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searching for DNB 544 found (18181 total)

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Dictionary of National Biography (1,927 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article

The Dictionary of National Biography (DNB) is a standard work of reference on notable figures from British history, published since 1885. The updated
Drum and bass (7,536 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
and bass (also written as "drum 'n' bass"; commonly abbreviated as "D&B", "DnB" or "D'n'B") is a genre of electronic music characterised by fast breakbeats
German National Library (1,643 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
The German National Library (German: Deutsche Nationalbibliothek (DNB)) is the central archival library and national bibliographic centre for the Federal
Integrated Authority File (309 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
managed by the German National Library (German: Deutsche Nationalbibliothek; DNB) in cooperation with various regional library networks in German-speaking
1295 in Ireland (117 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Events from the year 1295 in Ireland. John Wogan was appointed Justiciar of Ireland Matthew M'Catasaid rebuilt St Macartan's Cathedral, Clogher Roscrea
1802 in Ireland (230 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Events from the year 1802 in Ireland. First Christian Brothers' school founded by Edmund Rice in Waterford. Cork Fever Hospital and House of Recovery founded
1634 in Ireland (257 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Events from the year 1634 in Ireland. 11 November – the Irish House of Commons passes an Act for the Punishment of the Vice of Buggery.[citation needed]
De Nederlandsche Bank (672 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
52.3587222°N 4.900000°E / 52.3587222; 4.900000 De Nederlandsche Bank NV (DNB) is the central bank of the Netherlands. Founded by King William I in 1814
1800 in Ireland (488 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Events from the year 1800 in Ireland. 28 February – United Irishman Roddy McCorley is executed in Toomebridge for his part in the Irish Rebellion of 1798
1606 in Ireland (204 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Events from the year 1606 in Ireland. Plantation of Ulster: substantial lowland Scots settlement on disinhabited land in north Down, led by Hugh Montgomery
Medical college in India (3,175 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
courses called DM or DNB (Doctorate of Medicine), or MCh or DNB (Master of Chirurgery/Surgery) again of three years duration. An MD or a DNB (general medicine
1668 in Ireland (85 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Events from the year 1668 in Ireland. Roger Boyle, Earl of Orrery, resigns the office of Lord President of Munster on account of disputes with James Butler
Lovell Augustus Reeve (491 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Lovell Augustus Reeve (19 April 1814 – 18 November 1865) was an English conchologist and publisher. Born at Ludgate Hill, London, on 19 April 1814, he
Representative democracy (2,345 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Representative democracy, also known as indirect democracy or representative government, is a type of democracy founded on the principle of elected officials
Henry Cotton (divine) (582 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Henry Cotton (1789 –1879) was an Anglo-Irish churchman, ecclesiastical historian and author. He was a native of Buckinghamshire. Beginning in 1803, he
Michael Bryan (art historian) (813 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Michael Bryan (9 April 1757 – 21 March 1821) was an English art historian, art dealer and connoisseur. He was involved in the purchase and resale of the
1204 in Ireland (181 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Events from the year 1204 in Ireland. John de Courcy captured by Hugh de Lacy. Fairs Act enacted by John, King of England provides for the erection of
1707 in France (182 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Events from the year 1707 in France. Monarch: Louis XIV April 25: Battle of Almansa, described as "probably the only Battle in history in which the English
1814 in Ireland (434 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Events from the year 1814 in Ireland. 1 February – Royal Belfast Academical Institution opened as a school and college. 18 June – improved navigation of
1453 in France (99 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Events from the year 1453 in France. Monarch – Charles VII Ongoing since 1449 – The Revolt of Ghent, lasted from 1449 to 1453. 17 July – The Battle of
1682 in France (152 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Events from the year 1682 in France Monarch – Louis XIV Construction of the Canal de la Bruche started 1 April – Pierre-Joseph Thoulier d'Olivet, abbot
William Lambe (995 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
William Lambe, FRCP (26 February 1765 – 11 June 1847) was an English physician and early veganism activist. He has been described as a pioneer of vegan
The Discoverie of Witchcraft (1,212 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Discoverie of Witchcraft is a partially sceptical book published by the English gentleman Reginald Scot in 1584, intended as an exposé of early Modern
Jonathan Swift (6,295 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Alex Thom and Co, 1935 Stubbs (2016), pp. 86–90 Stephen DNB, p. 206 Stephen DNB, p. 207 Stephen DNB, p. 208 Bewley, Thomas H., "The health of Jonathan Swift"
Richard Neile (582 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Richard Neile (or Neale; 1562 – 31 October 1640) was an English churchman, bishop successively of six English dioceses, more than any other man, including
1740 (1,247 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
1740 (MDCCXL) was a leap year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar, the 1740th year
John Hildrop (580 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
John Hildrop (30 December 1682 – 18 January 1756) was an English cleric, known as a religious writer and essayist. Hildrop authored one of the earliest
Match (4,416 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
A match is a tool for starting a fire. Typically, matches are made of small wooden sticks or stiff paper. One end is coated with a material that can be
John Piers (601 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
John Piers (Peirse) (1522/3 – 1594) was Archbishop of York between 1589–1594. Previous to that he had been Bishop of Rochester and Bishop of Salisbury
Allen & Unwin (843 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
George Allen & Unwin was a British publishing company formed in 1911 when Sir Stanley Unwin purchased a controlling interest in George Allen & Co. It went
