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Longer titles found: Maritime history of California (view), Maritime history of Chile (view), Maritime history of Colonial America (view), Maritime history of England (view), Maritime history of Europe (view), Maritime history of Florida (view), Maritime history of Odisha (view), Maritime history of Scotland (view), Maritime history of Somalia (view), Maritime history of Worthing (view), Maritime history of the Channel Islands (view), Maritime history of the United Kingdom (view), Maritime history of the United States (1776–1799) (view), Maritime history of the United States (1800–1899) (view), Maritime history of the United States (1900–1999) (view), Maritime history of the United States (2000–present) (view), Indian maritime history (view), Ancient maritime history (view), Frank C. Munson Institute of American Maritime History (view), Australian Association for Maritime History (view), International Commission for Maritime History (view), International Journal of Maritime History (view)

searching for Maritime history 455 found (3242 total)

alternate case: maritime history

Bartolomeu Dias (1,491 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article

Bartolomeu Dias (c. 1450 – 29 May 1500) was a Portuguese mariner and explorer. He was the first European navigator to round the southern tip of Africa
Caravel (825 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The caravel (Portuguese: caravela, IPA: [kɐɾɐˈvɛlɐ]) is a small highly-maneuverable sailing ship developed in the 15th century by the Portuguese to explore
Table Bay (421 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Table Bay (Afrikaans: Tafelbaai) is a natural bay on the Atlantic Ocean overlooked by Cape Town (founded 1652 by Van Riebeeck) and is at the northern end
Naval history of China (4,758 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
revisionist writing in western languages about China and East Asian maritime history during the period 1500–1630." International Journal of Asian Studies
War Shipping Administration (1,073 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The War Shipping Administration (WSA) was a World War II emergency war agency of the US government, tasked to purchase and operate the civilian shipping
Victoria & Alfred Waterfront (386 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Victoria & Alfred (V&A) Waterfront in Cape Town is situated on the Atlantic shore, Table Bay Harbour, the City of Cape Town and Table Mountain. Adrian
Simon's Town (1,244 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
maritime museum, which contains collections and artefacts related to the maritime history of South Africa and the South African Navy. Simon's Town Museum is
SS Ironsides (2,105 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Lakes (1) (1869). Maritime History of the Great Lakes (2) (1869). Maritime History of the Great Lakes (3) (1869). Maritime History of the Great Lakes
Vasco da Gama (7,205 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Vasco da Gama, 1st Count of Vidigueira (UK: /ˌvæskoʊ də ˈɡɑːmə/, US: /ˌvɑːskoʊ də ˈɡæmə/; European Portuguese: [ˈvaʃku ðɐ ˈɣɐ̃mɐ]; c. 1460s – 24 December
Piracy off the coast of Venezuela (768 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Piracy off the coast of Venezuela increased during the crisis in Venezuela. The situation has been compared to piracy off the coast of Somalia, which was
Naval history of World War II (10,965 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
At the beginning of World War II, the Royal Navy was the strongest navy in the world, with the largest number of warships built and with naval bases across
Galleon (2,520 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Galleons were large, multi-decked sailing ships first used as armed cargo carriers by European states from the 16th to 18th centuries during the age of
Carrack (1,735 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
A carrack (Portuguese: nau, Spanish: nao, Catalan: carraca) is a three- or four-masted ocean-going sailing ship that was developed in the 14th to 15th
SAS Somerset (750 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
SAS Somerset was a Bar-class boom defence vessel of the South African Navy, now preserved as a museum ship in Cape Town. Formerly HMS Barcross, it operated
Salvador Pirates (338 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Salvador Pirates was the name given to the band of Confederate Navy sailors that attempted to seize a Panama Railroad coastal steamer on the high seas
Signal Hill (Cape Town) (592 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Signal Hill (Afrikaans: Seinheuwel), or Lion's Rump, is a landmark flat-topped hill located in Cape Town, next to Lion's Head and Table Mountain. The hill
Miller's Point, Western Cape (800 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Miller's Point is a headland and stretch of protected coastline in South Africa. It is located about 4 kilometres (2.5 mi) south of Simon's Town on the
Kondura (ship) (162 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Kondura or Condura (Greek: ϰονδοῦρα) was a type of ship used on the eastern shores of the Adriatic. It is first mentioned and described in the 10th century
Battle of Salt River (1,016 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Battle of Salt River was a small military engagement between the crew of a Portuguese fleet led by Francisco de Almeida and the indigenous ǃUriǁʼaekua
National Maritime Museum (1,937 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
understanding of British economic, cultural, social, political and maritime history and its consequences in the world today. The museum plays host to various
Three-drum boiler (4,816 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Three-drum boilers are a class of water-tube boiler used to generate steam, typically to power ships. They are compact and of high evaporative power, factors
Noon Gun (1,282 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Play media Play media The Noon Gun has been a historic time signal in Cape Town, South Africa since 1806. It consists of a pair of black powder Dutch naval
Lady Elizabeth (1879) (1,479 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Lady Elizabeth is a wrecked iron barque of 1,155 tons built by Robert Thompson Jr. of Southwick, Sunderland and launched on 4 June 1879. Robert Thompson
Gulf of Carpentaria (1,679 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Gulf of Carpentaria (14°S 139°E / 14°S 139°E / -14; 139Coordinates: 14°S 139°E / 14°S 139°E / -14; 139) is a large, shallow sea enclosed on three
Manueline (927 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Manueline (Portuguese: estilo manuelino, IPA: [ɨʃˈtilu mɐnweˈɫinu]), occasionally known as Portuguese late Gothic, is the sumptuous, composite Portuguese
Pedra Branca (Tasmania) (1,078 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Pedra Branca is a rock islet or small island, located in the Southern Ocean, off the southern coast of Tasmania, Australia. The island is situated approximately
Cape Agulhas (890 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Cape Agulhas (/əˈɡʊljəs/; Portuguese: Cabo das Agulhas [ˈkaβu ðɐz ɐˈɣuʎɐʃ], "Cape of the Needles") is a rocky headland in Western Cape, South Africa. It
De Witt Island (494 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
De Witt Island, also known as Big Witch, is an island located close to the south-western coast of Tasmania, Australia. The 516-hectare (1.99 sq mi) island
HMS Endeavour (7,775 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Coordinates: 41°36′N 71°21′W / 41.600°N 71.350°W / 41.600; -71.350 (Narragansett Bay) HMS Endeavour was a British Royal Navy research vessel that Lieutenant
Willson v. Black-Bird Creek Marsh Co. (321 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Willson v. Black-Bird Creek Marsh Co., 27 U.S. (2 Pet.) 245 (1829), was a significant United States Supreme Court case regarding the definition of the
Storm Bay (110 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Storm Bay is a large bay in the south-east region of Tasmania, Australia. The bay is the river mouth to the Derwent River estuary and serves as the
Castle of Good Hope (1,275 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Castle of Good Hope (Dutch: Kasteel de Goede Hoop; Afrikaans: Kasteel die Goeie Hoop) known locally as the Castle[self-published source?] or Cape Town
Miguel Corte-Real (523 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Miguel Corte-Real (Portuguese pronunciation: [miˈɣɛl ˈkoɾtɨ ʁiˈal]; c. 1448 – 1502?) was a Portuguese explorer who charted about 600 miles of the coast
Maatsuyker Island (547 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Maatsuyker Island is an island located close to the south coast of Tasmania, Australia. The 186-hectare (0.72 sq mi) island is part of the Maatsuyker Islands
Cape of Good Hope (3,544 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Cape of Good Hope (Afrikaans: Kaap die Goeie Hoop [ˌkɑːp di ˌχujə ˈɦuəp]; Dutch: Kaap de Goede Hoop [ˌkaːb də ˌɣudə ˈɦoːp] (listen); Portuguese: Cabo
Falkuša (1,095 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
A falkusa (Croatian: falkuša; Croatian pronunciation: [ˈfalkuʃa]) is a traditional fishing boat used by fishermen from the town of Komiža on the Adriatic
Confederate States Navy (3,425 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Confederate States Navy (CSN) was the naval branch of the Confederate States Armed Forces, established by an act of the Confederate States Congress
Schouten Island (717 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Schouten Island (formerly Schouten's Isle), part of the Schouten Island Group, is an island with an area of approximately 28 square kilometres (11 sq mi)
SS Russia (3,760 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Maritime History of the Great Lakes (1) (1886). Maritime History of the Great Lakes (2) (1886). Maritime History of the Great Lakes (1892). Maritime History
Charles T. Meide (817 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Shipwreck Project, an investigation sponsored by the Institute of Maritime History and Florida State University into the wreck of a French frigate lost
Luzzu (615 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
A luzzu (Maltese pronunciation: [lutt͡su], pl. luzzijiet) is a traditional fishing boat from the Maltese islands. This type of boat developed in the early
Amerigo Vespucci (5,365 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Amerigo Vespucci (/vɛˈspuːtʃi/; Italian: [ameˈriːɡo veˈsputtʃi]; 9 March 1451 – 22 February 1512) was an Italian merchant, explorer, and navigator from
Roaring Forties (649 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Roaring Forties are strong westerly winds found in the Southern Hemisphere, generally between the latitudes of 40°S and 50°S. The strong west-to-east
Kodungallur (2,620 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Kodungallur, IPA: [koɖuŋːɐlːuːr], (also English: Cranganore / K-town; Portuguese: Cranganor; formerly known as Mahodayapuram, Shingly, Vanchi, Muyirikkode
National Sea Rescue Institute (1,484 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The National Sea Rescue Institute (NSRI) is a voluntary non-profit organization in South Africa tasked with saving lives through drowning prevention. It
United States Maritime Commission (2,266 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The United States Maritime Commission (USMC) was an independent executive agency of the U.S. federal government that was created by the Merchant Marine
Stag (barque) (100 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Stag was a barque built in Nova Scotia which was renowned for her speed. Designed by a pioneering Canadian naval architect Ebenezer Moseley, Stag was built
J. Samuel White (909 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
J. Samuel White was a British shipbuilding firm based in East Cowes, taking its name from John Samuel White (1838–1915). It came to prominence during the
Order of Prince Henry (320 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
culture, its history and its values (with a particular focus on its maritime history). The number of members in each grade is restricted by its constitution
San Francisco Maritime National Historical Park (788 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Center is the premier resource for San Francisco and Pacific Coast maritime history. Originating in 1939, the collections have become the largest maritime
Tamralipta (448 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Tamralipta or Tamralipti (Pali: Tāmaliti) was the biggest city in ancient Bengal, located on the Bay of Bengal in Midnapore district of modern-day India
Sunderland Docks (360 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Sunderland Docks is an area of Sunderland, Tyne and Wear, England. Home to the Port of Sunderland, the docks have access to the North Sea. Sunderland City
Cisplatine War (1,847 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Cisplatine War (Portuguese: Guerra da Cisplatina), also known as the Argentine-Brazilian War (Spanish: Guerra argentino-brasileña) or in the Argentine
John J. Holland (734 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Captain John Joseph Holland was a shipbuilder in the Pacific Northwest in the late 19th century. Among the vessels he built at his yards were the sternwheel
