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Longer titles found: Thornycroft type destroyer leader (view), List of United States Navy destroyer leaders (view)

searching for Destroyer leader 135 found (494 total)

alternate case: destroyer leader

Soviet destroyer Baku (3,041 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article

July 1938 in honor of the Soviet politician, the still-incomplete destroyer leader was ordered towed to Vladivostok for completion at Shipyard No. 202
Leningrad-class destroyer (3,024 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Completed 6 Lost 2 Scrapped 4 General characteristics (Project 38) Type Destroyer leader Displacement 2,350 long tons (2,390 t) (standard) 2,680 long tons (2
USS Atlanta (CL-51) (4,095 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
a result of the class originally being intended to be a destroyer leader. A destroyer leader is larger than its destroyer counterparts to accommodate
American 21-inch torpedo (305 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
leaders Narwhal-class submarine Nautilus-class submarine Norfolk-class destroyer leader O'Brien-class destroyers Ohio-class submarines Omaha-class cruisers
Tashkent-class destroyer (1,572 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Tashkent class (officially known as Project 20) consisted of a single destroyer leader, built in Italy for the Soviet Navy just before World War II. Three
USS Bainbridge (CGN-25) (1,011 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
hull classification symbol of DLGN (nuclear-powered guided missile destroyer leader, called a "frigate" at the time), she was the first nuclear-powered
HMS Broke (1914) (1,429 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
HMS Broke was a Faulknor-class destroyer leader of the Royal Navy, initially built for the Chilean Navy as the Almirante Lynch-class destroyer Almirante
HMS Inglefield (1,519 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
HMS Inglefield was an I-class destroyer leader built for the Royal Navy that served during World War II. She was the navy's last purpose-built flotilla
Harwich Force (1,256 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Destroyer Flotilla light cruiser Undaunted (Capt. Francis G. St.John) destroyer leader Nimrod 17 (L-class) destroyers (Laforey, Lance, Lark, Lassoo, Laverock
HMS Grenville (197 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
HMS Grenville (1916), a destroyer leader launched on 17 June 1916 and sold in December 1931. HMS Grenville (H03), a G-class destroyer leader launched on 15 August
USS Macdonough (132 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
USS Macdonough (DDG-39), was a Farragut-class guided missile frigate (destroyer leader), launched in 1959 and served until 1992 SS Thomas Macdonough a Liberty
HMS Montrose (186 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Royal Navy: HMS Montrose (D01), a Scott-class (or Admiralty-type) destroyer leader that served throughout World War II and was scrapped in 1946. HMS Montrose (F236)
HMS Scott (156 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
explorer Robert Falcon Scott: HMS Scott (1917) was an Admiralty type destroyer leader. She was launched in 1917 and sunk in 1918 by a German submarine. HMS Scott (J79)
Soviet destroyer Tashkent (2,178 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
destroyer leader, the Soviets decided that they needed foreign design assistance around 1934–1935. They requested designs for a high-speed destroyer leader
HMS Valorous (252 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
the Fleet Lord Fisher). HMS Valorous (L00) was an Admiralty V-class destroyer leader built by William Denny and Brothers and launched in 1917. She was sold
HMS Worcester (D96) (1,817 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
for duty with the 16th Destroyer Flotilla – which also included the destroyer leader HMS Montrose and the destroyers HMS Venomous, HMS Veteran, HMS Verity
HMAS Stuart (234 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
have been named HMAS Stuart: HMAS Stuart (D00), an Admiralty-type destroyer leader, launched in 1918 for the Royal Navy. She was transferred to the RAN
Battle of Dover Strait (1917) (285 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
Commanders and leaders Edward Evans Theophil Gautier Strength Destroyer leader Broke Destroyer leader Swift 6 torpedo boats Casualties and losses Broke heavily
