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Longer titles found: Witch trials in the early modern period (view), Resistance theory in the Early Modern period (view), Germany in the early modern period (view), Scotland in the early modern period (view), Jewish women in early modern period (view), Economy of Scotland in the early modern period (view), History of early modern period domes (view)

searching for Early modern period 372 found (4016 total)

alternate case: early modern period

List of privateers (416 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article

A privateer was a private person or private warship authorized by a country's government by letters of marque to attack foreign shipping. Privateers were
Spanish Main (495 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
During the Spanish colonization of the Americas, the Spanish Main was the collective term for the parts of the Spanish Empire that were on the mainland
Voyages: The Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade Database (86 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Voyages: The Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade Database is a database run by researchers at Emory University which aims to present all documentary material pertaining
17th century (4,260 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
between January 1, 1600, and December 31, 1699. It falls into the Early Modern period of Europe and in that continent (whose impact on the world was increasing)
Lutheran orthodoxy (993 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Lutheran orthodoxy was an era in the history of Lutheranism, which began in 1580 from the writing of the Book of Concord and ended at the Age of Enlightenment
Serbian Hussar Regiment (827 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Serbian Hussar Regiment was a military unit of the Russian Imperial Army which predominantly consisted of Serbian colonists to Russia. Due to Rákóczi's
Cavalier boots (435 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Cavalier boots are a style of boot that were popular in Europe between approximately 1500-1700 AD. They are soft knee-high leather boots typically made
Městys (637 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Městys (or, unofficially or obsolete, městečko), translated as "market town", is a status conferred on certain municipalities in the Czech Republic, lying
Castle town (98 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
A castle town is a settlement built adjacent to or surrounding a castle. Castle towns were common in Medieval Europe. Some examples include small towns
Tercio (3,501 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
(Spanish "third") was a military unit of the Spanish Army in the early modern period. The Tercios were famous for their resistance on the battlefield
Battle of Rakshasbhuvan (692 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Battle of Rakshasbhuvan was fought on 10 August 1763. After the defeat of the Marathas at the Battle of Panipat, their rivals started seizing the opportunity
Kingdom of Naples (2,058 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Kingdom of Naples (Latin: Regnum Neapolitanum; Italian: Regno di Napoli; Neapolitan: Regno 'e Napule), officially known as the Kingdom of Sicily, comprised
L-plan castle (462 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
An L-plan castle is a castle or tower house in the shape of an L, typically built from the 13th to the 17th century. This design is found quite frequently
Morion (helmet) (1,527 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
A morion (Spanish: morrión) is a type of open helmet originally from the Kingdom of Castile (Spain), used from the beginning 16th to early 17th centuries
Tōhoku region (1,357 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Tōhoku region (東北地方, Tōhoku-chihō), Northeast region, or Northeast Japan (東北日本, Tōhoku-nihon) consists of the northeastern portion of Honshu, the largest
Rûm (1,446 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Rûm (Arabic pronunciation: [ˈruːmˤ]; singular Rûmi), also transliterated as Roum (in Arabic الرُّومُ ar-Rūm; in Persian and Ottoman Turkish روم Rûm; in
French livre (1,181 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The livre (French for "pound") was the currency of Kingdom of France and its predecessor state of West Francia from 781 to 1794. Several different livres
Peasant (3,184 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
A peasant is a pre-industrial agricultural laborer or a farmer with limited land-ownership, especially one living in the Middle Ages under feudalism and
Composite monarchy (2,602 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
down to 1841. In France, a far more unified state than Spain in the early modern period, the state was divided into different customary tax regimes, the
Rocaille (1,482 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Rocaille (US: /roʊˈkaɪ, rɒˈkaɪ/ ro(h)-KY, French: [ʁɔkɑj]) was a French style of exuberant decoration, with an abundance of curves, counter-curves, undulations
Musketeer (2,614 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
A musketeer (French: mousquetaire) was a type of soldier equipped with a musket. Musketeers were an important part of early modern armies, particularly
Howitzer (2,588 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
A howitzer /ˈhaʊ.ɪtsər/ is generally a large ranged weapon that stands between an artillery gun (also known as a cannon outside the US) – which has smaller
Cuirassier (2,947 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Cuirassiers (/ˌkwɪrəˈsɪər/; from French cuirassier [kɥiʁasje]) were cavalry equipped with a cuirass, sword, and pistols. Cuirassiers first appeared in
Adamic language (1,616 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
various ways by the late medieval Italian poet Dante Alighieri. In the early modern period, some authors continued to discuss the possibility of an Adamic language
Svrljig (735 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Svrljig (Serbian Cyrillic: Сврљиг, pronounced [sʋř̩ʎiːɡ]) is a town and municipality located in the Nišava District of the southern Serbia. According to
Evening gown (957 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
An evening gown, evening dress or gown is a long flowing[further explanation needed] dress usually worn at formal occasions. The drop ranges from ballerina
Line infantry (2,933 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Line infantry was the type of infantry that composed the basis of European land armies from the late 17th century to the middle of the 19th century. Maurice
Meyer Löw Schomberg (753 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Meyer Löw Schomberg (1690, Vetzburg aka Fetzburg, Württemberg, Germany – 4 March 1761, his house in Fenchurch Street, London) was a German-Jewish physician
List of people from West Bengal (2,115 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
This is a list of notable people from West Bengal, India. This list does not include the significant number of prominent East Bengali refugees from East
Serbian nobility (334 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Serbian nobility (Serbian: српска властела / srpska vlastela, српско властелинство / srpsko vlastelinstvo or српско племство / srpsko plemstvo) refers
Suruga Province (787 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Suruga Province (駿河国, Suruga no kuni) was an old province in the area that is today the central part of Shizuoka Prefecture. Suruga bordered on Izu, Kai
Polish–Cossack–Tatar War (1666–1671) (376 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Polish-Cossack-Tatar War was the war between the Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth and the Ottoman Empire (in practice, a proxy war between the Cossack Hetmanate
Kim Stanley Robinson (2,078 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Kim Stanley Robinson (born March 23, 1952) is an American writer of science fiction. He has published nineteen novels and numerous short stories but is
Physiology (3,430 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Physiology (/ˌfɪziˈɒlədʒi/; from Ancient Greek φύσις (physis) 'nature, origin', and -λογία (-logia) 'study of') is the scientific study of functions and
Conrad Richter (1,635 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Conrad Michael Richter (October 13, 1890 – October 30, 1968) was an American novelist whose lyrical work is concerned largely with life on the American
Siege of Ochakov (1788) (451 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
The second siege of Ochakov (now Ochakiv, Ukraine) was one of the major events of the Russo-Turkish War (1787–1792). It was known as "Özi Kuşatması" in
Exploration of the Americas (21 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The exploration of the Americas includes: Exploration of North America Colonization of the Mexico Voyages of Christopher Columbus v t e
Philosopher's stone (2,786 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The philosopher's stone, more properly philosophers' stone or stone of the philosophers (Arabic: ḥajar al-falāsifa, Latin: lapis philosophorum), is a mythical
Ian Mortimer (historian) (1,029 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Ian James Forrester Mortimer, FSA, FRHistS (born 22 September 1967) is a British historian and writer of historical fiction. He is best known for his book
Eastern Orthodoxy in Serbia (633 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
raised to the rank of Patriarchate. During the late Middle Ages and Early Modern period, Serbian Patriarchate of Peć (1346-1766) had at its peak more than
Drenica (597 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Drenica (Albanian: Drenicë, Drenica), also known as the Drenica Valley, is a hilly region in central Kosovo, covering roughly around 700 square kilometres
Muscovite–Volga Bulgars war (1376) (269 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
The Muscovite-Volga Bulgars War of 1376 was organized by Russian Prince Dmitry Donskoy of Moscow, and Dmitry Konstantinovich of Vladimir-Suzdal. The Moscow-Nizhny
Ford Madox Ford (2,745 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Ford Madox Ford (né Joseph Leopold Ford Hermann Madox Hueffer (/ˈhɛfər/ HEF-ər); 17 December 1873 – 26 June 1939) was an English novelist, poet, critic
Rye House, Hertfordshire (821 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Rye House near Hoddesdon in Hertfordshire is a former fortified manor house, located in what is now the Lee Valley Regional Park. The gatehouse is the
Esther Forbes (765 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Esther Louise Forbes (/fɔːrbz/; June 28, 1891 – August 12, 1967) was an American novelist, historian and children's writer who received the Pulitzer Prize
Classical language (2,391 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
A classical language is a language with an independent literary tradition and a large and ancient body of written literature. Classical languages are typically
