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Longer titles found: Ibrahim II of Ifriqiya (view), Ziyadat Allah I of Ifriqiya (view), Ziyadat Allah III of Ifriqiya (view), Abdallah II of Ifriqiya (view), Hilalian invasion of Ifriqiya (view), Muhammad II of Ifriqiya (view)

searching for Ifriqiya 85 found (658 total)

alternate case: ifriqiya

Chananel ben Chushiel (564 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article

Chananel ben Chushiel or Ḥananel ben Ḥushiel (Hebrew: חננאל בן חושיאל), an 11th-century Kairouanan rabbi and Talmudist, was a student of one of the last
Nissim ben Jacob (538 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Nissim ben Jacob (Hebrew: ניסים בן יעקב, also known as Rav Nissim Gaon or in Hebrew: רבנו נסים, lit. Nissim our teacher; 990–1062), was a rabbi best known
Samuel ben Jacob ibn Jam (364 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Samuel ben Jacob ibn Jam or Samuel ben Jacob Jam'a (Hebrew: שמואל בן יעקב אבן ג'אמע) was rabbi of the North-African community of קאבס (Gabès?) who flourished
Sidi Mahrez (199 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Sidi Mahrez ben Khalaf or Abu Mohamed Mahrez ben Khalaf ben Zayn (Arabic: سيدي محرز بن خلف; 951–1022) was a Tunisian Wali, scholar of the Maliki school
Ibn al‐Raqqam (486 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Ibn Al‐Raqqam Muḥammad Ibn Ibrahim Al‐Mursi Al‐Andalusi Al‐Tunisi Al‐Awsi (Arabic: ابن الرقام الأوسي) also known as Ibn Al‐Raqqam was a 13th century Andalusian-Arab
Ibn al-Kardabūs (143 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Abū Marwān ʿAbd al-Malik ibn Abī l-Qāsim ibn Muḥammad ibn al-Kardabūs al-Tawzarī (floruit 12th–13th century) was a Tunisian historian, perhaps of Andalusian
Isaac Israeli ben Solomon (2,142 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Isaac Israeli ben Solomon (Hebrew: יצחק בן שלמה הישראלי, Yitzhak ben Shlomo ha-Yisraeli; Arabic: أبو يعقوب إسحاق بن سليمان الإسرائيلي, Abu Ya'qub Ishaq
Chushiel (851 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Chushiel ben Elchanan (also Ḥushiel) was president of the bet ha-midrash at Kairouan, Tunisia toward the end of the 10th century. He was most probably
Bona crusade (623 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Bona Crusade or the Annaba crusade was a military campaign initiated by the King of Aragon Martin the Humane against the Hafsid sultanate, carried
Ibn Arafa (312 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Ibn Arafa (Arabic: ابن عرفة), born Mohammed ibn Mohammed ibn Arafa al-Warghammi, in 1316 in Tunis and died in 1401 in the same city, was a Tunisian Imam
Ahmad al-Tifashi (453 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Ahmad al-Tifashi whose full name is Shihab al-Din Abu al-Abbās Aḥmad ibn Yusuf al-Ḳaysi al-Tifachi (Arabic: أحمد بن يوسف القيسي التيفاشي), born in Tifash
Ibn Ishaq al-Tunisi (179 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Abū al‐ʿAbbās ibn Isḥāq al‐Tamīmī al‐Tūnisī (Arabic: ابن اسحاق التونسي), was a 13th century Tunisian astronomer and the author of an important zij which
Jacob ben Nissim (297 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Jacob ben Nissim ibn Shahin was a Jewish philosopher and mathematician who lived at Kairouan, Tunisia in the 10th century; he was a younger contemporary
Ibn al-Jazzar (1,238 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Ahmed Bin Jaafar Bin Brahim Ibn Al Jazzar Al-Qayrawani (895–979) (Arabic: أبو جعفر أحمد بن أبي خالد بن الجزار القيرواني), was an influential 10th-century
Capture of Tunis (1569) (224 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
The Capture of Tunis in 1569 was a campaign led by Uluç Ali to conquer Tunis. In 1569 the Beylerbey of Algiers, Uluç Ali, set off over land toward Tunis
Kingdom of Africa (4,440 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
zone of the Siculo-Norman state in the former Roman province of Africa (Ifrīqiya in Arabic), corresponding to Tunisia and parts of Algeria and Libya today
