCLXXIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar. Carloman, son of King Charles
404 BC (451 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
towns across the Aegean Sea in Ionia are again the subjects of the Persian Empire. The Spartan general, Lysander, puts in place a puppet government in
Abrocomas (339 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Tithraustes, Abrocomas unsuccessfully attempted to reconquer Egypt for the Persian Empire. Frye, Richard Nelson (1984). The History of Ancient Iran. C.H.Beck
Anaxagoras (2,429 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
in Clazomenae at a time when Asia Minor was under the control of the Persian Empire, Anaxagoras came to Athens. According to Diogenes Laërtius and Plutarch
Tomb of Payava (1,461 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
of the most famous tombs of Xanthos. It was built in the Achaemenid Persian Empire, for Payava who was probably the ruler of Xanthos, Lycia at the time
Siege of Halicarnassus (384 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Halicarnassus was fought between Alexander the Great and the Achaemenid Persian Empire in 334 BC. Alexander, who had no navy, was constantly being threatened
Megabates (228 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
was sent by Darius the Great to annex the small Aegean island to the Persian Empire. Herodotus is of the view that this venture failed after a siege of
Awards and decorations of the Islamic Republic of Iran Armed Forces (376 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Islamic Republic of Iran. Among the military honors created by the Persian Empire, medals of Zolfaghar, Knowledge, Razi, Art and Sports are still being
Thirty-first Dynasty of Egypt (1,483 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Second Egyptian Satrapy, was effectively a satrapy of the Achaemenid Persian Empire between 343 BC to 332 BC. It was founded by Artaxerxes III, the King
Battle of Pelusium (343 BC) (910 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
of the 400s BC Egyptian rebel Amyrtaeus used instability within the Persian Empire (Battle of Cunaxa) to gain Egypt its independence with himself as pharaoh
Paleo-Hebrew alphabet (2,788 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
been mostly replaced by the Aramaic alphabet as officially used in the Persian empire (which, like all alphabetical writing systems, was itself ultimately
Memnon of Rhodes (1,143 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
"simply a mercenary", Memnon was arguably the toughest defender of the Persian Empire Alexander had to face, and was nearly successful in putting a halt to
Twenty-seventh Dynasty of Egypt (1,524 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Persian: Mudrāya), was effectively a province (satrapy) of the Achaemenid Persian Empire between 525 BC and 404 BC. It was founded by Cambyses II, the King of
Muslim conquest of Sistan (269 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
captured during the reign of Caliph Umar, and like other provinces of the Persian Empire it also broke into revolt during Uthmans reign in 649. Uthman directed
Pericles, Dynast of Lycia (286 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
 12–13. Briant, Pierre (2002). From Cyrus to Alexander: A History of the Persian Empire. Eisenbrauns. p. 673. ISBN 9781575061207. Bryce, Trevor (2009). The
Ottoman–Persian Wars (614 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Pasha (1612) The Persian Empire War of 1603–1618, second stage Ahmed I, Mustafa I, Osman II Abbas I Treaty of Serav (1618) The Persian Empire War of 1623–1639
Siege of Nisibis (235) (194 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article
at Ctesiphon. When Severus Alexander launched a massive invasion of Persian empire in the early 230s, the Persian forces drove it back inflicting heavy
Battle of Firaz (557 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Euphrates valley. In this valley, Firaz at the outermost edge of the Persian Empire still had a Persian garrison. Khalid decided to drive away the Persians
Ecbatana (1,465 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
bronze denominations. The wealth and importance of the city in the Persian empire is attributed to its location on a crucial crossroads that made it a
Masistes (1,817 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
in Sardis, Lydia, which was a common practice of the nobility of the Persian Empire. In Herodotus' Histories, he comments that while Masistes was fighting
Persian Revolt (585 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
the Medes were finally conquered by 549 BC. Thus the first official Persian Empire was born. With Astyages defeated, Cyrus the Great, treated the deposed
Datis (224 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Achaemenid Elamite: Da-ti-ya), was a Median admiral who served the Persian Empire, under Darius the Great. He was an expert in Greek affairs and maintained
480 BC (908 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Year 480 BC was a year of the pre-Julian Roman calendar. At the time, it was known as the Year of the Consulship of Vibulanus and Cincinnatus (or, less
Cassandane (233 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
descendant of Cyrus. When Cassandane died, all the nations of Cyrus' Persian empire observed "a great mourning". This is reported by Herodotus. According
Battle of Khyber Pass (731 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
was an engagement fought in the mid-eighteenth century between the Persian empire of Nader Shah and the Mughal vassal state of Peshawar. The result was
Harvest festival (1,676 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
when the taxes were collected. Visitors from different parts of the Persian Empire brought gifts for the king, all contributing to a lively festival. In
440s BC (1,697 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
the period 449 BC – 440 BC. The Greek city-states make peace with the Persian Empire through the Peace of Callias, named after the chief Greek ambassador
Battle of Satala (530) (765 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
the forces of the Eastern Roman (Byzantine) Empire and the Sassanid (Persian) Empire in summer 530, near Satala in Byzantine Armenia. The Persian army approached
Theodore of Tarsus (1,739 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
690. Theodore grew up in Tarsus, but fled to Constantinople after the Persian Empire conquered Tarsus and other cities. After studying there, he relocated
226 (237 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Year 226 (CCXXVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar. At the time, it was known as the Year
Greece–Iran relations (334 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Persian invasion of Greece. By the late 6th century BC, the Achaemenid Persian Empire was in control over all of Asia Minor (which included many ethnically
The Persian (1,139 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Persian is a major character from the 1910 Gaston Leroux novel The Phantom of the Opera. In the book he is the one who tells most of the background
Assyria (disambiguation) (95 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
Assyria, an ancient empire in Mesopotamia Either of two provinces of the Persian Empire: Achaemenid Assyria, also known as Athura Asuristan (Sassanid) Assyria
611 (229 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
in Syria and Mesopotamia. King Khosrau II is re-establishing a neo-Persian Empire and intensifies his war effort. The Byzantine army, ruined by defeat
Sardis (2,386 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
of the ancient kingdom of Lydia, one of the important cities of the Persian Empire, the seat of a Seleucid Satrap, the seat of a proconsul under the Roman
Persian Gulf (6,242 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
years 550 to 330 BC, coinciding with the sovereignty of the Achaemenid Persian Empire over the Middle East area, especially the whole part of the Persian
Madh'hij (669 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
the Arabic Islamic conquest and was a major factor in the conquest of Persian empire and Iberian Peninsula. It is also found in Mosel and in Levant and Iberian
Execution of the Báb (1,472 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
charged with apostasy and shot by order of the Prime Minister of the Persian Empire. The events surrounding his execution have been the subject of controversy
Heraclius II of Georgia (2,408 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Georgian monarchy. Aided by his personal abilities and the unrest in the Persian Empire, Heraclius established himself as a de facto autonomous ruler, unified
Battle of the Granicus (2,018 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
first of three major battles fought between Alexander the Great and the Persian Empire. Fought in northwestern Asia Minor, near the site of Troy, it was here
483 BC (342 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Year 483 BC was a year of the pre-Julian Roman calendar. At the time, it was known as the Year of the Consulship of Vibulanus and Potitus (or, less frequently
Battle of Plataea (6,965 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
city-states (including Sparta, Athens, Corinth and Megara), and the Persian Empire of Xerxes I (allied with Boeotians, Thessalians, and Macedonians). The
Artemisia (191 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Artemisia I of Caria (fl. 480 BC), queen of Halicarnassus under the First Persian Empire, naval commander during the second Persian invasion of Greece Artemisia
356 BC (726 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Year 356 BC was a year of the pre-Julian Roman calendar. At the time, it was known as the Year of the Consulship of Ambustus and Laenas (or, less frequently
300 (comics) (1,719 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
Xerxes I's rise to the throne, and the subsequent destruction of the Persian Empire under his descendant Darius III, by Alexander the Great. Each page of
410s BC (2,073 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Amanineteyerike, King of Kush r. 431–405 BC Darius II, King of the Achaemenid Persian Empire r. 423–404 BC Amyrtaeus of Egypt, Anti-Achaemenid rebel and future Pharaoh
