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Longer titles found: Dictionary of Medieval Latin from British Sources (view), International Society for the Study of Medieval Latin Culture (view), List of medieval Latin commentators on Aristotle (view)

searching for Medieval Latin 172 found (2166 total)

alternate case: medieval Latin

Attorney at law (623 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article

Attorney at law or attorney-at-law, usually abbreviated in everyday speech to attorney, is the preferred term for a practising lawyer in certain jurisdictions
Dacia (4,894 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Dacia (/ˈdeɪʃə/, DAY-shə; Latin: [ˈd̪aː.ki.a]) was the land inhabited by the Dacians, its core in Transylvania, stretching to the Danube in the south,
Medieval poetry (902 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
and never made it to being recited without song or other music. In medieval Latin, while verse in the old quantitative meters continued to be written
Insular script (1,012 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Insular script is a medieval script system originating from Ireland that spread to England and continental Europe under the influence of Irish Christianity
Old Welsh (677 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Old Welsh (Welsh: Hen Gymraeg) is the stage of the Welsh language from about 800 AD until the early 12th century when it developed into Middle Welsh. The
Bargeboard (248 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
timbers or purlins of the roof. The word bargeboard is probably from the Medieval Latin bargus, or barcus, a scaffold, and not from the now obsolete synonym
Curia regis (887 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The curia regis ([ˈkuː.ri.a ˈreː.d͡ʒis]), Latin for "the royal council" or "king's court", was the name given to councils of advisers and administrators
Bocage (1,021 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
the Old French root bosc ("wood") > Modern French bois ("wood") cf. Medieval Latin boscus (first mentioned in 704 AD). The Norman place names retain it
Hiberno-Latin (916 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Hiberno-Latin, also called Hisperic Latin, was a learned style of literary Latin first used and subsequently spread by Irish monks during the period from
John Skylitzes (470 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
John Skylitzes, commonly Latinized as Ioannes Scylitzes (Greek: Ἰωάννης Σκυλίτζης, romanized: Iōánnēs Skylítzēs, Byzantine Greek: [i.oˈa.nis sc̠iˈlit.t͡sis];
Atocha (Madrid) (356 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Atocha [aˈtotʃa] is an administrative neighborhood (barrio) of Madrid belonging to the district of Arganzuela. The Atocha meadow appears as Prato de Thoia
Moselle Romance (924 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
the Moselle, although Hildegard's language appears to be an invented medieval Latin. Indeed, words from this "lingua" of Hildegard, such as "loifolum" similar
Lingua ignota (1,229 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
A lingua ignota (Latin for "unknown language") was described by the 12th-century abbess Hildegard of Bingen, who apparently used it for mystical purposes
Feudalism (6,566 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
societies commonly described as feudal. The word feudal comes from the medieval Latin feudālis, the adjectival form of feudum 'fee, feud', first attested
Harrowing of Hell (drama) (353 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
any indication, Eve's plea is successful. Dronke, Peter (1994). Nine Medieval Latin Plays. Cambridge Medieval Classics, I. Cambridge: Cambridge University
Mappae clavicula (921 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
The mappae clavicula is a medieval Latin text containing manufacturing recipes for crafts materials, including for metals, glass, mosaics, and dyes and
Cerebro (3,608 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Cerebro (/səˈriːbroʊ/; Spanish for "brain", from Latin cerebrum) is a fictional device appearing in American comic books published by Marvel Comics. The
Papyrus Graecus Holmiensis (310 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
 300 AD, gives similar recipes. Some of these recipes are found in medieval Latin collections of technological recipes, notably the Mappae clavicula.