Abu Said al-Baji (162 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Abu Said ibn Khalef ibn Yahia Al-Tamimi Al-Baji, commonly known as Sidi Bou Said (Arabic: سيدي أبو سعيد الباجي; 1156–1231) was a Tunisian Sufi scholar
Anselm Turmeda (518 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Anselm Turmeda (Catalan pronunciation: [ənˈsɛlm tuɾˈmɛðə]), later known as Abd-Allah at-Tarjuman (Arabic: عبد الله الترجمان; 1355–1423), was a Christian
Aisha Al-Manoubya (944 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
AÏsha Al-Manoubya (Arabic: عائشة المنوبية, ʿĀʾisha al-Mannūbiyya), also known by the honorific Al-Saida ('saint') or Lella ('the Lady') (1199–1267 CE)
Abu Tashufin I (221 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
preceding Sultan of Tlemcen. He overthrown his father and led the conquest of Ifriqiya expanding in the east making the Great Mosque of Algiers Zayyanid also
Haly Abenragel (460 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Abū l-Ḥasan 'Alī ibn Abī l-Rijāl al-Shaybani (Arabic: أبو الحسن علي ابن أبي الرجال) (commonly known as Haly, Hali, Albohazen Haly filii Abenragel or Haly
Kaid Ridavan (136 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Kaid Ridavan was the military leader of the Hafsid dynasty during the siege of Malta. In September 1429, an army of about 18,000 Hafsid soldiers led by
Kingdom of Altava (994 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Volubilis in the west to the Aurès and later Kairaouan and the interior of Ifriqiya in the east. This Kingdom collapsed following Eastern Roman military campaigns
Sidi Ben Arous (150 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Ahmed ben Arous, full name: Abu al-Abbas Ahmed Ben Abdallah ben Abu Bakr al-Houari, Tunisian Arabic: أحمد بن عروس; (c. 1376–21 October 1436) was a Tunisian
Red Castle of Tripoli (963 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Emirate of Ifriqiya (800-909), the Fatimid Caliphate (10th century) who refurbished it into a royal residence, the Zirid Emirate of Ifriqiya and Banu Khazrun
Kusaila (1,301 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
the west to the Aurès in the east and later Kairouan and the interior of Ifriqiya. He is known for prosecuting an effective Berber military resistance against
Zymen Danseker (973 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
in 1611. Both men are featured prominently in Kitab al-Munis fi Akhbar Ifriqiya wa Tunis written by Tunisian writer and historian Ibn Abi Dinar. A Dutchman
Elisenda de Sant Climent (217 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Elisenda de Sant Climent (1220–1275), was a Catalan slave. She was born to Guillem Ramon de Sant Climent and married a Catalan farmer on Mallorca; they
Maghrebi Arabs (915 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
al-Maghariba) or North African Arabs (Arabic: عرب شمال أفريقيا ‘Arab Shamal Ifriqiya) are the inhabitants of the North African Maghreb region whose native language
Dunash ibn Tamim (827 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Dunash ibn Tamim (Hebrew: דונש אבן תמים) was a Jewish tenth century scholar, and a pioneer of scientific study among Arabic-speaking Jews. His Arabic name
Ahmed es-Sikeli (448 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Ahmed es-Sikeli (Arabic: أحمد الصقلي), baptised a Christian under the name Peter, was a eunuch and kaid of the Diwan of the Kingdom of Sicily during the
Ishaq Ibn Imran (98 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Ishaq Ibn Imran (died c. 903-9) was an Arab physician working in Kairouan, which at the time was the capital of Tunisia. His treatise on melancholy, written
Ibn Sharaf al-Qayrawani (528 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
was an Arab Muslim writer and court poet who served first the Zīrids in Ifrīqiya (Africa) and later various sovereigns in al-Andalus (Spain). He wrote in
Skifa Kahla (780 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