List of Dutch military equipment of World War II (1,575 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
construction, not used by Germans) Destroyer leader HNLMS Tjerk Hiddes (under construction, scrapped by Germans) Destroyer leader HNLMS Gerard Callenburgh (under
NMS Mărăști (2,536 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
the Raid on Constanța a few days later and may have damaged a Soviet destroyer leader during the battle. The powerful Soviet Black Sea Fleet heavily outnumbered
NMS Regina Maria (2,109 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
the Raid on Constanța a few days later and may have damaged a Soviet destroyer leader during the battle. The powerful Soviet Black Sea Fleet heavily outnumbered
Lev Vladimirsky (559 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
destroyer. From 1932, he commanded a destroyer escort, destroyer, destroyer leader, and from 1937, serving as chief of staff of the brigade of cruisers
Black Sea campaigns (1941–1944) (2,452 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
attacked the Romanian city of Constanța. During this operation, the destroyer leader Moskva was lost to mines while evading fire from Axis coastal batteries
List of ships of Russia by project number (1,470 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Displacement (t) Number Built Notes Subtypes Common or NATO Russian Total 1 Destroyer Leader Leningrad-class 1930 2675 3 Originally assigned Project 2. 2 Guard
HMS Vivacious (D36) (1,637 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
on exercises with the destroyer leader HMS Campbell and the destroyer HMS Worcester of her own flotilla and the destroyer leader HMS Mackay and destroyers
Black Sea Shipyard (1,416 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
1929 Yakobinets 1927 1929 Kharkov 1932 1934 Leningrad (Project 1) Destroyer Leader Moskva 1932 1934 Bodry 1935 1936 Gnevnyy Destroyer Boyky 1935 1936
Capitani Romani-class cruiser (1,253 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
the Italian Navy after the war. Renamed San Marco, she served as a destroyer leader until her decommission in 1971. Pompeo Magno Pompey the Great CNR,
List of ship commissionings in 1917 (98 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Actus Section patrol craft April 24  Royal Navy Anzac Parker-class destroyer leader Transferred to Royal Australian Navy in 1919 May 1  United States Navy
Soviet destroyer Nezamozhnik (4,148 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
aviation until the end of August as a result of the sinking of the new destroyer leader Moskva. She did not arrive at the port until 13 August, when she and
NMS Amiral Murgescu (2,339 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
destroyer Regina Maria and the German coastal battery Tirpitz. The Soviet destroyer leader Moskva was sunk by Romanian mines and the cruiser Voroshilov was damaged
Soviet destroyer Boyky (1936) (1,942 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
off Sevastopol. On 9 July, the 2nd Destroyer Division, including the destroyer leader Kharkov, Boyky and her sister ships Bodry, Bezuprechny and Besposhchadny
Soviet destroyer Soobrazitelny (1940) (3,565 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
planned to bombard the port together with her sister Smyshleny and the destroyer leader Kharkov, but both Project 7U destroyers instead formed part of the
List of U.S. Navy acronyms (4,144 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Agency DL – Destroyer Leader (outdated) DLG – Guided Missile Destroyer Leader (outdated) DLGN – Nuclear-powered Guided Missile Destroyer Leader (outdated)
Soviet destroyer Moskva (1,624 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
officers and sailors traveled to Ankara to lay a wreath before the destroyer leader departed Istanbul on 25 November, returning to Sevastopol three days
Soviet destroyer Tbilisi (1,395 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
launching, 24 July 1939. To free up space for new construction, the destroyer leader was moved to Lake Silinskoye near the plant for completion. Tbilisi
HMS Venomous (3,529 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
November 1941 she was escorting Convoy OS 35 when she collided with the destroyer leader Keppel. She was withdrawn from service and in December 1941 work began
HMS Frobisher (109 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
