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searching for Mesoamerican languages 43 found (170 total)

alternate case: mesoamerican languages

Classical Otomi (508 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article

Classical Otomi is the name used for the Otomi language as spoken in the early centuries of Spanish colonial rule in Mexico and documented by Spanish friars
Lyle Campbell (873 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Lyle Richard Campbell (born October 22, 1942) is an American scholar and linguist known for his studies of indigenous American languages, especially those
Terrence Kaufman (846 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
on the substantial presence of early Mixe–Zoquean loans in many Mesoamerican languages, particularly from specific, culturally significant semantic domains
Classic Maya language (1,855 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Classic Maya (or properly Classic Ch'olti') is the oldest historically attested member of the Maya linguistic family. It is the main language documented
William Bright (452 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
William Bright (August 13, 1928 in Oxnard, California – October 15, 2006 in Louisville, Colorado) was an American linguist and toponymist who specialized
Alonso de Molina (1,133 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Alonso de Molina (1513 or 1514 – 1579 or 1585) was a Franciscan priest and grammarian, who wrote a well-known dictionary of the Nahuatl language published
John Alden Mason (397 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
John Alden Mason (14 January 1885 – 7 November 1967) was an American archaeological anthropologist and linguist. Mason was born in Orland, Indiana, but
Ronald Langacker (506 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Ronald Wayne Langacker (born December 27, 1942) is an American linguist and professor emeritus at the University of California, San Diego. He is best known
Andrés de Olmos (493 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Andrés de Olmos (c.1485 – 8 October 1571) was a Spanish Franciscan priest and grammarian and ethno-historian of Mexico's indigenous languages and peoples
Alfredo Barrera Vásquez (128 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Alfredo Barrera Vázquez (1900—December 28, 1980) was a Mexican anthropologist, linguist, academic and Mayanist scholar. He is noted for both his research
Thelma D. Sullivan (269 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Thelma Dorfman Sullivan (18 August 1918—11 August 1981) was an American paleographer, linguist and translator, regarded as one of the foremost scholars
Una Canger (631 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Una Canger (née Una Rasmussen) (born May 14, 1938) is a Danish linguist specializing in languages of Mesoamerica. She has published mostly about the Nahuatl
Jacob the Dacian (1,006 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Jacob the Dacian (Spanish: Jacobo Daciano; Latin: Iacobus de Dacia; c. 1484 in Copenhagen, Denmark – 1566 in Michoacán, New Spain) was a Danish-born Franciscan
Horacio Carochi (355 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Horacio Carochi (1586–1666) was a Jesuit priest and grammarian who was born in Florence and died in New Spain. He is known for his grammar of the Classical
Nora England (323 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Nora Clearman England (born November 8, 1946) is an American linguist, Mayanist, and Dallas TACA Centennial Professor at University of Texas at Austin
Yolanda Lastra (542 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Yolanda Lastra de Suárez (born 1932) is a Mexican linguist specializing in the descriptive linguistics of the indigenous languages of Mexico. She obtained
Pamela Munro (781 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Pamela Munro (b. May 23, 1947) is an American linguist who specializes in Native American languages. She is a distinguished research professor of linguistics
Agustín de Vetancurt (474 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Agustín de Vetancurt, also written Vetancourt, Betancourt, Betancur (1620–1700) was a Mexican Catholic historian and scholar of the Nahuatl language. Born
Faustino Galicia (109 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Faustino Galicia Chimalpopoca or Faustino Chimalpopoca(tl) Galicia (died 1877) was the most active scholar of the Nahuatl language of the 19th century
Otto Stoll (259 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Otto Stoll (29 December 1849 in Frauenfeld – 18 August 1922 in Zürich) was a Swiss linguist and ethnologist. Otto Stoll was a professor of ethnology and
Chatino language (1,569 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Chatino is a group of indigenous Mesoamerican languages. These languages are a branch of the Zapotecan family within the Oto-Manguean language family.