Gambrel (1,027 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
shortening what would otherwise be a tall roof. The name comes from the Medieval Latin word gamba, meaning horse's hock or leg. The term gambrel is of American
Iambic tetrameter (756 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Iambic tetrameter is a poetic meter in ancient Greek and Latin poetry; as the name of a rhythm, iambic tetrameter consists of four metra, each metron being
0 (7,862 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
quantity", c. 1600, from French zéro or directly from Italian zero, from Medieval Latin zephirum, from Arabic sifr "cipher", translation of Sanskrit sunya-m
Étival-Clairefontaine (108 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Mill is located in this city. The origins of Sanctivagium, altered in medieval Latin as Stivagium and Estival Old French, date back to the 7th century. Communes
List of English words of Arabic origin (2,978 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
vocabularies The following plant names entered medieval Latin texts from Arabic. Today, in descent from the medieval Latin, they are international systematic classification
Map (4,185 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
tradition and exist from ancient times. The word "map" comes from the medieval Latin: Mappa mundi, wherein mappa meant 'napkin' or 'cloth' and mundi 'the
Tse (Cyrillic) (707 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
German), ⟨cz⟩ (which was one of the conventions to represent the sound in Medieval Latin) or ⟨tz⟩. Its equivalent in the modern Romanian Latin alphabet is ⟨ț⟩
Piae Cantiones (737 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
ecclesiastical and school songs of the ancient bishops) is a collection of late medieval Latin songs first published in 1582. It was compiled by Jacobus Finno, a clergyman
Montjuïc (1,632 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Catalonia, Spain. Montjuïc or Montjuich, meaning "Jewish Mountain" in medieval Latin and Catalan, is a broad, shallow hill in Barcelona with a rich history
Proverbia Grecorum (2,403 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Michael W. Herren on his 65th Birthday, Publications of the Journal of Medieval Latin, vol. 6, Brepols, pp. 193–215, doi:10.1484/m.pjml-eb.6.09070802050003050104020503
Suckling pig (2,678 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
A suckling pig is a piglet fed on its mother's milk (i.e., a piglet which is still a "suckling"). In culinary contexts, a suckling pig is slaughtered between
Tower of Hercules (1,544 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Tower of Hercules (Galician: Torre de Hércules, Spanish: Torre de Hércules) is the oldest known extant Roman lighthouse. Built in the 1st century,
Pavilion (1,225 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
), from Latin papilionem (nominative papilio) "butterfly, moth," in Medieval Latin "tent" (see papillon); the type of tent was so called on its resemblance
Virey-sous-Bar (94 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Bar) is a commune in the Aube department in north-central France. In Medieval Latin, it was known as Vireium. Communes of the Aube department "Répertoire
Tapestry of Creation (693 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Tapestry of Creation or Girona Tapestry is a Romanesque panel of needlework from the 11th century, housed in the Museum of the Cathedral of Girona
Samite (1,163 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
or silver thread. The word was derived from Old French samit, from medieval Latin samitum, examitum deriving from the Byzantine Greek ἑξάμιτον hexamiton
Neume (3,335 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
the 15th century, from the Middle French neume, in turn from either medieval Latin pneuma or neuma, the former either from ancient Greek πνεῦμα pneuma
Vendeuvre-sur-Barse (154 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
France. It was named for the Villa Venderevensis, and was known in Medieval Latin as Vendoara, Vendoberum, Vendœuvres, Vendopera, Vendoperanse Castrum
Wittum (557 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Wittum (Latin: vidualitium), Widum or Witthum is a medieval Latin legal term, known in marital and ecclesiastical law. The term referred initially to steps
Spanish nobility (5,117 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Spanish nobles are persons who possess a title of nobility confirmed by Spain's Ministry of Justice, as well as those individuals appointed to one of the
Eulogy (1,256 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
word eulogy was first documented in the 16th century and came from the Medieval Latin term eulogium. Eulogium at that time has since turned into the shorter
Al-Mujahid (1,551 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
J., The Crusades and the Military Orders: Expanding the Frontier of Medieval Latin Christianity, CEU Medievalia, 2001,p.62 Ibn Khallikan’s Biographical
Dream vision (1,729 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