ISBN 978-9938-940-86-2. Nossov, Konstantin (2012). "Medieval Muslim fortifications of Ifriqiya: Defending northern Africa". Medieval Warfare. 2 (3): 39–42. ISSN 2211-5129
Spanish assault on Djerba (1510) (1,260 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
The Spanish assault on Djerba was a 1510 military expedition directed by Ferdinand II of Aragon against the Tunisian island of Djerba. It resulted in the
Siege of Mahdia (1159–1160) (161 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
al-Mu’min against the Norman forces of King William I of Sicily. The people of Ifriqiya sought help from Abd al-Mu’min against Norman occupation. Abd al-Mu’min
Islamic State – Central Africa Province (3,749 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
(abbreviated IS-CAP, also known as Central Africa Wilayah and Wilayat Wasat Ifriqiya) is an administrative division of the Islamic State (IS), a Salafi jihadist
Abd al-Rahman ibn Habib al-Siqlabi (701 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Abbasid-appointed governor of al-Andalus (Spain) in the 770s. He was sent from Ifrīqiya to oppose the Umayyad ruler ʿAbd al-Raḥmān I. He landed in Tudmīr and demanded
Qubba (656 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Ben Tanfous, Aziza; Bouteraa, Kadri; Rammah, Mourad; Zouari, Ali (2010). Ifriqiya: Thirteen Centuries of Art and Architecture in Tunisia. Islamic Art in
Dar Othman (420 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
of Dar Othman A tomb at dar Othman Binous, Jamila (2000). "Dar Othman". Ifriqiya, treize siècles d'art et d'architecture en Tunisie. Tunis: Démetér. pp
Médéa (487 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
(Paris, 1912), p.460. "François Decret, Les invasions hilaliennes en Ifrîqiya - Clio - Voyage Culturel". www.clio.fr. Retrieved 2015-11-07. Ted Morgan
Kabyle people (3,237 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Little Kabylie whose conquest of Ifriqiya resulted in the creation of the Caliphate. After the conquest of Ifriqiya the Kutama Berbers conquered the realm
Kasbah (1,629 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Ben Tanfous, Aziza; Bouteraa, Kadri; Rammah, Mourad; Zouari, Ali (2002). Ifriqiya: Thirteen Centuries of Art and Architecture in Tunisia (2nd ed.). Museum
Abu al-Abbas (517 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Arab historian born in Damascus Abu al-Abbas Ahmad II, Hafsid ruler of Ifriqiya (Tunisia) from 1370 to 1394 Abu al-Abbas Ahmad al-Mustansir, Marinid Sultan
Zakariya (430 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Sufi saint Abu Zakariya, founder and first ruler of the Hafsid dynasty in Ifriqiya Zakaria Abdulla (born 1956?), Kurdish singer Zakariyya Ahmad (1896–1961)
Norman–Arab–Byzantine culture (2,828 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
zone of the Siculo-Norman state in the former Roman province of Africa (Ifrīqiya in Tunisian Arabic), corresponding to Tunisia and parts of Algeria and
'Abd al-Wahid (390 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Abu Muhammad Abd al-Wahid ibn Abi Hafs, (d. 1221) Almohad governor of Ifriqiya Raes Abdul Wahed, Afghan Taliban commander Abdul Wahid Durrani (1917 –
Sidi Bou Said (599 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Bouteraa, Kadri; Rammah, Mourad; Zouari, Ali (2002). "II. 1 SIDI-BOU-SAÏD". Ifriqiya: Thirteen Centuries of Art and Architecture in Tunisia (2nd ed.). Museum
Islamic State – West Africa Province (3,331 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Islamic State's West Africa Province is officially termed "Wilāyat Garb Ifrīqīyā" (Arabic: ولاية غرب أفريقيا‎), meaning "West African Province". It is known
Abd al-Rahman ibn Awf (2,520 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Elder (killed at Ifriqiya). Sahla bint Suhayl of the Amir ibn Luayy clan of the Quraysh.: 190  Salim the Younger (killed at Ifriqiya). Umm Hakim bint
Moshe Dayan Center for Middle Eastern and African Studies (1,745 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
