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Longer titles found: List of Enix home computer games (view), List of home computers (view), The Home Computer Advanced Course (view), The Home Computer Course (view), Interact Home Computer (view), Home Computer Initiative (view), List of home computers by video hardware (view)

searching for Home computer 277 found (1707 total)

alternate case: home computer

IBM Personal Computer (5,465 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article

businesses; the 5100 had a price tag as high as $20,000. Their entry into the home computer market needed to be competitively priced. In 1980, IBM president John
Computer Games Magazine (595 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Computer Games Magazine was a monthly computer and console gaming print magazine, founded in October 1988 as the United Kingdom publication Games International
PC Gamer (1,874 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
PC Gamer is a magazine and website founded in the United Kingdom in 1993 devoted to PC gaming and published monthly by Future plc. The magazine has several
The Games Machine (186 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Games Machine is a video game magazine that was published from 1987 until 1990 in the United Kingdom by Newsfield, which also published CRASH, Zzap
Eyetech (568 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Eyetech Group Ltd is a company founded in 1983, in order to provide commercial companies with automatical data collection systems. They had already been
Commodore User (873 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
successful A2000 (aimed at businesses) and had successfully penetrated the home computer market. In 1990 CU Amiga-64 dropped the "64" from its name and relaunched
PC Accelerator (535 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
PC Accelerator (PCXL) was an American personal computer game magazine that was published by Imagine Media (currently a subsidiary of Future plc). It was
Sega Power (421 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Sega Power, initially known as S: The Sega Magazine, was a Future publication aimed at the Sega range of consoles, including the Master System, Mega Drive
Amiga Corporation (1,232 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
and bought Atari's Consumer Division (which included the console and home computer departments) that July; Tramel Technology, Ltd. became Atari Corporation
Atari Coldfire Project (933 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Atari Coldfire Project (ACP) is a volunteer project that has created a modern Atari ST computer clone called the FireBee. The Atari 16 and 32 computer
Gamereactor (594 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Gamereactor is a Scandinavian online media network covering video games in multiple languages and a former print magazines network. In 2013, it was "one
PC Format (836 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
PC Format was a computer magazine published in the United Kingdom by Future plc, and licensed to other publishers in countries around the world. In publication
The One (magazine) (903 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
The One was a video game magazine in the United Kingdom which covered 16-bit home gaming during the late 1980s and early 1990s. It was first published
PCMag (1,835 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
PC Magazine (shortened as PCMag) is an American computer magazine published by Ziff Davis. A print edition was published from 1982 to January 2009. Publication
Dell Technologies (1,089 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Dell Technologies Inc. is an American multinational technology company headquartered in Round Rock, Texas. It was formed as a result of the September 2016
Creative Computing (magazine) (2,020 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
The relationship ended with the McGraw-Hill purchase. A number of home computer games were published under the Sensational Software banner, also known
Microsoft Press (145 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
were The Apple Macintosh Book by Cary Lu and Exploring the IBM PCjr Home Computer by Peter Norton in 1984 at the West Coast Computer Faire. The publisher
Computer Game Review (177 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Computer Game Review was a print monthly magazine covering both computer gaming and video gaming. The magazine was started in 1991. Also known as Computer
PC Plus (290 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
PC Plus was a computer magazine published monthly from 1986 until September 2012 in the UK by Future plc. The magazine was aimed at intermediate to advanced
8000 Plus (144 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
8000 Plus (renamed PCW Plus early in 1992) was a monthly British magazine dedicated to the Amstrad PCW range of microcomputers. It was one of the earliest
Palmtex Portable Videogame System (2,662 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
later renamed and released as the Super Micro and distributed under the Home Computer Software name, is a handheld game console developed and manufactured
Tech Advisor (980 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Tech Advisor, previously known as PC Advisor, is a consumer tech website and digital magazine published by Foundry, a subsidiary of IDG Inc, which also
Packard Bell (1,143 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Packard Bell is a Dutch-registered computer manufacturing brand and subsidiary of Acer. Originally an American radio set manufacturer, Packard Bell Corporation
The Games Machine (Italy) (213 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
The Games Machine, also known by the acronym TGM, is an Italian video game magazine that features previews, reviews and cheat codes. Launched in September
Softalk (555 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Softalk (ISSN 0274-9629) was an American magazine of the early 1980s that focused on the Apple II computer. Published from September 1980 through August
Sega Pro (267 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Sega Pro was the first publication from Paragon Publishing and catered for the Sega consoles: the Master System, Game Gear and the Mega Drive. Early editorial
Trivial Pursuit (2,818 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
also subsequently released. British software company Domark released a home computer version (billed as Trivial Pursuit: The Computer Game) for multiple
Computer Gamer (207 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Computer Gamer was a video game magazine published in the United Kingdom by Argus Specialist Publications, covering home gaming from April 1985 to June
Planet PC (293 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Planet PC was a British PC gaming magazine aimed at pre-teens, first published in December 1999. It was issued monthly by Future plc in Bath, Somerset
Atomic (magazine) (1,063 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Atomic (or Atomic MPC) once was a monthly Australian magazine and online community that focused on computing and technology, with a great emphasis on gaming
Popular Computing Weekly (256 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Retrieved 1 February 2017. Tony Smith (3 January 2013). "1983's UK home computer chart toppers". The Register. Retrieved 1 February 2017. v t e v t e
Atari, Inc. (1993–present) (3,875 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Atari, Inc. is an American subsidiary and publishing arm of Atari SA. Formed in 1993 as the video game publishing arm of GoodTimes Home Video as GT Interactive