List of ships of the line of the Order of Saint John (173 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Malta was ruled by the Order of Saint John as a vassal state of the Kingdom of Sicily from 1530 to 1798. The islands of Malta and Gozo, as well as the
Laurie Halse Anderson (1,782 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Laurie Halse Anderson is an American writer, known for children's and young adult novels. She received the Margaret A. Edwards Award from the American
Dewa Province (1,033 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Dewa Province (出羽国, Dewa no kuni) was a province of Japan comprising modern-day Yamagata Prefecture and Akita Prefecture, except for the city of Kazuno
Polish–Ottoman War (1620–21) (622 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
The Polish–Ottoman War (1620–1621) was a conflict between the Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth and the Ottoman Empire over the control of Moldavia. It ended
War of the Polish Succession (1587–88) (738 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
The War of the Polish Succession or the Habsburg-Polish War took place from 1587 to 1588 over the election of the successor to the King of Poland and Grand
Swiss mercenaries (4,703 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
armies, especially the armies of the Kings of France, throughout the Early Modern period of European history, from the Later Middle Ages into the Age of Enlightenment
Navy of the Order of Saint John (1,105 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The navy of the Order of Saint John, also known as the Maltese Navy after 1530, was the first navy of a chivalric order. It was established in the Middle
Christian art (1,738 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Christian art is sacred art which uses themes and imagery from Christianity. Most Christian groups use or have used art to some extent, although some have
Spice (3,206 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Spices A spice is a seed, fruit, root, bark, or other plant substance primarily used for flavoring or coloring food. Spices are distinguished from herbs
Polish–Swedish War (1617–18) (566 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
The Polish–Swedish War (1617–18) was a phase of the longer Polish–Swedish War (1600–29). It continued the war of 1600–11 and was an attempt by Sweden to
Reiter (462 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Reiter or Schwarze Reiter ("black riders", anglicized swart reiters) were a type of cavalry in 16th to 17th century Central Europe including Holy Roman
Liberty (personification) (1,703 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Depictions of Liberty The concept of liberty has frequently been represented by personifications, often loosely shown as a female classical goddess. Examples
Polish–Swedish War (1617–18) (566 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
The Polish–Swedish War (1617–18) was a phase of the longer Polish–Swedish War (1600–29). It continued the war of 1600–11 and was an attempt by Sweden to
Christian art (1,738 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Christian art is sacred art which uses themes and imagery from Christianity. Most Christian groups use or have used art to some extent, although some have
Polish–Ottoman War (1672–1676) (1,499 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Polish–Ottoman War (1672–1676) was a conflict between the Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth and the Ottoman Empire, as a precursor of the Great Turkish War
Liberty (personification) (1,703 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Depictions of Liberty The concept of liberty has frequently been represented by personifications, often loosely shown as a female classical goddess. Examples
Polish–Ottoman War (1633–34) (1,108 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
The Polish–Ottoman War of 1633–1634 was one of the many military conflicts between the Crown of the Kingdom of Poland together with the Grand Duchy of
Diana Gabaldon (2,775 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Diana J. Gabaldon (/ˈɡæbəldoʊn/; born January 11, 1952) is an American author, known for the Outlander series of novels. Her books merge multiple genres
Edict of toleration (1,271 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
An edict of toleration is a declaration, made by a government or ruler, and states that members of a given religion will not be persecuted for engaging
Gronant (206 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Elis Gruffydd (c. 1490-c. 1552), a noted Welsh chronicler of the early modern period. A soldier who served in the English garrison at Calais, Gruffudd's
Brown Bess (2,350 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
"Brown Bess" is a nickname of uncertain origin for the British Army's muzzle-loading smoothbore flintlock Land Pattern Musket and its derivatives. The
Puppet monarch (765 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
A puppet monarch is a majority figurehead who is installed or patronized by an imperial power to provide the appearance of local authority but to allow
Free Company of Volunteers of Catalonia (1,944 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Free Company of Volunteers of Catalonia (Spanish: Compañía Franca de Voluntarios de Cataluña, Catalan: Companyia Franca de Voluntaris de Catalunya)
Skirmisher (2,073 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Skirmishers are light infantry or light cavalry soldiers deployed as a vanguard, flank guard or rearguard to screen a tactical position or a larger body
Anya Seton (677 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Anya Seton (January 23, 1904 – November 8, 1990), born Ann Seton, was an American author of historical fiction, or as she preferred they be called, "biographical
Greek Cypriots (2,165 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Greek Cypriots (Greek: Ελληνοκύπριοι, Turkish: Kıbrıs Rumları or Kıbrıs Yunanları) are the ethnic Greek population of Cyprus, forming the island's largest
Rococo (6,733 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Rococo (/rəˈkoʊkoʊ/, also US: /ˌroʊkəˈkoʊ/), less commonly Roccoco or Late Baroque, is an exceptionally ornamental and theatrical style of architecture
Ranged weapon (1,058 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
A ranged weapon is any weapon that can engage targets beyond hand-to-hand distance, i.e. at distances greater than the physical reach of the user holding
Eugène Sue (1,360 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Marie-Joseph "Eugène" Sue (French pronunciation: ​[ø.ʒɛn sy]; 26 January 1804 – 3 August 1857) was a French novelist. He was one of several authors who
Grimoire (3,638 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
held involved people who had owned grimoires. By the end of the Early Modern period and the beginning of the Enlightenment, many European governments
Winston Graham (1,616 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Winston Mawdsley Graham OBE, born Winston Grime (30 June 1908 – 10 July 2003), was an English novelist best known for the Poldark series of historical
Pike (weapon) (4,522 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
A pike is a pole weapon, a very long thrusting spear formerly used extensively by infantry. Pikes were used regularly in European warfare from the Late
Farringdon, Sunderland (970 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Farringdon is a suburb of Sunderland, Tyne and Wear, England. Originally a Monastic grange and manor estate for hundreds of years, Farringdon was rebuilt
Penmaenmawr (1,932 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Penmaenmawr (/ˈpɛnmaɪnˌmaʊər/, Welsh: [ˈpɛnmaːɨnmaur] (listen)) is a town and community in Conwy County Borough, Wales, which was formerly in the parish
Hilary Mantel (3,824 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Dame Hilary Mary Mantel, DBE, FRSL (/mænˈtɛl/ man-TEL; née Thompson; born 6 July 1952) is an English writer whose work includes historical fiction, personal
Finglas (1,575 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Finglas (/ˈfɪŋɡləs/; Irish: Fionnghlas, meaning "clear streamlet") is a northwestern outer suburb of Dublin, Ireland. It lies close to Junction 5 of the
Timeline of clothing and textiles technology (2,535 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
This timeline of clothing and textiles technology covers the events of fiber and flexible woven material worn on the body; including making, modification
History of the Jews in Wales (1,242 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The history of the Jews in Wales begins in the 13th century. However, shortly after the English conquest of Wales, Edward I issued the 1290 Edict of Expulsion
Colonna family (1,764 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Colonna, also known as Sciarrillo or Sciarra, is an Italian noble family, forming part of the papal nobility. It was powerful in medieval and Renaissance
Conzano (854 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Commune of Conzano (Italian: Comune di Conzano; Piemontese: Consan) is a municipality located in the south of Casale Monferrato, in the north-west
Sakai (1,606 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Sakai (堺市, Sakai-shi) is a city located in Osaka Prefecture, Japan, on the edge of Osaka Bay at the mouth of the Yamato River. It has been one of the largest
Russo-Turkish War (1768–1774) (2,805 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
The Russo-Turkish War of 1768–1774 was a major armed conflict that saw Russian arms largely victorious against the Ottoman Empire. Russia's victory brought
Russo-Polish War (1654–1667) (1,752 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
The Russo-Polish War of 1654–1667, also called the Thirteen Years' War, First Northern War, War for Ukraine or Russian Deluge (Polish: Potop rosyjski,
Economic miracle (262 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Economic miracle is an informal economic term for a period of dramatic economic development that is entirely unexpected or unexpectedly strong. Economic
Persian–Portuguese War (1,034 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Persian–Portuguese war took place from 1507 to 1622 and involved the Portuguese Empire and the Kingdom of Ormus, its vassal, on one side, and the Safavid
Kosiński uprising (561 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Kosiński uprising (1591–1593) is a name applied to two rebellions in the Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth (modern-day Ukraine) organised by Krzysztof Kosiński
Mongolian name (2,648 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Mongolian names have undergone a number of changes in the history of Mongolia, both with regard to their meaning and their source languages. In Inner Mongolia
Paracelsianism (1,106 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Paracelsianism (also Paracelsism; German: Paracelsismus) was an early modern medical movement based on the theories and therapies of Paracelsus. It developed
John Jakes (930 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