used in European, Old Russian, medieval Latin, Muslim, Gnostic, Hebrew, and other literatures. In the book "Medieval Latin visions", Russian philologist
Early Finnish wars (1,408 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
There are scattered descriptions of early Finnish wars, conflicts involving the Finnish people, some of which took place before the Middle Ages. The earliest
Hijrah (2,288 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
kinship or association." It has been also transliterated as Hegira in medieval Latin, a term still in occasional use in English. Early in Muhammad's preaching
San Clemente al Laterano (3,229 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Basilica of Saint Clement (Italian: Basilica di San Clemente al Laterano) is a Latin Catholic minor basilica dedicated to Pope Clement I located in
Prothonotary (1,525 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
πρῶτος protos "first" + Latin notarius ("notary"); the -h- appeared in Medieval Latin. The title was awarded to certain high-ranking notaries. The office
Invitatory (359 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
it is Psalm 94(95), also known as the Venite. The term derives from Medieval Latin invītātōrium, derived from invītāre, "to invite." The invitatory is
Serapion the Younger (1,044 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
to Latin in the late 13th century and was widely circulated in late medieval Latin medical circles. Portions of the Latin text make a good match with portions
Learned medicine (633 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
free from later accretions from Arabic-derived texts and texts of medieval Latin. This search for better texts was influential in the early 16th century
Khalid ibn Yazid (2,417 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Khālid ibn Yazīd (full name Abū Hāshim Khālid ibn Yazīd ibn Muʿāwiya ibn Abī Sufyān, Arabic: أبو هاشم خالد بن يزيد بن معاوية بن أبي سفيان), c. 668–704
Citrine (colour) (322 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
citrine as a colour in English was in 1386. It was borrowed from a medieval Latin and classical Latin word with the same meaning. In late medieval and
Gramática de la lengua castellana (445 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Gramática de la lengua castellana (lit. 'Grammar of the Castilian Language') is a book written by Antonio de Nebrija and published in 1492. It was the
Medical Renaissance (1,948 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
civilizations and Islamic medicine, following the translation into Medieval Latin of many works from these societies. Medical discoveries during the Medical
Chimere (1,631 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
A chimere (/ˈtʃɪmər/ CHIM-ər or /tʃɪˈmɪər/ chim-EER) is a garment worn by Anglican bishops in choir dress, and, formally as part of academic dress. A descendant
Hamper (1,319 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
'hampyre' evolved as contractions of the Anglo-French hanaper, from the Medieval Latin hanaperium, which was a secure case for holding a large goblet or cup
Devín Castle (1,520 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Devín Castle (Slovak: hrad Devín [ˈɦrad ˈɟeʋiːn] or Devínsky hrad [ˈɟeʋiːnski ˈɦrat], Hungarian: Dévényi vár, German: Burg Theben) is a castle in Devín
Book of Optics (2,176 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Commentary, of the First Three Books of Alhacen's De Aspectibus, the Medieval Latin Version of Ibn al-Haytham's Kitāb al-Manāẓir, 2 vols.", Transactions
Hesbaye (1,497 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
when it was an important Frankish pagus or gau, called Hasbania in medieval Latin. Major parts of three Belgian provinces are dominated by the Hesbaye
Chronicles of Mann (815 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
(Latin: Chronica Regum Manniæ et Insularum) or Manx Chronicle is a medieval Latin manuscript relating the early history of the Isle of Man. The main part
Slovakia (14,767 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Sloven/Slovienin). As such, it is a cognate of the words Slovenia and Slavonia. In medieval Latin, German, and even some Slavic sources, the same name has often been
Play of Daniel (545 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
The Play of Daniel, or Ludus Danielis, is either of two medieval Latin liturgical dramas based on the biblical Book of Daniel, one of which is accompanied
Santiago de Compostela Cathedral (5,318 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Santiago de Compostela Arch cathedral Basilica (Spanish and Galician: Catedral Basilica de Santiago de Compostela) is part of the Metropolitan Archdiocese
French Basque Country (6,641 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The French Basque Country, or Northern Basque Country (Basque: Iparralde, lit. 'the Northern Region'; French: Pays basque; Spanish: País Vasco francés)
Vade retro satana (967 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Vade retro satana (Ecclesiastical Latin for "Begone, Satan", "Step back, Satan", or "Back off, Satan"; alternatively spelt vade retro satanas, or sathanas)