Safmarine (1,959 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Safmarine, short for South African Marine Container Lines N.V., is a South African international shipping entity and former company offering container
Gaspar Corte-Real (1,561 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Gaspar Corte-Real (1450–1501) was a Portuguese explorer who, alongside his father João Vaz Corte-Real and brother Miguel, participated in various exploratory
Maritime Museum of the Atlantic (1,167 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Maritime Museum of the Atlantic is a maritime museum located in downtown Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada. The museum is a member institution of the Nova
Museo Storico Navale (101 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Navy) in 1919. Its collections include items relating to the naval and maritime history of Venice, and it has a large number of ship models and weapons on
Kajjik (486 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The kajjik or kajjikk is a traditional fishing boat from Malta. It developed in the 17th century from caïques which were used elsewhere in the Mediterranean
Hippolyte Bouchard (6,028 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Hippolyte Bouchard, or Hipólito Bouchard (15 January 1780 – 4 January 1837), was a French-born Argentine sailor and corsair who fought for Argentina, Chile
Jan van Riebeeck (1,392 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Johan Anthoniszoon "Jan" van Riebeeck (21 April 1619 – 18 January 1677) was a Dutch navigator and colonial administrator who located Cape Town and the
Robert Moran (shipbuilder) (766 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Robert Moran (January 26, 1857 – March 27, 1943) was a prominent Seattle shipbuilder who served as the city's mayor from 1888 to 1890. Today he is primarily
Speronara (1,006 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The speronara (Maltese: xprunara, French: spéronare) was a type of small merchant craft originating from Malta which was used in the Mediterranean from
Martinolich Shipbuilding Company (208 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Martinolich Shipbuilding Company was founded in the early 1900s by John Martinolich (1877-1960), an Italian immigrant from modern day Croatia. The
Australasian Hydrographic Society (767 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Australasian Hydrographic Society (AHS) is a professional hydrographic organisation covering Australasia, the South West Pacific and South East Asia
Bristol slave trade (2,327 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Bristol, a port city in south-west England, was involved in the transatlantic slave trade. Bristol's part in the trade was prominent in the 17th and 18th
Port of San Francisco (5,414 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Port of San Francisco is a semi-independent organization that oversees the port facilities at San Francisco, California, United States. It is run by
Ferdinand Magellan (5,057 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Ferdinand Magellan (/məˈɡɛlən/ or /məˈdʒɛlən/; Portuguese: Fernão de Magalhães, IPA: [fɨɾˈnɐ̃w dɨ mɐɣɐˈʎɐ̃jʃ]; Spanish: Fernando de Magallanes, IPA: [feɾˈnando
Schouten Islands (958 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Schouten Islands (Indonesian: Kepulauan Biak, also Biak Islands or Geelvink Islands) are an island group of Papua province, eastern Indonesia in the
Algoa Bay (2,066 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Algoa Bay is a bay in the Eastern Cape, South Africa. It is located in the east coast, 683 kilometres (424 mi) east of the Cape of Good Hope. Algoa Bay
National Maritime Museum of Ireland (401 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The National Maritime Museum of Ireland (Irish: Músaem Mhuirí Náisiúnta na hÉireann) opened in 1978 in the former Mariners' Church in Moran Park, located
Ocean Chief (clipper) (323 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Ocean Chief was a clipper ship used in a regular packet service and as a passenger ship for bounty emigrants to Australia between June 1854 and December
Factory (trading post) (1,883 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Factory (from Latin factorium 'place of doers, makers'; Portuguese: feitoria; Dutch: factorij; French: factorerie, comptoir) was the common name during
Battle of Guinea (701 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Battle of Guinea took place on the Gulf of Guinea, in western Africa, 1478, between a Portuguese fleet and a Castilian fleet in the context of the
Post Office Packet Service (1,395 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Post Office Packet Service dates to Tudor times and ran until 1823, when the Admiralty assumed control of the service. Originally, the Post Office
Thomas Coupe (289 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Captain Thomas Coupe (1818 – December 27, 1875) was a ship's captain and early settler of Whidbey Island. Thomas Coupe was born in New Brunswick, Canada
Batavia (1628 ship) (3,140 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
Batavia. Associated today with "one of the worst horror stories in maritime history", Batavia has been the subject of numerous published histories, the
Post Office Packet Service (1,395 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Post Office Packet Service dates to Tudor times and ran until 1823, when the Admiralty assumed control of the service. Originally, the Post Office
William Rankin Ballard (268 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Captain William Rankin Ballard (August 12, 1847 – February 4, 1929) was a Seattle pioneer, banker, and land developer. He was one of the founders of the
Thomas Coupe (289 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Captain Thomas Coupe (1818 – December 27, 1875) was a ship's captain and early settler of Whidbey Island. Thomas Coupe was born in New Brunswick, Canada
Oyster Wars (845 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Oyster Wars were a series of sometimes violent disputes between oyster pirates and authorities and legal watermen from Maryland and Virginia in the
Smeerenburg (1,281 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Smeerenburg was a whaling settlement on Amsterdam Island in northwest Svalbard. It was founded by the Danish and Dutch in 1619 as one of Europe's northernmost
Háthayim Marine Provincial Park (343 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Háthayim Marine Provincial Park, formerly Von Donop Marine Provincial Park, is a provincial park in British Columbia, Canada, located on the north end
SS Ellengowan (1,263 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
SS Ellengowan was a schooner rigged, single screw steamer built by Akers Mekaniske Verksted in Christiania (Oslo) Norway, under her original name, Nøkken
J. F. Duthie & Company (217 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
J. F. Duthie & Company was a small shipyard in Seattle, Washington. It was organized in 1911 and expanded in World War I to build cargo ships for the United
Cape Disappointment State Park (643 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Cape Disappointment State Park (formerly Fort Canby State Park) is a public recreation area on Cape Disappointment, located southwest of Ilwaco, Washington
Cape Horn (6,085 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Parker. Down East Books, 2004. ISBN 978-0-89272-646-2 Cape Horn. A Maritime History, by Robin Knox-Johnston. London Hodder&Stoughton ISBN 978-0-340-41527-6
Square-rigged caravel (1,680 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The square-rigged caravel, (Portuguese: caravela redonda) was a sailing ship created by the Portuguese in the second half of the fifteenth century. A much
King and Winge Shipbuilding Company (648 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
early ferry City of Seattle. Newell, Gordon R., ed., H.W. McCurdy Maritime History of Pacific Northwest, at page 358, Superior Publishing, Seattle, WA
SS Irish Pine (1919) (629 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Irish Pine was a 5,621 GRT cargo ship which was built in 1919 for the United States Maritime Commission (USMC) and named West Hematite. She was chartered
Portuguese East India Company (976 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Portuguese East India Company (Portuguese: Companhia do commércio da Índia or Companhia da Índia Oriental) was a short-lived ill-fated attempt by Philip
Manuel I of Portugal (1,812 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Manuel I (European Portuguese: [mɐnuˈɛɫ]; 31 May 1469 – 13 December 1521), known as the Fortunate (Portuguese: O Venturoso), was King of Portugal from
John II of Portugal (1,631 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
John II (Portuguese: João II; [ʒuˈɐ̃w̃]; 3 March 1455 – 25 October 1495), called the Perfect Prince (Portuguese: o Príncipe Perfeito), was King of Portugal
HMS Thames (1885) (1,536 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
HMS Thames was a Mersey-class protected cruiser built for the Royal Navy (RN) in the 1880s. The ship was placed in reserve upon her completion in 1888
Role of Nantes in the slave trade (2,301 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Nantes slave trade resulted in the deportation, from the late 17th to the beginning of the 19th century, of more than 500,000 black African slaves into
Shadow Divers (677 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Shadow Divers (published in 2004) is a non-fictional book by Robert Kurson recounting of the discovery of a World War II German U-boat 60 miles (97 km)
Effie M. Morrissey (1,742 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
(Official Site) Memorial University of Newfoundland Archival Treasures Maritime History of Massachusetts: Ernestina, a NRHP Travel Itinerary After months of
Pilgrims (Plymouth Colony) (6,167 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
The Pilgrims were the English settlers who came to North America on the Mayflower and established the Plymouth Colony in what is today Plymouth, Massachusetts
Oyster pirate (670 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Oyster pirate is a name given to persons who engage in the poaching of oysters. It was a term that became popular on both the west and east coasts of the
New Holland (Australia) (1,751 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
New Holland (Dutch: Nieuw-Holland) is a historical European name for mainland Australia. The name was first applied to Australia in 1644 by the Dutch seafarer
Cape Cross (633 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Cape Cross (Afrikaans: Kaap Kruis; German: Kreuzkap; Portuguese: Cabo da Cruz) is a small headland in the South Atlantic in Skeleton Coast, western Namibia
Mosylon (417 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Hantaara Malao Sarapion Booco Opone Qandala Heis Cape Guardafui Somali maritime history History of Somalia Hussein, Said M-Shidad. "The Ancient Kingdom of
American Neptune (209 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Neptune: A Quarterly Journal of Maritime History and Arts was an academic journal covering American maritime history from its establishment in 1941 until
Flying Cloud (clipper) (1,379 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article
Lars (2 January 1996). "Clipper Ships: "Hornet" (1851)". Hornet. The Maritime History Virtual Archives. Retrieved 7 June 2010. Hough, Izak J. H. "Flying
Third Fleet (Australia) (501 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
The Third Fleet comprised 11 ships that set sail from the United Kingdom in February, March and April 1791, bound for the Sydney penal settlement, with
Willem Janszoon (1,432 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Willem Janszoon (Dutch pronunciation: [ˈʋɪləm ˈjɑnsoːn]; c. 1570 – c. 1630), sometimes abbreviated to Willem Jansz., was a Dutch navigator and colonial
British Warships in the Age of Sail (969 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
1714–1792 volume, the second work to be published, the South West Maritime History Society described it as 'frankly quite superb', and 'the most complete
ARA Uruguay (2,119 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
images of ARA Uruguay being moved Some antique images (in English) Maritime History and Archeology - General history of the ship, with some events not
St Francis Island (279 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
St Francis Island (originally in Dutch: Eyland St. François) is an island on the south coast of South Australia near Ceduna. It is part of the Nuyts Archipelago
Maritime museum (1,824 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
A maritime museum (sometimes nautical museum) is a museum specializing in the display of objects relating to ships and travel on large bodies of water
St. Roch (ship) (641 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
RCMPV St. Roch is a Royal Canadian Mounted Police schooner, the first ship to completely circumnavigate North America, and the second vessel to transit
Dirk Hartog (1,247 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Dirk Hartog (Dutch pronunciation: [dɪr(ə)k ˈɦɑrtɔx]; baptised 30 October 1580 – buried 11 October 1621) was a 17th-century Dutch sailor and explorer. Dirk
