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searching for Paula England 8 found (119 total)

alternate case: paula England

Care work (6,980 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article

scholars including Marilyn Waring, Nancy Folbre, Martha Albertson Fineman, Paula England, Maria Floro, Diane Elson, Caren Grown and Virginia Held. The products
Arthur Stinchcombe (628 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Collins, Paula England and Marshall Meyer, "The Revival of Economic Sociology," Chapter 1 in Mauro F. Guillén, Randall Collins, Paula England, and Marshall
Dating (18,164 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
766-774. doi:10.1037/a0021690 Elizabeth A. Armstrong; Laura Hamilton; Paula England (Summer 2010). "Is Hooking Up Bad For Young Women?". American Sociological
Work–family conflict (2,576 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
1297–1338. CiteSeerX 10.1.1.709.8363. doi:10.1086/511799. Budig, Michelle; Paula England (2001). "The Wage Penalty for Motherhood". American Sociological Review
Peter Sprigg (678 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Southern Poverty Law Center. Retrieved 2010-11-30. Marcia Carlson (ed.), Paula England (ed.), Social Class and Changing Families in an Unequal America, Palo
Statistical discrimination (economics) (1,000 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
Differences: Illustrated with Medical School Admission and Licensing Data" Paula England (1992). Comparable Worth: Theories and Evidence. Transaction Publishers
Motherhood penalty (3,848 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
sexism Time bind Women in the workforce Working parent Budig, Michelle; Paula England (2001). "The Wage Penalty for Motherhood". American Sociological Review
Gender inequality in the United States (12,712 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
fewer men entering female-dominated professions; professor of sociology Paula England cites this horizontal segregation of careers as a contributing factor