Green children of Woolpit (5,295 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The legend of the green children of Woolpit concerns two children of unusual skin colour who reportedly appeared in the village of Woolpit in Suffolk,
Stefan Nemanja (4,858 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Stefan Nemanja (Serbian Cyrillic: Стефан Немања, pronounced [stêfaːn ně̞maɲa]; c. 1113 or 1114 – 20 February 1199) was the Grand Prince (Veliki Župan)
Rogoredo (679 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Donato Milanese comune to the south-east. The name derives from the medieval Latin word robur, meaning "sessile oak, and stands for "oak wood". References
Cambrai Homily (2,324 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Cambrai Homily is the earliest known Irish homily, dating to the 7th or early 8th century, and housed in the Médiathèque d'agglomération de Cambrai
Besa (Albanian culture) (1,832 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
related, to the Classical Latin word fides, which in Late Ancient and Medieval Latin took on the Christian meaning of "faith, (religious) belief" today extant
Litre (3,023 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Byzantine Greek—where it was a unit of weight, not volume—via Late Medieval Latin, and which equalled approximately 0.831 litres. The litre was also used
Common Romanian (4,903 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Common Romanian (Romanian: română comună), also known as Ancient Romanian (străromână), or Proto-Romanian (protoromână), is a comparatively reconstructed
Tantum ergo (1,687 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
"Tantum ergo" is the incipit of the last two verses of Pange lingua, a Medieval Latin hymn generally attributed to St Thomas Aquinas c. 1264, but based upon
Dacian (279 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
(106-271/275 AD) (obsolete), A Dane, Denmark having been known as Dacia in Medieval Latin Dacian (prefect), 4th-century Roman prefect who persecuted Christians
Paroxytone (165 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
for certain verb conjugations and a few words of foreign origin. In medieval Latin lyric poetry, a paroxytonic line or half-line is one in which the penultimate
Piedmont, Montgomery County, Virginia (129 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
2 km) east-southeast of Christiansburg. The name Piedmont comes from medieval Latin Pedemontium or Pedemontis, i.e., ad pedem montium, meaning "at the foot
Vandino and Ugolino Vivaldi (1,994 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Vandino (sometimes Vadino or Guido) and Ugolino Vivaldi (sometimes Ugolino de Vivaldo) (fl. 1291) were two brothers and Genoese explorers and merchants
Piedmont, Montgomery County, Virginia (129 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
2 km) east-southeast of Christiansburg. The name Piedmont comes from medieval Latin Pedemontium or Pedemontis, i.e., ad pedem montium, meaning "at the foot
Titivillus (913 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Titivillus is a demon said to introduce errors into the work of scribes. The first reference to Titivillus by name occurred in Tractatus de Penitentia
Book of Ezra (2,548 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
first printed rabbinic bibles of the early 16th century, following late medieval Latin Christian tradition. Composed in Hebrew and Aramaic, its subject is
Welsh Marches (2,450 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
term has varied at different periods. The English term Welsh March (in Medieval Latin Marchia Walliae) was originally used in the Middle Ages to denote the
Quo warranto (2,083 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
In the English-American common law, quo warranto (Medieval Latin for "by what warrant?") is a prerogative writ issued by a court which orders someone to
Mos Teutonicus (1,385 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Mos Teutonicus (Latin for "German custom") was a postmortem funerary custom used in Europe in the Middle Ages as a means of transporting, and solemnly
A. G. Rigg (370 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Toronto a high standard academic environment for learning and studying medieval Latin in North America. Both initiatives were undertaken in close collaboration
The Turnip (361 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Fairy Tales': A Comparative Study with Translations". The Journal of Medieval Latin. 13: 61–126. doi:10.1484/J.JML.2.304194. JSTOR 45019572. Ziolkowski
Latin phonology and orthography (7,971 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
This article contains phonetic transcriptions in the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA). For an introductory guide on IPA symbols, see Help:IPA. For
Patrologia Latina (1,423 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
patristic and medieval Greek works with their (sometimes non-matching) medieval Latin translations. Although consisting of reprints of old editions, which