Sega Force (553 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Sega Force was an early 1990s publication that covered the Sega console range (Sega Mega Drive, Mega-CD, Master System and Game Gear). Sega Force and Nintendo
Amiga (10,548 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
compatibility add-on, the Amiga was most commercially successful as a home computer, with a wide range of games and creative software. The Video Toaster
List of Coleco Adam games (322 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
This is a list of Coleco Adam games compatible with the Home Computer system or the ColecoVision Expansion port 3. Some of these games are exclusive only
Z-machine (1,082 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
implementation for that platform. With the large number of incompatible home computer systems in use at the time, this was an important advantage over using
Olivetti S.p.A. (3,425 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Olivetti S.p.A. is an Italian manufacturer of computers, tablets, smartphones, printers and other such business products as calculators and fax machines
Virtual Network Computing (1,808 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
technical support and accessing files on one's work computer from one's home computer, or vice versa. VNC was originally developed at the Olivetti & Oracle
Mark Healey (245 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Suffolk. Healey started his career making games for the Commodore 64 home computer – his first published game was KGB Super Spy for Codemasters, which
ColecoVision (2,983 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
cartridges. A later module converts ColecoVision into the Coleco Adam home computer. ColecoVision was discontinued in 1985 when Coleco withdrew from the
KoalaPad (827 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The KoalaPad is a graphics tablet, released in 1983 by U.S. company Koala Technologies Corporation, for the Apple II, TRS-80 Color Computer (as the TRS-80
Disk magazine (1,365 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
A disk magazine, colloquially known as a diskmag or diskzine, is a magazine that is distributed in electronic form to be read using computers. These had
Michael Jackson's Moonwalker (1,837 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
home console versions were actually based on an evolved version of the home computer version of the game (with gameplay somewhat similar to the Shinobi series)
Atari XG-1 light gun (592 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
2600 home video game consoles. It was bundled with the XEGS Deluxe home computer and video game console combination system, and with the light gun game
List of Atari XEGS games (291 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
other Atari 8-bit computer software and peripherals and functions as a home computer. This list contains games released during the XEGS's lifetime, all of
Acorn User (306 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Acorn User magazine was founded by Acorn Computers in 1982, contract-published by Addison-Wesley, to coincide with the launch of the BBC Micro. It covered
Acorn User (306 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Acorn User magazine was founded by Acorn Computers in 1982, contract-published by Addison-Wesley, to coincide with the launch of the BBC Micro. It covered
Beam Software (2,125 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Exploding Fist helped define the genre of one-on-one fighting games on the home computer. The game won Best Overall Game at the Golden Joystick Awards. In 1987
List of Pac-Man clones (1,463 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Munch Man is a 1982 clone from Texas Instruments for the TI-99/4A home computer. Instead of clearing a maze, the player fills it with "links" (in Munch
Minimig (1,649 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Minimig (short for Mini Amiga) is an open source re-implementation of an Amiga 500 using a field-programmable gate array (FPGA). Minimig started around
Regnecentralen (1,035 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Regnecentralen (RC) was the first Danish computer company, founded on October 12, 1955. Through the 1950s and 1960s, they designed a series of computers
Computer Shopper (UK magazine) (369 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
Computer Shopper was a magazine published monthly between 1988 and 2020 in the UK by Dennis Publishing Ltd. It contained reviews of home computers, consumer
Your Commodore (244 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Your Commodore was a magazine for Commodore computers, including the Commodore 64, Amiga, and the Commodore PC range. It was published in the UK from October
Digit (magazine) (674 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Digit is an Indian technology media publisher magazine and a website owned by 9.9 Media. According to the last Indian Readership Survey results that mentioned
SoftSide (1,070 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
SoftSide is a defunct computer magazine, begun in October 1978 by Roger Robitaille and published by SoftSide Publications of Milford, New Hampshire. Dedicated
80 Micro (715 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
80 Micro was a computer magazine, published between 1980 and 1988, that featured program listings, products and reviews for the TRS-80. Wayne Green, the
The Running Man (King novel) (1,511 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
Richards. The film was later made into a video game released on several home computer platforms. A new film adaptation of the novel is in development with
Exatron Stringy Floppy (512 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Exatron Stringy Floppy (or ESF) is a continuous-loop tape drive developed by Exatron. The company introduced an S-100 stringy floppy drive at the 1978
Be Inc. (749 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Be Inc. was an American computer company founded in 1990. It is best known for the development and release of BeOS, and the BeBox personal computer. Be
Time Zone (video game) (482 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
Time Zone is one of the first games of this magnitude released for home computer systems. Ports were released for Japanese home computers PC-88, PC-98
Commodore Format (1,301 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Commodore Format was a British magazine for users of the Commodore 64 home computer. It was published on the third Thursday of every month. All 61 issues
Tarbell Cassette Interface (326 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Tarbell Cassette Interface is an expansion card for use with the Altair 8800 early personal computer, or other systems using the Altair's S-100 bus
The Last Starfighter (3,055 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
but never commercially released under the Last Starfighter name. The home computer version was eventually renamed and released (with some minor changes)
MD5 (4,406 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
catastrophically; such collisions can be found in seconds on an ordinary home computer. On 31 December 2008, the CMU Software Engineering Institute concluded
VEB Robotron (924 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Program or KOBRA Robotron A 5120 office computer, 1982 Robotron KC 87 home computer, 1987 Robotron A 7100 and EC 1834 (XT-compatible) personal computer
Input (157 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Input (magazine), a magazine from the mid-1980s covering the subject of home computer programming Input (online magazine), an online technology and culture
Amstrad CPC 464 (590 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