before being launched the following year as an Improved Marksman-class destroyer leader. HMS Frobisher (D81) was a Hawkins-class heavy cruiser launched in
USS Truxtun (175 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
from 1945 to 1946. USS Truxtun (CGN-35), originally guided missile destroyer leader DLGN-35, a guided missile cruiser in commission from 1967 to 1995
Soviet destroyer Bezuprechny (1937) (1,299 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
off Sevastopol. On 9 July, the 2nd Destroyer Division, including the destroyer leader Kharkov, Bezuprechny and her sister ships Bodry, Boyky and Besposhchadny
HMS Walrus (D24) (894 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
1921 as part of the 5th Destroyer Flotilla, which also included the destroyer leader Malcolm and destroyers Vanity, Vendetta, Vivacious, Voyager, Waterhen
BL 6-inch Mk XII naval gun (649 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
commissioned 1915 Revenge-class battleships laid down 1913, commissioned 1916 Destroyer leader HMS Swift as re-gunned in 1917 Danae-class (or D-class) light cruisers
Tromp-class cruiser (430 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Organization: 136–141. ISSN 0043-0374. Mulder, Jantinus; Mulder, Frits (2012). Destroyer Leader HNLMS Tromp. Emmen: Lanasta. ISBN 9789086161911. Teitler, G. (1984)
Soviet destroyer Bodry (1936) (1,705 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
Black Sea Fleet with her sisters built for the Black Sea Fleet and the destroyer leader Tashkent. On that day, she was in Sevastopol having her boilers cleaned
Convoy HX 106 (316 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
corvette 12 Feb 1941 17 Feb 1941 HMS Malcolm  Royal Navy Admiralty-type destroyer leader 12 Feb 1941 15 Feb 1941 HMS/HMT Northern Pride  Royal Navy ASW (anti-submarine
Snake Island (Ukraine) (5,297 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
The first naval action took place on 23 June 1941, when the Soviet destroyer leader Kharkov together with the destroyers Bezposhchadny and Smyshlyonyi
HMS Valentine (130 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
HMS Valentine (1418), a barge built in 1418 and sold in 1424 HMS Valentine (1917), a destroyer leader launched in 1917 and sunk in 1940 HMS Valentine (R03), renamed HMS Kempenfelt (R03)
Pacific Fleet (Russia) (5,479 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
entered World War II. At the same time, the Soviets transferred a destroyer leader, three destroyers, and five submarines from the Pacific Fleet to the
Baltic Fleet (7,826 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Revolutsiya (named after October revolution) destroyer leader Leningrad (named after the city of Leningrad) destroyer leader Minsk (named after the capital of Belarus)
BL 4.7-inch 45-calibre naval gun (365 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
service beginning in 1918 on destroyers of the new Admiralty type destroyer leader (Scott class) and Thornycroft type leader (Shakespeare class). Some
Action of 9 July 1941 (509 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
attacked the Romanian port of Constanța, resulting in the loss of the destroyer leader Moskva to Romanian mines. The loss of Moskva caused Soviet Admiral
HMS Faulknor (H62) (4,317 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article
Naval Institute Press. ISBN 1-59114-119-2. Smith, Peter C. (2004). Destroyer Leader: The Story of HMS Faulknor 1935–46 (3rd revised and expanded ed.).
Yugoslav destroyer Zagreb (1,611 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Zvonimir & Grobmeier, A. H. (2006). "Question 36/05: Armament of Yugoslav Destroyer Leader Split". Warship International. XLIII (4): 362. ISSN 0043-0374. Friedman
HMS Vesper (1,534 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
33333; -10.50000 (Beignon sunk). On 13 September 1940 she joined the destroyer leader HMS Campbell and escort destroyer HMS Garth in an anti-invasion patrol
German submarine U-589 (1,019 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
World Wars. Arms & Armour. ISBN 1-85409-515-3. Smith, Peter (1968). Destroyer Leader: The Story of HMS Faulknor. London: William Kimber & Co. Helgason,
German submarine U-88 (1941) (830 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article
Wars. London: Arms & Armour. ISBN 1-85409-515-3. Smith, Peter (1968). Destroyer Leader: The Story of HMS Faulknor. London: William Kimber & Co. Helgason,