Maria Island (2,364 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Maria Island (or Toarra-Marra-Monah or Tiarra-Marra-Monah in Paredarerme) is a mountainous island located in the Tasman Sea, off the east coast of Tasmania
Second Fleet (Australia) (1,412 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
The Second Fleet was a convoy of six ships carrying settlers, convicts and supplies to Sydney Cove, Australia in 1789. It followed the First Fleet which
St Peter Island (South Australia) (374 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
St Peter Island (originally in Dutch: Eyland St. Pierre) is an island in the Nuyts Archipelago on the west coast of Eyre Peninsula in South Australia near
Hendrik Brouwer (602 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Hendrik Brouwer ([ˈbrʌu̯ər]; 1581 – 7 August 1643) was a Dutch explorer and governor of the Dutch East Indies. He is thought to first have sailed to the
Cape Finisterre (1,379 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Cape Finisterre (/ˌfɪnɪˈstɛər/, also US: /-tɛri/; Galician: Cabo Fisterra [fisˈtɛrɐ]; Spanish: Cabo Finisterre [finisˈtere]) is a rock-bound peninsula
SS Point Pleasant Park (1,619 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
SS Point Pleasant Park was a merchant steamship constructed for Canada's Merchant Navy in 1942 during the Second World War as part of Canada's Park ship
Maarten Gerritsz Vries (690 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Maarten Gerritszoon Vries, or Fries, also referred to as de Vries, (18 February 1589, Harlingen, Netherlands – late 1647, at sea near Manila) was a 17th-century
Prince Henry the Navigator (3,053 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Dom Henrique of Portugal, Duke of Viseu (4 March 1394 – 13 November 1460), better known as Prince Henry the Navigator (Portuguese: Infante Dom Henrique
Kentish Knock (England) (797 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
The Kentish Knock is a long shoal (bank, shallows) in the North Sea east of Essex, England. It is the most easterly of those of the Thames Estuary and
St Peter Island (South Australia) (374 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
St Peter Island (originally in Dutch: Eyland St. Pierre) is an island in the Nuyts Archipelago on the west coast of Eyre Peninsula in South Australia near
Coffin ship (835 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
A coffin ship (Irish: long cónra) was any of the ships that carried Irish immigrants escaping the Great Irish Famine and Highlanders displaced by the Highland
J. M. Chapman (233 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
J. M. Chapman, a 90-ton schooner, was purchased in 1863, by Asbury Harpending and other California members of the Knights of the Golden Circle in San Francisco
History of Easter Island (5,082 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Geologically one of the youngest inhabited territories on Earth, Easter Island, located in the mid-Pacific Ocean, was, for most of its history, one of
Dom Fernando II e Glória (1,525 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Dom Fernando II e Glória is a wooden-hulled, 50-gun frigate of the Portuguese Navy. She was launched in 1843 and made her maiden voyage in 1845. Built
Park ship (2,299 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Park ships were merchant steamships constructed for Canada’s Merchant Navy during the Second World War. Park ships and Fort ships (built in Canada for
Newport News Shipbuilding (2,219 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Newport News Shipbuilding (NNS), a division of Huntington Ingalls Industries, is the largest industrial employer in Virginia, and sole designer, builder
Rodrigues (2,664 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Rodrigues (French: Île Rodrigues [il ʁɔdʁiɡ]; Creole: Rodrig) is a 108 km2 (42 sq mi) autonomous outer island of the Republic of Mauritius in the Indian
SS Canberra (1,792 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
SS Canberra was an ocean liner, which later operated on cruises, in the P&O fleet from 1961 to 1997. She was built at the Harland and Wolff shipyard in
Gough Island (3,193 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Gough Island (/ɡɒf/), also known historically as Gonçalo Álvares after the Portuguese explorer, is a rugged volcanic island in the South Atlantic Ocean
Dirk Hartog Island (2,100 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Dirk Hartog Island is an island off the Gascoyne coast of Western Australia, within the Shark Bay World Heritage Area. It is about 80 kilometres (50 miles)
Jorge Álvares (593 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Jorge Álvares (died July 8, 1521) was a Portuguese explorer. He is credited as the first European to have reached China by sea during the Age of Discovery
Isaack Gilsemans (203 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Isaack Gilsemans (ca. 1606, in Rotterdam – 1646, in Batavia, Dutch East Indies), was a Dutch merchant and artist. Gilsemans is most noted for joining the
Great Lakes Patrol (3,332 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Great Lakes Patrol was carried out by American naval forces, beginning in 1844, mainly to suppress criminal activity and to protect the maritime border
India–Pakistan maritime trespassing (828 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
India–Pakistan maritime trespassing refers to the frequent trespassing and violation of respective national territorial waters of India and Pakistan in
Vice-Admiral of the United Kingdom (1,372 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Vice-Admiral of the United Kingdom is an honorary office generally held by a senior Royal Navy admiral. He is the official deputy to the Lord High
SS Ira H. Owen (2,160 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
 238. Maritime History of the Great Lakes (1891). Maritime History of the Great Lakes (1892). Marsh Collection Society (1893). Maritime History of the
Jan Carstenszoon (363 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Jan Carstenszoon or more commonly Jan Carstensz was a 17th-century Dutch explorer. In 1623, Carstenszoon was commissioned by the Dutch East India Company
Ballard Bunder Gatehouse (420 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Ballar Bunder Gatehouse is a Grade I Heritage structure that has been converted into a maritime museum, located at Ballard Estate in the old Fort area
Spitsbergen (5,154 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Spitsbergen (Urban East Norwegian: [ˈspɪ̀tsˌbærɡn̩]; formerly known as West Spitsbergen; Norwegian: Vest Spitsbergen or Vestspitsbergen [ˈvɛ̂stˌspɪtsbærɡn̩]
Bluenose (3,005 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Bluenose was a fishing and racing gaff rig schooner built in 1921 in Nova Scotia, Canada. A celebrated racing ship and fishing vessel, Bluenose under the
Maritime industries of Taiwan (2,899 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The maritime industries of Taiwan are a large part of Taiwan's economy. Industries of particular importance are shipbuilding, boat building, maritime transport
Second Banda Oriental campaign (574 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Second Banda Oriental campaign was a military campaign of the Argentine War of Independence, that besieged and captured the Banda Oriental (present-day
Brouwer Route (505 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Brouwer Route was a 17th-century route used by ships sailing from the Cape of Good Hope to the Dutch East Indies, as the eastern leg of the Cape Route
Scottish Built Ships database (89 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Scottish Built Ships database is a free-to-use record of over 35,000 ships built in Scotland. It was renamed from the "Clyde Built Ships" database
Vancouver Shipyard (205 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Vancouver Shipyard was an emergency shipyard constructed along the Columbia River in Vancouver, Washington, to help meet the production demands of
Dutch West India Company (3,562 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Dutch West India Company (Dutch: Geoctrooieerde Westindische Compagnie, or GWC; Dutch pronunciation: [ɣəʔɔktroːˈjeːrdə ʋɛstˈɪndisə kɔmpɑˈɲi]; English:
Hartog Plate (1,103 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Hartog Plate or Dirk Hartog's Plate is either of two plates, although primarily the first, which were left on Dirk Hartog Island during a period of European
22 Squadron SAAF (631 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
22 Squadron is a squadron of the South African Air Force. It is currently a maritime helicopter squadron operating Lynx and Oryx helicopters for the South
Seafarers International Union of North America (1,733 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Seafarers International Union or SIU is an organization of 12 autonomous labor unions of mariners, fishermen and boatmen working aboard vessels flagged
Spanish Armada (7,781 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Spanish Armada (Spanish: Grande y Felicísima Armada, lit. 'Great and Most Fortunate Navy') was a Habsburg Spanish fleet of 130 ships that sailed from
Black Ships (1,501 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Black Ships (in Japanese: 黒船, romanized: kurofune, Edo period term) was the name given to Western vessels arriving in Japan in the 16th and 19th centuries
Scarborough Maritime Heritage Centre (538 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
England, and opened on 12 December 2009. The centre reveals the town's maritime history to residents and visitors. Five years in the making, this "museum of
Makassan contact with Australia (3,709 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Makassar people from the region of Sulawesi (modern-day Indonesia) began visiting the coast of northern Australia sometime around the middle of the 1700s
Arthur Bowes Smyth (1,166 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Arthur Bowes Smyth (23 August 1750 – 31 March 1790) was a naval officer and surgeon on the First Fleet that established the colony of New South Wales.
Prince Edward Islands (3,784 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Prince Edward Islands are two small islands in the Subantarctic Indian Ocean that are part of South Africa. The islands are named Marion Island (named
Cabo de la Vela (429 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Coordinates: 12°12′27″N 72°10′22″W / 12.20750°N 72.17278°W / 12.20750; -72.17278 Cabo de la Vela (Spanish for "cape of sails") is a headland in the
First Four Ships (1,270 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The First Four Ships refers to the four sailing vessels chartered by the Canterbury Association which left Plymouth, England, in September 1850 to transport
Lady Alexandra (1,011 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Lady Alexandra was a steamship built in 1924 in Montrose, Scotland which served in British Columbia from 1924 to 1952, mostly on Howe Sound. Lady Alexandra
Svalbard (8,186 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Svalbard (/ˈsvɑːlbɑːr/ SVAHL-bar, Urban East Norwegian: [ˈsvɑ̂ːɫbɑr] (listen)), previously known as Spitsbergen, or Spitzbergen, is a Norwegian archipelago
Francisco de Almeida (1,667 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Dom Francisco de Almeida (Portuguese pronunciation: [fɾɐ̃ˈsiʃku dɨ aɫˈmɐjðɐ]), also known as the Great Dom Francisco (c. 1450 – 1 March 1510), was a Portuguese
Union blockade (5,519 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
year: 1862. New York: D. Appleton & Company. 1863. p. 604. "U.S. Navy, Maritime History of Massachusetts--A National Register of Historic Places Travel Itinerary"
Arniston, Western Cape (544 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Arniston is a small seaside settlement on the coast of the Overberg region of South Africa, close to Cape Agulhas, the southernmost tip of Africa. Prior
Action of 21 July 1781 (1,422 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The action of 21 July 1781 was a naval skirmish off the harbour of Spanish River, Cape Breton, Nova Scotia (present-day Sydney, Nova Scotia), during the
South African Naval Museum (1,205 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
South Africa. It contains collections and artefacts related to the maritime history of South Africa and the South African Navy. The South African Naval
Navy Museum (Portugal) (231 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
In 1863, he began collecting items related to the preservation of maritime history of Portugal, a collection that was enlarged in the following decades
Chief of the Navy (Somalia) (152 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
The Chief of the Navy (Somali: Taaliyaha Ciidamada Badda Somaaliyeed) is the head of the Naval operations and the administrative head in the Somali Navy
Arctic Bridge (746 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Arctic Bridge or Arctic Sea Bridge is a seasonal sea route approximately 6,700 kilometres (4,200 mi; 3,600 NM) long linking Russia to Canada, specifically
SS Mendi (2,717 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
SS Mendi was a British 4,230 GRT passenger steamship that was built in 1905 and, as a troopship, sank after collision with great loss of life in 1917.