Dania (135 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Dania in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. Dania may also refer to: Medieval Latin name for Denmark, named for the Dani tribe Dania Academy, usually referred
Latin biographies of Muhammad (485 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Michelina (2012). The Pseudo-historical Image of the Prophet Muhammad in Medieval Latin Literature: A Repertory. De Gruyter. Stella, Francesco (2020). "Latin
Codex Calixtinus (2,505 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Codex Calixtinus (or Codex Compostellus) is a manuscript that is the main witness for the 12th-century Liber Sancti Jacobi ('Book of Saint James')
The Donkey (fairy tale) (631 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
Donkey' from the Middle Ages to the Brothers Grimm". The Journal of Medieval Latin. 5: 53–94. doi:10.1484/J.JML.2.304038. JSTOR 45019406. Ziolkowski, Jan
Proparoxytone (328 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
deleted entirely, and still has the stress in familial and familiar.) In medieval Latin lyric poetry, a proparoxytonic line or half-line is one where the antepenultimate
Benediktbeuern (304 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Bichl. The village has 3,602 residents as of 31 December 2019. The medieval Latin name of Benediktbeuern was Buria (adjective: Burana). Benediktbeuern
Pedant (278 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
uncertain, but several dictionaries suggest that it was contracted from the medieval Latin pædagogans, present participle of pædagogare, 'to act as pedagogue,
Bezant (846 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
the late medieval Greeks, while the name bezant was used by the late medieval Latin merchants for the same coin. The Italians also used the name perpero
Cortes of León of 1188 (435 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Cortes of León or Decreta of León from year 1188 was a parliamentary body in the medieval Kingdom of León. According to UNESCO it is the first documented
Casale (290 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
casale in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. Casale may refer to: Casalis, medieval Latin for a group of houses in the countryside Casal di Principe in the province
Lorne, Scotland (2,173 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Lorne (or Lorn; Scottish Gaelic: Latharna) is an ancient province (medieval Latin: provincia) in the west of Scotland, which is now a district in the
Reinhard Strohm (344 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
interest in 14th to 18th-century music. Strohm studied Musicology, Medieval Latin, and Romance Literatures, at the University of Munich, Scuola Normale
Beatus (275 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Beatus, meaning blessed in Medieval Latin, may mean: One who has been beatified, the stage before being declared a saint The Commentary on the Apocalypse
Planh (502 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
deceased (eulogy) and prayer for his or her soul. It is descended from the medieval Latin planctus. The planh is similar to the sirventes in that both were typically
Carmen de Prodicione Guenonis (166 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Guenonis ("Song of the Treachery of Ganelon") is an anonymous poem in medieval Latin, written in the first half of the 12th century. Composed in elegiac
Columba (4,602 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
most of the remainder of his life in Scotland. Three surviving early medieval Latin hymns are attributed to him. Columba was born to Fedlimid and Eithne
Edward III of England (15,117 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Edward III (13 November 1312 – 21 June 1377), also known as Edward of Windsor before his accession, was King of England from January 1327 until his death
Pia mater (2,617 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
the membranes surrounding the brain and spinal cord. Pia mater is medieval Latin meaning "tender mother". The other two meningeal membranes are the dura
Hermeneutic style (4,552 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The hermeneutic style is a style of Latin in the later Roman and early Medieval periods characterised by the extensive use of unusual and arcane words
Hail Queen of Heaven, the Ocean Star (611 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
passage of the Catholic Emancipation Act in England. Loosely based on the medieval Latin plainchant Ave maris stella, the hymn is generally sung to the modified
Great Charter of Ireland (252 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Magna Carta Hiberniae 1216 (or the Great Charter of Ireland) is an issue of the English Magna Carta (or Great Charter of Liberties) in Ireland. King Henry
Ambitus (music) (315 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
['am.bi.t̪us]) is a Latin term literally meaning enclos[ur]e, and in Medieval Latin means the "range" of a melodic line, most usually referring to the range