John William Jakes (born March 31, 1932) is an American writer, best known for American historical fiction. His Civil War trilogy, North and South, has
Bar Confederation (2,755 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Bar Confederation (Polish: Konfederacja barska; 1768–1772) was an association of Polish nobles (szlachta) formed at the fortress of Bar in Podolia
Dildo (4,079 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
A dildo (lat. I dilate from the verb dildare) is a sex toy, often explicitly phallic in appearance, intended for sexual penetration or other sexual activity
Persian–Portuguese War (1,034 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Persian–Portuguese war took place from 1507 to 1622 and involved the Portuguese Empire and the Kingdom of Ormus, its vassal, on one side, and the Safavid
Bar Confederation (2,755 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Bar Confederation (Polish: Konfederacja barska; 1768–1772) was an association of Polish nobles (szlachta) formed at the fortress of Bar in Podolia
Miles Christianus (810 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
and only became prominent after the Protestant Reformation. In the early modern period, the understanding of the term again became more metaphorical, but
Cotton Mather (10,220 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Cotton Mather /ˈmæðər/ FRS (February 12, 1663 – February 13, 1728) was a New England Puritan minister, prolific author, and pamphleteer. One of the most
Clemence Dane (1,221 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Clemence Dane was the pseudonym of Winifred Ashton (21 February 1888 – 28 March 1965), an English novelist and playwright. After completing her education
Letter of marque (3,702 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
A letter of marque and reprisal (French: lettre de marque; lettre de course) was a government license in the Age of Sail that authorized a private person
Emma Donoghue (2,012 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Emma Donoghue (born 24 October 1969) is an Irish-Canadian playwright, literary historian, novelist, and screenwriter. Her 2010 novel Room was a finalist
Man-at-arms (3,955 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
A man-at-arms was a soldier of the High Medieval to Renaissance periods who was typically well-versed in the use of arms and served as a fully armoured
Birdoswald (451 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Birdoswald is a former farm in the civil parish of Waterhead in the English county of Cumbria (formerly in Cumberland). It stands on the site of the Roman
Arturo Pérez-Reverte (1,696 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Arturo Pérez-Reverte Gutiérrez (born 25 November 1951 in Cartagena) is a Spanish novelist and journalist. He worked as a war correspondent for RTVE and
18th century (6,296 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The 18th century lasted from January 1, 1701 (MDCCI) to December 31, 1800 (MDCCC). The term is often used to refer to the 1700s, the century between January
Patten (shoe) (1,884 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Pattens are protective overshoes that were worn in Europe from the Middle Ages until the early 20th century. Pattens were worn outdoors over a normal shoe
James Clavell (2,797 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
James Clavell (born Charles Edmund Dumaresq Clavell, 10 October 1921 – 7 September 1994), was an Australian (and later naturalized American) novelist,
Mary Johnston (1,348 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Mary Johnston (November 21, 1870 – May 9, 1936) was an American novelist and women's rights advocate from Virginia. She was one of America's best selling
Amitav Ghosh (1,508 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Amitav Ghosh (born 11 July 1956) is an Indian writer and the winner of the 54th Jnanpith award, best known for his work in English fiction. Amitav Ghosh
Second Hundred Years' War (1,243 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Second Hundred Years' War (c. 1689 – c. 1815) is a periodization or historical era term used by some historians to describe the series of military
Russo-Swedish War (1788–1790) (3,896 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
The Russo-Swedish War of 1788–1790, known as Gustav III's Russian War in Sweden, Gustav III's War in Finland and Catherine II's Swedish War in Russia,
Sanfedismo (1,015 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Sanfedismo (from Santa Fede, "Holy Faith" in Italian) was a popular anti-Jacobin movement, organized by Cardinal Fabrizio Ruffo, which mobilized peasants
Greeks in Romania (1,182 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Greeks are a historic minority group in Romania. At times, as during the Phanariote era, this presence has amounted to hegemony; at other times (including
Third Battle of Panipat (6,248 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Third Battle of Panipat took place on 14 January 1761 at Panipat, about 97 km (60 miles) north of Delhi, between the Maratha Empire and the invading
La Tour-d'Aigues (477 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
La Tour-d'Aigues (French pronunciation: ​[la tuʁ dɛɡ]; Occitan: La Torre d'Egues) is a commune in the Vaucluse department in the Provence-Alpes-Côte d'Azur
Pan-Slavic language (1,293 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
A pan-Slavic language is a zonal constructed language for communication among Slavic people. Nowadays there are approximately 18 extant Slavic languages
Polish–Swedish War (1621–1625) (1,319 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
The Polish–Swedish War of 1621 to 1625 was a war in a long-running series of conflicts between the Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth and the Swedish Empire
Naval artillery in the Age of Sail (2,025 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Naval artillery in the Age of Sail encompasses the period of roughly 1571–1862: when large, sail-powered wooden naval warships dominated the high seas
Polish–Swedish War (1626–1629) (1,784 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
The Polish–Swedish War of 1626–1629 was the fourth stage (after 1600–1611, 1617–1618, and 1620–1625) in a series of conflicts between Sweden and Poland
Komarpant (565 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Komarpanth (or Komarpant naik or Comorpaica) are a social group centred in and around Karwar Goa, komarpants, primarily speak their own language, known
Northern Seven Years' War (2,544 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Northern Seven Years' War (also known as the Nordic Seven Years' War, the First Northern War or the Seven Years War in Scandinavia) was fought between
Sophie (1,267 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Sophie (meaning "wisdom") is a version of the name Sophia. Sophie, Countess of Bar (c. 1004 or 1018–1093), sovereign Countess of Bar and lady of Mousson
Portuguese Restoration War (5,007 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Portuguese Restoration War (Portuguese: Guerra da Restauração) was the war between Portugal and Spain that began with the Portuguese revolution of
Smolensk War (2,726 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Smolensk War (1632–1634) was a conflict fought between the Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth and Russia. Hostilities began in October 1632 when Russian
Jane Porter (934 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Jane Porter (17 January 1776 – 24 May 1850) was an English historical novelist, dramatist and literary figure. Her work The Scottish Chiefs is seen as
Quinto, Aragon (1,767 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Quinto (Spanish pronunciation: [ˈkinto]) is a town and municipality in the province of Zaragoza, northeast Spain. It is located on the south bank of the
Frederick Marryat (1,745 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Captain Frederick Marryat CB FRS (10 July 1792 – 9 August 1848) was a Royal Navy officer, a novelist, and an acquaintance of Charles Dickens. He is noted
Polish–Swedish War (1600–1611) (1,757 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
The Polish–Swedish War (1600–1611) was a continuation of struggle between Sweden and the Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth over control of Livonia and Estonia
Spada da lato (352 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
and the immediate predecessor (or early form) of the rapier of the Early Modern period. Its use was taught in the Dardi school of Italian fencing, and was
Polish–Swedish wars (3,371 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Polish–Swedish Wars were a series of wars between the Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth and Sweden. Broadly construed, the term refers to a series of
Philippa Gregory (2,232 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Philippa Gregory (born 9 January 1954) is an English historical novelist who has been publishing since 1987. The best known of her works is The Other Boleyn
Rafael Sabatini (1,876 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Rafael Sabatini (29 April 1875 – 13 February 1950) was an Italian-English writer of romance and adventure novels. He is best known for his worldwide bestsellers:
Hoogstraten (987 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Hoogstraten (Dutch pronunciation: [ˈɦoːxstraːtə(n)]) is a municipality located in the Belgian province of Antwerp. The municipality comprises Hoogstraten
War of the Polish Succession (3,589 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The War of the Polish Succession (Polish: Wojna o sukcesję polską; 1733–35) was a major European conflict sparked by a Polish civil war over the succession
H. Rider Haggard (3,662 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Sir Henry Rider Haggard KBE (/ˈhæɡərd/; 22 June 1856 – 14 May 1925) was an English writer of adventure fiction set in exotic locations, predominantly Africa
Syrmia (2,664 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Syrmia (Serbo-Croatian: Srem/Срем or Srijem/Сријем) is a region of the southern Pannonian Plain, which lies between the Danube and Sava rivers. It is divided
Felicity Heal (632 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Felicity Margaret Heal, FRHistS, FBA (born 24 September 1945) is a British historian and academic, specialising in early modern Britain. From 1980 to 2011
Aparan (1,512 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Aparan (Armenian: Ապարան), is a town and urban municipal community in Armenia, located in the Aragatsotn Province, about 50 kilometers northwest of the
Temporal power of the Holy See (1,400 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The temporal power of the Holy See designates the political and secular influence of the Holy See, the leading of a State by the pope of the Catholic Church
Franco-Spanish War (1635–1659) (4,511 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
The 1635 to 1659 Franco-Spanish War was a European conflict fought primarily by France and Spain, with other powers participating at different points.