New Zealand Maritime Museum (591 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
in central Auckland. It houses exhibitions spanning New Zealand's maritime history, from the first Polynesian explorers and settlers to modern day triumphs
Dutch–Portuguese War (3,783 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Dutch–Portuguese War was an armed conflict involving Dutch forces, in the form of the Dutch East India Company and the Dutch West India Company, against
Dejima (4,456 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Dejima (Japanese: 出島, "exit island") was a Portuguese and subsequently Dutch trading post at Nagasaki, Japan, from 1634 to 1854. Dejima was also the location
João de Barros (1,278 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
João de Barros (Portuguese pronunciation: [ʒuˈɐ̃w̃ dɨ ˈbaʁuʃ]) (1496 – 20 October 1570), called the Portuguese Livy, is one of the first great Portuguese
Port Jackson and Manly Steamship Company (1,249 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Port Jackson and Manly Steamship Company (PJ&MSC) was a publicly listed company that operated the Manly ferries in Sydney, Australia. After being taken
Tristão da Cunha (782 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Tristão da Cunha (sometimes misspelled Tristão d'Acunha; Portuguese pronunciation: [tɾiʃˈtɐ̃w̃ ðɐ ˈkuɲɐ]; c. 1460 – c. 1507) was a Portuguese explorer
Battle of Chaul (677 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Battle of Chaul was a naval battle between the Portuguese and an Egyptian Mamluk fleet in 1508 in the harbour of Chaul in India. The battle ended in
Arklow Maritime Museum (769 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Mitchell, schooner MV Murell MV Tyrronall "Preserving Arklow's rich maritime history – Independent.ie". Retrieved 4 August 2017. "National Archives: Census
Maritime Delimitation in the Black Sea case (1,298 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Case concerning maritime delimitation in the Black Sea (Romania v Ukraine) [2009] ICJ 3 was a decision of the International Court of Justice (ICJ)
Cape Bojador (1,872 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Cape Bojador (Arabic: رأس بوجادور‎, trans. Rā's Būjādūr; Berber languages: ⴱⵓⵊⴷⵓⵔ, Bujdur; Spanish and Portuguese: Cabo Bojador; French: Cap Boujdour)
Van Diemen Gulf (385 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Van Diemen Gulf is a gulf in the Northern Territory of Australia. It connects to the Timor Sea in the north via Dundas Strait. Most of its area is also
François Thijssen (409 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
François Thijssen or Frans Thijsz (died 13 October 1638?) was a Dutch explorer who explored the southern coast of Australia. He was the captain of the
Prester John (4,740 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Prester John (Latin: Presbyter Johannes) was a legendary Christian patriarch, presbyter, and king. Stories popular in Europe in the twelfth through to
Garden Island (New South Wales) (2,336 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Garden Island is an inner-city locality of Sydney, Australia, and the location of a major Royal Australian Navy (RAN) base. It is located to the north-east
Richmond Shipyards (1,738 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The four Richmond Shipyards, located in the city of Richmond, California, United States, were run by Permanente Metals and part of the Kaiser Shipyards
Martin Behaim (1,491 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Martin Behaim (6 October 1459 – 29 July 1507), also known as Martin von Behaim and by various forms of Martin of Bohemia, was a German textile merchant
Knysna (2,797 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Knysna (/ˈnaɪznə/; probably from a Khoekhoegowab word ǀûn hais meaning "fern leaves" or literally "tree-hair") is a town with 76,150 inhabitants as of
Todd Pacific Shipyards, Los Angeles Division (2,164 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Todd Pacific Shipyards, Los Angeles Division was a shipyard in San Pedro, Los Angeles, California. Before applying its last corporate name, the shipyard
Liberty Station, San Diego (2,027 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Liberty Station is a mixed-use development in San Diego, California, on the site of the former Naval Training Center San Diego. It is located in the Point
Eendrachtsland (1,104 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Eendrachtsland or Eendraghtsland was derived from 't Landt van d'Eendracht or Land van de Eendracht and was one of the earliest names given by Europeans
Bass Strait (3,352 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Bass Strait (/bæs/) is a strait separating the island of Tasmania from the Australian mainland (more specifically the state of Victoria with the exception
Duc d'Anville expedition (1,678 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Duc d'Anville expedition (June – October 1746) was sent from France to recapture Louisbourg and take peninsular Acadia (present-day mainland Nova Scotia)
Maritime Museum of San Diego (674 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
quarterly peer-reviewed journal Mains'l Haul: A Journal of Pacific Maritime History. The Maritime Museum at the Star of India Wharf is located on the west
Abel Tasman (3,903 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Abel Janszoon Tasman (Dutch: [ˈɑbəl ˈjɑnsoːn ˈtɑsmɑn]; 1603 – 10 October 1659) was a Dutch seafarer, explorer, and merchant, best known for his voyages
São João Baptista (galleon) (500 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
The São João Baptista (English: Saint John the Baptist), commonly known as the Botafogo, was a Portuguese galleon built in the 16th century, around 1530
Innisfallen (ship) (542 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Several ships have been named Innisfallen, the name being derived from the island of Innisfallen in County Kerry and often given to vessels serving the
Diogo Cão (1,505 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Diogo Cão (Portuguese pronunciation: [diˈoɣu ˈkɐ̃w̃]), anglicised as Diogo Cam and also known as Diego Cam, was a Portuguese explorer and one of the most
Lyme Regis Museum (237 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
the surrounding area dating from the Jurassic period, geology, local maritime history, memorabilia, and writers associated with the town such as Jane Austen
Greek shipping (1,909 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Greece is a maritime nation by tradition, as shipping is arguably the oldest form of occupation of the Greeks and has been a key element of Greek economic
French blockade of the Río de la Plata (1,599 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The French blockade of the Río de la Plata was a two-year-long naval blockade imposed by France on the Argentine Confederation ruled by Juan Manuel de
Backstairs Passage (1,088 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Backstairs Passage is a strait in South Australia lying between Fleurieu Peninsula on the Australian mainland and Dudley Peninsula on the eastern end
French blockade of the Río de la Plata (1,599 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The French blockade of the Río de la Plata was a two-year-long naval blockade imposed by France on the Argentine Confederation ruled by Juan Manuel de
Backstairs Passage (1,088 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Backstairs Passage is a strait in South Australia lying between Fleurieu Peninsula on the Australian mainland and Dudley Peninsula on the eastern end
Pacific Squadron (3,979 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Pacific Squadron was part of the United States Navy squadron stationed in the Pacific Ocean in the 19th and early 20th centuries. Initially with no
CSS Acadia (2,156 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
CSS Acadia is a former hydrographic surveying and oceanographic research ship of the Hydrographic Survey of Canada and its successor the Canadian Hydrographic
Naval Training Center San Diego (1,467 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Naval Training Center San Diego (NTC San Diego) (1923–1997) is a former United States Navy base located at the north end of San Diego Bay, commonly known
Battle off Halifax (1782) (1,102 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
The Battle off Halifax took place on 28 May 1782 during the American Revolutionary War. It involved the American privateer Jack and the 14-gun Royal Naval
SS D.R. Hanna (808 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
1910". Maritime History of the Great Lakes. Retrieved 3 March 2018. "D. R. Hanna (Propeller), U203676, struck bridge, 13 Oct 1915". Maritime History of the
Francisco Serrão (780 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Francisco Serrão (died 1521) was a Portuguese explorer and a possible cousin of Ferdinand Magellan. His 1512 voyage was the first known European sailing
Gil Eanes (599 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Gil Eanes (or Eannes, in the old Portuguese spelling; Portuguese pronunciation: [ʒiɫ iˈɐnɨʃ]) was a 15th-century Portuguese navigator and explorer. Gil
Norwegian Lady Statues (1,083 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Norwegian Lady Statues are located in the sister cities of Moss, a coastal town and municipality in the county of Østfold, Norway, and at the Oceanfront
Jan Mayen (4,136 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Jan Mayen (Urban East Norwegian: [jɑn ˈmɑ̀ɪən]) is a Norwegian volcanic island in the Arctic Ocean, with no permanent population. It is 55 km (34 mi) long
Puget Sound Maritime Historical Society (309 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
being renovated with a presumed opening date in 2012. The Puget Sound Maritime History Museum is located at Chandler's Cove at South Lake Union. People can
Adolphe (ship) (405 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
Newcastle harbour. The rescue of the ship's crew has gone down in local maritime history as one of the most remarkable in local waters. Adolphe was a four-masted
Golden Bay / Mohua (3,160 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Golden Bay / Mohua is a shallow, paraboloid-shaped bay in New Zealand, near the northern tip of the South Island. An arm of the Tasman Sea, the bay lies
John III of Portugal (4,043 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
John III (Portuguese: João III Portuguese pronunciation: [ʒuˈɐ̃w̃]; 7 June 1502 – 11 June 1557), nicknamed The Pious (Portuguese: o Piedoso), was the King
FV Jutland (196 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Jutland was a Canadian beam trawler based out of Liverpool, Nova Scotia. Built in 1918 by the Boehner Bros., she was owned by LaHave Fishing Company. On
Maritime Union of Australia (1,258 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Maritime Union of Australia (MUA) was a union which covered waterside workers, seafarers, port workers, professional divers, and office workers associated
Rose Hill Packet (1,358 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Rose Hill Packet, was a marine craft built in Australia, named after the second place of European settlement in Australia, "Rose Hill", the furthest navigable
Battle of Diu (4,656 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Battle of Diu was a naval battle fought on 3 February 1509 in the Arabian Sea, in the port of Diu, India, between the Portuguese Empire and a joint
SS Taber Park (525 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Taber Park was a Park ship freighter, built in 1944. She was sunk by torpedo from a German submarine U-boat on March 13, 1945. She was completed on 28
William Brown (admiral) (3,768 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
Browniano) was created in 1948 for "research and study the nation's maritime history and naval interests, and cooperate with both the Argentine and Irish
104 (barge) (1,822 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article
January 26, 2021. Maritime History of the Great Lakes (1890). "104 (Barge), U53257, 8 Feb 1890". Ontario, Canada: Maritime History of the Great Lakes
Maatsuyker Islands (1,491 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Maatsuyker Islands are a group of islands and rocks located 5.5 kilometres (3.4 mi) off the south coast of Tasmania, Australia. Maatsuyker Island is
Battle of Winnepang (1,337 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Battle of Winnepang occurred during Dummer's War when New England forces attacked Mi'kmaq at present day Jeddore Harbour, Nova Scotia. The naval battle
Pusey and Jones (970 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Pusey and Jones Corporation was a major shipbuilder and industrial-equipment manufacturer. Based in Wilmington, Delaware, it operated from 1848 to
SS Hertford (1,317 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
SS Hertford was a refrigerated cargo steamship that was launched in Germany in 1917, seized by the United Kingdom in 1920 as World War I reparations, and
António Correia (admiral) (420 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
António Correia (c. 1487 – 1566) was a Portuguese commander who in 1521 conquered Bahrain, beginning eighty years of Portuguese rule in the Persian Gulf
Two Years Before the Mast (2,502 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Two Years Before the Mast is a memoir by the American author Richard Henry Dana Jr., published in 1840, having been written after a two-year sea voyage
Jerónimos Monastery (3,677 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Jerónimos Monastery or Hieronymites Monastery (Portuguese: Mosteiro dos Jerónimos, IPA: [muʃˈtɐjɾu ðuʒ ʒɨˈɾɔnimuʃ]) is a former monastery of the Order
Gaspar Correia (530 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Gaspar Correia (1492 – c. 1563 in Goa) was a Portuguese historian considered a Portuguese Polybius. He authored Lendas da Índia (Legends of India), one
