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searching for Noongar language 31 found (62 total)

alternate case: noongar language

Eucalyptus marginata (1,627 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article

Eucalyptus marginata, commonly known as jarrah, djarraly in Noongar language and historically as Swan River mahogany, is a plant in the myrtle family,
Gina Williams (1,136 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
teach my children. It's an incredibly beautiful language – when I hear Noongar language I hear music, it literally sings to me." Gina said as a child "I wanted
Leonard Collard (363 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Aboriginal encyclopaedia, Noongarpedia, to preserve the endangered Noongar language. Mooro nyungar katitijin bidi - Mooro peoples knowledge trail : interpretation
Yirra Yaakin (209 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
community cultural development. Yirra Yaakin means "stand tall" in the Noongar language.[citation needed] In 2013, Yirra Yaakin staged Bob Merritt's play The
Ballardong (341 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Noongar language groups
Eucalyptus doratoxylon (684 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
commonly known as the spearwood mallee, spearwood or geitch-gmunt in Noongar language is a species of mallee that is endemic to Western Australia. It has
The Merindas (476 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
of electronic and dance music and their lyrics combine English and Noongar language. The Merindas have performed at music festivals around Australia since
Whadjuk (3,890 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Pindjarup on their southern coastal flank. The Whadjuk formed part of the Noongar language group, with their own distinctive dialect. Culturally they were divided
Wiilman (593 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Noongar language groups
Popanyinning, Western Australia (252 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
had a population of 180. The name means "water hole" in the local Noongar language and was first recorded in a survey in 1869 for a pool in the Hotham
Koreng (660 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Noongar language groups
Angela Ryder (574 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
website for Polytechnic West in May 2012. The Moorditj Moodle contains Noongar language content for the college. In January 2010, the Langford Aboriginal Association
Mineng (1,031 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Noongar language groups
Yornaning, Western Australia (414 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Handling. The name is believed to mean "land of many waters" in the local Noongar language and was first recorded as a place name in a survey of the area in 1869;
Glenys Collard (429 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Bennell, Glenys Collard, Chris Williamson (illustrator), Bunbury : Noongar Language and Culture Centre, 1991. She was also a contributor to Education in
Pindjarup (1,343 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Noongar language groups
Ongerup, Western Australia (1,105 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
The name Ongerup means "place of the male kangaroo" in the local Noongar language. The area around Ongerup was first explored by Surveyor General John
Preston Beach, Western Australia (520 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
local government - the name meaning "place of waters or lakes" in the Noongar language. The townsite was gazetted in 1975. However, in 1989, the name was
Bridgetown, Western Australia (966 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
as Geegelup, which was believed to mean "place of gilgies" in the Noongar language, referring to the fresh water lobster that inhabits the area. However
Dibbler (1,113 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
systematic arrangements. John Gould gave several names from the Nyoongar/Noongar language; Marn-dern and Wy-a-lung are from northern areas, Dib-bler is from
City of Rockingham (1,386 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
traditional tribal territory of the Whadjuk, who form part of the Noongar language group. Rockingham was named after the British ship Rockingham. In 1896
Heath mouse (2,040 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
or heath rat, and by the pre-existing name dayang, derived from the Noongar language. Common names also include blunt-faced rat, Shortridge's native mouse
Perth Water (1,106 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
which has since been adopted for the whole of the Swan River. In the Noongar language, Derbarl refers to the estuary water and Yerrigan is "rising up". The
Cold fire (Noongar fire type) (248 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article
9-13. Whitehurst, R. (1997). "Noongar Dictionary" (PDF) (2nd ed.). Noongar Language and Culture Centre. Abbott, Ian (2002), Historical records of Noongar
Fanny Balbuk (441 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Map showing Noongar language areas
Corymbia calophylla (2,989 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
government printer. p. 44. doi:10.5962/bhl.title.61019. "Learn some of the Noongar language". ABC Education. Australian Broadcasting Corporation. 2 December 2021
Graeme Dixon (285 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
University of Western Australia, 2002. Robyn McCarron (16 April 2015). "Noongar Language and Literature". Murdoch University. Retrieved 1 May 2016. "Author
Willie wagtail (4,266 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Pilbara, and was able to send a strong wind if frightened. In the Noongar language dialects, the willie wagtail is known as the Djiti-Djiti (pronounced
Bluff Knoll (1,528 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
mist-like spirit named Noatch (meaning "dead body" or "corpse" in the Noongar language) resides there. In 'Boola Miyel: The place of many faces' Noongar Elders
Parkeyerring Lake (977 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Lake to the south west. Wait-Jen means emu’s foot print in the local Noongar language; the trail follows an ancient dreamtime track taken by the Wagyl. The
Timeline of Aboriginal history of Western Australia (15,861 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
kept in contact. Many, if not most, children learned at least some Noongar language while traditional skills, beliefs and as much as possible, land laws