Richard Barre (2,600 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Terms & Phrases p. 164 Sharpe "Richard Barre's Compedium" Journal of Medieval Latin p. 128 Greenway "Prebendaries of Hurstborne and Burbage" Fasti Ecclesiae
List of English words of Gaulish origin (1,471 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
lode; tunnel, shaft; mineral ore; mine" (for coal, tin, etc,)) and from Medieval Latin mina, minera (="ore,"), probably ultimately from Old Celtic *meini-
Minim (palaeography) (425 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
In palaeography, a minim is a short, vertical stroke used in handwriting. The word is derived from the Latin minimum, meaning least or smallest. A minim
Bewnans Ke (1,906 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
has much correspondence with a French text, a translation of a lost medieval Latin hagiography of Kea, allowing gaps in the narrative to be tentatively
Bewnans Ke (1,906 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
has much correspondence with a French text, a translation of a lost medieval Latin hagiography of Kea, allowing gaps in the narrative to be tentatively
Pica (disorder) (3,758 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
biological, natural or manmade. The term was drawn directly from the medieval Latin word for magpie, a bird subject to much folklore regarding its opportunistic
The Wandering Scholars (312 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
first published in 1927 by Constable, London. It deals primarily with medieval Latin lyric poetry and the main part is a study of the goliards, which she
Old Catalan (2,497 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Old Catalan, also known as Medieval Catalan, is the modern denomination for Romance varieties that during the Middle Ages were spoken in territories that
Gothic language (9,687 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
This article contains Gothic characters. Without proper rendering support, you may see question marks, boxes, or other symbols instead of letters. Gothic
Angel (given name) (635 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
English-speaking world Angel is used for both boys and girls. From the medieval Latin masculine name Angelus, which was derived from the name of the heavenly
Medieval university (3,659 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
onward, this Western-style organizational form gradually spread from the medieval Latin west across the globe, eventually replacing all other higher-learning
Apostles' Creed (5,531 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Spirit. For this reason, it was held to predate the Nicene Creed in medieval Latin tradition. The expression "Apostles' Creed" is first mentioned in a
Khouri (720 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
curia, or may come from the French curé meaning parish Priest, from Medieval Latin curatus "one responsible for the care (of souls)," from Latin curatus
Carsten Peter Thiede (818 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Christianity because of his background as a linguist and his expertise in medieval Latin philology, the study of the origins of Christianity came to form his
Great Michael (928 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
"La Grande Nef d'Ecosse" (The Big Nave of Scotland) (Nave is from the medieval Latin navis, meaning 'ship'). In March 1514 Michael was reported to be docked
Bardulia (573 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
According to some sources, Bardulia is the ancient name of the territories that composed the primitive Castile in the north of what later became the province
Function (music) (2,669 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
Antique concepts, such as dynamis in Ancient Greece, or qualitas in medieval Latin. The concept of harmonic function originates in theories about just
List of works by Wulfstan of York (1,693 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Wulfstan II, Archbishop of York wrote some works in Latin, and numerous works in Old English, then the vernacular. He has also been credited with a few
Rustication (academia) (1,130 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
student has been sent back to his or her family in the country, or from medieval Latin rustici, meaning "heathens or barbarians" (missus in rusticōs, "sent
Historia scholastica (342 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
The Historia Scholastica is a Biblical paraphrase written in Medieval Latin by Petrus Comestor. Completed around 1173, he wrote it for the cathedral school
Sandarac (798 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
sandarac to refer to arsenic sulfide particularly red arsenic sulfide. In Medieval Latin, the term sandaraca meant red lead as well as red arsenic sulfide. The
William de Blois (bishop of Lincoln) (1,039 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
Fryde, et al. Handbook of British Chronology p. 255 Latham Revised Medieval Latin Word-List p. 293 Fryde, E. B.; Greenway, D. E.; Porter, S.; Roy, I.