Port of Boston (3,478 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Port of Boston (AMS Seaport Code: 0401, UN/LOCODE: US BOS) is a major seaport located in Boston Harbor and adjacent to the City of Boston. It is the
Action of Faial (2,551 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The action of Faial or the Battle of Faial Island was a naval engagement that took place on 22–23 June 1594 during the Anglo-Spanish War in which the large
Ardmore, County Waterford (1,309 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Ardmore (Irish: Aird Mhór, meaning 'great height') is a seaside resort and fishing village in County Waterford, Ireland, not far from Youghal on the south
Marlinspike Hall (607 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
in Walloon Brabant, Belgium. In an allusion to the Haddock family's maritime history, the hall's English name refers to the marlinspike, a tool used in
First Fleet (8,151 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The First Fleet was a fleet of 11 ships that brought the first European settlers to Australia. It was made up of two Royal Navy vessels, three store ships
Whaling in Australia (4,507 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Australian whaling in the nineteenth century," International Journal of Maritime History, 27 (2) May 2015, pp.328-347. Lawrence, Susan (2006). Whalers and free
João Gonçalves Zarco (687 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
João Gonçalves Zarco (c. 1390 – 21 November 1471) was a Portuguese explorer who established settlements and recognition of the Madeira Islands, and was
Hellenic Maritime Museum (380 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
the task of collecting and conserving objects related to the Greek maritime history. For reasons relating to serious historical adventures of the time
Immigration to Australia (6,102 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Australian continent was first settled when ancestors of Indigenous Australians arrived via the islands of Maritime Southeast Asia and New Guinea over
Lieutenant of the Admiralty (540 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Lieutenant of the Admiralty is a now honorary office generally held by a senior retired Royal Navy admiral. He is the official deputy to the Vice-Admiral
Rear-Admiral of the United Kingdom (1,147 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Rear-Admiral of the United Kingdom is a now honorary office generally held by a senior (possibly retired) Royal Navy admiral. Despite the title, the
Lieutenant of the Admiralty (540 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Lieutenant of the Admiralty is a now honorary office generally held by a senior retired Royal Navy admiral. He is the official deputy to the Vice-Admiral
Craig Symonds (1,080 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
California) is the Distinguished Visiting Ernest J. King Professor of Maritime History for the academic years 2017–2020 at the U.S. Naval War College in Newport
Mossel Bay (4,142 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Mossel Bay (Afrikaans: Mosselbaai) is a harbour town of about 99,319 people on the Southern Cape (or Garden Route) of South Africa. It is an important
Degredado (1,056 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Degredado is the traditional Portuguese term for an exiled convict, especially between the 15th and 18th centuries. The term degredado (etymologically
Siege of Cannanore (1507) (692 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
The Siege of Cannanore was a four-month siege, from April to August 1507, when troops of the local ruler (the Kōlattiri Raja of Cannanore), supported by
Boyd massacre (2,182 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Boyd massacre occurred in December 1809 when Māori residents of Whangaroa Harbour in northern New Zealand killed and cannibalized between 66 and 70
Anthony van Diemen (981 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
1593-1636", The Great Circle: Journal of the Australian Association of Maritime History, 26.2, (2004:3-23). Van der Kraan, Alfons. "Anthony van Diemen: Patron
Chesapeake Affair (1,587 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Chesapeake Affair was an international diplomatic incident that occurred during the American Civil War. On December 7, 1863, Confederate sympathizers
CSBC Corporation, Taiwan (1,266 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
CSBC Corporation, Taiwan (Chinese: 台灣國際造船; pinyin: Táiwān Guójì Zàochuán, literally "Taiwan International Shipbuilding Corporation") is a company that
Crosswicks Creek Site III (272 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Historic Places on November 26, 1990 for its significance in military and maritime history. Many Continental ships were trapped in the Delaware River watershed
Black Watch (full-rigged ship) (437 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Black Watch was a large full-rigged ship built by Windsor shipbuilder Bennett Smith in Windsor, Nova Scotia. It was the last ship built by Smith in Windsor
California Shipbuilding Corporation (1,261 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
California Shipbuilding Corporation built 467 Liberty and Victory ships during World War II, including Haskell-class attack transports. California Shipbuilding
J.L. Thompson and Sons (1,286 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
J.L. Thompson and Sons was a shipyard on the River Wear, Sunderland, which produced ships from the mid-18th century until the 1980s. The world-famous Liberty
SS Mont-Blanc (2,592 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
SS Mont-Blanc was a freighter built in Middlesbrough, England in 1899 and purchased by the French company, Société Générale de Transport Maritime (SGTM)
United States Maritime Service (1,836 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The United States Maritime Service (USMS) was established in 1938 under the provisions of the Merchant Marine Act of 1936 as voluntary organization to
Marine Engineers' Beneficial Association (2,798 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Marine Engineers' Beneficial Association (M.E.B.A.) is the oldest maritime trade union in the United States still currently in existence, established
Pêro Escobar (251 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Pedro Escobar, also known as Pêro Escobar, was a 15th-century Portuguese navigator who discovered São Tomé (December 21, 1471), Annobón (January 1, 1472)
Dunbrody (1845) (253 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
The Dunbrody was a three-masted barque built in Quebec in 1845 by Thomas Hamilton Oliver for the Graves family, merchants from New Ross in Wexford. She
Diogo Lopes de Sequeira (240 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
D.Diogo Lopes de Sequeira (1465–1530) was a Portuguese fidalgo, sent to analyze the trade potential in Madagascar and Malacca, he arrived at Malacca on
2020 Iran gasoline export to Venezuela (1,605 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
In May 2020, Iran sent five oil tankers—Forest, Fortune, Petunia, Faxon, and Clavel—all under the flag of Iran, to Venezuela, followed by another tanker
Fernão Mendes Pinto (1,956 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Fernão Mendes Pinto (Portuguese pronunciation: [fɨɾˈnɐ̃w̃ ˈmẽdɨʃ ˈpĩtu]; c.1509 – 8 July 1583) was a Portuguese explorer and writer. His voyages are recorded
João Fernandes Lavrador (444 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
João Fernandes Lavrador (1453-1501), (Portuguese pronunciation: [ʒuˈɐ̃w̃ fɨɾˈnɐ̃ðɨʃ lɐvɾɐˈðoɾ]) was a Portuguese explorer of the late 15th century. He
Jacksonville Maritime Museum (541 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
became known as the Jacksonville Maritime Heritage Center – told the maritime history of Jacksonville, Florida, United States, and the First Coast through
SS Orcades (1936) (932 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
RMS Orcades was a British passenger ship that Vickers-Armstrongs Ltd of Barrow-in-Furness built as an ocean liner in 1937. Her owner was Orient Line, which
SS Hestmanden (523 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Nortraship's fleet, it represents a central part of Norway's war history and maritime history and is a very important protection object. Hestmanden is considered
Dei Gratia (brigantine) (224 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Dei Gratia was a Canadian brigantine built in Bear River, Nova Scotia in 1871. The brigantine was named after the Latin phrase for "By the Grace of God"
Lançados (1,065 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The lançados (literally, the thrown out ones or the cast out ones) were settlers and adventurers of Portuguese origin in Senegambia, Cabo Verde, Guinea
2nd Spanish Armada (2,612 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The 2nd Spanish Armada also known as the Spanish Armada of 1596 was a naval operation that took place during the Anglo–Spanish War. Another invasion of
Pieter de Carpentier (534 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Pieter de Carpentier (19 February 1586 – 5 September 1659) was a Dutch administrator of the Dutch East India Company (VOC) who served as Governor-General
Transport in Dorset (1,160 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
English Channel coast, and its natural sheltered harbours, it has a maritime history, though lack of inland transport routes have led to the decline of
Steamship Historical Society of America (289 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
States which hold meetings, programs, and outings for their members. Maritime history of the United States Providence Business News article about the Image
Tschukundu (212 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Tschukundu and Indlovu are tugboats, built in South Africa by Farocean Marine to a design from Dutch shipbuilders the Damen Group. The tug's design was
Mercure Liverpool Atlantic Tower Hotel (156 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
was designed to resemble the prow of a ship to reflect Liverpool's maritime history. The Thistle Atlantic Tower The hotel at night, Saint Nicholas' Church
Australian places with Dutch names (399 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Of an estimated 200 place names the Dutch bestowed on Australian localities in the 17th century as a result of the Dutch voyages of exploration along the
Thames Diamond Jubilee Pageant (3,621 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Coordinates: 51°30′20″N 0°04′32″W / 51.50556°N 0.07556°W / 51.50556; -0.07556 The Thames Diamond Jubilee Pageant was a parade on 3 June 2012 of 670
Governor Parr (363 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Governor Parr was a four masted schooner built in Parrsboro, Nova Scotia in 1918. Built by W.R. Huntley & Sons for Archie Davidson and Captain Angus D
Flor de la Mar (1,452 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Flor do Mar or Flor de la Mar (Flower of the Sea), spelled Frol de la Mar in all Portuguese chronicles of the 16th century, was a Portuguese nau (carrack)
João Vaz Corte-Real (455 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
João Vaz Corte-Real (Portuguese pronunciation: [ʒuˈɐ̃w̃ vaʃ ˈkoɾt(ɨ) ʁiˈaɫ]; c. 1420 – 1496) was a Portuguese sailor, claimed by some accounts to have
Dunbar (ship) (2,914 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
The Dunbar was a full-rigged ship designed and built from 1852 to 1853 by James Laing & Sons of Sunderland, England and used for maritime trade, as a troop
Eliza (1808) (329 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Eliza was an American brig wrecked at Fiji in 1808. Eliza had been constructed and registered at Providence, Rhode Island, United States. She carried a
SS Merchant (2,705 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
series. Maritime History of the Great Lakes (1904). Maritime History of the Great Lakes (1866). Maritime History of the Great Lakes (1) (1867). Maritime History
Sinking of Chian-der 3 (405 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Coordinates: 51°30′S 64°42′W / 51.50°S 64.70°W / -51.50; -64.70 (Sinking Chian-der 3) The sinking of Chian-der 3 was an incident that occurred on 28
Pieter Nuyts (2,239 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Pieter Nuyts or Nuijts (1598 – 11 December 1655) was a Dutch explorer, diplomat and politician. He was part of a landmark expedition of the Dutch East
Puget Sound Navy Museum (504 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Puget Sound Navy Museum is an official naval museum located in Bremerton, Washington, United States. The museum is one of the 10 Navy museums that
Enpō (470 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Ogasawara Islands in Tokugawa Japan", Kaiji Shi Kenkyuu (Journal of the Maritime History). Hall, John Whitney. (1970). Japan: From Prehistory to Modern Times
John B. Goodman (art director) (210 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
a known bibliophile as well, with particular interests in American maritime history, early sailing ships, the American West, California, and the Gold Rush
António de Abreu (555 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
António de Abreu (c. 1480 – c. 1514) was a 16th-century Portuguese navigator and naval officer. He participated under the command of Afonso de Albuquerque
HMSAS Parktown (T39) (1,301 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
HMSAS Parktown was a minesweeping whaler of the South African Naval Services that was sunk during the Second World War. She was built as the whaler Southern
Damião de Góis (1,075 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Damião de Góis (Portuguese: [dɐmiˈɐ̃w̃ dɨ ˈɡɔjʃ]; February 2, 1502 – January 30, 1574), born in Alenquer, Portugal, was an important Portuguese humanist
SS Irish Willow (1918) (4,951 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article
Irish Maritime History". Lugnad.ie. 12 September 2013. Retrieved 3 May 2015. "Remember SS Meath | On-line Journal of Research on Irish Maritime History".