Nader's Central Asian Campaign (966 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
During the mid-eighteenth century the Persian empire of Nader Shah embarked upon the conquest and annexation of the Khanates of Bukhara and Khiva . The
510 (246 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Year 510 (DX) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar. At the time, it was known as the Year
343 BC (491 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Persians collapses, and Egypt is once again reduced to a satrapy of the Persian Empire. A Persian satrap is put in place in Egypt. The walls of the country's
Hellespontine Phrygia (555 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
 551. Briant, Pierre (2002). From Cyrus to Alexander: A History of the Persian Empire. Eisenbrauns. p. 351. ISBN 9781575061207. Jona Lendering. "Hellespontine
Phrygians (2,965 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
conquered by its neighbour Lydia, before it passed successively into the Persian Empire of Cyrus the Great and later the empire of Alexander and his successors
List of Classical Age states (328 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Kingdom/client kingdom 285 BC - 698 AD Numidia Cirta Kingdom 202 - 46 BC Persian Empire Ecbatana, Pasargadae, Persepolis, Susa Empire 549 - 330 BC Ptolemaic
334 BC (432 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Year 334 BC was a year of the pre-Julian Roman calendar. At the time, it was known as the Year of the Consulship of Caudinus and Calvinus (or, less frequently
460 BC (591 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Year 460 BC was a year of the pre-Julian Roman calendar. At the time, it was known as the Year of the Consulship of Poplicola and Sabinus (or, less frequently
380 BC (434 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
supporting the Egyptian Pharaohs in maintaining their independence from the Persian Empire. The Egyptian Pharaoh Hakor dies and is succeeded by his son Nepherites
Second Athenian League (1,341 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
primarily for self-defense against the growth of Sparta and secondly, the Persian Empire. In 478 BC, Athens founded the Delian League to counter Persian influence
465 BC (281 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
method in Europe for naming years.[citation needed] King Xerxes I of the Persian Empire, together with his eldest son, is murdered by one of his Ministers,
Second Athenian League (1,341 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
primarily for self-defense against the growth of Sparta and secondly, the Persian Empire. In 478 BC, Athens founded the Delian League to counter Persian influence
465 BC (281 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
method in Europe for naming years.[citation needed] King Xerxes I of the Persian Empire, together with his eldest son, is murdered by one of his Ministers,
St. Mary Church, Isfahan (242 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Rebirth of a Persian Empire. I.B.Tauris. p. 130. ISBN 978-0-85773-366-5. Newman, Andrew J. (2012). Safavid Iran: Rebirth of a Persian Empire. I.B.Tauris
408 BC (318 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Year 408 BC was a year of the pre-Julian Roman calendar. At the time, it was known as the Year of the Tribunate of Iullus, Ahala and Cossus (or, less frequently
Siege of Naxos (499 BC) (2,748 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
tyrant Aristagoras, operating with support from, and in the name of the Persian Empire of Darius the Great, to conquer the island of Naxos. It was the opening
Russo-Persian War (1804–1813) (2,996 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
The 1804–1813 Russo-Persian War was one of the many wars between the Persian Empire and Imperial Russia, and began like many of their wars as a territorial
338 BC (674 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Year 338 BC was a year of the pre-Julian Roman calendar. At the time it was known as the Year of the Consulship of Camillus and Maenius (or, less frequently
Restoration of Tahmasp II to the Safavid throne (483 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
were re-annexed by Nader whence they were once again absorbed into the Persian empire. Having delayed a confrontation with Tahmasp long enough, Ashraf found
Shirin (1,419 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Khosrow's father Hormizd IV, the General Bahram Chobin took power over the Persian empire. Shirin fled with Khosrow to Syria, where they lived under the protection
332 BC (419 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
time he offers a large ransom for his family, the ceding of all of the Persian Empire west of the Euphrates River, and the hand of his daughter in return
459 BC (221 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Year 459 BC was a year of the pre-Julian Roman calendar. At the time, it was known as the Year of the Consulship of Vibulanus and Uritinus (or, less frequently
Bagoas (courtier) (371 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
Greek: Βαγώας Bagōas) was the name of two eunuchs in the court of the Persian Empire in the 4th century BC. Bagoas the Elder was a courtier of Darius and
486 BC (266 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Year 486 BC was a year of the pre-Julian Roman calendar. At the time, it was known as the Year of the Consulship of Viscellinus and Rutilus (or, less frequently
490s BC (1,882 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
This article concerns the period 499 BC – 490 BC. After a failed attack on the rebellious island of Naxos in 501 BC (on behalf of the Persians), Aristagoras
Samanu (393 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
kazan). This practice has been traced back to pre-Islamic Sasanian Persian Empire. Although Samanu is prominent for "Haft-Sin" (the seven symbolic items
Mordecai (1,328 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
resolved to kill not only Mordecai but all Jewish exiles throughout the Persian empire, and won the king's permission to carry out his plan. Mordecai communicated
362 BC (264 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Year 362 BC was a year of the pre-Julian Roman calendar. At the time, it was known as the Year of the Consulship of Ahala and Aventinensis (or, less frequently
484 BC (217 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Year 484 BC was a year of the pre-Julian Roman calendar. At the time, it was known as the Year of the Consulship of Mamercus and Vibulanus (or, less frequently
Hormizd III (774 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
ISBN 978-0857716668.CS1 maint: ref=harv (link) Kia, Mehrdad (2016). The Persian Empire: A Historical Encyclopedia [2 volumes]: A Historical Encyclopedia. ABC-CLIO
336 BC (526 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Year 336 BC was a year of the pre-Julian Roman calendar. At the time, it was known as the Year of the Consulship of Crassus and Duillius (or, less frequently
395 BC (418 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Year 395 BC was a year of the pre-Julian Roman calendar. At the time, it was known as the Year of the Tribunate of Cossus, Medullinus, Scipio, Fidenas
Sasanian conquest of Jerusalem (3,895 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
harbor and Caesarea remained an important maritime city, providing the Persian Empire with access to the Mediterranean Sea. The Sasanian Persians were joined
Battle of Salamis (7,708 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
between an alliance of Greek city-states under Themistocles, and the Persian Empire under King Xerxes in 480 BC. It resulted in a decisive victory for the
481 BC (305 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Year 481 BC was a year of the pre-Julian Roman calendar. At the time, it was known as the Year of the Consulship of Vibulanus and Fusus (or, less frequently
Bastani sonnati (365 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Retrieved 2018-08-31. History of ice creams begun around 500 BCE in the Persian Empire where ice was used in combination with grape juices, fruits, and other
Battle of the Eurymedon (4,360 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
and land, between the Delian League of Athens and her Allies, and the Persian Empire of Xerxes I. It took place in either 469 or 466 BCE, in the vicinity
Ancient Greek warfare (6,272 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Greece fell under the Spartan hegemony. But this was unstable, and the Persian Empire sponsored a rebellion by the combined powers of Athens, Thebes, Corinth
350 BC (435 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Year 350 BC was a year of the pre-Julian Roman calendar. At the time it was known as the Year of the Consulship of Laenas and Scipio (or, less frequently
522 BC (205 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Zheng Briant, Pierre (2002), From Cyrus to Alexander: A History of the Persian Empire, Eisenbrauns. Chisholm 1911, p. 106. sfn error: no target: CITEREFChisholm1911
373 BC (156 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Year 373 BC was a year of the pre-Julian Roman calendar. At the time, it was known as the Third year without Tribunate or Consulship (or, less frequently
Achaemenid architecture (8,442 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
structures of the opulent city of Persepolis. With the advent of the second Persian Empire, the Sassanid dynasty (224–624 C.E.), revived Achaemenid tradition by
361 BC (305 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years. With the Persian empire weakening, revolts occur in many parts of the empire, including Sidon
401 BC (298 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Year 401 BC was a year of the pre-Julian Roman calendar. At the time, it was known as the Year of the Tribunate of Potitus, Cossus, Camillus, Ambustus
464 BC (156 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
by Inaros, a Libyan, who gains control of the Delta region and is aided by the Athenians. Artaxerxes I succeeds Xerxes as king of the Persian empire.