Heraldic adoption (776 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Heraldic adoption (Polish: adopcja herbowa), was in the Kingdom of Poland a legal form of ennoblement and adoption into an existing heraldic clan; along
Eiji Yoshikawa (1,232 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Eiji Yoshikawa (吉川 英治, Yoshikawa Eiji, August 11, 1892 – September 7, 1962) was a Japanese historical novelist. Among his best-known novels are revisions
Fähnlein (616 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Fähnlein (in Swedish: fänika) was an infantry unit approximately equivalent to the company or battalion which was used in parts of Europe during the
Valtellina (1,667 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Valtellina or the Valtelline (occasionally spelled as two words in English: Val Telline; Romansh: Vuclina (listen); Lombard: Valtelina or Valtulina; German:
Robert W. Chambers (2,346 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Robert William Chambers (May 26, 1865 – December 16, 1933) was an American artist and fiction writer, best known for his book of short stories titled The
Howard Fast (2,918 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Howard Melvin Fast (November 11, 1914 – March 12, 2003) was an American novelist and television writer. Fast also wrote under the pen names E. V. Cunningham
James A. Michener (2,844 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
James Albert Michener (/ˈmɪtʃənər/ or /ˈmɪtʃnər/; February 3, 1907 – October 16, 1997) was an American author. He wrote more than 40 books, most of which
Cinnamon (4,157 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Cinnamon is a spice obtained from the inner bark of several tree species from the genus Cinnamomum. Cinnamon is used mainly as an aromatic condiment and
Colonisation of Africa (3,487 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The history of external colonisation of Africa can be dated from ancient, medieval, or modern history, depending on how the term colonisation is defined
Learned medicine (626 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Learned medicine is the European medical tradition in the Early Modern period, when it experienced the tension between the texts derived from ancient
Zamagna (324 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Zamagna (in Italian; Zamanja, Džamanjić or Zamanjić in Serbo-Croatian) was one of the noble families (post-Roman patriciates) of the Republic of Ragusa
Trefignath (1,397 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Trefignath is a Neolithic burial chamber near Trearddur, south of Holyhead on Holy Island, off Anglesey in Wales. In its most complete form it included
Ottoman–Venetian War (1570–1573) (3,554 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
The Fourth Ottoman–Venetian War, also known as the War of Cyprus (Italian: Guerra di Cipro) was fought between 1570 and 1573. It was waged between the
Martial arts timeline (2,711 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
This martial arts timeline is designed to help describe the history of the martial arts in a linear fashion. Many of the articles for particular styles
Battle of Tocarema (2,144 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Battle of Tocarema (Spanish: Batalla de Tocarema) was a battle fought between an alliance of the troops of Spanish conquistador Gonzalo Jiménez de
Târnăveni (1,118 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Târnăveni (Romanian pronunciation: [tɨrnəˈvenʲ], historically Diciosânmartin; Hungarian: Dicsőszentmárton, Hungarian pronunciation: [ˈdit͡ʃøːsɛntmaːrton]
English church monuments (1,563 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
A church monument is an architectural or sculptural memorial to a deceased person or persons, located within a Christian church. It can take various forms
Ruthenia (2,228 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Ancient Greek: Ῥωσία, Latin: Rus(s)ia, Ruscia, Ruzzia). During the early modern period, the term also acquired several specific meanings. The ancient land
Ann Rinaldi (690 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Ann Rinaldi (born August 27, 1934 in New York City) is an American young adult fiction author. She is best known for her historical fiction, including
Mouzeil (1,032 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Mouzeil is a commune in the Loire-Atlantique department in the Pays de la Loire in western France. Mouzeil can be found in the countryside in the northern
Buff coat (1,171 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The European buff coat is an item of leather clothing that was primarily worn by cavalry and officers during the 17th century, but also worn by a small
Barawa (2,265 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
battle, the city of Barawa quickly recovered from the attack. In the early modern period, Barawa was ruled by the Geledi Sultanate. It was considered the
Christmas in Scotland (993 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
being closely linked in Scotland during the Late Middle Ages and the Early Modern period. A 1640 Act of the Parliament of Scotland abolished the "Yule vacation
Christmas in Scotland (993 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
being closely linked in Scotland during the Late Middle Ages and the Early Modern period. A 1640 Act of the Parliament of Scotland abolished the "Yule vacation
Mughal artillery (1,368 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Mughal artillery included a variety of cannons, rockets, and mines employed by the Mughal Empire. This gunpowder technology played an important role in
Charlotte Mary Yonge (2,454 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Charlotte Mary Yonge (1823–1901) was an English novelist who wrote to the service of the church. Her books helped to spread the influence of the Oxford
Neoclassicism (8,886 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Neoclassicism (also spelled Neo-classicism; from Greek νέος nèos, "new" and Greek κλασικός klasikόs, "of the highest rank") was a Western cultural movement
C. J. Sansom (1,154 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Christopher John Sansom is a British writer of historical crime novels. He was born in 1952 in Edinburgh and was educated at George Watson's College in
White Carniola (1,739 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
White Carniola (Slovene: Bela krajina; German: Weißkrain or Weiße Mark) is a traditional region in southeastern Slovenia on the border with Croatia. Due
Chateau des Marais, Guernsey (788 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Chateau des Marais is a protected chateau in Saint Sampson, Guernsey. The colloquial name is Ivy Castle. A moated medieval castle dating from before
De la Gardie campaign (897 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The De la Gardie campaign was a joint military campaign by the Tsardom of Russia and Sweden during the Polish–Muscovite War from April 1609 to June 1610
Baroness Orczy (2,272 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Baroness Emma Orczy (full name: Emma Magdolna Rozália Mária Jozefa Borbála Orczy de Orci) (/ˈɔːrtsiː/; 23 September 1865 – 12 November 1947), usually known
Irish Confederate Wars (5,443 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Irish Confederate Wars, also called the Eleven Years' War (from the Irish language name Cogadh na hAon-déag mBliana), took place in Ireland between
Montenegro–Russia relations (1,551 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Montenegro–Russia relations (Russian: Российско-черногорские отношения, Montenegrin: Rusko-crnogorski odnosi / Руско-црногорски односи) are foreign relations
Dennis Wheatley (3,174 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Dennis Yeats Wheatley (8 January 1897 – 10 November 1977) was an English writer whose prolific output of thrillers and occult novels made him one of the
Slonim (1,795 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Slonim (Belarusian: Сло́нім, Russian: Сло́ним, Lithuanian: Slanimas, Polish: Słonim, Yiddish: סלאָנים‎, Slonim) is a city in Grodno Region, Belarus, capital
Treaty of Perpetual Peace (749 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Treaty of Perpetual Peace was signed by James IV of Scotland and Henry VII of England in 1502. It agreed to end the intermittent warfare between Scotland
Paganism (4,908 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Paganism (from classical Latin pāgānus "rural", "rustic", later "civilian") is a term first used pejoratively in the fourth century by early Christians
Mary Elizabeth Braddon (1,484 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Mary Elizabeth Braddon (4 October 1835 – 4 February 1915) was an English popular novelist of the Victorian era. She is best known for her 1862 sensation
Kingdom of Sicily (6,065 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Kingdom of Sicily (Latin: Regnum Siciliae, Italian: Regno di Sicilia, Sicilian: Regnu di Sicilia, Catalan: Regne de Sicília, Spanish: Reino de Sicilia)
Rollright Stones (5,678 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
*rodland 'wheel enclosure' refers to the King's Men circle. By the Early Modern period, folkloric stories had developed about the Stones, telling of how
Persecution of Jews during the Black Death (1,906 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Black Death persecutions and massacres were a series of violent attacks on Jewish communities falsely blamed for outbreaks of the Black Death in Europe
Vitis vinifera (2,938 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Vitis vinifera, the common grape vine, is a species of Vitis, native to the Mediterranean region, Central Europe, and southwestern Asia, from Morocco and
Kingdom of France (5,339 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
begin with and was only incorporated into the kingdom during the early modern period. Territories inherited from Western Francia: Domain of the Frankish
Kratovo, North Macedonia (1,530 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Kratovo (Macedonian: Кратово [ˈkratɔvɔ] (listen)) is a small town in North Macedonia. It is the seat of Kratovo Municipality. It lies on the western slopes
Galley tactics (2,449 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Galley tactics were the dominant form of naval tactics used from antiquity to the late 16th century when sailing ships began to replace oared ships as