John B. Goodman (art director) (210 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
a known bibliophile as well, with particular interests in American maritime history, early sailing ships, the American West, California, and the Gold Rush
Bristol Industrial Museum (586 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
bus manufacture, and printing – and exhibits documenting Bristol's maritime history. The museum was managed by Bristol City Council along with nearby preserved
Sinking of Chian-der 3 (405 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Coordinates: 51°30′S 64°42′W / 51.50°S 64.70°W / -51.50; -64.70 (Sinking Chian-der 3) The sinking of Chian-der 3 was an incident that occurred on 28
Raid on St. John (1775) (636 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
The Raid on St. John took place on 27 August 1775 during the American Revolutionary War. The raid involved American privateers from Machias, Maine attacking
Kanbun (era) (641 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article
Ogasawara Islands in Tokugawa Japan", Kaiji Shi Kenkyuu (Journal of the Maritime History). Nussbaum, Louis Frédéric and Käthe Roth. (2005). Japan Encyclopedia
Cadboro (1824 schooner) (481 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Cadboro (or Cadborough) was a schooner launched at Rye in 1824. The Hudson's Bay Company purchased her in 1826 and sold her in 1860. She grounded and was
Union-Castle Line (1,362 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Union-Castle Line was a British shipping line that operated a fleet of passenger liners and cargo ships between Europe and Africa from 1900 to 1977
João de Castro (968 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Dom João de Castro (7 February 1500 – 6 June 1548) was a Portuguese nobleman, scientist, writer, and the fourth viceroy of Portuguese India. He was called
Lourenço de Almeida (187 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Lourenço de Almeida (c.1480 - March 1508) was a Portuguese explorer and military commander. He was born in Martim, Kingdom of Portugal, the son of Francisco
Tristão Vaz Teixeira (236 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Tristão Vaz Teixeira (c. 1395–1480) was a Portuguese navigator and explorer who, together with João Gonçalves Zarco and Bartolomeu Perestrelo, was the
1947 Ramdas ship disaster (426 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Coordinates: 18°55′N 72°49′E / 18.91°N 72.81°E / 18.91; 72.81 The 1947 Ramdas ship disaster occurred near Bombay (now Mumbai) in India. The Indian passenger
SS Fort Camosun (478 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
SS Fort Camosun was a coal-burning 7000-ton freighter, built in Victoria, British Columbia, Canada in 1942. In June of 1942, during World War II, she departed
Sydney (ship) (365 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Sydney was an East Indiaman of 900 tons that carried a crew of 130 men. The ship had been constructed in Java and was registered in Calcutta. Sydney, Austin
Canadian Merchant Navy (1,010 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Canada, like several other Commonwealth nations, created the Canadian Merchant Navy in a large-scale effort during World War II. 184 ships are involved
International Seamen's Union (1,206 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
National Maritime Union Paul Hall United States Merchant Marine "SIU & Maritime History". seafarers.org. Archived from the original on February 24, 2007. Retrieved
HMHS Llandovery Castle (2,016 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
HMHS Llandovery Castle, built in 1914 in Glasgow as RMS Llandovery Castle for the Union-Castle Line, was one of five Canadian hospital ships that served
History of Portugal (1415–1578) (5,759 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
The history of the Kingdom of Portugal from the Illustrious Generation of the early 15th century to the fall of the House of Aviz in the late 16th century
SS Choctaw (3,749 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
(1) (2018), p. 4–5. Maritime History of the Great Lakes (1) (1896). Maritime History of the Great Lakes (2) (1896). Maritime History of the Great Lakes
Sable Island (5,714 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Sable Island (French: île de Sable, literally "island of sand") is a small Canadian island situated 300 km (190 mi) southeast of Halifax, Nova Scotia,
Fernão do Pó (278 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Fernão do Pó (Portuguese pronunciation: [fɨɾˈnɐ̃w du ˈpɔ]; fl. 1472), also known as Fernão Pó, Fernando Pó or Fernando Poo, was a 15th-century Portuguese
West Coast lumber trade (2,083 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The West Coast lumber trade was a maritime trade route on the West Coast of the United States. It carried lumber from the coasts of Northern California
National Maritime Union (1,760 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The National Maritime Union (NMU) was an American labor union founded in May 1937. It affiliated with the Congress of Industrial Organizations (CIO) in
Royal Hospital School (3,133 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Royal Hospital School (usually shortened as "RHS" and historically nicknamed "The Cradle of the Navy") is a British co-educational independent day
Moelfre, Anglesey (1,360 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Moelfre ([ˈmɔɨ̯lvrɛ] (listen)) is a village, a community and until 2012 an electoral ward on the north-east coast of the Isle of Anglesey in Wales. The
Volta do mar (646 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Volta do mar, volta do mar largo, or volta do largo (the phrase in Portuguese means literally 'turn of the sea' but also 'return from the sea') is a navigational
Waterside Workers' Federation of Australia (1,549 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Waterside Workers' Federation of Australia (WWF) was an Australian trade union that existed from 1902 to 1993. After a period of negotiations between
Gonçalo Coelho (412 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Gonçalo Coelho (fl. 1501–04) was a Portuguese explorer who belonged to a prominent family in northern Portugal. He commanded two expeditions (1501–02 and
João Álvares Fagundes (729 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
João Álvares Fagundes (born c. 1460, Kingdom of Portugal- died 1522, Kingdom of Portugal), was an explorer and ship owner from Viana do Castelo in Northern
Bay Shipbuilding Company (1,515 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Bay Shipbuilding Company (BSC) is a shipyard and dry dock company in Sturgeon Bay, Door County, Wisconsin. As of 2015, Bay Ships was a subsidiary of Fincantieri
Le Maire Strait (242 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Le Maire Strait (Estrecho de le Maire) (also the Straits Lemaire) is a sea passage between Isla de los Estados and the eastern extremity of the Argentine
Naval History (magazine) (90 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Naval History is a bi-monthly magazine published by the United States Naval Institute since 1987. The 72-page publication includes feature articles spanning
Madeline Island Museum (421 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
early missionaries who visited Madeline Island, and the region's maritime history. These exhibits are housed in two buildings, the original museum building
Het Steen (420 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
archeology and in 1952 an annex was added to house the museum of Antwerp maritime history, which in 2011 moved to the nearby Museum Aan de Stroom. Here is also
Janszoon voyage of 1605–06 (2,501 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Willem Janszoon captained the first recorded European landing on the Australian continent in 1606, sailing from Bantam, Java, in the Duyfken. As an employee
Sir John Sherbrooke (Halifax) (1,304 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Sir John Sherbrooke was a successful and famous Nova Scotian privateer brig during the War of 1812, the largest privateer from Atlantic Canada during the
Betsey (schooner) (360 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Betsey was a schooner of 75 tons that was wrecked in the South China Sea in 1805 while en route to the newly established penal colony of New South Wales
Deal, Kent (5,101 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
listed building. Deal has several museums; most are related to Deal's maritime history. Both Deal Castle and Walmer Castle are operated by English Heritage
João de Santarém (172 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
João de Santarém (15th century) was a Portuguese explorer who discovered São Tomé (in December 21, 1471), Annobón (in January 1472) and Príncipe (January
Hull Maritime Museum (833 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
The museum's stated mission is "To preserve and make available the maritime history of Hull and east Yorkshire through artefacts and documents". The museum
Steamboats of California (1,421 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Steamboats operated in California on San Francisco Bay and the Sacramento–San Joaquin River Delta, and Sacramento River as early as November 1847, when
Battle of Blomindon (1,347 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Battle of Blomindon took place on 21 May 1781 during the American Revolutionary War. The naval battle involved three armed U.S. privateer vessels against
Bunkyū (708 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
25, 2007, at the Wayback Machine Kaiji Shi Kenkyū (Journal of the Maritime History). No. 50, June, 1993, Tokyo: The Japan Society of the History of Maritime
Fishermen's Protective Union (1,838 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
and Politics, Maritime History Archive, Memorial University. Retrieved 20 February 2008. Fishermen's Protective Union, Maritime History Archive, Memorial
South African Navy (8,894 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The South African Navy (SA Navy) is the naval warfare branch of the South African National Defence Force. The Navy is primarily engaged in maintaining
Los Angeles Maritime Museum (487 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Ralph J. Scott, a U.S. National Historic Landmark, is docked nearby. Maritime history of California Maritime museums in California Museums in Los Angeles
Harrington (1796 ship) (899 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Harrington was launched at Calcutta in 1796 for the Bengal Pilot Service. A French privateer captured her on 9 November 1797 at Balasore Roads. She returned
Jorge de Menezes (182 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Jorge de Menezes (c. 1498 – 1537) was a Portuguese explorer, who in 1526–27 landed on the islands of Biak (Cenderawasih Bay), whilst he awaited the passing
Sir Charles Ogle (371 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Sir Charles Ogle was a ferry that operated from 1830 until 1894 for the Halifax-Dartmouth Ferry Service. The ferry was the first steamship built in Nova
Damo, Somalia (235 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Gondershe Hafun Hannassa Heis Malao Mosylon Opone Qandala Sarapion Somali maritime history Chittick, Neville (1975). An Archaeological Reconnaissance of the Horn:
Naval battle off St. John (1696) (880 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
The Naval battle off St. John took place on July 14, 1696, between France and England toward the end of King William's War in the Bay of Fundy off present-day
Flora Alberta (541 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The FV Flora Alberta was a Canadian auxiliary fishing schooner based out of Lunenburg, Nova Scotia. She was launched in 1941 by Smith and Rhuland, the
Djong (ship) (8,570 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article
to India, Twelfth to Fifteenth Centuries". International Journal of Maritime History. 9 (2): 51–81. doi:10.1177/084387149700900205. S2CID 130906334. R.