traditional book reviews, as well as review articles in translation." Ifriqiya: An analytical publication focusing on sub-Saharan Africa. Iqtisadi: Middle
Abu Yahya (179 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Zakariya (1203–1249), the founder and first ruler of the Hafsid dynasty in Ifriqiya Abu Yahya Muhammad ibn Ali ibn Abi Imran al-Tinmalali, the last Muslim
1153 (1,024 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
sends a Sicilian expedition under Admiral Philip of Mahdia to conquer Ifriqiya. With the support of Muslim troops, the Siculo-Normans suppress a rebellion
Macaron (2,579 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
"macaroon". According to Dan Jurafsky in Slate magazine, Arab troops from Ifrīqiya (now Tunisia) brought new techniques (papermaking) and foods like lemons
Al-Furat (249 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Egyptian historian Asad ibn al-Furat (759–828), a jurist and theologian from Ifriqiya Bruce Forat, an electronics engineer, founder of Forat Electronics Mun'im
Berber calendar (2,755 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
2002 – ISBN 9961-762-05-3 H. R. Idris, "Fêtes chrétiennes célébrées en Ifrîqiya à l'époque ziride", in Revue Africaine 98 (1954), pp. 261–276 Emile Laoust
Gates of Sfax (170 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Binous, Naceur Baklouti, Aziza Ben Tanfous and Kadri Bouteraa (2015). Ifriqiya :Thirteen centuries of art and architecture in Tunisia. Tunis: Déméter
Timeline of Tripoli (1,273 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Archaeology Research Papers. M. Brett (1986). "The City-State in Medieval Ifriqiya: the Case of Tripoli". Les Cahiers de Tunisie. 34. Krystyna von Henneberg
Murad I Bey (501 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Ibn Abi Dhiaf, op. cit, p. 40 Fawzī Mahfūz, Architecture et urbanisme en Ifriqiya médiévale : proposition pour une nouvelle approche, éd. Centre de publication
Mila (city) (1,424 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
remained in the 11th century that there were 4000 Kutama Berbers throughout Ifriqiya Finally in the 19th century it was the largest colony Koulouglis of the
Abul Abbas (73 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Abbasid caliph Harun al-Rashid Muhammad I Abu 'l-Abbas, emir of Aghlabids in Ifriqiya This disambiguation page lists articles associated with the title Abul
George of Antioch (959 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
capitulated. The cities of Sfax and Soussa surrendered soon after. Tunisia (Ifriqiya) was incorporated into the Kingdom of Sicily, which reached its apogee
Arabization (7,772 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
(al-Maghreb al-Aqsa) during the Berber Revolt, but not the territory of Ifriqiya which stayed Arab (East Algeria, Tunisia, and West-Libya). Centuries later
Abdulaziz II (63 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
refer to: Abu Faris Abd al-Aziz II (reigned 1394–1434), Hafsid Caliph of Ifriqiya Mehmed Abdulaziz or Abdulaziz II (1901–1977), 40th Head of the Ottoman
Flag of Sicily (1,505 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
existed in the south of the Italian peninsula and for a time the region of Ifriqiya from its founding by Roger II of Sicily in 1130 until 1816. It was a successor
Minaret (4,569 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Ben Tanfous, Aziza; Bouteraa, Kadri; Rammah, Mourad; Zouari, Ali (2002). Ifriqiya: Thirteen Centuries of Art and Architecture in Tunisia (2nd ed.). Museum
Ahmad II (85 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
dynastic name. Among others it may refer to: Abu al-Abbas Ahmad II, Caliph of Ifriqiya from 1370 to 1394 Ahmed II (1643–1695), Sultan of the Ottoman Empire from
Tamim (name) (184 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
Emir of Qatar Tamim ibn al-Mu'izz (died 1108), ruler of the Zirids in Ifriqiya Tamim Ansary (born 1948), Afghan-American author and public speaker Tamim