The CPC 464 is the first personal home computer built by Amstrad in 1984. It was one of the bestselling and best produced microcomputers, with more than
Snoopy's Silly Sports Spectacular (407 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
, known in Japan as Donald Duck (ドナルドダック) and based on the British home computer game, Alternative World Games, is a child-oriented sports game that
Tulip Computers (488 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
the distributor for Europe for the Exidy Sorcerer, a Zilog Z80 based home computer. When Exidy gave up on the Sorcerer in 1979, Compudata licensed the
Dell (14,905 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Dell is an American technology company that develops, sells, repairs, and supports computers and related products and services and is owned by its parent
The Lord of the Rings: Journey to Rivendell (566 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
catalogues as a game that would be released on the Atari 2600 and Atari Home Computer. The game was originally advertised under the name Lord of the Rings
Bomberman (1983 video game) (740 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
maze video game developed and published by Hudson Soft. The original home computer game Bomber Man was released in July 1983 for the NEC PC-8801, NEC PC-6001
Simons' BASIC (1,792 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Simons' BASIC is an extension to BASIC 2.0 for the Commodore 64 home computer. Written by British programmer David Simons in 1983, who was 16 years old
3D Movie Maker (1,361 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
software in conjunction with the release of its then-new Windows 95 home computer operating system, 3D Movie Maker is built on BRender, a software rasterized
Robert Yannes (348 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
(DOC) which was used in both commercial synthesizers and the Apple IIGS home computer. Robert Yannes graduated from Villanova University in 1978. He started
Electron User (277 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Electron User was a magazine targeted at owners of the Acorn Electron microcomputer. It was published by Database Publications of Stockport, starting in
Falcon Northwest (922 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Falcon Northwest is a private company headquartered in Medford, Oregon. It designs, assembles, and markets high-end custom computers. The company was founded
Bill & Ted (1,862 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Bill & Ted is an American science fiction comedy franchise created by Chris Matheson and Ed Solomon. It features William "Bill" S. Preston Esq. and Ted
Apple Inc. (27,866 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Coordinates: 37°20′06″N 122°00′32″W / 37.3349°N 122.0090°W / 37.3349; -122.0090 Apple Inc. is an American multinational technology company that specializes
Micro Center (1,044 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Micro Center is an American computer retail store, headquartered in Hilliard, Ohio. It was founded in 1979, and as of 2021[update], has 25 stores in 16
Jeotex (4,642 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Jeotex, Inc., known as Datawind, Inc until 2019 . and founded in Montreal, Quebec, Canada, is a developer and manufacturer of low-cost tablet computers
Pharming (979 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
unprotected access to target a computer, such as altering a customer's home computer, rather than a corporate business server.[citation needed] The term
Commodore Computing International (120 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Commodore Computing International was a magazine for the Commodore range of computers, including the Commodore 64, Amiga, and Commodore PC range. The magazine
Commodore Force (568 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Commodore Force was a computer games magazine covering games for the Commodore 64. It was published in the UK by Europress Impact. Its predecessor was
Ralink (455 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
RT2570 chipset to allow a Nintendo DS or Wii to be internetworked via a home computer. Ralink provides some documentation without a non-disclosure agreement
M.C. Kids (1,082 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
sold in Europe. The NES release in Europe had the same name as the home computer ports. A different version of the game was published for the Game Boy
Chihiro Fujioka (397 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Earthbound (アースバウンド) 1983 Home computer Composer Lizard (リザード) 1985 Home computer Composer Aspic Special 1987 Home computer Composer Satsui no Kaisou:
Instant book (1,317 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
competing work. Operation Entebbe and IBM's introduction of its PCjr home computer also received instant books. Instant books have gone in and out of favor
Klang Box (197 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
the track previously unreleased), 'Numbers,' 'Musique Non Stop,' and 'Home Computer' (b/w "It's More Fun to Compute") are being manufactured, and 250 boxes
Rolling Thunder (video game) (1,531 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
was a commercial success in arcades, and it was released for various home computer platforms in 1987 and the Nintendo Entertainment System in 1989. The
Archive (magazine) (255 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Archive is a membership magazine for users of the Acorn Archimedes personal computer and related RISC OS hardware. It is the oldest and longest-running
Atari ST (8,835 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
The Atari 1040ST, released in 1986 with 1 MB of RAM, was the first home computer with a cost-per-kilobyte of less than US$1. "ST" officially stands for
Atari ST (8,835 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
The Atari 1040ST, released in 1986 with 1 MB of RAM, was the first home computer with a cost-per-kilobyte of less than US$1. "ST" officially stands for
Instant book (1,317 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
competing work. Operation Entebbe and IBM's introduction of its PCjr home computer also received instant books. Instant books have gone in and out of favor
Mini-Cassette (457 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
machines and was also employed as a data storage for the Philips P2000 home computer. As of August 2021, Phillips still produces mini-cassette players along
Purism (company) (1,894 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Purism, SPC is an American computer technology social purpose corporation based in San Francisco, California and registered in the state of Washington
Sega Zone (179 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Sega Zone was a Sega orientated publication from Dennis Publishing in the early 1990s. Sega Zone had split off from the former multiformat console title
AT (form factor) (778 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
processors. The IBM AT became a widely copied design in the booming home computer market of the 1980s. IBM clones made at the time began using AT compatible
MicroDigital Omega (127 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
The MicroDigital Omega was a home computer developed and sold in the early 2000s by MicroDigital. It runs the RISC OS operating system. The Omega suffered
Custom PC (magazine) (898 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Custom PC (usually abbreviated to 'CPC') is a UK-based computer magazine created by Mr Freelance Limited, and originally published by Dennis Publishing
Yes (530 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
command to output "y" or a string repeatedly Philips :YES, a 1985 home computer Yes! Roadster, a German sports car Yasuj Airport, Iran, IATA airport