Cospatrick (ship) (674 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Cospatrick was a wooden three-masted full-rigged sailing ship that caught fire south of the Cape of Good Hope early on 18 November 1874, while on a voyage
Christena disaster (629 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Christena disaster was a ferry boat shipwreck with 233 casualties that occurred on 1 August 1970 between the islands of St. Kitts and Nevis in the
SAS President Kruger (2,360 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
SAS President Kruger was the first of three President-class Type 12 frigates built in the United Kingdom for the South African Navy (SAN) during the 1960s
Topsail (1,220 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Lars (1996). "Letter from R.B. Forbes to Captain Bradbury, 1855". The Maritime History Virtual Archives. Retrieved March 23, 2016. Bruzelius, Lars (1996)
Coppermine expedition (5,519 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Coppermine expedition of 1819–1822 was a British overland undertaking to survey and chart the area from Hudson Bay to the north coast of Canada, eastwards
Rafael Perestrello (1,051 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Rafael Perestrello (fl. 1514–1517) was a Portuguese explorer and a cousin of Filipa Moniz Perestrello, the wife of explorer Christopher Columbus. He is
National Maritime Museum, Gdańsk (1,070 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
rivers and those ashore – as well as the dissemination of knowledge on maritime history of Poland and its economy through the ages. In 1958, a Museum's Friends
Norfolk (1801 brig) (458 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Norfolk was built in Quebec in 1797 and registered in London in 1797 as Harbinger. In 1801 the Colonial government in New South Wales purchased her and
Isle of Sheppey (4,018 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Isle of Sheppey is an island off the northern coast of Kent, England, neighbouring the Thames Estuary, centred 42 miles (68 km) from central London
Marstal (681 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
seat of the now abolished Marstal Municipality. Marstal has a long maritime history. For centuries Marstal vessels have sailed the seven seas, and even
Fernão Lopes de Castanheda (473 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Fernão Lopes de Castanheda (Santarém, c. 1500 – 1559 in Coimbra) was a Portuguese historian in the early Renaissance. His "History of the discovery and
SAS Walvisbaai (546 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Coordinates: 39°27′36″N 0°19′41″W / 39.4600626°N 0.3279534°W / 39.4600626; -0.3279534 HMS Packington (pennant number: M1214) was a Ton-class minesweeper
Gundalow (489 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Publisher, Portsmouth, 2001 Ports of Piscataqua; soundings in the maritime history of the Portsmouth, N.H., Customs District from the days of Queen Elizabeth
Madre de Deus (738 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Madre de Deus (Mother of God; also called Mãe de Deus and Madre de Dios) was a Portuguese ship, renowned for her fabulous cargo, which stoked the English
Point Arguello Light (963 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Point Arguello Lighthouse is a lighthouse on Point Arguello in Santa Barbara County, California, serving the Santa Barbara Channel on the Gaviota Coast
Padrão (540 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
A padrão is a stone pillar left by Portuguese maritime explorers in the 15th and 16th centuries to record significant landfalls and thereby establish primacy
Blind Man's Bluff: The Untold Story of American Submarine Espionage (143 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Blind Man's Bluff: The Untold Story of American Submarine Espionage (ISBN 0-06-103004-X) by Sherry Sontag, Christopher Drew, and Annette Lawrence Drew
Pedro Álvares Cabral (7,926 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Pedro Álvares Cabral (European Portuguese: [ˈpeðɾu ˈaɫvɐr(ɨ)ʃ kɐˈβɾaɫ] or Brazilian Portuguese: [ˈpedɾu ˈawvɐɾis kaˈbɾaw]; born Pedro Álvares de Gouveia;
Honda Point disaster (2,217 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Honda Point disaster was the largest peacetime loss of U.S. Navy ships. On the evening of September 8, 1923, seven destroyers, while traveling at 20
HMCS Integrity (1804) (2,510 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article
the South West Pacific". The Great Circle. Australian Association of Maritime History. 5 (2): 88. JSTOR 41562665. Bladen (ed.) 1979, vol. 4, p. 901. Governor
List of place names of Dutch origin (1,506 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Dutch, aided by their skills in shipping, map making, finance and trade, traveled to every corner of the world and left their language embedded in
Jaap R. Bruijn (1,268 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
known and respected Dutch maritime historians. He was professor of maritime history at the University of Leiden from 1979 until his retirement in 2003
Capture of USS Hancock (615 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The American frigate USS Hancock was captured by the British Royal Navy in a 1777 naval battle during the American Revolutionary War. The two highest ranking
HMS Otranto (3,254 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
HMS Otranto was an armed merchant cruiser requisitioned by the British Admiralty when World War I began in 1914. Built before the war for the UK–Australia
SS Sirius (1837) (1,119 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
SS Sirius was a wooden-hulled sidewheel steamship built in 1837 by Robert Menzies & Sons of Leith, Scotland for the London-Cork route operated by the Saint
Rottnest Island (6,986 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Rottnest Island (known as Wadjemup to the local Noongar people, and otherwise colloquially known as Rotto) is a 19-square-kilometre (7.3 sq mi) island
List of museums in New Caledonia (38 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
New Caledonia Noumea City Museum Museum of the town of Païta Museum of Maritime History (New Caledonia) List of museums Institutions in New Caledonia
Anglo-French blockade of the Río de la Plata (5,332 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Anglo-French blockade of the Río de la Plata was a five-year-long naval blockade imposed by France and Britain on the Argentine Confederation ruled
Sailors' Union of the Pacific (486 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Sailors' Union of the Pacific (SUP), founded on March 6, 1885 in San Francisco, California, is an American labor union of mariners, fishermen and boatmen
Portuguese discoveries (7,980 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Portuguese discoveries (Portuguese: Descobrimentos portugueses) are the numerous territories and maritime routes recorded by the Portuguese as a result
Morning Light (ship) (396 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Morning Light was a wooden sailing ship. Her size was 265.3’ by 44.1’ by 21.1’. Launched in 1856, she weighed 2377 tons. She was registered at Saint John
Maritime Institute of Ireland (830 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Maritime Institute of Ireland (MII) was founded in 1941, at a time when World War II was raging and many seamen were in great peril of either being
Gomes Eanes de Zurara (1,714 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Gomes Eanes de Zurara (c. 1410 – c. 1474), sometimes spelled Eannes or Azurara, was a Portuguese chronicler of the Age of Discovery, the most notable after
Kings County (barque) (345 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Kings County was a four-masted barque built in 1890 at Kingsport, Nova Scotia on the Minas Basin. She was named to commemorate Kings County, Nova Scotia
Graveyard of the Pacific (487 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Graveyard of the Pacific is a somewhat loosely defined stretch of the Pacific Northwest coast stretching from around Tillamook Bay on the Oregon Coast
Barbarikon (398 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Barbarikon (Ancient Greek: Βαρβαρικόν) was the name of a sea port near the modern-day city of Karachi, Sindh, Pakistan, important in the ancient era of
Wallabi Group (372 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Coordinates: 28°28′S 113°42′E / 28.467°S 113.700°E / -28.467; 113.700 Wallabi Group Easter Group Pelsaert Group Wallabi Group North I. • East Wallabi
Asgard II (783 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Asgard II was the Irish national sail training vessel, until she sank in the Bay of Biscay in 2008. A brigantine, she was commissioned on 7 March 1981
Skoda (barquentine) (340 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Skoda was a barquentine built in Kingsport, Nova Scotia in 1893 by shipbuilder Ebenezer Cox, marking the end of an era as the last vessel built by Cox
Conservation and restoration of lighthouses (2,938 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
landmark navigation. They also act as a physical representation to maritime history and advancement. These historic buildings are prone to deterioration
Sankaty (944 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Sankaty (a.k.a. HMCS Sankaty, a.k.a. Charles A. Dunning) was a propeller-driven steamer that served as a ferry to Martha's Vineyard and Nantucket in Massachusetts;
Raid on Annapolis Royal (1781) (1,034 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
The Raid on Annapolis Royal took place on 29 August 1781 during the American Revolutionary War. The raid involved two American privateers - the Resolution
Diogo do Couto (752 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Diogo do Couto (Lisbon, c. 1542 – Goa, 10 December 1616) was a Portuguese historian. He was born in Lisbon in 1542 to Gaspar do Couto and Isabel Serrão
Institute of Marine Engineering, Science and Technology (1,813 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Institute of Marine Engineering, Science and Technology (IMarEST) is the international membership body and learned society for marine professionals
Marine archaeology in the Gulf of Cambay (1,389 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Marine archeology in the Gulf of Khambhat - earlier known as Gulf of Cambay - centers around controversial findings made in December 2000 by the National
Naval battle off St. John (1691) (495 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
The Naval battle off St. John took place on 22 September 1691 between France and England toward the beginning of King William's War in the Bay of Fundy
Northwest Passage (12,303 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Northwest Passage (NWP) is the sea route between the Atlantic and Pacific oceans through the Arctic Ocean, along the northern coast of North America
List of ships of the Confederate States Navy (4,777 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
This is a list of ships of the Confederate States Navy (CSN), used by the Confederate States of America during the American Civil War between 1861 and
Shipwreck Coast (335 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Hill Maritime Village. Retrieved 25 March 2012. Shipwreck Coast - Maritime History Historic Shipwreck Trail guide Maritimequest Shipwreck Database (Downloadable
Pluricontinentalism (203 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Pluricontinentalism (Portuguese: Pluricontinentalismo) was a geopolitical concept, positing that Portugal was a transcontinental country and a unitary
RMS Transvaal Castle (1,189 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
RMS Transvaal Castle was a British ocean liner built by John Brown & Company at Clydebank for the Union-Castle Line for their mail service between Southampton
Walton (barque) (263 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Walton, a three-masted barque, was built for the Parker family in Walton, Nova Scotia in 1855. Under the command of Frederick Parker (sailing for his father
Pêro da Covilhã (1,429 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Pedro, or Pêro da Covilhã or (Portuguese pronunciation: [ˈpeɾu dɐ kuviˈʎɐ̃]; c. 1460 – after 1526), sometimes written: Pero de Covilhăo, was a Portuguese
Whaling in the United States (3,736 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Commercial whaling in the United States dates to the 17th century in New England. The industry peaked in 1846–1852, and New Bedford, Massachusetts, sent
Nellie J. Banks (663 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Nellie J. Banks was a 35 GRT cod fishing schooner turned "rum runner", built in 1910. She was one of the last rum runners seized off the coast of Nova
MV Kerlogue (2,458 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
shtml another copy McGann, Marie-Claire. "MV Kerlogue". On-line Journal of Research on Irish Maritime History. Lugnad.ie. Retrieved 19 October 2014.