Ground-coupled heat exchanger (2,540 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
in hot arid areas for thousands of years, probably beginning in the Persian Empire. Implementation of these systems in India as well as in the cooler climates
Battle of Mycale (4,379 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
the Greek city-states, including Sparta, Athens and Corinth, and the Persian Empire of Xerxes I. The previous year, the Persian invasion force, led by Xerxes
444 BC (219 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Year 444 BC was a year of the pre-Julian Roman calendar. At the time, it was known as the Year of the Tribunate of Atratinus, Siculus and Luscus and the
Battle of Marathon (7,980 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
longer-term interaction between the Greeks and Persians. In 500 BC the Persian Empire was still relatively young and highly expansionistic, but prone to revolts
Battle of Artemisium (5,010 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
city-states, including Sparta, Athens, Corinth and others, and the Persian Empire of Xerxes I. The Persian invasion was a delayed response to the defeat
List of people known as "the Great" (1,405 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Persia. The title was inherited by Alexander III when he conquered the Persian Empire, and the epithet eventually became personally associated with him. The
494 BC (466 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Year 494 BC was a year of the pre-Julian Roman calendar. At the time, it was known as the Year of the Consulship of Tricostus and Geminus (or, less frequently
381 BC (245 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Year 381 BC was a year of the pre-Julian Roman calendar. At the time, it was known as the Year of the Tribunate of Camillus, Albinus, Albinus, Medullinus
423 BC (211 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Year 423 BC was a year of the pre-Julian Roman calendar. At the time, it was known as the Year of the Consulship of Atratinus and Ambustus (or, less frequently
Muhammad Dandamayev (294 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Academy of Sciences (IOM-RAS), was a historian who focused on the ancient Persian Empire, and the social institutions of Babylonia during the first millennium
386 BC (165 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Year 386 BC was a year of the pre-Julian Roman calendar. At the time, it was known as the Year of the Tribunate of Camillus, Cornelius, Fidenas, Cincinnatus
Mithridates V of Parthia (97 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Retrieved 2019-01-13.CS1 maint: ref=harv (link) Kia, Mehrdad (2016). The Persian Empire: A Historical Encyclopedia. ABC-CLIO. ISBN 978-1610693912.CS1 maint:
454 BC (246 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Year 454 BC was a year of the pre-Julian Roman calendar. At the time, it was known as the Year of the Consulship of Capitolinus and Varus (or, less frequently
396 BC (361 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Year 396 BC was a year of the pre-Julian Roman calendar. At the time, it was known as the Year of the Tribunate of Saccus, Capitolinus, Esquilinus, Augurinus
Persian Church (71 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
refer to: Church in the Persian Empire, incorporating various Christian denominations and communities in the Persian Empire (226-641) Church in Persia
Military conquests of Umar's era (2,453 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
presence north of Syria, Armenia was annexed in 643 During the Conquest of Persian Empire. These preemptive attack resulted in the creation of a buffer zone or
351 BC (190 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Year 351 BC was a year of the pre-Julian Roman calendar. At the time it was known as the Year of the Consulship of Peticus and Crispinus (or, less frequently
Persis (1,122 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
over Persis, Ardashir I rapidly extended the territory of his Sassanid Persian Empire, demanding fealty from the local princes of Fars, and gaining control
358 BC (322 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Year 358 BC was a year of the pre-Julian Roman calendar. At the time, it was known as the Year of the Consulship of Ambustus and Proculus (or, less frequently
330 BC (666 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Year 330 BC was a year of the pre-Julian Roman calendar. At the time, it was known as the Year of the Consulship of Crassus and Venno (or, less frequently
Heleen Sancisi-Weerdenburg (755 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
of astutely targeted issues in Western traditions on the Achaemenid Persian empire—including the notion of decadence as a defining feature of ancient Persian
412 BC (280 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Year 412 BC was a year of the pre-Julian Roman calendar. At the time, it was known as the Year of the Consulship of Ambustus and Pacilus (or, less frequently
Artaxerxes (171 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
may refer to: The throne name of several Achaemenid rulers of the 1st Persian Empire: Artaxerxes I of Persia (died 425 BC), Artaxerxes I Longimanus, r. 466–425
510s (2,112 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The 510s decade ran from January 1, 510, to December 31, 519. Battle of Llongborth (possibly Langport or Portsmouth): King Budic II of Brittany seeks,
353 BC (197 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Year 353 BC was a year of the pre-Julian Roman calendar. At the time, it was known as the Year of the Consulship of Peticus and Poplicola (or, less frequently
Dom Pérignon (1,655 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Dom Pérignon Rosé (the 1959) for the 2,500 year celebration of the Persian Empire. A bottle of that champagne, from that order, was sold at auction for
Iğdır Province (1,198 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
remained under Urartian control until its transition to the Median Empire, Persian Empire, Alexander The Great, Orontid Dynasty of the Kingdom of Armenia. Seleucid
340 BC (526 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Year 340 BC was a year of the pre-Julian Roman calendar. At the time it was known as the Year of the Consulship of Torquatus and Mus (or, less frequently
Persepolis Administrative Archives (4,722 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
physically stored together – found in Persepolis dating to the Achaemenid Persian Empire. The discovery was made during legal excavations conducted by the archaeologists
Qurchi (royal bodyguard) (583 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
ref=harv (link) Newman, Andrew J. (2008). Safavid Iran: Rebirth of a Persian Empire. I.B.Tauris. pp. 1–281. ISBN 9780857716613.CS1 maint: ref=harv (link)
Wars of the Delian League (8,269 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
ambitious decision to support a revolt in the Egyptian satrapy of the Persian Empire. Although the Greek task force achieved initial success, they were unable
Petubastis III (742 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
occurred at the same time as other rebellions in the eastern parts of the Persian Empire. Darius I, the author of the Behistun Inscription, does not go into
Siege of Eretria (2,209 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
longer-term interaction between the Greeks and Persians. In 500 BC the Persian Empire was still relatively young and highly expansionistic, but prone to revolts
366 BC (386 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Year 366 BC was a year of the pre-Julian Roman calendar. At the time, it was known as the Year of the Consulship of Mamercinus and Lateranus (or, less
357 BC (241 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Year 357 BC was a year of the pre-Julian Roman calendar. At the time, it was known as the Year of the Consulship of Rutilus and Imperiosus (or, less frequently
History of ancient Lebanon (1,733 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
revolts and rebellions resumed in the Lebanese coastal cities. The Persian Empire, including the Phoenician province, eventually fell to Alexander the
391 BC (390 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Year 391 BC was a year of the pre-Julian Roman calendar. At the time, it was known as the Year of the Tribunate of Flavus, Medullinus, Camerinus, Fusus
1971 in Iran (66 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Iranian legislative election 12–16 October: 2,500 year celebration of the Persian Empire 30 November: Abu Musa and the Greater and Lesser Tunbs conflict 28 July
Sattagydia (673 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Fleming, Achaemenid Sattagydia 1982, p. 105. Olmstead, History of the Persian Empire 1948, pp. 48–49. Fleming, Achaemenid Sattagydia 1982, p. 103. Magee
Ancient history of Cyprus (4,993 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
