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searching for Early Germanic culture 13 found (43 total)

alternate case: early Germanic culture

Childhood in the Viking Age (645 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article

In Viking Age Scandinavia, boys were legally considered to be adults at age 16. But before they reached adulthood, they had a childhood spent learning
Mund (law) (683 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
The mund is a principle in Germanic tradition and law that can be crudely translated as "protection" and which grew as the prerogative of a Germanic tribe
Knésetja (432 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Knésetja (lit. "knee-setting"; German Kniesetzung) is the Old Norse expression for a custom in Germanic law, by which adoption was formally expressed by
Grevensvænge figurines (291 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
significance of the horned helmets, seems to have persisted into early Germanic culture. The kneeling warrior figures have been interpreted as the "Ashvins"
Old Norse philosophy (1,328 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Bauschatz, Paul C. (1982). The Well and the Tree: World and Time in Early Germanic Culture. New York: University of Massachusetts Press. ISBN 9780870233524
Thyle (440 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
JSTOR 2852453. Paul C. Bauschatz, The Well and the Tree: World and Times in Early Germanic Culture, Amherst: University of Massachusetts, 1982, ISBN 0-87023-352-1
Guy Halsall (2,081 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
is still widespread agreement in the scholarly community that an early Germanic culture did indeed exist. He calls this "the problems of Germanism". He
Symbel (2,252 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Heitstrenging Bauschatz, Paul C. The Well and the Tree: World and Time in Early Germanic Culture. Amhurst: University of Massachusetts Press, 1983. ISBN 0-87023-352-1
Frisian nationalism (2,531 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
of the Frisian people and viewed the Frisians as having retained early Germanic culture and customs in its purest form, whereas the Dutch have corrupted
Jan de Vries (philologist) (2,637 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
on the literature of the early Germanic peoples. Reconstructing early Germanic culture and presenting it to the public became a lifelong passion for de
Elf (10,477 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Álfhildur. These names suggest that elves were positively regarded in early Germanic culture. Of the many words for supernatural beings in Germanic languages
Germanic heroic legend (13,809 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Bauschatz, Paul C. (1982). The Well and the Tree: World and Time in Early Germanic Culture. University of Massachusetts Press. ISBN 0-87023-352-1. Beck, Wolfgang
Prehistory of the Netherlands (3,350 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
influence. The Celtic influence and contacts between Gaulish and early Germanic culture along the Rhine is assumed to be the source of a number of Celtic