Jōkamachi (1,175 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Jin'yamachi. It is also referred to as Jōka as was common before the early modern period. The advent of Jōkamachi dates back to the Sengoku period (period
Glossa Ordinaria (774 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
time. The Glossa ordinaria was a standard reference work into the Early Modern period, although it was supplemented by the Postills attributed to Hugh
Patrick O'Brian (4,929 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Patrick O'Brian, CBE (12 December 1914 – 2 January 2000), born Richard Patrick Russ, was an English novelist and translator, best known for his Aubrey–Maturin
Osasco (1,812 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Osasco (Portuguese pronunciation: [oˈzasku]) is a municipality in São Paulo State, Brazil, located in the Greater São Paulo and ranking 5th in population
Military history of Vietnam (2,090 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Army and warfare made their first appearance in Vietnamese history during the 3rd millennium BC. Throughout thousands of years, wars played a great role
Dagger (3,950 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
A dagger is a knife with a very sharp point and usually two sharp edges, typically designed or capable of being used as a thrusting or stabbing weapon
Galley tactics (2,449 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Galley tactics were the dominant form of naval tactics used from antiquity to the late 16th century when sailing ships began to replace oared ships as
Kratovo, North Macedonia (1,530 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Kratovo (Macedonian: Кратово [ˈkratɔvɔ] (listen)) is a small town in North Macedonia. It is the seat of Kratovo Municipality. It lies on the western slopes
Outline of war (3,212 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The following outline is provided as an overview of and topical guide to war: War – organised and often prolonged armed conflict that is carried out by
Garde Écossaise (1,725 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Garde Écossaise (French pronunciation: ​[ɡaʁd ekɔsɛz], Scots Guard) was an elite Scottish military unit founded in 1418 by the Valois Charles VII of
David Lindsay (novelist) (1,076 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
David Lindsay (3 March 1876 – 16 July 1945) was a British author best remembered for the philosophical science fiction novel A Voyage to Arcturus (1920)
Armenian Highlands (2,388 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Armenian Highlands (Armenian: Հայկական լեռնաշխարհ, romanized: Haykakan leṙnašxarh; also known as the Armenian Upland, Armenian plateau, or Armenian
Tatars of Romania (1,392 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Tatars of Romania (Romanian: Tătarii din România) or Dobrujan Tatars (Crimean Tatar: Dobruca tatarları) are a Turkic ethnic group that have been present
Great Northern War (6,513 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Great Northern War (1700–1721) was a conflict in which a coalition led by the Tsardom of Russia successfully contested the supremacy of the Swedish
Glossa Ordinaria (774 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
time. The Glossa ordinaria was a standard reference work into the Early Modern period, although it was supplemented by the Postills attributed to Hugh
Maryse Condé (1,975 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Maryse Condé (née Boucolon; February 11, 1937) is a French novelist, critic, and playwright from the French Overseas department and region of Guadeloupe
Sultanate of Women (1,580 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
mothers of the Sultans of the Ottoman Empire. This phenomenon in the early modern period, approximately between the years 1533 and 1656, began during the
Second Northern War (4,978 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Second Northern War (1655–60), also First or Little Northern War) was fought between Sweden and its adversaries the Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth
Dorothy Dunnett (1,875 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Dorothy, Lady Dunnett OBE (née Halliday, 25 August 1923 – 9 November 2001) was a Scottish novelist best known for her historical fiction. Dunnett is most
David Caute (769 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
John David Caute (born 16 December 1936 in Alexandria, Egypt) is a British author, novelist, playwright, historian and journalist. Caute was educated at
Divination (4,313 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Divination (from Latin divinare, 'to foresee, to foretell, to predict, to prophesy', related to divinus, 'divine'), or "to be inspired by a god," is the
Pješivci (516 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Pješivci (Serbian and Montenegrin: Пјешивци; pronounced [pjê̞ʃiːʋt͡si]) was a tribe in Old Montenegro (part of modern Montenegro), consisting of numerous
St Columb Major (2,961 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
St Columb Major is a town and civil parish in Cornwall, England, United Kingdom. Often referred to locally as St Columb, it is approximately seven miles
Muscovite–Lithuanian Wars (3,506 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Muscovite–Lithuanian Wars (also known as Russo-Lithuanian Wars, or just either Muscovite Wars or Lithuanian Wars) were a series of wars between the
Charles De Coster (643 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Charles-Theodore-Henri De Coster (20 August 1827 – 7 May 1879) was a Belgian novelist whose efforts laid the basis for a native Belgian literature. He
Watton-at-Stone (2,023 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Watton-at-Stone is a village in the English county of Hertfordshire, situated midway between the towns of Stevenage and Hertford in the valley of the River
East Lothian (3,076 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
East Lothian (/ˈloʊðiən/; Scots: East Lowden; Scottish Gaelic: Lodainn an Ear) is one of the 32 council areas of Scotland, as well as a historic county
Cecelia Holland (686 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Cecelia Holland is an American historical fiction novelist. Holland was born December 31, 1943, in Henderson, Nevada. She grew up in Metuchen, New Jersey
Hilary Saint George Saunders (635 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Hilary Aidan Saint George Saunders MC (14 January 1898 – 16 December 1951) was a British author, born in Clifton near Bristol. He was the son of G.W. St
Brian Cleeve (2,355 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Brian Brendon Talbot Cleeve (22 November 1921 – 11 March 2003) was a writer, whose published works include twenty-one novels and over a hundred short stories
Max Brand (1,087 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Frederick Schiller Faust (May 29, 1892 – May 12, 1944) was an American author known primarily for his Western stories using the pseudonym Max Brand. He
Banaadir (1,811 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
adjacent to Mogadishu stretching as far as hundreds of miles. The early modern period which extended the meaning of Benadir to the interior midway towards
Military history of England (1,099 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The military history of England and Wales deals with the period prior to the creation of the United Kingdom of Great Britain in 1707. For the period after
Cartography (6,924 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
illuminate lettering, heraldic arms, or other decorative elements. The Early Modern Period saw the convergence of cartographical techniques across Eurasia and
Hadrumetum (1,304 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Vandal, Byzantine, and Umayyad conquerors left it ruined. In the early modern period, it was the village of Hammeim, now part of Sousse, Tunisia. The
Vale Castle, Guernsey (1,263 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Vale Castle, is a protected building located in the Vale, Guernsey. The original name was "Le Chateau St Michel", later it became "Chateau de Val" or "Chateau
Pułtusk (1,703 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Pułtusk (pronounced Poow-toosk [ˈpuu̯tusk]) is a town in Poland by the river Narew, 70 kilometres (43 miles) north of Warsaw. It is located in the Masovian
Vermeer's Hat (1,944 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Vermeer's Hat: The Seventeenth Century and the Dawn of the Global World is a book by the Canadian historian Professor Timothy Brook, in which he explores
Female hysteria (3,487 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Female hysteria was once a common medical diagnosis for women, which was described as exhibiting a wide array of symptoms, including anxiety, shortness
Ethiopian Empire (3,793 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
of Tigray killed Iyoas I and replaced him with Yohannes II. The Early Modern period was one of intense cultural and artistic creation. Notable philosophers
Deluge (history) (6,264 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
The term Deluge (Polish: potop szwedzki, Lithuanian: švedų tvanas) denotes a series of mid-17th-century campaigns in the Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth
Battle of Maraycalla (86 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The battle of Maraycalla was fought in 1534 between Spanish conquistadors and renegade forces of the Inca Empire, whose capital Cuzco had been taken by
Susanna Gregory (847 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Susanna Gregory is the pseudonym of Elizabeth Cruwys, a Cambridge academic who was previously a coroner's officer. She writes detective fiction, and is
Moldavian Magnate Wars (3,837 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Moldavian Magnate Wars or Moldavian Ventures refer to the period at the end of the 16th century and the beginning of the 17th century when the magnates
Kathleen Winsor (956 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Kathleen Winsor (October 16, 1919 – May 26, 2003) was an American author. She is best known for her first work, the 1944 historical novel Forever Amber
Outline of the History of the British Isles (803 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The following outline is provided as an overview of and topical guide to the history of the British Isles: History of the British Isles – history of the