another, until the late-fourth century BC saw the overthrow of the Persian Empire by Alexander the Great. Alexander's conquests only served to accelerate
521 BC (82 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The year 521 BC was a year of the pre-Julian Roman calendar. In the Roman Empire, it was known as year 233 Ab urbe condita. The denomination 521 BC for
Cyrus I (710 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
grandson would come to be known as Cyrus the Great, founder of the Persian Empire. It has been noted that this account of his life and reign would place
First Empire (86 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Empire of Haiti (1804–1806) First Mexican Empire (1821–1823) First Persian Empire, sometimes used to describe the Achaemenid Empire (ca. 550 BCE – 336
Rashidun (2,440 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
multi-prong attacks against the Sassanid Persian Empire that resulted in the conquest of the Persian empire in less than two years, marked his reputation
610s (4,368 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
in Syria and Mesopotamia. King Khosrau II is re-establishing a neo-Persian Empire and intensifies his war effort. The Byzantine army, ruined by defeat
424 BC (483 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Year 424 BC was a year of the pre-Julian Roman calendar. At the time, it was known as the Year of the Tribunate of Crassus, Fidenas, Rutilus and Iullus
392 BC (282 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Year 392 BC was a year of the pre-Julian Roman calendar. At the time, it was known as the Year of the Consulship of Poplicola and Capitolinus (or, less
630s (5,606 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
king Khosrau II) succeeds her sister Borandukht, as monarch of the Persian Empire. Azarmidokht is succeeded after a few months reign by Khosrau IV, who
392 BC (282 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Year 392 BC was a year of the pre-Julian Roman calendar. At the time, it was known as the Year of the Consulship of Poplicola and Capitolinus (or, less
493 BC (249 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Year 493 BC was a year of the pre-Julian Roman calendar. At the time, it was known as the Year of the Consulship of Auruncus and Viscellinus (or, less
Teres I (346 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
the Odrysian state of Thrace. Thrace had nominally been part of the Persian empire since 516 BC during the rule of Darius the Great, and was re-subjugated
Thrace (2,608 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
divided into numerous tribal groups. The region was controlled by the Persian Empire at its greatest extent, and Thracian soldiers were known to be used
Battle of River (1,079 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
his best general Khalid ibn al-Walid. Muslims invaded the Sassanid Persian Empire in April 633 and defeated the Sassanid army in the Battle of Chains
349 BC (105 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Year 349 BC was a year of the pre-Julian Roman calendar. At the time it was known as the Year of the Consulship of Camillus and Crassus (or, less frequently
Second Persian invasion of Greece (9,234 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
supported the unsuccessful Ionian Revolt against the Persian Empire of Darius I in 499–494 BC. The Persian Empire was still relatively young, and prone to revolts
Christianity in the 7th century (2,727 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Arabia. Shortly before Mohammad's death the Roman Empire and Sassanid Persian Empire had concluded decades of war, leaving both empires crippled. The Third
Ottoman–Persian War (1730–1735) (609 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
dynasty, came under risk of re-incorporation into the newly resurgent Persian Empire. The talented Safavid general, Nader, gave the Ottomans an ultimatum
Orontes I (916 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Artaxerxes. Briant, Pierre (2002). From Cyrus to Alexander: A History of the Persian Empire. Eisenbrauns. p. 662. ISBN 9781575061207. Stylianou, P. J.; Stylianou
Ten Thousand (2,539 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
employed by Cyrus the Younger to attempt to wrest the throne of the Persian Empire from his brother, Artaxerxes II. Their march to the Battle of Cunaxa
377 BC (169 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Year 377 BC was a year of the pre-Julian Roman calendar. At the time, it was known as the Year of the Tribunate of Mamercinus, Poplicola, Cicurinus, Rufus
Heidemarie Koch (736 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
especially in terms of the influences that they exerted on the subsequent Persian Empire. She is married to the Christian archaeologist Guntram Koch. Die religiösen
632 (590 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
– Yazdegerd III, age 8, ascends to the throne as king (shah) of the Persian Empire. He becomes the last ruler of the Sassanid Dynasty (modern Iran). January
620s (4,943 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Anatolia. After the conquest of Egypt and Palestine, he restores the Persian Empire as it existed in 490 BC under Darius I. The Slavs invade the area around
Chapar Khaneh (555 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
era. The system was created by Cyrus the Great, the founder of the Persian Empire, and later developed by Darius the Great, as the royal method of communication
Arsames (satrap of Egypt) (826 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
" Briant, Pierre (2002). From Cyrus to Alexander: A History of the Persian Empire. Eisenbrauns. p. 215. ISBN 9781575061207. Rice, Michael (1999). Who's
List of political entities in the 3rd century (58 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
260 – 273 AD Asia: West Parthian Persian Empire Ctesiphon Empire 247 BC – 224 AD Asia: West Sasanian Persian Empire Estakhr, Ctesiphon Empire 224 – 637
348 BC (208 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Year 348 BC was a year of the pre-Julian Roman calendar. At the time it was known as the Year of the Consulship of Corvus and Laenas (or, less frequently
344 BC (265 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Year 344 BC was a year of the pre-Julian Roman calendar. At the time it was known as the Year of the Consulship of Rutilus and Torquatus (or, less frequently
Sparabara (457 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
bearers" in Old Persian, were the front line infantry of the Achaemenid Persian Empire. They were usually the first to engage in hand-to-hand combat with the
Muslim conquest of the Maghreb (3,967 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Byzantine and Sasanian empires, and were concluding their conquest of the Persian Empire with their defeat of the Persian army at the Battle of Nahāvand. It
Media (region) (1,336 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article
under the command of the satrapy of Media in the later period. When the Persian empire decayed and the Cadusii and other mountainous tribes made themselves
Abd-al-Masih (martyr) (244 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
later versions in Arabic and Armenian. He lived near Sinjar in the Persian Empire. Having been converted to Christianity he pierced his ear to wear earring
Cadusii (1,313 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Cadusii (Ancient Greek: Καδούσιοι) were an ancient non-Iranian people living in north-western Iran. The Cadusii lived in Cadusia – a mountainous district
Kabul hoard (4,528 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
silver bullion." Alram, The Coinage of the Persian Empire 2016, pp. 64–65. Alram, The Coinage of the Persian Empire 2016, pp. 69–71: "the tetradrachms of Athens
Pharnabazus III (850 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
in 334 BC, with Pharnabazus joining him. When Alexander invaded the Persian empire, Memnon defended the strategically important town of Halicarnassus,
The Virtues of War (209 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
control of the Macedonian throne and re-subdues Greece. He invades the Persian empire, eventually conquering it all, and continues into Afghanistan and into
Georgian mythology (4,374 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
the Ossetians) and that of the Zoroastrian religion of the Ancient Persian empire, which has left such an enduring legacy among the nations of the Caucasus
Lazic War (1,146 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Byzantine vassal state for an annual payment of gold. Iberian War The Persian Empire: A Historical Encyclopedia (2 volumes): A Historical... "When the war
Heraclitus (11,028 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
native of the city of Ephesus, in modern-day Turkey and then part of the Persian Empire. Due to the oracular and paradoxical nature of his philosophy, and his