Jessica Coon (407 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Jessica Coon is an associate professor of linguistics at McGill University and Canada Research Chair in syntax and indigenous languages. She was the linguistics
Paul Friedrich (linguist) (405 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Paul William Friedrich (October 22, 1927 – August 11, 2016) was an American anthropologist, linguist, poet, and Professor of Social Thought at the University
Pedro de Betanzos (429 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Pedro de Betanzos (died 1570) was a Spanish Franciscan missionary and linguist. Betanzos was born in Betanzos in Galicia. He was one of the earliest Franciscan
Zapotec languages (6,362 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
/ˈzæpətɛk/ languages are a group of around 50 closely related indigenous Mesoamerican languages that constitute a main branch of the Oto-Manguean language family
Active–stative alignment (2,286 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
In linguistic typology, active–stative alignment (also split intransitive alignment or semantic alignment) is a type of morphosyntactic alignment in which
Vigesimal (2,920 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
A vigesimal (/vɪˈdʒɛsɪməl/) or base-20 (base-score) numeral system is based on twenty (in the same way in which the decimal numeral system is based on
Classical Kʼicheʼ (3,606 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Classical Kʼicheʼ was an ancestral form of today's Kʼicheʼ language (Quiché in the older Spanish-based orthography), which was spoken in the highland regions
Cacaopera language (126 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
native speakers had died before this time. Campbell, Lyle (1973). "MesoAmerican Languages Collection of Lyle Campbell". Archive of the Indigenous Language
Benjamin Lee Whorf (9,163 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Benjamin Lee Whorf (/wɔːrf/; April 24, 1897 – July 26, 1941) was a US linguist and fire prevention engineer. Whorf is widely known as an advocate for the
Robert E. Longacre (749 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Proto-Mixtecan was the first extensive linguistic reconstruction in Mesoamerican languages. This was one of several SIL studies which helped to establish the
Mesoamerican literature (3,520 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Alonso de Molina and Andrés de Olmos. But also Mayan and other Mesoamerican languages have early grammars and dictionaries, some of very high quality
Chatinos (458 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
rain, the mountain, and fire. Chatino is a family of indigenous Mesoamerican languages, which is classified under the Zapotecan branch of the Oto-Manguean
Southern Maya area (3,961 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
by speakers of Maya languages, and others by speakers of other Mesoamerican languages, including Xinca, Lenca, Mixe–Zoquean, and Pipil; accordingly, in
Proto-Mixe–Zoquean language (363 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
roots in a similar language, called the proto-Mixe Zoque. In later Mesoamerican languages, evidence of loan words suggests that in earlier times the Olmecs'
Highland Oaxaca Chontal (968 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
University of Chicago. Sonnenschein, Aaron. (Unpublished/pending). In Mesoamerican Languages Handbook. (Tentative title). S. Wichmann (ed). Mouton DeGruyer.
Mesoamerican calendars (3,106 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
name. As a result, the word for “day” also means “name” in some Mesoamerican languages. Each day sign was presided over by a god and many had associations
Mesoamerican writing systems (2,810 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
onwards. Already by the mid-16th c., use of the Latin script for Mesoamerican languages seems to have been well established. For writing Maya, colonial
Tone letter (2,694 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
opposite convention of 1 being low and 6 being high. In the case of Mesoamerican languages, the highest pitch is 1 but the lowest depends on the number of
Mixtec language (5,113 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
(SSILA). DiCanio, Christian & Ryan Bennett. (To appear). Prosody in Mesoamerican Languages (pre-publication version). In C. Gussenhoven & A. Chen (Eds.), The
Middle American Research Institute (2,281 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
systems, and he also teaches and studies on the linguistics of Mesoamerican languages. The Middle American Research Institute gallery is open to the public
Otomi language (8,831 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
ballads, and songs involving animals. As in the traditions of other Mesoamerican languages, a common poetic instrument is the use of parallelism, couplets
Ixcateopan (archaeological site) (4,808 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
century Mesoamerican culture, Nahuatl began its diffusion over other mesoamerican languages to become the lingua franca in most of Mesoamerica, especially under