Micro Instrumentation and Telemetry Systems (7,805 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
and Jon Titus's Mark-8 computer in July 1974 were the catalyst of the home computer revolution. Art Salsberg became the editor of Popular Electronics in
PC Paintbrush (861 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
PCPaint in 1984. At Christmas 1984, amidst record sales volumes in the home computer market, Microsoft had created a "sidecar" bundle for the PCjr, complete
Franklin Electronic Publishers (1,381 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Franklin Electronic Publishers, Incorporated (formerly Franklin Computer Corporation) is an American consumer electronics manufacturer based in Burlington
Gradius (video game) (2,655 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
were released for various platforms, such as the Famicom/NES, the MSX home computer, and the PC Engine. It was a major success in 1986, becoming the year's
Franklin Electronic Publishers (1,381 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Franklin Electronic Publishers, Incorporated (formerly Franklin Computer Corporation) is an American consumer electronics manufacturer based in Burlington
Blasteroids (898 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
graphics instead of vector graphics, and has power-ups and a boss. Home computer ports of Blasteroids were released by Image Works for the Amiga, Amstrad
Averatec (158 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Averatec (Korean: 에버라텍) was a South Korean laptop computer brand. The Averatec support was absorbed it's the parent company which resulted in a number
ReadySoft (242 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
based in Ontario, Canada. Products include various emulators as well as home computer ports of Sullivan Bluth's videodisc game series Dragon's Lair, Space
Commodore Disk User (153 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Commodore Disk User, also referred to as CDU, was a magazine for the Commodore range of computers, including the Commodore 64, Commodore 128 and Commodore
Atari 8-bit computer peripherals (1,356 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Atari 8-bit computer peripherals include floppy drives, printers, modems, and video game controllers for Atari's 8-bit computer family, which includes
Takes a Little Time (Amy Grant song) (242 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
an enhanced CD (ECD); a video could be viewed when inserted into a home computer. The ECD portion of the CD contained a live acoustic version of the
Karate Champ (2,414 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
it was the highest-grossing arcade game of 1985 and the best-selling home computer game up until 1989. Karate Champ established and popularized the one-on-one
Target: Renegade (578 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
computers, Ocean acquired the option to produce and release their own home-computer-only sequels to the game, and Target Renegade was the first of these
Castle Wolfenstein (2,777 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
action-adventure game that was developed by Muse Software for the Apple II home computer. It is one of the earliest games to be based on stealth mechanics. An
Jumping Flash! (2,825 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
used in Geograph Seal, an earlier game by Exact for the Sharp X68000 home computer. Jumping Flash! has been described as an ancestor of, as well as an
Popular Electronics (3,480 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
January 1975, had the Altair 8800 computer on the cover and ignited the home computer revolution. Paul Allen showed that issue to Bill Gates. They wrote a
Computer animation (4,616 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
programs; however, the rendering can require much time on an ordinary home computer. Professional animators of movies, television and video games could
Gazeebow Unit (468 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
teenagers in the provincial capital of St. John's. Gazeebow Unit uses a home computer to develop their music; they integrate samples and downloaded drum loops
Chris Crawford (game designer) (2,887 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
developing games, he became known among other creators in the nascent home computer game industry for his passionate advocacy of game design as an art form
Play (Chinese magazine) (680 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article
Play (simplified Chinese: 家用电脑与游戏; pinyin: Jiāyòng Diànnǎo Yǔ Yóuxì; "Home Computer and Game") was a Chinese game-and-software oriented magazine founded
Gambler (magazine) (79 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Gambler was a Polish monthly video game magazine published between 1993–1999 by the Lupus publishing house. The magazine was partly created by former employees
Now Playing (magazine) (149 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Now Playing was a short-lived entertainment magazine that focused on popular entertainment, including movies, television, music, DVDs, and games. It was
RadioShack (13,951 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
RadioShack, formerly RadioShack Corporation, is an American retailer founded in 1921. At its peak in 1999, RadioShack operated over 8,000 worldwide stores
SmartComputing (382 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Smart Computing was a monthly computing and technology magazine published by Sandhills Publishing Company in Lincoln, Nebraska, USA. First released under
Total PC Gaming (489 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Total PC Gaming was a monthly magazine published by Imagine Publishing, launched in 2007 it ran until March 2010. The magazine featured videogame industry
500 (558 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Japanese coin 500 euro note, a Euro banknote Amiga 500, a home computer Amiga 500 Plus, a home computer Lenovo IdeaPad 500, a discontinued brand of notebook
Watford Electronics (233 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
mail-order company. In the early 1980s Watford Electronics expanded into the home computer market. It was particularly active in the BBC Micro scene, producing
Ben Daglish (1,005 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
he was one year old. He was known for creating many soundtracks for home computer games during the 1980s, including such as The Last Ninja, Trap, Krakout
Kaspersky Lab (6,135 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
working for the Russian government stole confidential data from the home computer of an American National Security Agency contractor via Kaspersky antivirus
Yabasic (598 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
shipped with PS2 consoles in PAL territories so it could be considered a home computer, not just a games machine, thus bypassing European import taxes. As
Enola Gay (song) (3,236 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
that he has "loved for decades". "Enola Gay" is popular with early home computer enthusiasts, being used in demos such as Swinth (Commodore 64). Hackers
Velocity Micro (1,038 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Velocity Micro is a privately held boutique computer manufacturer located in Richmond, Virginia (USA), specializing in custom high-performance gaming computers
Computist (553 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
volumes of Core were published: "All About Graphics", "Utilities" and "Home Computer Games". Originally, the "Games" topic was scheduled for Issue 4, but
Radio-Electronics (1,242 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