Districts of Cyprus (119 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
syllabary Ancient Neo-Assyrian Empire Ten city-kingdoms Achaemenid Persian Empire Ionian Revolt Ptolemaic dynasty Roman Cyprus Kitos War Medieval Byzantine
Dadarsi (154 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
". Briant, Pierre (2002). From Cyrus to Alexander: A History of the Persian Empire. Eisenbrauns. pp. 1–1196. ISBN 9781575061207.CS1 maint: ref=harv (link)
Battle of Lade (3,159 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
between an alliance of the Ionian cities (joined by the Lesbians) and the Persian Empire of Darius the Great, and resulted in a decisive victory for the Persians
Bardiya (2,540 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
68 Briant, Pierre (2002), From Cyrus to Alexander: A History of the Persian Empire, Eisenbrauns. Herodotus; Godley, A. D., tr. (1931), Herodotus, with
630 (590 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
date) April 27 – Ardashir III, king of the Persian Empire June 9 – Shahrbaraz, king of the Persian Empire Du Ruhui, chancellor of the Tang Dynasty (b
Nader's Sindh Expedition (263 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
was also host to a myriad of fortresses & strongholds. Belligerents Persian Empire Subedar of Sindh Commanders and leaders Nader Shah Mian Sarfraz Kalhoro
Longevity myths (5,270 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Longevity myths are traditions about long-lived people (generally supercentenarians), either as individuals or groups of people, and practices that have
Artaxerxes II of Persia (2,963 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Artaxerxes II. Soldiers of many ethnicities on the upper relief The Persian Empire under Artaxerxes II was viewed[by whom?] as a political power that had
Longevity myths (5,270 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Longevity myths are traditions about long-lived people (generally supercentenarians), either as individuals or groups of people, and practices that have
Abol (126 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Fath Khan (1755–1787), the third Shah of Zand dynasty, who ruled the Persian Empire for a period in 1779 Abol Hassan Ispahani (1902–1981), Pakistani legislator
Abydos (Hellespont) (3,555 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
Peace of Antalcidas in 387 BC, Abydos was annexed to the Persian Empire. Within the Persian Empire, Abydos was administered as part of the satrapy of Hellespontine
List of wars: 1500–1799 (697 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
(to 1504)  Kalmar Union  Denmark  Norway 1502 1510 Persian-Uzbek Wars Persian Empire Timurid Empire Shaybanid dynasty 1502 1543 Guelders Wars  Holy Roman
Treaty of Saint Petersburg (196 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
refer to: Treaty of Saint Petersburg (1723), concluded between the Persian Empire and the Russian Empire Treaty of Saint Petersburg (1755), Great Britain
Council of Ministers (Cyprus) (46 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
syllabary Ancient Neo-Assyrian Empire Ten city-kingdoms Achaemenid Persian Empire Ionian Revolt Ptolemaic dynasty Roman Cyprus Kitos War Medieval Byzantine
Battus IV of Cyrene (216 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
He was the first Cyrenaean king to rule as a client king under the Persian Empire. Battus was the son and only child of the fifth Cyrenaean king, Arcesilaus
Jason of Pherae (907 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Thessaly into a powerful Greek state and even spoke of invading the Persian Empire. Pausanias (geographer) records that Jason was familiar with the teachings
Achaemenid coinage (4,908 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
(shékel)) represented the bimetallic monetary standard of the Achaemenid Persian Empire which has continued until today. It seems that before then, a continuation
Shehnai (546 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
said[by whom?] to have given its name to the "surna/zurna" of the old Persian Empire, which is the name by which the reed-pipe is known throughout the Middle
Eastern Christianity (4,405 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
the East, which was centered in Mesopotamia/Assyria, then part of the Persian Empire and spread widely throughout Asia. The modern Assyrian Church of the
Cyrus (1,479 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
the grandson of Cyrus I, an Achaemenid ruler and founder of the Great Persian Empire Cyrus the Younger (died 401 BC), brother to the Persian King Artaxerxes
Public holidays in Cyprus (114 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
syllabary Ancient Neo-Assyrian Empire Ten city-kingdoms Achaemenid Persian Empire Ionian Revolt Ptolemaic dynasty Roman Cyprus Kitos War Medieval Byzantine
Ganjnameh (347 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
3. pp. 285–286.CS1 maint: ref=harv (link) Kia, Mehrdad (2016). The Persian Empire: A Historical Encyclopedia [2 volumes]. ABC-CLIO. ISBN 978-1610693912
Abagtha (176 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
led to her demise and the selection of Esther as the new queen of the Persian Empire. The etymology of the name "Abagtha" is uncertain. In Esther 1:10, Abagtha
Mardonius (general) (1,285 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
and the army continued onto Macedonia, which was soon added to the Persian Empire as a fully subordinate client kingdom, becoming also part of its administrative
Kandahar (7,613 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
1000–750 BC, and it became an important outpost of the Achaemenid (Persian) Empire in the 6th century BC. Alexander the Great had laid-out the foundation
Celaenae (725 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Briant, tr. Peter T. Daniels, From Cyrus to Alexander: A History of the Persian Empire (Eisenbrauns, 2006: ISBN 1-57506-120-1), p. 2. Herodotus, The Histories
Kingdom of Cappadocia (1,489 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Alexander of Macedon invaded Cappadocia as part of his conquest of the Persian Empire, he appointed two temporary governors. For the Iranians in Asia Minor
History of the Jews in Iran (10,747 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
actual historical relationship with one another. During the peak of the Persian Empire, Jews are thought to have comprised as much as 20% of the population
Darius the Great (6,860 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Darius built were often inscribed in the official languages of the Persian Empire, Old Persian, Elamite and Babylonian and Egyptian hieroglyphs. To construct
Artaphernes (1,287 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
tyrant Aristagoras, to conquer the island of Naxos in the name of the Persian Empire, was supported by Artaphernes who assisted in the assembly of a force
List of wars involving Azerbaijan (37 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
History of Azerbaijan Antiquity Ancient history and Median Empire First Persian Empire and Alexander's conquests Caucasian Albania Parthian dynasty Sasanian
Abraham of Arbela (261 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
other things, the persecutions and tortures that took place in the Persian Empire under Shapur II (died 379). In paragraph 8 of chapter 8 he says: At
Battle of the Persian Gate (2,149 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
local shepherd, defeating the Persians and capturing Persepolis. The Persian Empire suffered a series of defeats against the Macedonian forces at Granicus
Prince (Prince of Persia) (6,740 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
The Prince is the name given to a group of fictional characters who act as the main protagonists of the Prince of Persia franchise, developed and published
Artabanus III of Parthia (162 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Schippmann 1986, pp. 647–650. Kia 2016, p. 179. Kia, Mehrdad (2016). The Persian Empire: A Historical Encyclopedia. ABC-CLIO. ISBN 978-1610693912.CS1 maint:
590 (673 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
ruled since 579, he is succeeded by his son Khosrau II as king of the Persian Empire. September – Bahrām Chobin defeats the inferior forces of Khosrau II
Cyme (Aeolis) (3,501 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
democracy over tyranny. Cyme eventually came under the control of the Persian Empire following the collapse of the Lydian Kingdom at the hands of Cyrus the
Orodes III of Parthia (195 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
21 November 2019.CS1 maint: ref=harv (link) Kia, Mehrdad (2016). The Persian Empire: A Historical Encyclopedia [2 volumes]. ABC-CLIO. ISBN 978-1610693912
Battle of Tsitsamuri (298 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
needed] between the armies of Kingdom of Kakheti under Teimuraz I and Persian Empire led by Ali Kuli Khan. The battle took place after the initiation of