USS Dewey (DDG-45) (441 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article
45)". navysite.de. Retrieved 8 June 2009. "Destroyer OnLine – The Destroyer Leader – Coontz (DLG) class". Destroyers OnLine. Retrieved 8 June 2009. Willshaw
HMS Valentine (L69) (1,551 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
1953. In early 1916, the British Royal Navy had a requirement for a destroyer leader suitable for leading the new, fast, R-class destroyers. To meet this
Action off Lofoten (1,467 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
four 4.7-inch guns. Of the H-class destroyers, Hardy was built as a destroyer leader and thus had an additional 4.7-inch gun. Shortly after departing German
Baku (disambiguation) (169 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
Nepal, a village development committee Soviet destroyer Baku, a Soviet destroyer leader Soviet aircraft carrier Admiral Gorshkov, briefly named Baku Baku (manga)
Standley (141 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Colorado, United States USS William H. Standley (CG-32), Belknap-class destroyer leader / cruiser Standee Standel Standen Stanley (disambiguation) Stanly (disambiguation)
HMS Malcolm (109 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
ships: HMS Malcolm was the original name for the Admiralty V-class destroyer leader HMS Valkyrie (1917), launched in 1917 and broken up in 1936 HMS Malcolm (D19)
Regele Ferdinand-class destroyer (1,771 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
artillery battery Tirpitz, caused the Soviet ships to withdraw, losing the destroyer leader Moskva in a Romanian minefield that had been laid shortly before the
Vifor-class destroyer (1,561 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
accuracy of the return fire, the Soviet fleet withdrew, losing the destroyer leader Moskva into a Romanian minefield, laid by the Romanian minelayers Amiral
Henschel Hs 293 (2,325 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
February 1944) SS Hiram S. Maxim (damaged) HMS Inglefield , I-class destroyer leader (sunk) SS James W. Marshall (damaged 15 September 1943 during Operation
Willis Augustus Lee (1,531 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
USS Willis A. Lee (DD-929), redesignated before commissioning as a destroyer leader (DL-4), was named for him. Below is the ribbon bar of Vice Admiral
USS McDougal (DD-358) (706 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
she served as flagship for Destroyer Squadron 9. As a heavily armed destroyer leader, she took part in type-training, readiness cruises, and battle problems
HMS Witch (D89) (1,978 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
for service with local escort forces there. Accordingly, she and the destroyer leader Malcolm, and the destroyers Quadrant and Wolverine escorted Convoy
Raid on Constanța (1,678 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
bombers Casualties and losses Constanța port facilities damaged 1 cruiser damaged 1 destroyer leader sunk 9 bombers destroyed 268+ killed 69 captured
Yugoslav destroyer Beograd (1,932 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Zvonimir & Grobmeier, A. H. (2006). "Question 36/05: Armament of Yugoslav Destroyer Leader Split". Warship International. XLIII (4): 362. ISSN 0043-0374. Freivogel
Kiev-class destroyer (1,594 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
14 Completed 0 Cancelled 11 Scrapped 3 General characteristics Type Destroyer leader Displacement 2,350 long tons (2,390 t) (standard) 3,045 long tons (3
HMS Seymour (82 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
more than one ship of the British Royal Navy: HMS Seymour (1916), a destroyer leader launched in 1916 and sold in 1930 HMS Seymour (K563), a frigate in
HMS Spragge (106 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
1693 HMS Spragge (1677), a fireship of 1677 HMS Spragge (1919), a destroyer leader cancelled in 1919 HMS Spragge (K572), a frigate in service from 1944
German coastal battery Tirpitz (398 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
June 1941, adding 39 rounds to the battle and damaging the Soviet destroyer leader Kharkov. After the 23 August 1944 coup, the situation became uncertain
Greek destroyer Vasilissa Olga (1,709 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Encyclopedia. London: Cassell. ISBN 1-86019-874-0. Smith, Peter C. (2004). Destroyer Leader: The Story of HMS Faulknor 1935–46 (3rd revised and expanded ed.).