computer (July 1974). These two issues are considered milestones in the home computer revolution. In 1905 Hugo Gernsback established Electro Importing Company
Acorn Eurocard systems (908 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
modular system strongly influenced the design of Acorn's first all-in-one home computer, the Acorn Atom, released in March 1980; and also much of the circuitry
Creative Micro Designs (435 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Creative Micro Designs (CMD) was founded in 1987 by Doug Cotton and Mark Fellows. It is a computer technology company which originally developed and sold
Nibble (magazine) (383 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Nibble was a magazine for Apple II personal computer enthusiasts published from 1980 until 1992. The name means "half a byte" or "four bits." Most of the
Miner 2049er (1,329 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
two or three), which was more typical of the time. Unlike most of the home computer versions, Miner 2049er for the Atari 8-bit family was released on 16K
Motion Computing (1,438 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Motion Computing was a developer of slate Tablet PC computers located in Austin, Texas. Motion Computing focused on vertical markets such as healthcare
Loki (disambiguation) (447 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
ciphers Loki (C++), a C++ software library Loki (computer), a proposed home computer Loki Software, a software firm Loki (Marvel Comics), a character in
FamilyPC (230 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
FamilyPC was a monthly American computer magazine published from 1994 to 2001. The collaboration between The Disney Publishing Group and Ziff-Davis was
Seminole Government Television (196 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
addition, select SGTV original programs can be viewed ON DEMAND from your home computer. (In the City of Oviedo, the channel is pre-empted on Monday from 5:30
Individual Computers (395 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Individual Computers is a German computer hardware company specializing in retrocomputing accessories for the Commodore 64, Amiga, and PC platforms. Individual
Ganbare Goemon! Karakuri Dōchū (384 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Mystical Ninja) and the first to be released on a video game console and home computer. It was initially released for the Family Computer July 30, 1986 and
Big K (magazine) (122 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Big K was a short-lived multi format magazine published by IPC Magazines Ltd during the 1980s. The design of the magazine was very similar in style to
Martech (1,205 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
1989. It published a number of successful video games for the emerging home computer games marketplace, including BBC Model B, Sinclair ZX81, Sinclair Spectrum
Disc Filing System (2,782 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
education market in Australia, with very little penetration of the home computer market until the arrival of the Acorn Electron. The DFS shipped as a
Ultima: Escape from Mt. Drash (1,170 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Drash is a role-playing video game published for the Commodore VIC-20 home computer by Sierra On-Line in 1983. In the game, creatures called "garrintrots"
List of Apple IIGS games (212 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
abilities of the earlier Apple II. The machine is part of the 16-bit home computer gaming revolution of the mid 1980s to early 1990s, competing directly
Champion Boxing (242 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
was released in the arcades, and ported to the SG-1000 and the MSX home computer the same year. However, this is a professional wrestling game instead
Ultrasoft (380 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
specialised in the development and publishing of games for the ZX Spectrum home computer. With over 40 titles published, its most successful including the platform
Superscape (162 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
entertainment. Superscape evolved from Incentive Software, a publisher of home computer games in the 1980s and 1990s. Superscape Group plc was listed on the
List of disk magazines (1,394 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Sex'n'Crime was a disk magazine for the demoscene of the Commodore 64 home computer. The magazine was published from 1989 to 1990 by Amok, a label of publisher
Nebulus (video game) (853 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
Phillips and published by Hewson Consultants in the late 1980s for home computer systems. International releases and ports were known by various other
Amsoft (533 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Amstrad home computer would have been an Amsoft title, as several titles were included in the sales bundles. While developing its first home computer, the
Early history of video games (6,606 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
in the 1970s and 1980s, when arcade video games, gaming consoles and home computer games were introduced to the general public. Since then, video gaming
Chris Sawyer (976 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
code on his Memotech MTX home computer- which possessed a built in assembler- and then later on an Amstrad CPC series home computer. He sent tapes containing
Flink (354 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
one of the few Amiga CD32 titles not to see a release for the Amiga home computer on which the CD32's hardware is based. The creators, Erwin Kloibhofer
Texas Instruments TMS9900 (2,122 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
design wins outside TI's own use. Among those uses was TI's TI-99/4 home computer, which ultimately sold about ~2.8 million units. By the mid-1980s the
Canard PC (519 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Canard PC is an independent magazine founded in France in 2003 devoted to PC gaming and published monthly. The title Canard PC is a paronym, derived from
American Laser Games (794 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
light-gun controllers, including the 3DO Game Gun and the PC Gamegun, for home computer use. The latter proved unsuccessful due to its poor accuracy. American
The Rainbow (magazine) (1,394 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
The Rainbow was a monthly magazine for the TRS-80 Color Computer by the Tandy Corporation (now RadioShack). It was started by Lawrence C. Falk (commonly
The Robotic Workshop (114 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Mindstorms, that allowed users to build and program robots using a home computer. Access Software announced The Robotic Workshop in the January 1987
Rebelstar (1,582 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Rebelstar, but not its sequel, was also adapted for the Amstrad CPC home computer. Each title in the Rebelstar series is a science fiction-themed turn-based
APF Electronics Inc. (507 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Archived from the original on February 21, 2014. Loguidice, Bill. "Home Computer Designations of the Late 1970s: A Feature Article". Armchair Arcade
Denton Designs (237 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
and initially specialised in developing software for the ZX Spectrum home computer. Amongst the founders were developers who had worked on the unfinished
Magic Desk (2,615 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
cultivating the built-in productivity software for Commodore's succeeding home computer, the Plus/4. Magic Desk is a graphical user interface featuring a word