List of revenues of Darius I of Persia (156 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Herodotus c 480 BC. This serves to show the greatness of Darius and the Persian empire, show who was paying tribute to the empire and how much they were capable
Chronology of the expedition of Alexander the Great into Asia (210 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
summary of the expedition of Alexander the Great into Asia against the Persian Empire of king Darius III, with indication of the countries/places visited
Ancient warfare (10,860 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
throughout the Mediterranean as sovereign states such as Egypt and even the Persian Empire would adopt the design of these ships and apply them to their own military
Artumpara (193 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Telmessos. Briant, Pierre (2002). From Cyrus to Alexander: A History of the Persian Empire. Eisenbrauns. p. 673. ISBN 9781575061207. André-Salvini, Béatrice (2005)
Third Empire (77 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
1923 novel by A. Moeller-Bruck which influenced the Nazi Party Third Persian Empire, sometimes used to describe the Sassanid Empire (ca. AD 224–651) 3rd
Persepolis (6,875 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
the local governors. From there, the foundations of the second great Persian Empire were laid, and there Estakhr acquired special importance as the center
Ismail II (1,882 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Rebirth of a Persian Empire. I.B.Tauris. p. 118. ISBN 9780857716613. Andrew J Newman (11 April 2012). Safavid Iran: Rebirth of a Persian Empire. I.B.Tauris
Fall of Babylon (3,267 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
1991, p.381-382 Oates, 1986, p.134-135 A.T. Olmstead, History of the Persian Empire, Univ. of Chicago Press, 1948, p.38 Oates, 1986, p.133 Histories I.191;
Early centers of Christianity (9,650 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
the time was ripe for a new and vital faith. The rulers of the Second Persian empire (226–640) also followed a policy of religious toleration to begin with
Battle of Ab Darrah Pass (1,906 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
but by 1510 he found in Shah Ismail I, the founder of a new Safavid Persian Empire, a serious threat. He decided to confront this threat head on and marched
Mezitli (424 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Pompeipolis (Πομπηιόπολη) is within Mezitli. Soli was the dominion of Rhodes, Persian Empire (Achaemenids), Macedonian Empire, Seleucid Empire, Roman Empire and
Hakim Mosque, Isfahan (208 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
ref=harv (link) Newman, Andrew J. (2008). Safavid Iran: Rebirth of a Persian Empire. I.B.Tauris. ISBN 978-0857716613.CS1 maint: ref=harv (link) About Hakim
Mithridates IV of Parthia (611 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Retrieved 2019-11-22.CS1 maint: ref=harv (link) Kia, Mehrdad (2016). The Persian Empire: A Historical Encyclopedia [2 volumes]. ABC-CLIO. ISBN 978-1610693912
Timeline of ancient history (3,441 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
BCE: The construction of Marib Dam in Arabia Felix. 653 BCE: Rise of Persian Empire. 612 BCE: An alliance between the Babylonians, Medes, and Scythians
Parisa (given name) (223 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
wife of Darius II (Persian: داريوش دوم‎), (Dārayavahuš), king of the Persian Empire and Parysatis II, the youngest daughter of Artaxerxes III of Persia
Salit bin 'Amr 'Ala bin Hadrami (338 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Emperor Phocas deposing and killing Emperor Maurice. The prowess of the Persian Empire had reached a crescendo that it was unbelievable it would crumble in
History of Asia (12,178 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
throughout the major civilizations of Asia. The Achaemenid dynasty of the Persian Empire, founded by Cyrus the Great, ruled an area from Greece and Turkey to
Battle of Barbalissos (1,455 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
University Press. ISBN 9780674778863. Kia, Mehrdad (2016-06-27). The Persian Empire: A Historical Encyclopedia [2 volumes]: A Historical Encyclopedia. ABC-CLIO
Treasury of Bahman Mirza (429 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Dynasty of Iran who was a prominent politician in the 19th century Persian Empire and historian. Bahman Mirza Qajar was born on October 11, 1811 in Tehran
550s BC (239 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
BC—Cyrus II the Great overthrows Astyages of the Medes, establishing the Persian Empire. c. 550 BC—Temple of Hera I, Paestum, Italy, is built. 550 BC—Siddhartha
Ionian Revolt (6,714 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Revolt constituted the first major conflict between Greece and the Persian Empire, and as such represents the first phase of the Greco-Persian Wars. Although
1840s (10,469 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Tell is created. 1847 – The Ottoman Empire cedes Abadan Island to the Persian Empire. There was a wave of revolutions in Europe, collectively known as the
Perso-Roman Peace Treaty of 363 (596 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Peace Treaty of 363 between the Eastern Roman Empire and the Sassanid Persian Empire was the consequent treaty from the Julian's Persian War. Upon Emperor
History of Bahrain (11,937 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
century BC to the 3rd century BC Bahrain was a pivotal part of the Persian Empire by the Achaemenids, an Iranian dynasty. From the 3rd century BC to the
King of Tyre (563 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
He united Cyprus under his rule and achieved independence from the Persian Empire. Eugoras fl. 340's Azemilcus c.340–332 BC. He was king during the siege
457 (389 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
he defeats Hormizd and becomes the seventeenth Sasanian king of the Persian Empire. Victorius of Aquitaine computes new tables for celebrating Easter.
Arian Kartli (518 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
have inferred that this land lay within the orbit of the Achaemenid Persian Empire. Herodotus' list of the Achaemenid provinces, which places the proto-Georgian
Arbinas (358 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
(2004). The Priest and the Great King: Temple-palace Relations in the Persian Empire. Eisenbrauns. p. 150. ISBN 9781575060903. Keen, Antony G. (1998). Dynastic
Kurda (649 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Western Asia: The Near East from the Early Bronze Age to the fall of the Persian Empire. p. 516. Daniel Fleming (2012). The Legacy of Israel in Judah's Bible:
List of earthquakes in Cyprus (88 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
syllabary Ancient Neo-Assyrian Empire Ten city-kingdoms Achaemenid Persian Empire Ionian Revolt Ptolemaic dynasty Roman Cyprus Kitos War Medieval Byzantine
Harpalus (772 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
service, Harpalus did not follow Alexander in his advance within the Persian Empire but received nonetheless a post in Asia Minor. Alexander reportedly
Dadisho (164 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
to the History of the Assyrian Church or The Church of the Sassanid Persian Empire 100-640 A.D. London: Society for Promoting Christian Knowledge.CS1 maint:
Peroz I (1,904 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
the history of the Assyrian Church, or, The Church of the Sassanid Persian Empire, 100–640 A.D. Gorgias Press. ISBN 1-59333-103-7. Pourshariati, Parvaneh
Gandhari people (328 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Kubha river in Vedic times. In later times, they formed a part of the Persian empire. They are first mentioned as Gandhari in the Rigveda, then along with
Four kingdoms of Daniel (4,133 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
kingdoms in Daniel (with variations) as: the Babylonian Empire the Medo-Persian Empire the Greek Empire the Roman Empire, with other implications to come later
570s BC (274 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
BC—Birth of Cyrus the Great, later King of Anshan, and architect of the Persian Empire. 570 BC—Birth of Xenophanes c.570 BC—Birth of Pythagoras on the island
579 (384 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Sea. He is succeeded by his son Hormizd IV, who becomes king of the Persian Empire. Summer – Hormizd IV refuses to give up territories, and breaks off
Battle of Ghamra (85 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Buzakha Ghamra Yamama Zafar Dawmat al-Jandal Naqra Conquest of the Persian Empire Chains River Walaja Ullais Hira Al-Anbar Ayn al-Tamr Muzayyah Saniyy
Apum (530 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Western Asia: The Near East from the Early Bronze Age to the fall of the Persian Empire. p. 53. Trevor Bryce (2009). The Routledge Handbook of the Peoples and