Soviet Navy (5,828 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
battleships, one training cruiser, eight destroyers including one destroyer leader, five patrol ships, two minesweepers, and some more older minesweepers
HMS Windsor (D42) (1,937 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
(Beignon sunk). Later in July 1940, Windsor was assigned along with the destroyer leader HMS Montrose and the destroyers HMS Walpole, and HMS Whitshed to the
HMS Windsor (D42) (1,937 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
(Beignon sunk). Later in July 1940, Windsor was assigned along with the destroyer leader HMS Montrose and the destroyers HMS Walpole, and HMS Whitshed to the
Battle of Lissa (1866) (3,478 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
Scotland. Augusto Riboty of Varese was the namesake of an Italian destroyer leader launched in 1916 (and which survived both world wars, finally being
McDonough (disambiguation) (287 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
USS Macdonough (DDG-39), a Farragut-class guided missile frigate (destroyer leader) that served from 1959 to 1992 USS Commodore McDonough, an 1862 ferryboat
HMS Tarpon (1917) (1,740 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
June 1917, Tarpon, together with the light cruiser Royalist and the destroyer leader Abdiel, together with a close escort of four destroyers and a more
HMS Moorsom (1914) (2,088 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
Moorsom was one of eight destroyers of the Tenth Flotilla sent with the destroyer leader Nimrod to Dunkirk on 19 January 1917 to provide reinforcement to the
February 1945 (2,590 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
submarine U-713 was depth charged and sunk in the Arctic Sea by British destroyer leader HMS Keppel. German submarine U-1208 was depth charged and sunk in the
HMS Vanquisher (2,560 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
entered World War II in September 1939, Vanquisher, Winchelsea, the destroyer leader Mackay, and the destroyers Versatile, Vimy, Walker, Warwick, and Whirlwind
Soviet destroyer Sposobny (1940) (1,954 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
of the Black Sea Fleet, Vice Admiral Filipp Oktyabrsky, aboard the destroyer leader Kharkov, to Odessa. While they were present, all three ships bombarded
HMS Walker (D27) (2,725 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
to relieve Keppel on 17 January. From 25 to 26 March, Walker, the destroyer leader Campbell, and the destroyers Volunteer and Wanderer escorted convoy
Yakov Sverdlov (3,459 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
University shortly after Sverdlov's death. The Imperial Russian Navy destroyer leader Novik (commissioned during 1913) was renamed Yakov Sverdlov during
Night action at the Battle of Jutland (6,676 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
sighted the fourth Destroyer Flotilla under Captain Wintour on the destroyer leader HMS Tipperary heading north to their night station. Initially he mistook
HMS Firedrake (H79) (2,243 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article
Naval Institute Press. ISBN 1-59114-119-2. Smith, Peter C. (2004). Destroyer Leader: The Story of HMS Faulknor 1935–46 (3rd revised and expanded ed.).
HMS Fiji (58) (2,079 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article
Chatham Publishing. ISBN 978-1-86176-281-8. Smith, Peter C. (2004). Destroyer Leader: The Story of HMS Faulknor 1935–46. Barnsley, Yorkshire: Pen & Sword
HMS Valorous (L00) (2,308 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
II. In early 1916, the British Royal Navy had a requirement for a destroyer leader suitable for leading the new, fast, R-class destroyers. To meet this
Soviet destroyer Bditelny (1937) (1,221 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
SS Svaneti and she was briefly refitted the following month. After the destroyer leader Tashkent was crippled by German aircraft on 26 June, Bditelny was one
Yugoslav destroyer Ljubljana (2,989 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Zvonimir & Grobmeier, A. H. (2006). "Question 36/05: Armament of Yugoslav Destroyer Leader Split". Warship International. XLIII (4): 362. ISSN 0043-0374. Friedman
Soviet destroyer Razyaryonny (1941) (1,668 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
Razyaryonny and her sisters Razumny and Revnostny, together with the destroyer leader Baku, were planned to be transferred to the Northern Fleet as the Expedition
First Ostend Raid (1,984 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Blockships: HMS Sirius, Brilliant Destroyers: HMS Swift, Faulknor (destroyer leader), Matchless, Mastiff, Afridi, Tempest, Tetrarch Light craft: 18 Motor
HMS Wivern (D66) (2,672 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
was transferred to Western Approaches Command with Wild Swan, the destroyer leader HMS Malcolm, and the destroyer HMS Veteran to serve in the 5th Escort
Yugoslav destroyer Split (1,700 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Zvonimir & Grobmeier, A. H. (2006). "Question 36/05: Armament of Yugoslav Destroyer Leader Split". Warship International. XLIII (4): 362. ISSN 0043-0374. Cernuschi
HMS Fortune (H70) (2,436 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article
Naval Institute Press. ISBN 1-59114-119-2. Smith, Peter C. (2004). Destroyer Leader: The Story of HMS Faulknor 1935–46 (3rd revised and expanded ed.).