Secret Service (magazine) (423 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Secret Service was a Polish monthly magazine for gaming and consoles published from 1993 to 2001 by ProScript publishing house. The first issue of the
Puzznic (322 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Amstrad CPC, Commodore 64, MS-DOS, and ZX Spectrum between 1990 and 1991. Home computer ports were handled by Ocean Software; the 2003 PlayStation port was
Michael Tomczyk (2,057 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
VIC-20. His contributions are described in detail in his 1984 book, THE HOME COMPUTER WARS: An Insider's True Account of Commodore and Jack Tramiel. His role
The Final Cartridge III (538 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Final Cartridge III was a popular extension cartridge which was created for the Commodore 64 and Commodore 128, produced by the Dutch company Riska
Voja Antonić (1,126 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
journalist and writer. He is known for creating a build-it-yourself home computer Galaksija and originating a related "Build your own computer Galaksija"
Replica 1 (1,866 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
include (model dependent): RS-232 Serial port: for interfacing with a home computer running a terminal emulation program, such as HyperTerminal for Windows
EACA (180 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
EACA International Ltd was a Hong Kong manufacturer active from 1975 to 1983, producing Pong-style television video games, and later producing thousands
OCP Art Studio (368 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Drawing of geometrical shapes. Released in 1985 for the ZX Spectrum home computer and in 1986 for the Amstrad CPC and Commodore 64. Released in 1986 and
Aackosoft (284 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
developer and publisher that exclusively developed games for the MSX home computer, becoming one of the biggest publishers for the MSX platform. It re-released
Commodore (410 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
computer company that operated from 1954 to 1994 Commodore 64, an 8-bit home computer introduced in January 1982 by Commodore International Commodore USA
Technologie (122 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
art is made in the graphical style of the TRS-80 Color Computer, a home computer from the early 1980s. "Bulletproof" "New Prayer" "River of Joy" "Living
Variable Geo (2,219 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
by TGL under their Giga brand. Their Giga brand was used for their home computer games while their TGL brand was used for their console games. The game
Bug-Byte (652 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
computer games during the early 1980s, for Sinclair, Commodore and other home computer brands, particularly for the Spectrum. Among the better known titles
Ghostbusters (1984 video game) (1,543 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
same name. It was designed by David Crane and released for several home computer platforms in 1984, and later for video game console systems, including
Artillery game (1,593 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
variants of the artillery game soon emerged after the first graphical home computer versions. A two-player game called Smithereens! was released in 1982
Tomy Tutor (873 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Japan as the Pyūta (ぴゅう太) and in the UK as the Grandstand Tutor, is a home computer produced by the Japanese toymaker Tomy. It was architecturally similar
Intellivision (8,797 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Intellivision was introduced at the 1979 Las Vegas CES in January as a modular home computer with the Master Component priced at US$165 and a soon-to-follow Keyboard
Artillery game (1,593 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
variants of the artillery game soon emerged after the first graphical home computer versions. A two-player game called Smithereens! was released in 1982
Computer Shopper (70 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
(1988-present), a home computer magazine published in the United Kingdom Computer Shopper (US magazine) (1979–2009), a home computer magazine published
Video games in Sweden (209 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
project groups of game developers. The graphical home computer VIC-20 was released in 1980. The home computer Commodore 64 was released 1983. The game Space
TI Invaders (928 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
video game published by Texas Instruments in 1981 for the TI-99/4A home computer. The game is a Space Invaders clone where the goal is to shoot of all
Tehkan World Cup (1,464 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
gameplay format was later adapted by Sensible Software to develop the home computer game MicroProse Soccer (1988) and provided the basis for later association
Data East (2,257 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
a successful entry in the home computer game market with a 1985 port of Karate Champ, which became the first home computer game to sell more than 500
Information Age (5,901 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Also in 1977, Sord Computer Corporation released the Sord M200 Smart Home Computer in Japan. Steve Wozniak (known as "Woz"), a regular visitor to Homebrew
Raster Blaster (305 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Raster Blaster (or Rasterblaster on the disk label) is a pioneering home computer pinball simulation written by Bill Budge for the Apple II and published
View (298 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
processor computer program developed by Acornsoft for the BBC Micro home computer Model–view–controller, a design pattern in software engineering Mutual
Mark Knight (musician) (727 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
the violin when he was 6. At 10 years old he was given a Commodore 64 home computer and took an interest in electronic music. Whilst studying in college
Hack and slash (972 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
The Jungle Fighter (1990), Taito's Saint Sword (1991), Vivid Image's home computer game First Samurai (1991), and Vanillaware's Dragon's Crown (2013).
Operation Wolf (2,631 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
of the top five highest-grossing dedicated arcade games of 1988. The home computer conversions topped the UK sales charts in late 1988 until it was replaced
Malware (6,218 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
This was the standard operating procedure for early microcomputer and home computer systems, where there was no distinction between an administrator or
NABU Network (791 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
The NABU Network was an early home computer system which was linked to a precursor of the Internet, operating over cable TV. It operated from 1982 to
Soft & Cuddly (1,203 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Cuddly is a horror arcade adventure game released for the ZX Spectrum home computer, developed by John George Jones and published by The Power House. It
Fuse (emulator) (266 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
Unix Spectrum Emulator (Fuse) is an emulator of the 1980s ZX Spectrum home computer and its various clones for Unix, Windows and macOS. Fuse is free software
PC Today (135 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
PC Today (Later Cyber Trend) was a monthly mobile computing and technology computer magazine published by Sandhills Publishing Company in Lincoln, Nebraska
Speech synthesis (8,838 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
impairments or reading disabilities to listen to written words on a home computer. Many computer operating systems have included speech synthesizers since