Battle of Pelusium (525 BC) (1,458 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
of the Persian Empire. Eisenbrauns. p. 54. ISBN 9781575061207. Briant, Pierre (2002). From Cyrus to Alexander: A History of the Persian Empire. Eisenbrauns
Yehud Medinata (3,587 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
it would be in keeping with the situation in some other parts of the Persian Empire, such as Phoenicia. The second and third pillars of the early period
Greater Iran (8,285 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
the Greek Seleucid kingdom, which ruled the island at the time. The Persian Empire successfully invaded, but it is often believed that mass immigration
Battle of Nineveh (627) (1,089 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
Caucasus-based Turks responded by sending 40,000 of their men to ravage the Persian Empire in 626 to start the Third Perso-Turkic War. Joint Byzantine and Göktürk
Apum (530 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Western Asia: The Near East from the Early Bronze Age to the fall of the Persian Empire. p. 53. Trevor Bryce (2009). The Routledge Handbook of the Peoples and
Battle of Erzurum (1821) (133 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
of the Ottoman–Persian War (1821–1823) Belligerents Ottoman Empire Persian Empire Commanders and leaders Mahmud II Abbas Mirza Strength 50,000 soldiers
621 (413 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Byzantine forces in Asia Minor for non-military expenditure against the Persian Empire. The city of Málaga, in southern Spain in the province of Spania, is
East Syriac Rite (5,789 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
South India, Central and Inner Asia and strongest in the Sasanian (Persian) Empire. The Church of the East traces its origins to the 1st century when
Iranian calendars (2,733 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
He was accompanied by Darius, a Zoroastrian who became ruler of the Persian empire in 517 BC. The Zoroastrians adopted the wandering Egyptian solar calendar
Sceptre (1,230 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
legates apparently was revived in the marshal’s baton. In the First Persian Empire, the Biblical Book of Esther mentions the sceptre of the King of Persia
Trade unions in Cyprus (126 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
syllabary Ancient Neo-Assyrian Empire Ten city-kingdoms Achaemenid Persian Empire Ionian Revolt Ptolemaic dynasty Roman Cyprus Kitos War Medieval Byzantine
List of banks in Cyprus (335 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
syllabary Ancient Neo-Assyrian Empire Ten city-kingdoms Achaemenid Persian Empire Ionian Revolt Ptolemaic dynasty Roman Cyprus Kitos War Medieval Byzantine
Battle of Gaugamela (4,957 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
survivors of the Royal Guard and 2,000 Greek mercenaries. At this point the Persian Empire was divided into two halves—East and West. On his escape, Darius gave
Artemisia of Caria (53 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Artemisia I of Caria (fl. 480 BC), queen of Halicarnassus under the First Persian Empire, naval commander during the second Persian invasion of Greece Artemisia
Adramyttium (3,066 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
the Kingdom of Lydia in 546 BC Adramyttium came under the rule of the Persian Empire and was administered as part of the satrapy (province) of Hellespontine
Alabanda (906 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
447. Briant, Pierre (2002). From Cyrus to Alexander: A History of the Persian Empire. Eisenbrauns. ISBN 978-1575061207.CS1 maint: ref=harv (link) Roisman
Iranian Armenians (4,068 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
synonymous when describing his conquests. Armenia became a satrapy of the Persian Empire for a long period of time. Regardless, relations between Armenians and
Book of Esther (5,707 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Egypt to pharaoh Amyrtaeus, after which it was no longer part of the Persian empire. In his Historia Scholastica Petrus Comestor identified Ahasuerus (Esther
Syloson (350 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Συλοσῶνος) governed Samos as a vassal ruler on behalf of the Achaemenid Persian Empire. He was appointed by king Darius I and was the brother of Polycrates
Belshazzar (1,481 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
(link) Briant, Pierre (2002). From Cyrus to Alexander: A History of the Persian Empire. Eisenbrauns. ISBN 9781575061207.CS1 maint: ref=harv (link) Chavalas
Pharnabazus II (3,150 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Hellenica, 4.3 Ruzicka, Stephen (2012). Trouble in the West: Egypt and the Persian Empire, 525-332 BC. Oxford University Press, USA. pp. 57–60. ISBN 9780199766628
631 (489 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
king Khosrau II) succeeds her sister Borandukht, as monarch of the Persian Empire. Azarmidokht is succeeded after a few months reign by Khosrau IV, who
Qubad Kamran (160 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Qubad Kamran, also known as Kavadh I, is a character in the Persian epic The Adventures of Amir Hamza (Hamzanama). He was a king of Persia and is the subject
Tylos (1,235 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
the Great. From the 6th to 3rd century BC Bahrain was included in the Persian Empire by the Achaemenids, an Iranian dynasty. The Greek admiral Nearchus is
Mithrapata (335 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Fried, The Priest and the Great King: Temple-palace Relations in the Persian Empire (Eisenbrauns, 2004), p. 150 Muhammad A. Dandamaev, Vladimir G. Lukonin
Catholicos of the East and Malankara Metropolitan (1,117 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
the head of the Syrian Church which comprised the region once formed Persian Empire and to the East of that empire. Syriac Churches which includes the Assyrian
Salamis (119 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Island Battle of Salamis, 480 BC, between allied Greeks and Achaemenid Persian empire Salamis, Cyprus or Constantia, an ancient city in Cyprus Battle of Salamis
Abulites (522 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
recovered by Alexander in Susa. Susa was the co-capital of the Achaemenid Persian Empire, but the "hoarding of specie" does illustrate the "shortsightedness
Lydia (satrapy) (582 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
estates in the region following the Greek revolt, Greeks loyal to the Persian Empire were also given estates. Artaphernes was succeeded as satrap in 492
Attalus (general) (473 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
Parmenion as commanders of the advance force that would invade the Persian Empire in Asia Minor. According to a story of Aristotle's, lengthened by Cleitarchus
Satrap (1,374 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
pp. 385–391. ISBN 978-0-7864-1918-0. A. T. Olmstead, History of the Persian Empire, 1948. Pauly-Wissowa (comprehensive encyclopaedia on Antiquity; in German)
Alexandria Eschate (909 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
other parts of the Persian empire rebelled or otherwise were troublesome, they would be exiled to the far northeast of the Persian empire, the most distant
List of sovereign states in the 1760s (408 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
States of the Church  Parma – Duchy of Parma and Placentia Persia – Persian Empire  Piombino – Principality of Piombino Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth
Amélie Kuhrt (554 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
scope for new projects and initiatives sponsored by the Academy. The Persian Empire: A Corpus of Sources of the Achaemenid Period. London: Routledge, 2007
Belisarius series (1,705 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
intervention. Anything in the way (other Indian kingdoms, the Sassanid Persian Empire, and so forth) must be crushed, including plans to deal with China after
Nisean horse (1,145 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
and many nomadic tribes, (such as the Scythians) in and around the Persian Empire also imported, captured, or stole Nisean horses. Nisean horses had several
Gordian Knot (1,060 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
which point Phrygia had been reduced to a satrapy, or province, of the Persian Empire. An oracle had declared that any man who could unravel its elaborate
Iran–Iraq relations (5,079 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
between the two empires. Though Babylonia was annexed by the rising Persian Empire in 539 BC, the Sumero–Akkadian culture of the Mesopotamians significantly
Cyprus Stock Exchange (343 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