Praemunire (1,529 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
mistaken etymology, with munera, "duties," "civic obligations." In medieval Latin, praemunire was confused with and used for praemonere, to forewarn,
Ostinato (4,645 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Gnawa music. The term ostinato essentially has the same meaning as the medieval Latin word pes, the word ground as applied to classical music, and the word
Faculty of Classics, University of Oxford (659 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
number of research projects, including: Oxyrhynchus Papyri Dictionary of Medieval Latin from British Sources Classical Art Research Centre (which includes the
History of the Spanish language (7,734 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Latin sulphur azul, "blue", Arabic: لازورد lāzaward "lapis lazuli" (cf. medieval Latin azura, French azure) blandir, "to brandish", French brandir bolsa, "bag
Cornish language (13,377 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Cornish (Standard Written Form: Kernewek or Kernowek; [kəɾˈnuːək]) is a Southwestern Brittonic language of the Celtic language family. Along with Welsh
Volodymyr (city) (2,520 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
Kingdom of Galicia–Volhynia. Population: 37,910 (2022 estimate). The medieval Latin name of the town "Lodomeria" became the namesake of the 19th century
Cornish language (13,377 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Cornish (Standard Written Form: Kernewek or Kernowek; [kəɾˈnuːək]) is a Southwestern Brittonic language of the Celtic language family. Along with Welsh
History of the Spanish language (7,734 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Latin sulphur azul, "blue", Arabic: لازورد lāzaward "lapis lazuli" (cf. medieval Latin azura, French azure) blandir, "to brandish", French brandir bolsa, "bag
Honorificabilitudinitatibus (3,372 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
[hɔnoːrɪfɪkaːbɪlɪtuːdɪnɪˈtaːtɪbʊs]) is the dative and ablative plural of the medieval Latin word honōrificābilitūdinitās, which can be translated as "the state
Latin Catholic Diocese of Acre (801 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
bishop of Acre was a suffragan bishop of the archbishop of Tyre in the medieval Latin Kingdom of Jerusalem. Acre is present-day Akko, Israel. The introduction
Euclid's Data (124 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Sokolik, Baltimore: Union Square Press, 1993 (ISBN 0-9635924-1-6) The Medieval Latin Translation of the Data of Euclid, translated by Shuntaro Ito, Tokyo
Liber Scintillarum (370 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Liber Scintillarum (literally "Book of Sparks") is a late seventh or early eighth-century florilegium of biblical and patristic sayings in Latin. It was
Pylos (9,421 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
This article contains special characters. Without proper rendering support, you may see question marks, boxes, or other symbols. Pylos (UK: /ˈpaɪlɒs/,
Nürnberger Handschrift GNM 3227a (916 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Codex 3227a of the Germanisches Nationalmuseum in Nuremberg (also known as Hs. 3227a, GNM 3227a, Nürnberger Handschrift GNM 3227a) is a manuscript of 169
William d'Aubigny (died 1139) (515 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
acquired large estates in Norfolk. From his title of Butler (pincerna in medieval Latin) to King Henry I of England, he was called William d'Aubigny Pincerna
John Minsterworth (4,675 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Sir John Minsterworth (died 1377) was a fourteenth-century English knight from Gloucestershire, who fought in the Hundred Years' War and was executed by
Sylvan Pass (Wyoming) (314 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
entrance. The pass was named after nearby Sylvan Lake (derived from medieval Latin sylvānus, from Latin Silvānus, god of the woods, from silva, forest)
Perranzabuloe (1,855 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
to 5,486 at the 2011 census. The name of the parish derives from the medieval Latin Perranus in Sabulo meaning Piran in the sand. It refers to Saint Piran
Gwytherin (267 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
church is dedicated to Saint Winefrid (Welsh: Gwenfrewy gwenfrewi; Medieval Latin: Winefrida). In the centre of the village opposite the Lion Inn is the
Michael Herren (107 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Michael W. Herren is a Canadian historian, particularly in antique and medieval Latin literature, currently Distinguished Research Professor Emeritus at York
Storia de Mahometh (1,924 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Michelina (2012). The Pseudo-historical Image of the Prophet Muhammad in Medieval Latin Literature: A Repertory. De Gruyter. Díaz y Díaz, Manuel C. (1970).