Medieval theatre (2,888 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Medieval theatre encompasses theatrical performance in the period between the fall of the Western Roman Empire in the 5th century and the beginning of
Deluge (history) (6,264 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
The term Deluge (Polish: potop szwedzki, Lithuanian: švedų tvanas) denotes a series of mid-17th-century campaigns in the Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth
Emilio Salgari (2,343 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Emilio Salgari (Italian pronunciation: [eˈmiːljo salˈɡaːri], but often erroneously pronounced [ˈsalɡari]; 21 August 1862 – 25 April 1911) was an Italian
David Caute (769 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
John David Caute (born 16 December 1936 in Alexandria, Egypt) is a British author, novelist, playwright, historian and journalist. Caute was educated at
Divine right of kings (7,075 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The divine right of kings, divine right, or God's mandate is a political and religious doctrine of political legitimacy in a monarchy. It stems from a
16th century (8,707 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The 16th century begins with the Julian year 1501 (MDI) and ends with either the Julian or the Gregorian year 1600 (MDC) (depending on the reckoning used;
Cossack uprisings (855 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Cossack uprisings (also rebellions, revolts) were a series of military conflicts between the cossacks and the states claiming dominion over the territories
Politics of Fidel Castro (1,701 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Thus, Marxists believe that capitalism replaced feudalism in the early modern period as the wealthy industrial class, or bourgeoisie, took political and
Werne (905 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Werne an der Lippe (Westphalian: Wäen) is a town in the Federal state of North Rhine-Westphalia in the Unna district in Germany. It is located on the southern
Carolly Erickson (248 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Carolly Erickson (born January 1, 1943) is an American author of historical fiction and non-fiction. She lives in Hawaii. In 2008, her book The Tsarina's
Battle of Kirtipur (1,133 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Gorkha Kirtipur The Battle of Kirtipur (Nepali: कीर्तिपुरको युद्ध) occurred in 1767 during the Gorkha conquest of Nepal, and was fought at Kirtipur, one
Leuven (4,063 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Leuven (/ˈlɜːvən/, Dutch: [ˈløːvə(n)] (listen)) or Louvain (/luːˈvæ̃/, also US: /luːˈveɪn/, French: [luvɛ̃]; German: Löwen [ˈløːvn̩] (listen)) is the capital
Kathryn Lasky (1,404 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Kathryn Lasky (born June 24, 1944) is an American children's writer who also writes for adults under the names Kathryn Lasky Knight and E. L. Swann. Her
Plate armour (3,290 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Plate armour is a historical type of personal body armour made from bronze, iron, or steel plates, culminating in the iconic suit of armour entirely encasing
History of martial arts (3,876 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
and is subject to the changes of fencing fashion throughout the Early Modern period. It establishes itself as the separate style of Mensur fencing in
John Buchan (4,716 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
John Buchan, 1st Baron Tweedsmuir GCMG GCVO CH PC DL (/ˈbʌxən/; 26 August 1875 – 11 February 1940) was a Scottish novelist, historian, and Unionist politician
Early Modern English (4,824 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Because those phonemes were in such a state of flux during the whole Early Modern period (with evidence of rhyming occurring among them as well as with the
Miquelet (militia) (560 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Miquelets or Micalets (Catalan pronunciation: [mikəˈlɛts]; Spanish: Migueletes) were irregular Catalan and Valencian mountain light troops. They enjoyed
Great Britain (7,095 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Coordinates: 53°50′N 2°25′W / 53.833°N 2.417°W / 53.833; -2.417 Great Britain is an island in the North Atlantic Ocean off the northwest coast of continental
Stanley J. Weyman (1,100 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Stanley John Weyman (pronounced [waɪ mæn], 7 August 1855 – 10 April 1928) was an English writer of historical romance. His most popular works were written
History of clothing in the Indian subcontinent (3,650 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
History of clothing in the Indian subcontinent can be traced to the Indus Valley Civilization or earlier. Indians have mainly worn clothing made up of
Dubno (1,826 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Dubno (Ukrainian: Ду́бно, Polish: Dubno) is a city located on the Ikva River in Rivne Oblast (province) of western Ukraine. Serving as the administrative
Rosemary Sutcliff (2,655 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Rosemary Sutcliff CBE (14 December 1920 – 23 July 1992) was an English novelist best known for children's books, especially historical fiction and retellings
Ethiopia–Somalia relations (1,291 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Ethiopia–Somalia relations (Somali: Xiriirka Itoobiya-Soomaaliya) are bilateral relations between Ethiopia and Somalia. These relations are characterized
Vinnytsia (2,663 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Vinnytsia (/ˈvɪnɪts(j)ə, ˈviːn-/ VIN-it-s(y)ə, VEEN-; Ukrainian: Вінниця, romanized: Vinnycja, IPA: [ˈwinːɪtsʲɐ] (listen); Lithuanian: Vinica), also known
Austria–Czech Republic relations (1,254 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Austria–Czech Republic relations are the neighborly relations between Austria and the Czech Republic, two member states of the European Union. Both countries
Centre for Renaissance and Early Modern Studies (196 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Centre for Renaissance and Early Modern Studies (CREMS) was launched in October 2005 at the University of York. It is focused on the study of the 16th
Tim Severin (2,044 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Timothy Severin (25 September 1940 – 18 December 2020) was a British explorer, historian, and writer. Severin was noted for his work in retracing the legendary
Poltava (3,373 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Poltava (UK: /pɒlˈtɑːvə/, US: /pəlˈ-/; Ukrainian: Полтава [polˈtɑwɐ]) is a city located on the Vorskla River in central Ukraine. It is the capital city
Battle of Villalar (1,005 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Battle of Villalar was a battle in the Revolt of the Comuneros fought on 23 April 1521 near the town of Villalar in Valladolid province, Spain. The
Poltava (3,373 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Poltava (UK: /pɒlˈtɑːvə/, US: /pəlˈ-/; Ukrainian: Полтава [polˈtɑwɐ]) is a city located on the Vorskla River in central Ukraine. It is the capital city
Historiography of Switzerland (1,951 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The historiography of Switzerland is the study of the history of Switzerland. Early accounts of the history of the Old Swiss Confederacy are found in the
Witchcraft in Italy (1,382 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Evidence of magic use and witch trials were prevalent in the Early Modern period, and Inquisitorial prosecution of witches and magic users in Italy during
Christian apologetics (4,779 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Christian apologetics (Greek: ἀπολογία, "verbal defence, speech in defence") is a branch of Christian theology that defends Christianity against objections
Bernoulli family (664 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
substantially to the development of mathematics and physics during the early modern period. Originally from Antwerp, a branch of the family relocated to Basel
Essaouira (3,395 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Essaouira (/ɛsəˈwɪrə/; Arabic: الصويرة‎, romanized: aṣ-Ṣawīra; Berber: ⵎⵓⴳⴰⴷⵓⵔ, Amegdul; Portuguese: Mogador) is a city in the western Moroccan region
Budbrooke (1,520 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Budbrooke is a small village and civil parish in the Warwick district of Warwickshire, England, about 2½ miles west of Warwick town centre. According to
Aragonese language (2,859 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Aragonese (/ˌærəɡɒˈniːz/; aragonés [aɾaɣoˈnes] in Aragonese) is a Romance language spoken in several dialects by about 12,000 people as of 2011, in the
Hāfu (3,090 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Hāfu (ハーフ, "half") is a Japanese language term used to refer to an individual born to one ethnic Japanese and one non-Japanese parent. A loanword from
Evelyn Everett-Green (2,357 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Evelyn Ward Everett-Green (17 November 1856 in London – 23 April 1932 in Funchal) was an English novelist who started with improving, pious stories for
Ghent (4,220 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Ghent (/ɡɛnt/ GHENT; Dutch: Gent, [ɣɛnt] (listen); French: Gand, [ɡɑ̃] (listen); traditional English: Gaunt) is a city and a municipality in the Flemish
S. Fowler Wright (1,129 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Sydney Fowler Wright (6 January 1874 – 25 February 1965) was a British editor, poet, science fiction author, writer of screenplays, mystery fiction and
William Harrison Ainsworth (4,335 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
William Harrison Ainsworth (4 February 1805 – 3 January 1882) was an English historical novelist born at King Street in Manchester. He trained as a lawyer
Cosmo Hamilton (1,015 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Cosmo Hamilton (29 April 1870 – 14 October 1942), born Henry Charles Hamilton Gibbs, was an English playwright and novelist. He was the brother of writers
Bad Doberan (2,147 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Bad Doberan (German pronunciation: [baːt dobəˈʁaːn]) is a town in the district of Rostock, Mecklenburg-Vorpommern, Germany. It was the capital of the former