syllabary Ancient Neo-Assyrian Empire Ten city-kingdoms Achaemenid Persian Empire Ionian Revolt Ptolemaic dynasty Roman Cyprus Kitos War Medieval Byzantine
Shila (Nestorian patriarch) (385 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
to the History of the Assyrian Church or The Church of the Sassanid Persian Empire 100-640 A.D. London: Society for Promoting Christian Knowledge.CS1 maint:
Indian campaign of Alexander the Great (5,130 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Empire of Persia, the Macedonian king (and now the great king of the Persian Empire), Alexander, launched a campaign into the Indian subcontinent in present-day
Battle of al-Qaryatayn (95 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Buzakha Ghamra Yamama Zafar Dawmat al-Jandal Naqra Conquest of the Persian Empire Chains River Walaja Ullais Hira Al-Anbar Ayn al-Tamr Muzayyah Saniyy
Cyprus Stock Exchange (343 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
syllabary Ancient Neo-Assyrian Empire Ten city-kingdoms Achaemenid Persian Empire Ionian Revolt Ptolemaic dynasty Roman Cyprus Kitos War Medieval Byzantine
Camisares (202 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
required) Briant, Pierre (2002). From Cyrus to Alexander: A History of the Persian Empire. Eisenbrauns. pp. 1–1196. ISBN 9781575061207.CS1 maint: ref=harv (link)
Last Stand of the 300 (423 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
directed by David Padrusch. In 480 B.C, during the Greco-Persian Wars the Persian Empire led by Xerxes I of Persia fought the Greek city-states forces at the
Wildlife of Cyprus (560 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
syllabary Ancient Neo-Assyrian Empire Ten city-kingdoms Achaemenid Persian Empire Ionian Revolt Ptolemaic dynasty Roman Cyprus Kitos War Medieval Byzantine
Azerbaijan (Iran) (10,635 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
historically known as Azerbaijan, became the new north-west frontier of the Persian Empire and later Iran. The territories north of the Aras River, which were
Parysatis (957 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
the Persian Empire. ISBN 9781575061207. Amélie Kuhrt (January 2002). "38: Parysatis: A Cruel Queen or Defender of Dynastic Integrity?". The Persian Empire:
Amyntas II (son of Bubares) (237 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
97‑144. Briant, Pierre (2002). From Cyrus to Alexander: A History of the Persian Empire. Eisenbrauns. ISBN 978-1575061207.CS1 maint: ref=harv (link) Roisman
Post office (1,309 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
precisely who initiated the practice. Certainly, by the time of the Persian Empire, a system of Chapar-Khaneh existed along the Royal Road. The 2nd-Century
Mohammad Vali Khan Tonekaboni (795 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Customs where he was in charge of all imports into and exports out of the Persian empire. Later he became Minister of Treasury where he was singlehandedly in
Sasanian glass (2,775 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Persia, namely present-day Northern Iraq (ancient Mesopotamia), Iran (Persian Empire) and Central Asia. This is a silica-soda-lime glass production characterized
Siege of Aleppo (637) (420 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
Buzakha Ghamra Yamama Zafar Dawmat al-Jandal Naqra Conquest of the Persian Empire Chains River Walaja Ullais Hira Al-Anbar Ayn al-Tamr Muzayyah Saniyy
Sabrisho I (217 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
the history of the Assyrian Church, or, The Church of the Sassanid Persian Empire, 100–640 A.D. Gorgias Press. ISBN 1-59333-103-7. Baum, Wilhelm; Winkler
Siege of Jerusalem (636–637) (2,385 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
conquest in the east by invading Iraq, then a province of the Sassanid Persian Empire; while on the western front, his armies invaded the Byzantine Empire
Ad Sinarum gentem (402 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Persecution of Christians in the Roman Empire Diocletianic Persecution Neo-Persian Empire Sasanian conquest of Jerusalem Byzantine Empire East–West Schism Massacre
Book of Steps (746 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
possibly early fifth century). The author appears to be living in the Persian Empire, perhaps somewhere near the Lesser Zab, as it is mentioned in Memra
List of political parties in Cyprus (193 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
syllabary Ancient Neo-Assyrian Empire Ten city-kingdoms Achaemenid Persian Empire Ionian Revolt Ptolemaic dynasty Roman Cyprus Kitos War Medieval Byzantine
870s (5,412 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The 870s decade ran from January 1, 870, to December 31, 879. August 8 – Treaty of Meerssen: King Louis the German forces his half-brother Charles the
List of wars involving Georgia (country) (109 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
Kingdom of Kartli Kingdom of Kakheti Persian Empire Defeat 1738-39 Nader Shah's invasion of the Mughal Empire Persian Empire Kingdom of Kartli Mughal Empire
Hermias of Atarneus (2,109 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
remained embroiled in dynastic conflicts. Likewise, the once-great Persian Empire was hampered by internal feuds and revolts and incompetent leaders,
Bahram IV (902 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
ISBN 9788772892597.CS1 maint: ref=harv (link) Kia, Mehrdad (2016). The Persian Empire: A Historical Encyclopedia [2 volumes]: A Historical Encyclopedia. ABC-CLIO
Gotarzes I (967 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Retrieved 2019-09-29.CS1 maint: ref=harv (link) Kia, Mehrdad (2016). The Persian Empire: A Historical Encyclopedia [2 volumes]. ABC-CLIO. ISBN 978-1610693912
Sogdianus of Persia (385 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
to the Achaemenid throne as Darius II; he was the sole ruler of the Persian Empire until 404 BC. Ctesias the Cnidian. Persica. 18. Zawadzki, S. (1995–1996)
Heraclius (5,505 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
In a letter delivered by his ambassadors, Heraclius acknowledged the Persian empire as superior, described himself as Khosrow II's "obedient son, one who
Chief Justice of Cyprus (172 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
syllabary Ancient Neo-Assyrian Empire Ten city-kingdoms Achaemenid Persian Empire Ionian Revolt Ptolemaic dynasty Roman Cyprus Kitos War Medieval Byzantine
Margiana (2,272 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Ancient Iran.CS1 maint: ref=harv (link) Herzfeld, Ernst (1968). The Persian Empire: Studies in Geography and Ethnography of the Ancient Near East. Lendering
Greek Cypriot diaspora (197 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
syllabary Ancient Neo-Assyrian Empire Ten city-kingdoms Achaemenid Persian Empire Ionian Revolt Ptolemaic dynasty Roman Cyprus Kitos War Medieval Byzantine
Ottoman–Persian War (1743–1746) (845 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
centre of political and military might of the Persian empire in the southern Caucasus Belligerents Persian Empire Ottoman Empire Commanders and leaders Nader
Tahmasp I (3,417 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
a Persian Empire. I. B. Tauris. p. 32. ISBN 9781860646676. Retrieved 15 October 2014. Newman, Andrew J. (2005). Safavid Iran : Rebirth of a Persian Empire
Orontes I Sakavakyats (303 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Cyrus the Great in Book 3 of the Cyropaedia. Cook, J.M. (1993). The Persian Empire ([Repr.] ed.). New York: Barns & Noble Books. pp. 170, 173, 193, 212
Kolonai (1,249 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
the same year. In 399 BC Kolonai was forcibly reincorporated into the Persian Empire by the local dynast Mania, but in the following year it was freed again
History of the Balkans (11,194 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Thrace, but also the full subordinate inclusion of Macedon into the Persian Empire. The Persian invasion led indirectly to Macedonia's rise in power and
Pierre Briant (442 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Alexandre (1996) - in English, From Cyrus to Alexander: A History of the Persian Empire (2002). Darius dans l'Ombre d'Alexandre (2003) Cyrus the Great Achemenet
Elisha (Nestorian patriarch) (435 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
to the History of the Assyrian Church or The Church of the Sassanid Persian Empire 100-640 A.D. London: Society for Promoting Christian Knowledge.CS1 maint:
Armenian Revolutionary Federation (9,187 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Armenian Revolutionary Federation (ARF) (classical Armenian: Հայ Յեղափոխական Դաշնակցութիւն, ՀՅԴ), also known as Dashnaktsutyun (in a short form, Dashnak)
Judeo-Aramaic languages (1,289 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Aramaic had become quite distinct from the official Aramaic of the Persian Empire by this period. Middle Babylonian Aramaic was the dominant dialect,