Coastal batteries of Romania (508 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
supported by coastal artillery, the Tirpitz battery damaging the Soviet destroyer leader Kharkov. Nicolae Petrescu, M. Drăghiescu Istoricul principalelor puncte
HMS Wishart (2,909 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Vidette, Westcott, Wrestler, the light cruisers Kenya and Liverpool, the destroyer leader Onslow, and the destroyers Escapade and Icarus in covering a Malta-bound
Soviet destroyer Besposhchadny (1936) (1,663 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
off Sevastopol. On 9 July, the 2nd Destroyer Division, including the destroyer leader Kharkov, Besposhchadny and her sister ships Bodry, Boyky and Bezuprechny
Soviet destroyer Minsk (1,542 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
General characteristics (as built) Class and type Leningrad-class destroyer leader Displacement 2,350 long tons (2,390 t) (standard) 2,680 long tons (2
Waldemar F. A. Wendt (1,040 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
assistant coach of crew until June 1936, when he reported aboard the destroyer leader USS Moffett (DD-362) until June 1939. Wendt attended the Naval Postgraduate
HMS Forester (H74) (2,914 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article
Naval Institute Press. ISBN 1-59114-119-2. Smith, Peter C. (2004). Destroyer Leader: The Story of HMS Faulknor 1935–46 (3rd revised and expanded ed.).
Operation Wilfred (2,193 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
– 5,087 ton auxiliary minelayer Inglefield – "I"-class minelaying destroyer leader Imogen – "I"-class minelaying destroyer Ilex – "I"-class minelaying
HMS Foxhound (H69) (3,043 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article
Naval Institute Press. ISBN 1-59114-119-2. Smith, Peter C. (2004). Destroyer Leader: The Story of HMS Faulknor 1935–46 (3rd revised and expanded ed.).
Yuri Panteleyev (3,060 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
the entrance to the port of Kotka. His detachment, consisting of the destroyer leader Minsk, two destroyers and several supporting vessels approached the
3-inch/70-caliber Mark 26 gun (764 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
destroyers: USS Carpenter (DDE-825), USS Robert A. Owens (DDE-827) destroyer leader: USS Norfolk (DL-1), Mitscher-class destroyer leaders - USS Mitscher (DL-2)
HMS Matchless (1914) (3,184 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
Matchless was one of eight destroyers of the 10th Flotilla sent with the destroyer leader Nimrod to Dunkirk on 19 January 1917 to provide reinforcement to the
Hans-Joachim Horrer (282 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Greenhill Books, Naval Institute Press. ISBN 1-55750-186-6. Smith, Peter (1968). Destroyer Leader: The Story of HMS Faulknor. London: William Kimber & Co.
HMS Fury (H76) (4,110 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article
Naval Institute Press. ISBN 1-59114-119-2. Smith, Peter C. (2004). Destroyer Leader: The Story of HMS Faulnor 1935–46 (3rd revised and expanded ed.). Barnsley
Soviet destroyer Razumny (1,633 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Pacific to the Northern Fleet via the Northern Sea Route. Led by the destroyer leader Baku, Razumny and her sister ships Razyaryonny and Revnostny departed
German World War II destroyers (2,930 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
future service and was sold for scrap in 1949. The Royal Yugoslav Navy destroyer leader, KB Dubrovnik, was captured by Italy in the Bay of Kotor on 17 April
Ship Characteristics Board (2,771 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
were originally listed in descending priority (the Norfolk cruiser/destroyer leader having top priority, the Tang submarines as second priority, etc.)