João Serrão (321 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Juan Rodríguez Serrano, also known as João Rodrigues Serrão in the Portuguese version, (Fregenal de la Sierra - Cebu, 1521) was a 16th-century Spanish
Benjamin M. Hartshorne (561 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Benjamin Minturn Hartshorne (1826–1900) was a California businessman who immigrated during the California Gold Rush. He was involved in Sacramento River
Richard Hough (509 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
7 October 1999) was a British author and historian specializing in maritime history. Hough married the author Charlotte Woodyatt, whom he had met when
João da Nova (2,157 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
João da Nova (Galician spelling Xoán de Novoa or Joam de Nôvoa, Spanish spelling Juan de Nova; Portuguese pronunciation: [ʒuˈɐ̃w̃ dɐ ˈnɔvɐ]; born c. 1460
Bartolomeu Perestrello (570 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Bartolomeu Perestrello (Portuguese pronunciation: [baɾtuluˈmew pɨɾɨʃˈtɾelu], in Italian Bartolomeo Perestrello), 1st Capitão Donatário, Lord and Governor
Lopo Soares de Albergaria (462 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Lopo Soares de Albergaria (c. 1460 in Lisbon – c. 1520 in Torres Vedras) was the third Governor of Portuguese India, having reached India in 1515 to supersede
HMS Acheron (1838) (341 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
HMS Acheron was a Hermes-class wooden paddle sloop of the Royal Navy. She was launched at Sheerness in 1838. Between 1848 and 1851 she made a coastal survey
Naval history of the Netherlands (2,840 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The naval history of the Netherlands dates back to the 15th century. As overseas trade was a traditional cornerstone of the Dutch economy, naval defence
Naval Review (magazine) (264 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
The Naval Review was first published in February 1913 by a group of eight Royal Navy officers. They had formed a naval society "to promote the advancement
Terrae Incognitae (36 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Terrae Incognitae is a triannual peer-reviewed academic journal covering the history of cartography, geography, and exploration. It is published by the
HMS Tribune (1796) (1,347 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
HMS Tribune was a Royal Navy 36-gun fifth rate. This frigate was originally the French Galathée-class frigate Charente Inférieure, which was launched in
SS Irish Oak (1919) (3,817 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article
defeat of the German U-boats: the Battle of the Atlantic. Studies in Maritime History. University of South Carolina Press. pp. 115–116. ISBN 9780872499843
Fly (brig) (114 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Fly was a brig of 100 tons that sailed from Calcutta, India, on 14 May 1802 bound for Sydney, New South Wales. She was carrying a cargo of 4,000 imperial
Tikoma (462 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The barque Tikoma was built in Richibucto, New Brunswick, Canada, by John and Thomas Jardine, nephews of the ship builder John Jardine. She was registered
RNLB Mary Stanford (ON 733) (1,812 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article
"Heritage Boats in Grand Canal Dock". On-line Journal of Research on Irish Maritime History. 11 February 2014. Retrieved 13 February 2014. Leach, Nicholas (1 May
Macquarie Lighthouse (4,599 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Macquarie Lighthouse, also known as South Head Upper Light, was the first, and is the longest serving, lighthouse site in Australia. It is located
RNLB Mary Stanford (ON 733) (1,812 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article
"Heritage Boats in Grand Canal Dock". On-line Journal of Research on Irish Maritime History. 11 February 2014. Retrieved 13 February 2014. Leach, Nicholas (1 May
Fly (brig) (114 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Fly was a brig of 100 tons that sailed from Calcutta, India, on 14 May 1802 bound for Sydney, New South Wales. She was carrying a cargo of 4,000 imperial
Codseeker (611 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Codseeker was a fishing schooner launched in April, 1877 that capsized east of Cape Sable Island, at the southwestern tip of Nova Scotia. The schooner
John Palmer (1814 schooner) (192 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
John Palmer was a schooner of 37 tons (bm) that J. & W. Jenkins constructed in Cockle Bay, Sydney in 1814; she was owned by D. H. Smith of Sydney, and
Battle off Yarmouth (1777) (599 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
The Battle off Yarmouth took place on 28 March 1777 during the American Revolutionary War off the coast of Yarmouth, Nova Scotia. The battle is the first
Cape Henlopen Light (384 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Cape Henlopen Light was a lighthouse near Lewes, in present-day Cape Henlopen State Park, Delaware, United States. The lighthouse was on the north side
Mexican-Colorado Navigation Company (86 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Mexican-Colorado Navigation Company was a steam navigation company formed in Los Angeles, California, that operated on the Colorado River from 1901 to
Operation Sail (1,168 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
cooperation between countries while providing sail training and celebrating maritime history. It is also sometimes erroneously referred to as "Tall Ships". While
Heroína (ship) (1,297 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
The Heroína (Spanish for "heroine") was a privately owned frigate that was operated as a privateer under a license issued by the United Provinces of the
Pacific Mail Steamship Company (5,920 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Pacific Mail Steamship Company was founded April 18, 1848, as a joint stock company under the laws of the State of New York by a group of New York
Seamen's Union of Australia (704 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Seamen's Union of Australia (SUA) was the principal trade union for merchant seamen in Australia from 1876 to 1991. The SUA developed a reputation
Raid on Canso (1776) (697 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
The Raid on Canso took place on 22 September – November 22, 1776 during the American Revolutionary War. The raid involved American Continental Navy captain
Warship (magazine) (334 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Warship (ISSN 0142-6222) is a long-running yearly publication covering the design, development, and service history of combat ships. It is published by
Canadian Arctic Expedition, 1913–1916 (948 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Canadian Arctic Expedition 1913–1916 was a scientific expedition in the Arctic Circle organized and led by Vilhjalmur Stefansson. The expedition was
Nicolau Coelho (474 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Nicolau Coelho (c.1460, in Felgueiras – 1502, off the coast of Mozambique) was an expert Portuguese navigator and explorer during the age of discovery
Grace (1811 ship) (479 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Grace was launched at Ipswich in 1811. She spent most of her career sailing to South America. However, she was returning to Britain from New South Wales
SS Libau (957 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Libau (pronounced [lɪˈbaʊ]; also known as SS Castro) was a merchant steam ship. In 1916 it masqueraded under the cover name of Aud ([ʔaʊ̯d]) in an attempt
Grain race (666 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Grain Race or The Great Grain Race was the informal name for the annual windjammer sailing season generally from South Australia's grain ports on Spencer
List of ship launches in 1851 (285 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Bruzelius, Lars (1999-04-23). "Clipper Ships: "Ino" (1851)". Ino. The Maritime History Virtual Archives. Retrieved August 2, 2010. Bruzelius, Lars (1996-04-05)
Margaret (1799 brig) (269 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Margaret was a British-built Australian brig that was launched in 1799 and wrecked in 1803. Margaret was constructed in London in 1799 and registered to
Pedro Mascarenhas (373 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Dom Pedro Mascarenhas (1480 – 16 June 1555) was a Portuguese explorer and colonial administrator. He was the first European to discover the island of Diego
Mersey (1801 ship) (474 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
5. (C. Potter) Nicholson, Ian Hawkins (1996). Via Torres Strait: a maritime history of the Torres Strait Route and the ship's post office at Booby Island
Duarte Pacheco Pereira (2,426 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Duarte Pacheco Pereira (European Portuguese: [duˈaɾt(ɨ) pɐˈʃeku p(ɨ)ˈɾejrɐ]; c. 1460 – 1533), called the Portuguese Achilles (Aquiles Lusitano) by the
Kalingapatnam (424 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Kalingapatnam is a town in Srikakulam district of the Indian state of Andhra Pradesh. It is located in Gara mandal of Srikakulam revenue division. It has
Abraham Lincoln's patent (1,896 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
whether it would have actually worked. Paul Johnston, curator of the maritime history department at the Smithsonian, came to the conclusion that the version
Raphael Semmes (2,752 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
of the cruiser CSS Alabama, the most successful commerce raider in maritime history, taking 65 prizes. Late in the war, he was promoted to rear admiral
Duarte de Menezes (475 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Dom Duarte de Menezes (before 1488 - after 1539), was a 16th-century Portuguese nobleman and colonial officer, governor of Tangier from 1508 to 1521 and
Sydney Heritage Fleet (814 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Sydney Heritage Fleet, is the trading name of Sydney Maritime Museum Ltd., a public (non-profit) company in Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. The Fleet
Duke of Portland (whaler) (242 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Duke of Portland was an American whaler of 400 tons. She was registered in Boston, United States and left Norfolk Island in June 1802, under the command
Caroline (schooner) (187 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Caroline was a schooner constructed in New Bedford, Massachusetts. She disappeared without trace in 1802. Built and registered in New Bedford, she was
Raid on Charlottetown (1775) (2,349 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
The Raid on Charlottetown took place on 17-18 November 1775 as part of the Washington's first naval expedition during the American Revolutionary War. The
River Queen (steamboat) (649 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
The River Queen was a sidewheel steamer which became closely associated with President Abraham Lincoln and General Ulysses S. Grant while operating on
Gonçalo Velho Cabral (1,630 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Gonçalo Velho Cabral (c. 1400 – c. 1460) was a Portuguese monk and Commander in the Order of Christ, explorer (credited with the discovery of the Formigas
Rosses Point Peninsula (491 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Point who were drowned at sea throughout history. As an ode to its maritime history, the Wild Atlantic Shanty Festival is held every summer on Rosses Point
Union Line (Colorado River) (401 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
The Union Line was a transport company of steamboats of the Colorado River, owned by Thomas E. Trueworthy, operating in southeastern California, western
SS Lac La Belle (1,880 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Worth series. Maritime History of the Great Lakes (1) (1866). Daily News (1866). Maritime History of the Great Lakes (1868). Maritime History of the Great
Haijin (4,332 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Hăijìn (海禁) or sea ban was a series of related isolationist policies restricting private maritime trading and coastal settlement during most of the
Diogo Gomes (1,656 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Diogo Gomes (c. 1420 – c. 1500) was a Portuguese navigator, explorer and writer. Diogo Gomes was a servant and explorer of Portuguese prince Henry the
Milford Haven Museum (272 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Haven, Pembrokeshire. Opened in 1991, it has a heavy focus on the maritime history of the town, with exhibitions which explore the fishing and oil industries