Ahmad ibn Muhammad (254 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
from 862 to 866. Abu Ibrahim Ahmad ibn Muhammad, Abbasid vassal Emir of Ifriqiya (856–863) Abu al-Abbas Ahmad ibn Muhammad ibn Kathir al-Farghani, (died
University of Ez-Zitouna (1,203 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
in general. Starting from the 13th century, Tunis became the capital of Ifriqiya under Almohad and Hafsid rule. This shift in power helped al-Zaytuna to
Mosque of the Three Doors (417 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Ben Tanfous, Aziza; Bouteraa, Kadri; Rammah, Mourad; Zouari, Ali (2002). Ifriqiya: Thirteen Centuries of Art and Architecture in Tunisia (2nd ed.). Museum
Hind Shalabi (690 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Interpretation of the Holy Qur'an Between Theories and Application", "Readings in Ifriqiya from the conquest to the middle of the fifth century AH" and "Conjugations”
Aoudaghost (1,400 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
gold, and they have no silver. Most of the inhabitants ... are natives of Ifriqiya [Tunisia] ... but there are also a few people from other countries ...
Sousse (3,188 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
years after the reign of Ziadet-Allah I (817–838), the second city of Ifriqiya and the Sahel. Subsequently, the building is enlarged during the reign
Abu Dharr al-Ghifari (1,962 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
000 to the Medinan Zayd ibn Thabit from the khums of the booty seized in Ifriqiya in 27/647. He then quoted relevant Qur'anic passages threatening the hoarders
Zawi ibn Ziri (1,530 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
his great grand nephew, Al-Mu'izz ibn Badis, the ruler of the Zirids in Ifriqiya at that time. It was then that he buried his father's head in the tomb
Territory of the Islamic State (7,353 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
 Abkhazia  South Ossetia Azerbaijan 23 June 2015 Central Africa (Wasat Ifrîqiyâ) Congo  Kenya  Tanzania — Before August 2018 East Asia  Brunei  Indonesia
Islamic culture (6,226 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
ISBN 978-0-8264-9423-8. "Kairouan Capital of Political Power and Learning in the Ifriqiya". Muslim Heritage. Retrieved 2014-03-16. Burckhardt, Titus (2009). Titus
Qallalin tiles (319 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Ben Tanfous, Aziza; Bouteraa, Kadri; Rammah, Mourad; Zouari, Ali (2002). Ifriqiya: Thirteen Centuries of Art and Architecture in Tunisia (2nd ed.). Museum
Idrisid dynasty (3,761 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
under Fatimid rule. In 979 Buluggin ibn Ziri, the Fatimid governor of Ifriqiya (after the Fatimid Caliphs had their capital to Cairo), returned to defeat
Tunisian National Military Museum (515 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Aziza Ben; Bouteraa, Kadri; Rammah, Mourad; Zouari, Ali (2013-06-01). Ifriqiya: Thirteen Centuries of Art and Architecture in Tunisia. Museum With No
Abd al-Rahman (2,986 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
governor of Septimania Abd al-Rahman ibn Habib al-Fihri (died 755), ruler of Ifriqiya Yusuf ibn Abd al-Rahman al-Fihri (fl. 756), governor of al-Andalus Abd
Cairo (14,815 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
969, the Shi'a Isma'ili Fatimid empire conquered Egypt after ruling from Ifriqiya. The Fatimid general Jawhar Al Saqili founded a new fortified city northeast
Abu Ishaq Ibrahim II (644 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
with the previous Marinid conquest, the Arab tribes of the interior of Ifriqiya soon rebelled and in 1357 the Dawadid Arabs were forbidden to collect a
Medina of Sfax (2,623 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Fatimids to seek revenge by sending Arab tribes from the south to destroy Ifriqiya. Despite all these disturbances, Sfax saw an important cultural renaissance