Venad (historical region) (2,957 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
Kozhikode (Nediyiruppu), and Kochi (Perumpadappu) in medieval and early modern period. Rulers of Venad trace their ancestry to the Vel chieftains related
Serbian Militia (1,632 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Serbian Militia (Latin: Rascianica militia; Serbian: Српска Милиција or Srpska Milicija) was a military unit of the Habsburg-Austrian army consisting
Bulhar (804 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Bulhar (Somali: Bulaxaar) is a historic port in the Sahil region of Somaliland with routes dating back to antiquity. The port was rejuvenated in the 19th
Hirschel Levin (290 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Rabbi Hirschel Ben Arye Löb Levin (also known as Hart Lyon and Hirshel Löbel; 1721 – 26 August 1800) was Chief Rabbi of Great Britain and of Berlin, and
Irish art (1,974 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The history of Irish art starts around 3200 BC with Neolithic stone carvings at the Newgrange megalithic tomb, part of the Brú na Bóinne complex which
Intersex rights in Malta (1,441 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Intersex rights in Malta since 2015 are among the most progressive in the world. Intersex children in Malta have world-first protections from non-consensual
Ottoman–Habsburg wars (6,250 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Ottoman–Habsburg wars were fought from the 16th through the 18th centuries between the Ottoman Empire and the Habsburg Monarchy, which was at times
Charge (warfare) (4,591 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
A charge is an offensive maneuver in battle in which combatants advance towards their enemy at their best speed in an attempt to engage in a decisive close
Moravian Wallachia (1,067 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Moravian Wallachia (Czech: Moravské Valašsko, or simply Valašsko; Romanian: Valahia Moravă) is a mountainous ethnoregion located in the easternmost part
Münster (4,239 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Münster (German: [ˈmʏnstɐ] (listen), Low Franconian and Low German: Mönster; Latin: Monasterium, from the Greek μοναστήριον monastērion, "monastery") is
Tim Willocks (272 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Tim Willocks is a British physician and novelist (Born 27 October 1957) in Stalybridge, Cheshire, England. Willocks studied medicine at the University
Acton, London (3,940 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Acton (/ˈæktən/) is an area of West London, England, within the London Borough of Ealing. It is 6.1 miles (10 km) west of Charing Cross. It lies within
Warwick Deeping (1,408 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
George Warwick Deeping (28 May 1877 – 20 April 1950) was an English novelist and short story writer, whose best-known novel was Sorrell and Son (1925)
German literature (3,002 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
German literature (German: Deutschsprachige Literatur) comprises those literary texts written in the German language. This includes literature written
Hotin County (718 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Hotin County was a county (ținut is Middle Ages and Early Modern Period, județ after) in the Principality of Moldavia (1359-1812), the Governorate of
Myōjin (1,025 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
shining/apparent deity (大明神) and save all sentient beings." Up until the early modern period, use of titles such as myōjin or gongen for many deities and their
History of Karnataka (3,008 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The history of Karnataka goes back more than two millennia. Several great empires and dynasties have ruled over Karnataka and have contributed greatly
Taylor Caldwell (1,809 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Janet Miriam Holland Taylor Caldwell (September 7, 1900 – August 30, 1985) was a British-born American novelist and prolific author of popular fiction
Nijmegen (3,807 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Nijmegen (Dutch: [ˈnɛimeːɣə(n)] (listen); Nijmeegs: Nimwèège [ˈnɪmβ̞ɛːçə]) is a city in the Netherlands' province of Gelderland, on the Waal river close
Cerridwen Fallingstar (2,785 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Cerridwen Fallingstar (born Cheri Lesh, November 15, 1952), is an American Wiccan Priestess, Shamanic Witch, and author. Since the late 1970s she has written
Baroque (12,476 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Baroque (UK: /bəˈrɒk/, US: /bəˈroʊk/; French: [baʁɔk]) is a style of architecture, music, dance, painting, sculpture and other arts that flourished
Pike and shot (3,217 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Frederic J. The French Reluctance to Adopt Firearms Technology in the Early Modern Period, in The Heirs of Archimedes: Science and the Art of War Through the
Pike and shot (3,217 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Frederic J. The French Reluctance to Adopt Firearms Technology in the Early Modern Period, in The Heirs of Archimedes: Science and the Art of War Through the
Sindhi literature (2,526 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Sindhi literature (Sindhi: سنڌي ادب‎), Sindhi-language literature in the Pakistani province of Sindh, consists of poetry and prose. It was influenced by
Demi-lancer (597 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The demi-lancer or demilancer was a type of heavy cavalryman found in Western Europe in the 16th and early 17th centuries. Demi-lancer was a term used
Taylor Caldwell (1,809 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Janet Miriam Holland Taylor Caldwell (September 7, 1900 – August 30, 1985) was a British-born American novelist and prolific author of popular fiction
Medieval Serbian literature (2,140 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
end of the 15th century, with its traditions extending into the early modern period. Medieval Serbia is an heir of Constantine the Great's Byzantium
Catholic Slavs (469 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Catholic Slavs and Slavic Catholic are terms used for the historically and/or predominantly Catholic Slavic ethnic groups and nations and for the history
Chalcis (2,971 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Chalcis (/ˈkælsɪs/; Ancient Greek & Katharevousa: Χαλκίς, Chalkís) or Chalkida (Modern Greek: Χαλκίδα, romanized: Halkídha, [xalˈciða]) is the chief town
Exercitiegenootschap (907 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
An exercitiegenootschap (Dutch pronunciation: [ɛksərˈsitsi.ɣəˌnoːtsxɑp], exercise company) or militia was a military organisation in the 18th century Netherlands
The General Crisis (1,757 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The General Crisis is a term used by some historians to describe the period of widespread global conflict and instability that occurred from the early
Atlantic World (3,684 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
James J. Horn, eds. "To Make America": European Emigration in the Early Modern Period. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1991. Altman, Ida and
Margaret Oliphant (3,213 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Margaret Oliphant Wilson Oliphant (born Margaret Oliphant Wilson; 4 April 1828 – 20 June 1897) was a Scottish novelist and historical writer, who usually
Polish–Russian War of 1792 (4,879 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Polish–Russian War of 1792 (also, War of the Second Partition, and in Polish sources, War in Defence of the Constitution) was fought between the Polish–Lithuanian
Burngreave (1,812 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Burngreave is an inner city district of Sheffield, South Yorkshire, England lying north of the city centre. The population of the ward taken at the 2011
Paul C. Doherty (1,844 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Paul Charles Dominic Doherty OBE (born 21 September 1946) is an English author, educator, lecturer and historian. He is also the Headmaster of Trinity
Twardogóra (925 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Twardogóra (pronounced Tfardo-goorah [tfardɔˈɡura], German: Festenberg) is a historic town in Oleśnica County, Lower Silesian Voivodeship, in south-western
Protests against early modern witch trials (2,518 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Throughout the era of the European witch trials in the Early Modern period, from the 15th to the 18th century, there were protests against both the belief
Hindu art (4,082 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Hindu art Hindu art encompasses the artistic traditions and styles culturally connected to Hinduism and have a long history of religious association with
Jack Lindsay (2,489 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Jack Lindsay (20 October 1900 – 8 March 1990) was an Australian-born writer, who from 1926 lived in the United Kingdom, initially in Essex. He was born
Alphons (1,414 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Alphons (Latinized Alphonsus, Adelphonsus, or Adefonsus) is a male given name recorded from the 8th century (Alfonso I of Asturias, r. 739–757) in the
Bari (4,523 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Bari (/ˈbɑːri/ BAR-ee, Italian: [ˈbaːri] (listen); Barese: Bare [ˈbæːrə]; Latin: Barium; Ancient Greek: Βάριον, romanized: Bárion) is the capital city
Battle of Bhaktapur (1,132 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Gorkha Bhaktapur The Battle of Bhaktapur was the final campaign in the Gorkha conquest of Nepal. It took place in Bhaktapur in 1769, and resulted in the
Wychbold (2,234 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Wychbold is a village in the Wychavon district of Worcestershire. The village is situated on the A38 between Droitwich Spa and Bromsgrove, and by Junction
Solomon Hirschell (190 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Rabbi Solomon Hirschell (12 February 1762, London – 31 October 1842, London) was the Chief Rabbi of Great Britain, 1802–42. He is best remembered for his
Barbara Willard (508 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Barbara Mary Willard (12 March 1909 – 18 February 1994) was a British novelist best known for children's historical fiction. Her "Mantlemass Chronicles"