Cave de Sueth (641 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
(medieval French name; in modern French: Cave de Suète), known from medieval Latin sources as Cava de Suet, as Habis Jaldak in medieval Arabic and as 'Ain
Bonito (466 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
However, the noun referring to the fish seems to come from the low and medieval Latin form boniton, a word with a strange structure and an obscure origin
Heptameter (364 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
meter is also called septenary, and this is the most common form for medieval Latin and vernacular verse, including the Ormulum. Its first use in English
African Romance (8,795 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
African Romance or African Latin is an extinct Romance language that was spoken in the various provinces of Roman Africa by the African Romans under the
Kassel conversations (437 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Kassel conversations (German: Kasseler Gespräche) is the conventional name of an early medieval text preserved in a manuscript from c. 810. It is held
Terentius et delusor (625 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Cambridge University Press. Dronke, Peter, ed. and trans. (1994). Nine Medieval Latin Plays. Cambridge Medieval Classics I. Cambridge: Cambridge University
Joseph and Aseneth (2,399 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Joseph and Asenath is a narrative that dates from between 200 BCE and 200 CE. It concerns the Hebrew patriarch Joseph and his marriage to Asenath, expanding
Paul Schmidt (164 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Paul Gerhard Schmidt (1937–2010), German medievalist and professor of medieval Latin philology Paul Karl Schmidt alias Paul Carell (1911–1997), chief press
Walter of Compiègne (249 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
1934. ISBN 0-19-814325-7) vol. 2 pp. 82–83. Yolles, Julian; Weiss, Jessica, eds. (2018). Medieval Latin Lives of Muhammad. Harvard University Press.
Alistair Campbell (academic) (217 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
between the classical and hermeneutic styles of late Roman and early medieval Latin. Treharne, Elaine M. (2004). Old and Middle English c.890-c.1400: an
Lemur (18,648 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Lemurs (/ˈliːmər/ LEE-mər) (from Latin lemures – "ghosts" or "spirits") are wet-nosed primates of the superfamily Lemuroidea (/lɛmjʊˈrɔɪdiə/), divided
Compendium (517 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
leading points of a longer 'system or work'". Its etymology comes from a Medieval Latin use (com+pendere), literally meaning to weigh together. A field guide
Betty Radice (811 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Association. She produced numerous English translations of classical and medieval Latin texts which were published in the mid-twentieth century. Born Betty
Realm (425 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
the beginning of the 17th century. The word supposedly derives from medieval Latin regalimen, from regalis, of or belonging to a rex (king). The word rex
Vitas Patrum Emeritensium (313 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
The Vitas Patrum Emeritensium is an early medieval Latin hagiographical work written by an otherwise unknown Paul, a deacon of Mérida. The work narrates
Gave (placename element) (214 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
word gave derives from the old Gascon gabar, attested as gabarrus in medieval Latin. Based on a pre-Celtic root *gab meaning 'hollow'[citation needed] (thus
Hermeticism (6,700 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
authentic Hermetic texts and concepts. The term Hermetic is from the medieval Latin hermeticus, which is derived from the name of the Greek god Hermes.
Gulf of Lion (617 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
current name of the gulf appeared at least during the 13th century (in medieval Latin sinus Leonis, mare Leonis) and could come from comparison with a lion:
Gunther (4,905 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Most significantly, he plays a role in the German Nibelungenlied, the medieval Latin Waltharius, and the Old Norse Poetic Edda and Völsunga saga. He also
Schottenkirche, Vienna (801 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
church in Vienna attached to the Schottenstift, founded by Irish (in Medieval Latin scoti) Benedictine monks in the 12th century. In 1418, the Duke Albert
John Hastings, 2nd Earl of Pembroke (6,888 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
John Hastings, 2nd Earl of Pembroke (29 August 1347 – 16 April 1375), was a fourteenth-century English nobleman and soldier. He also held the titles of
Tultusceptru de libro domni Metobii (1,048 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Pseudo Metodio y España". Habis. 2: 143–164. Yolles, Julian; Weiss, Jessica, eds. (2018). Medieval Latin Lives of Muhammad. Harvard University Press.