Soviet destroyer Grozny (1936) (1,970 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
her boilers replaced from August to 19 March 1943. Together with the destroyer leader Baku and Gromky, Grozny unsuccessfully attempted to intercept German
List of shipwrecks in May 1916 (1,224 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
HMS Tipperary  Royal Navy World War I: Battle of Jutland: The Faulknor-class destroyer leader was shelled and sunk by SMS Westfalen ( Imperial German Navy) with
Soviet destroyer Gromky (1937) (2,261 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
JW 53 and escorted the bulk of it into Kola Bay. Together with the destroyer leader Baku and Grozny, Gromky unsuccessfully attempted to intercept German
Kampfgeschwader 100 (5,377 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
ports at Anapa, Tuapse, and Novorossiysk. For one loss they sank the destroyer leader Tashkent, the destroyer Bditelny and the transports Ukrania, Proletariy
John C. England (2,792 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Gulf of Tonkin from January 3 to June 6, 1966. Originally called a "destroyer leader" or frigate (DLG), in 1975 she was re-designated a cruiser (CG) in
Soviet destroyer Kharkov (2,128 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
General characteristics (as built) Class and type Leningrad-class destroyer leader Displacement 2,150 long tons (2,180 t) (standard) 2,582 long tons (2
Convoy ONS 5 order of battle (340 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Kingdom 5,507 Sunk By U-638 HMS Duncan  Royal Navy Escort 22 Apr - 3 May destroyer leader, Senior Officer's ship Escort Group B7 Dunsley (1929)  United Kingdom
Battle off Samar (14,865 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
5 nmi (4.0 mi; 6.4 km), Hagen fired and claimed a dozen hits on the "destroyer leader" (Yahagi) before it veered off, Yahagi's detailed action report records
RVAH-7 (1,645 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
missile cruiser USS Long Beach, and the nuclear-powered guided missile destroyer leader USS Bainbridge. As the submarine-launched ballistic missile became
Romanian Navy during World War II (3,100 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
fuel tanks set on fire. No Romanian warship was sunk while the Soviet destroyer leader Moskva was lost to a Romanian minefield as she was avoiding fire from
RVAH-7 (1,645 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
missile cruiser USS Long Beach, and the nuclear-powered guided missile destroyer leader USS Bainbridge. As the submarine-launched ballistic missile became
List of shipwrecks in August 1918 (1,728 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
of five crew. HMS Scott  Royal Navy World War I: The Admiralty type destroyer leader struck a mine, from SM UC-71 ( Imperial German Navy), and sank in the
List of shipwrecks in May 1940 (2,827 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
1939. London: Chatham publishing. p. 525. ISBN 1-86176-023-X. "French destroyer leader class Jaguar". warshipsww2.eu. Archived from the original on 19 June
List of shipwrecks in December 1916 (2,466 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
1916 Ship State Description HMS Hoste  Royal Navy The Parker-class destroyer leader collided with the Admiralty M-class destroyer HMS Negro off the Orkney
Order of battle for the Leningrad strategic defensive operation (1,414 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
(named after the October Revolution) destroyer leader Leningrad (named after the city of Leningrad) destroyer leader Minsk [ru] (named after the capital
List of shipwrecks in September 1943 (3,925 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
historisches-marinearchiv.de. Retrieved 9 September 2019. "French destroyer leader class Jaguar". Warshipsww2. Archived from the original on 19 June 2015
Order of battle for Convoy PQ 17 (773 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
minesweeper  Royal Navy 27 June 4 July HMS Keppel Shakespeare-class destroyer leader  Royal Navy 30 June 4 July HMS La Malouine Flower-class corvette  Royal
James H. Doyle Jr. (2,143 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
posted in June 1959 as Executive Officer of the USS John S. McCain, a destroyer leader ASW/gun ship commissioned in 1953, the second of the Mitscher-class
Augustus Agar (5,738 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
and crew ringing in his ears. He was then assigned to command the destroyer leader HMS Malcolm as head of the 16th Destroyer Flotilla based at Harwich
Action off Lerwick (5,532 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
arrangements were being made, four light cruisers, twelve destroyers and a destroyer leader were ordered to attack the German minesweepers operating in the German
SS Leninsky Komsomol (4,712 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
warship took up the escort of the Leninsky Komsomol after the U.S. destroyer leader Norfolk had photographed the eight uncovered missiles on the Russian
Bibliography of World War II warships (2,534 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
The 'Kelly'. London: Kimber. — HMS Kelly Smith, Peter C. (1968). Destroyer Leader: The Story of 'H.M.S. Faulknor'. London: Kimber. — HMS Faulknor ——————