Felix (name) (1,901 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Felix is a name that stems from Latin (fēlix, felicis) and means "happy" or "lucky". Its female form is Felicity (English)—late 14c., "happiness; that
H. Bedford-Jones (751 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Henry James O'Brien Bedford-Jones (April 29, 1887 – May 6, 1949) was a Canadian-American historical, adventure fantasy, science fiction, crime and Western
Swinside (1,446 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
was defined by the inclusion of two outer portal stones. In the Early Modern period, local folklore about the stones held that they had once been used
Cynthia Harrod-Eagles (1,258 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Cynthia Harrod-Eagles (born August 13, 1948) is a British writer of romance and mystery novels. She normally writes under her own name but also uses the
Cauterets (2,855 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Cauterets (in Occitan Cautarés, in Catalan Cautarés, in Aragonese Cautarès) is a spa town, a ski resort and a commune in the Hautes-Pyrénées department
Waren (Müritz) (2,755 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Waren (Müritz) (also Waren an der Müritz) is a town and climatic spa in the state of Mecklenburg-Vorpommern, Germany. It was the capital of the former
Steinar Imsen (159 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Technology. His field of concentration is the Late Middle Ages and the Early Modern Period (c. 1300–1700). Imsen has also worked as editor of Norsk historisk
Silver coin (2,884 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Silver coins are possibly the oldest mass-produced form of coinage. Silver has been used as a coinage metal since the times of the Greeks; their silver
Ruzhyn (urban-type settlement) (1,709 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Coordinates: 49°43′N 29°14′E / 49.717°N 29.233°E / 49.717; 29.233 Ruzhyn (Ukrainian: Ружин; Polish: Rużyn; Russian: Ружин translit. Ruzhyn; Yiddish:
Hungarians (6,358 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Hungarians, also known as Magyars (Hungarian: magyarok), are a nation and ethnic group native to Hungary (Hungarian: Magyarország) and historical Hungarian
Battle of Kathmandu (1,564 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Gorkha Kathmandu Sindhuli The Battle of Kathmandu (Nepali: काठमाडौंको युद्ध) or Siege of Kathmandu or Siege of Kantipur is a battle which occurred during
Margaret George (1,005 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Margaret George (born 1943) is an American historical novelist specializing in epic fictional biographies. She is known for her meticulous research and
Waren (Müritz) (2,755 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Waren (Müritz) (also Waren an der Müritz) is a town and climatic spa in the state of Mecklenburg-Vorpommern, Germany. It was the capital of the former
Anthony Burgess (7,308 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
John Anthony Burgess Wilson, FRSL (/ˈbɜːrdʒəs/; 25 February 1917 – 22 November 1993), who published under the name Anthony Burgess, was an English writer
Hungarians (6,358 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Hungarians, also known as Magyars (Hungarian: magyarok), are a nation and ethnic group native to Hungary (Hungarian: Magyarország) and historical Hungarian
Ruzhyn (urban-type settlement) (1,709 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Coordinates: 49°43′N 29°14′E / 49.717°N 29.233°E / 49.717; 29.233 Ruzhyn (Ukrainian: Ружин; Polish: Rużyn; Russian: Ружин translit. Ruzhyn; Yiddish:
Cassel, Nord (2,944 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Cassel (Dutch: Kassel) is a commune in the Nord départment in northern France. Built on a prominent hill overlooking French Flanders, the town has existed
Złotoryja (1,858 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Złotoryja (pronounced Zwoto-riya [zwɔtɔˈrɨja]; German: Goldberg, Latin: Aureus Mons, Aurum) is a historic town in Lower Silesian Voivodeship in southwestern
Margaret Irwin (594 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Margaret Emma Faith Irwin (27 March 1889 – 11 December 1967) was an English historical novelist. She also wrote a factual biography of Sir Walter Raleigh
Maurice Hewlett (1,009 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Maurice Henry Hewlett (1861 – 15 June 1923) was an English historical novelist, poet and essayist. He was born at Weybridge, the eldest son of Henry Gay
Tripolitanian civil war (174 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Tripolitanian civil war was a conflict from 1793 to 1795 which occurred in what is today the country of Libya. Ali Benghul, an Ottoman officer, deposed
Evelyn Anthony (792 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Evelyn Bridgett Patricia Ward-Thomas (3 July 1926 – 25 September 2018), better known by the pen name Evelyn Anthony, was a British writer. Anthony was
Valerie Anand (599 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Valerie Anand (born 1937) is a British author of historical fiction. Under the pen name Fiona Buckley she writes the series of historical mysteries, set
H. F. M. Prescott (544 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Hilda Frances Margaret Prescott, more usually known as H. F. M. Prescott (22 February 1896 – 5 May 1972), was an English author, academic and historian
Mentalism (philosophy) (238 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article
representation-first philosophers (what John Sergeant calls 'Ideism') common in the Early Modern period, including such philosophers as René Descartes, John Locke, George
Niigata (city) (2,808 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Niigata (新潟市, Niigata-shi, Japanese: [niːɡata]) is the capital and the most populous city of Niigata Prefecture located in the Chūbu region of Japan. It
Hartlib Circle (1,755 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Hartlib Circle was the correspondence network set up in Western and Central Europe by Samuel Hartlib, an intelligencer based in London, and his associates
E-hon (793 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
from the Muromachi period are typically known as nara-ehon. In the early modern period (1600–1868) illustrated books exploded in popularity. They covered
Robin Maxwell (author) (203 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Robin Maxwell (born February 26, 1948) is an American historical novelist who specializes in the Tudor period. She is also a screenwriter and political
James S. Shapiro (882 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Literature at Columbia University who specializes in Shakespeare and the Early Modern period. Shapiro has served on the faculty at Columbia University since 1985
William and Mary style (1,415 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
What later came to be known as the William and Mary style is a furniture design common from 1700 to 1725 in the Netherlands, the Kingdom of England, the
Push of pike (556 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The push of pike was a particular feature of late medieval and Early Modern warfare that occurred when two opposing columns of pikemen (often Swiss mercenaries
Groß-Umstadt (1,062 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Groß-Umstadt is a town in the district of Darmstadt-Dieburg in the Bundesland (federal state) of Hessen in Germany. It is near Darmstadt and Frankfurt
Naomi Mitchison (4,369 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Naomi Mary Margaret Mitchison, Baroness Mitchison, CBE (née Haldane; 1 November 1897 – 11 January 1999) was a Scottish novelist and poet. Often called
Battle of Lalitpur (1,085 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Gorkha Lalitpur The Battle of Lalitpur in 1768 ended with the Gorkha conquest of Lalitpur, one of the three kingdoms in Nepal centered in the Kathmandu
Muqata'ah (683 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
life of the buyer. As the Ottoman Empire began to move into the early modern period, vacant timars, instead of being reassigned, were often added to
Pitești (4,111 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Pitești (Romanian pronunciation: [piˈteʃtʲ]) is a city in Romania, located on the Argeș River. The capital and largest city of Argeș County, it is an important
Isolationism (1,720 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Mary Elizabeth Berry, Japan in Print: Information and Nation in the Early Modern Period, Berkeley: University of California Press, 2006. Albert Craig, Chōshū
Nonsuch Park (1,729 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
For the original Tudor Palace that stood in Nonsuch Park, see Nonsuch Palace. Nonsuch Park /ˈnʌnˌsʌtʃ/ is a public park between Stoneleigh, North Cheam
Gold coin (4,227 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
A gold coin is a coin that is made mostly or entirely of gold. Most gold coins minted since 1800 are 90–92% gold (22 karat), while most of today's gold
Serbian Free Corps (707 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Serbian Free Corps (German: Serbische Freikorps), known simply as frajkori (Serbian Cyrillic: фрајкори), was a volunteer militia composed of ethnic
Ballroom dance (4,809 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Ballroom dance is a set of partner dances, which are enjoyed both socially and competitively around the world, mostly because of its performance and entertainment
Sophia Lee (724 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Sophia Lee (1750 – 13 March 1824) was an English novelist, dramatist and educator. She was a formative writer of Gothic fiction. She was the daughter of
Punjab (5,385 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Coordinates: 31°N 74°E / 31°N 74°E / 31; 74 Punjab (Gurmukhi: ਪੰਜਾਬ; Shahmukhi: پنجاب; /pʌnˈdʒɑːb/, /-ˈdʒæb/; /ˈpʌndʒɑːb/, /-dʒæb/; Punjabi: [pənˈdʒaːb]
Military Revolution (4,858 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
methods of warfare changed profoundly somewhere around or during the Early Modern Period. Roberts placed his military revolution around 1560–1660 as the period
Xanten (2,640 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Xanten (German pronunciation: [ˈksantən] (listen), Lower Franconian Santen) is a town in the state of North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany. It is located in