Mickey (disambiguation) (164 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
computer mouse Mickey or 1850XLD, which was developed into the Atari ST home computer Mickey set, H2X American ground scanning radar Mickey Finn (drugs) or
Qi Hardware (352 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Qi Hardware is an organization which produces copyleft hardware and software, in an attempt to apply the Free Software Foundation's GNU GPL concept of
Micrograph (944 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
may also be obtained using a USB microscope attached directly to a home computer or laptop. An electron micrograph is a micrograph prepared using an
Dave Haynie (125 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Press. ISBN 9780973864908. Herd, Bill. "COMMODORE C64: THE MOST POPULAR HOME COMPUTER EVER TURNS 40". Hackaday. Retrieved 26 July 2022. Reimer, Jeremy. "A
Sam (807 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
used in bioinformatics Sam (text editor) SAM Coupé, an 8-bit British home computer Microsoft Sam, a voice for the screen reader in Windows 2000 and XP
Star Fox (disambiguation) (148 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
a 1983 video game for the Atari 2600 Starfox (1987 video game), a home computer game by Reaktor Software Starfox (comics), a Marvel Comics superhero
Rambo III (video game) (577 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
and published by Taito, and Ocean developed and published the other home computer versions: Atari ST, Amiga, Spectrum, C64, Amstrad CPC.[citation needed]
Kane (444 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
radio station in Guildford, United Kingdom Kane (video game), 1986 home computer game published by Mastertronic Citizen Kane, a 1941 film directed by
E.V.O.: Search for Eden (2,232 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Theory of Evolution), released exclusively in Japan for the PC-9801 home computer in 1990. Spanning a period of over a billion years, the game's story
Sorcerer (293 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Sorcerer (Linux distribution), Linux distribution Exidy Sorcerer, a home computer system released in 1978 The Sorcerer (cave art), cave painting in 'The
Proprietary software (4,384 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
limited to one user, but allow the user to install a second copy on a home computer or laptop. This is no longer true with the switching to Creative Cloud
Artic Computing (540 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
1980 to 1986. The company's first games were for the Sinclair ZX81 home computer, but they expanded and were also responsible for various ZX Spectrum
Need for Speed: Carbon (4,270 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
racing events, and greater customization options. Alongside console, home computer, and arcade versions, the game also received portable editions for the
Vector Graphic (743 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Vector Graphic was an early microcomputer company founded in 1976, the same year as Apple Computer, during the pre-IBM PC era, along with the NorthStar
Forth (programming language) (5,639 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
capabilities of the Atari 400 and 800 computers in department stores. Three home computer games from Electronic Arts, published in the 1980s, were written in
Spindizzy (video game) (1,382 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
Spindizzy is an isometric computer game released for several 8-bit home computer formats in 1986 by Electric Dreams Software. It combines action and puzzle
Silicon Dreams (2,751 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
interpreted language termed A-code and was usable in all major types of home computer of the time, on either diskette or cassette. Level 9 self-published
Speak & Spell (toy) (5,250 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
The Speak & Spell line is a series of electronic hand-held child computers by Texas Instruments that consisted of a TMC0280 linear predictive coding speech
LanSlide Gaming PCs (416 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
LanSlide Gaming PCs is a privately owned, internet-based, gaming computer company located in Schenectady, New York. Specializing in high end portable gaming
UltraCade Technologies (347 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
UltraCade Technologies, also known simply as UltraCade, was a computer and video game hardware company, founded in 2002 by David R. Foley. Founded on the
Dragon MSX (138 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
home computer was designed by Radofin (the creators of the Mattel Aquarius) for Dragon Data, which were well known for their Dragon 64 home computer,
BBC Master (4,272 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
The BBC Master is a home computer released by Acorn Computers in early 1986. It was designed and built for the British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC)
Beeb (91 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Beeb BEEB, a BBC children's magazine published in 1985 BBC Micro, a home computer built for the BBC by Acorn Computers Ltd., nicknamed The Beeb Beeb.com
Video editing (1,414 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
process that required special training. In contrast to this, nearly any home computer sold since the year 2000 has the speed and storage capacity to digitize
Camouflage (Chris Sievey song) (562 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
"Camouflage" is a single released by the English musician and comedian Chris Sievey in 1983. The single is notable for its B-side, which rather than containing
Yie Ar Kung-Fu II (647 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Commodore 64, MSX, Amstrad CPC, ZX Spectrum, BBC Micro and Acorn Electron home computer systems and featured a different approach to the game. In France, the
System 3 (171 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
could refer to: Acorn System 3, a home computer produced by Acorn Computers from 1980 Cromemco System Three, a home computer produced by Cromemco from 1978
Atmos (212 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Jaeger-LeCoultre, which runs on changes in ambient temperature Oric Atmos, a home computer first marketed in 1984 Ambience (sound recording), sounds of a given
Red pill and blue pill (2,648 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
man named Morpheus (Laurence Fishburne). Neo spends his nights at his home computer trying to discover the secret of the Matrix and what the Matrix is.
Syzygy (417 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
video game Unreal Tournament 2003 Syzygy, a game for the Dragon 32 home computer, published by Microdeal Syzygy, a linking word game by Lewis Carroll
Micro Electronics, Inc. (96 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Micro Electronics, Inc. (MEI) is an American privately owned corporation headquartered in Hilliard, Ohio. Founded in 1979 by John Baker, it serves as the
Idlebrain.com (1,019 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
based in Sunnyvale, California. Initially, Sunil hosted the site on his home computer. Jeevi used to contribute to the fledgling site personally while also
Cisco Heat (1,295 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
it to be a drastic improvement over Jaleco's previous arcade games. Home computer ports were met with a more negative reception for their poor quality
Strider (1989 arcade game) (4,630 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
Hiryu. The game debuted on Capcom's CP System arcade board. Various home computer ports were developed by Tiertex and published by U.S. Gold in 1989.
Zemmix (453 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Daewoo released a series of gaming consoles compatible with the MSX home computer standards. The consoles were in production between 1985 and 1995. The
Innerprise Software (72 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
existence Innerprise Software managed to publish titles for the Amiga Home Computer and Sega Genesis in North America and Europe. "Back2Roots – Retired
Robert S. Harris (158 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Harris, nicknamed RoSHa, is the designer and programmer of several 1980s home computer and console games, including War Room (ColecoVision, 1983) and Killer
Family BASIC (802 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
music through computers by programming sound effects in BASIC on his home computer. Two revisions of Family BASIC were produced — the first, "v.2.1", was
Wirehog (446 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
accessible". The client allowed users to both access data stored on their home computer from a remote location and let friends exchange files between each other's
Seneca Data (285 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
John M. Hoyt (February 23, 2012). "Think about Nexlink for your next home computer – They're not just for business anymore!". Retrieved 1 July 2013. Joseph
Saboteur (1985 video game) (686 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
Townsend and published by Durell Software in 1985 for several 8-bit home computer formats. In 2017, Clive Townsend, in association with realtech VR, released
Roadwars (178 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Arcadia, the short-lived arcade game division of Mastertronic. The home computer versions were developed by Binary Design and published by Melbourne
Ted Nelson (2,297 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
is documented in the books Computer Lib / Dream Machines (1974), The Home Computer Revolution (1977) and Literary Machines (1981). Much of his adult life
Ultimate Play the Game (3,308 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
trade being in creating arcade conversion kits, before moving into the home computer software market developing games under the Ultimate Play the Game name
Foxmail (674 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Retrieved 6 December 2019. Kang Yu; Chen Zeyou (2008). An Introduction to Home Computer Use: Increasing Proficiency (家庭电脑应用入门·提高·精通). DynoMedia Inc. pp. 214–217
Gateway (telecommunications) (991 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
connects an office or home intranet to the Internet. If an office or home computer user wants to load a web page, at least two network gateways are accessed—one
Munch Man (434 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
as Munchman) is a video game written by Jim Dramis for the TI-99/4A home computer and published as a cartridge by Texas Instruments in 1982. Based on
Vilnius BASIC (201 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
[Programming for BK-0010-01] (in Russian). version 07.24. "East-European Home-Computer". Germany: HCM - The HomeComputer Museum. Wikibooks has a book on the
Filmmaking (3,370 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
film, create and edit the sound and music, and mix the final cut on a home computer. However, while the means of production may be democratized, financing
Puggsy (1,249 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Psygnosis on the Mega Drive and Mega-CD consoles, as well as the Amiga home computer. Puggsy is the name of the title character, an orange space hopper–like
Paddle (game controller) (735 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
support it. The Atari paddles are also compatible with the Atari 800 home computer, with its four-game controller ports. This would allow eight paddles
Disk User (78 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Disk User was a bi-monthly magazine for the BBC Micro range of 8-bit microcomputers. The first issue was available from 15 May 1987. Its coverdisks contained
Memotech (228 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Memotech was a British computer company founded by Geoff Boyd and Robert Branton in Witney in Oxfordshire, England. They started out during the early 1980s
Supremacy: Your Will Be Done (1,133 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
earlier home computer versions. However, there are several differences between them: The NES version uses fewer screens than its home computer counterparts
Loop (music) (1,339 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article
Complete Guide to Remixing: Produce Professional Dance-Floor Hits on Your Home Computer. Boston: Berklee Press. ISBN 0-87639-044-0. Holmes, Thom (2008). "Early
Roadwars (178 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Arcadia, the short-lived arcade game division of Mastertronic. The home computer versions were developed by Binary Design and published by Melbourne
CD-R King (652 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
CD-R King (styled as cd-r king or CD-R KING) was a Filipino retail chain that sold discounted computer parts and gadgets, electronic appliances, and accessories
Commodore PET (5,936 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
education market they had largely lost by then to the Apple IIe. In the home computer market, the PET line was soon outsold by machines that supported high-resolution
Personal wiki (626 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
management Trapani, Gina, Geek to Live: How to host a personal wiki on your home computer, lifehacker.com, 2005-9-16. Accessed 2012-4-17. Zukerman, Erez, Editorial
Moonlight Madness (video game) (1,258 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
Moonlight Madness is a video game for the ZX Spectrum home computer, published in 1986 by Bubble Bus Software. It is an arcade adventure game in which
Zone X (211 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Johnston and published by Gremlin Graphics in 1985 for the Atari 8-bit home computer. The player enters a mine to collect all the scattered plutonium samples
Constantin Sotiropoulos (63 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
video game and multimedia programming language for the Commodore Amiga home computer, and STOS BASIC on the Atari ST. He has also been creator of copy protection
Fast Track (magazine) (85 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Fast Track is a monthly information technology magazine published by 9.9 MediaWorx Pvt. Ltd and distributed along with Digit. It is an in-depth reference
Tim Maloney (232 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
wrote "Get Animated! Creating Professional Cartoon Animation on Your Home Computer." In it, Maloney aims to share his low budget, lone wolf secrets to
R.O.B. (3,564 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
toward home computers, but its prototype of a lavish Famicom-based home computer and multimedia package called Advanced Video System (AVS) was poorly
Wacky Waiters (81 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Waiters is a 1982 two-dimensional platform game for the Commodore VIC-20 home computer, published by Imagine Software. Gameplay involves controlling a waiter
One Block Radius (373 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
released as a proper album. It was not sold at retail, came packaged with home-computer printed labels, and featured members of the band introducing tracks
10BASE2 (1,025 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
make it impractical. Unfortunately for 10BASE2, by the time multiple home computer networks became common, the format had already been practically superseded
Mel Croucher (841 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
the Sinclair ZX81, his label published several games for the early home computer market, including three Computer Trade Association award-winners: Pimania
Dragon Breed (503 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
arcades in 1989. It runs on M72 and M81 hardware. Activision released home computer conversions in 1990. The player controls King Kayus, who rides a large
Cat (disambiguation) (774 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
utility that concatenates and lists files Cat, a clone of the Apple II home computer Canon Cat, a desktop computer Computer-assisted translation or computer-aided
Dragon User (603 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Dragon User was a British magazine for users of the Dragon 32/64 computers published from 1982 by Sunshine Publications. Production of the computers themselves
Apple 1 (85 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Apple 1 or variation, may refer to: Apple I, the first home computer from Apple Computer (Apple. Inc) Apple One, the subscription service from Apple,
PC Player (British magazine) (129 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
PC Player was a short lived PC videogaming magazine published in the UK by Maverick Magazines. Launched in December 1993 with John Davison as editor, PC