Saint Lucia (6,703 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Coordinates: 13°52′54″N 60°58′06″W / 13.8817°N 60.9682°W / 13.8817; -60.9682 Saint Lucia (UK: /sənt luˈsiːə, -ˈluː.ʃə/ (listen), US: /seɪnt ˈluːʃə/
John Lawrence (writer) (1,034 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
John Lawrence (22 January 1753 – 17 January 1839) was an English writer on political and agricultural subjects, chiefly known for being an early proponent
William Talbot (bishop) (632 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
William Talbot (1658 – 10 October 1730) was an English Anglican bishop. He was Bishop of Oxford from 1699 to 1715, Bishop of Salisbury from 1715 to 1722
Matthias Mawson (408 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Matthias Mawson (1683–1770) was an English churchman and academic, who served as Master of Corpus Christi College, Cambridge and then as Bishop of Llandaff
Folliott Cornewall (321 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Folliott Herbert Walker Cornewall (bapt. 9 May 1754 – 5 September 1831) was an English bishop of three sees. Cornewall was the second surviving son of
Dirty Dick (408 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Nathaniel Bentley (c. 1735–1809), commonly known as Dirty Dick, was an 18th and 19th-century merchant who owned a hardware shop and warehouse in London
George Carew (priest) (286 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
George Carew (1497/98–1583) was an English churchman who became Dean of Exeter. He was the third son of Sir Edmund Carew. He graduated B.A. at Broadgates
Francis Polkinghorne Pascoe (528 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Francis Polkinghorne Pascoe (1 September 1813 – 20 June 1893) was an English entomologist mainly interested in Coleoptera, commonly known as beetles. He
William Wickham (bishop) (221 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
William Wickham (Wykeham) (1539 – 11 June 1595) was an English bishop. He was educated at Eton College and King's College, Cambridge, where he was a Fellow
John Thomas (bishop of Winchester) (520 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
John Thomas (17 August 1696 – 1 May 1781) was an English bishop. He was educated at Charterhouse School and Christ Church, Oxford, where he graduated M
History of Saint Lucia (1,961 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The History of St Lucia refers to the history of this Caribbean island-state. According to some, Saint Lucia was first inhabited sometime between 1000
Francis Turner (bishop) (1,006 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Francis Turner D.D. (23 August 1637 – 2 November 1700) was Bishop of Ely, one of the seven bishops who petitioned against the Declaration of Indulgence
Seneschal (853 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The word seneschal (/ˈsɛnəʃəl/) can have several different meanings, all of which reflect certain types of supervising or administering in a historic context
Lady Godiva (3,188 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Collection of Old Ballads (1723–25) Hales & Furnivall 1868, 3:473-, vv. 53–60 DNB 1890 thus was inaccurate in stating that "This ballad first mention the order
Thomas Braidwood (860 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Thomas Braidwood (1715–1806) was a Scottish educator, significant in the history of deaf education. He was the founder of Britain's first school for the
1650 (1,702 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
1650 (MDCL) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar, the 1650th year
Robert Carr (bishop) (765 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Robert James Carr (1774–1841) was an English churchman, Bishop of Chichester in 1824 and Bishop of Worcester in 1831. Born 9 May 1774 and christened 9
Thomas Braidwood (860 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Thomas Braidwood (1715–1806) was a Scottish educator, significant in the history of deaf education. He was the founder of Britain's first school for the
Charles Manners-Sutton (719 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Charles Manners-Sutton (17 February 1755 – 21 July 1828; called Charles Manners before 1762) was a bishop in the Church of England who served as Archbishop
Thomas Ravis (507 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Thomas Ravis (c. 1560 – 14 December 1609) was a Church of England bishop and academic. He was among those engaged in translating the King James Bible.
1650 (1,702 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
1650 (MDCL) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar, the 1650th year
John Scory (807 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
John Scory (died 1585) was an English Dominican friar who later became a bishop in the Church of England. He was Bishop of Rochester from 1551 to 1552
Samuel Bolton (419 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Samuel Bolton (1606 – 15 October 1654) was an English clergyman and scholar, a member of the Westminster Assembly and Master of Christ's College, Cambridge
James Anderson (Freemason) (1,117 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Dr. James Anderson (c. 1679/1680 – 1739) was a Scottish writer and minister born and educated in Aberdeen, Scotland. He was ordained a minister in the
Richard Love (583 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Richard Love (1596–1661) was an English churchman and academic, Master of Corpus Christi College, Cambridge, Lady Margaret's Professor of Divinity, member
Lancelot Blackburne (973 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Lancelot Blackburne (sometimes Blackburn, Blackborne or Blackbourn[e]; 10 December 1658 – 23 March 1743) was an English clergyman, who became Archbishop
John Gilbert (archbishop of York) (647 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
John Gilbert (18 October 1693 – 9 August 1761) was Archbishop of York from 1757 to 1761. Gilbert was the son of John Gilbert, fellow of Wadham College
Thomas Dampier (372 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Thomas Dampier (1748 – 13 May 1812) served as Bishop of Rochester and Bishop of Ely. He was eldest son of Dr Thomas Dampier, who was lower master at Eton
George Pelham (bishop) (123 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
George Pelham (13 October 1766 – 7 February 1827) was a Church of England bishop, serving in the sees of Bristol (1802–1807), Exeter (1807–1820) and Lincoln
Lord Deputy of Ireland (523 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Lord Deputy was the representative of the monarch and head of the Irish executive under English rule, during the Lordship of Ireland and then the Kingdom
William Hamilton Drummond (1,251 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
William Hamilton Drummond, D.D. (August 1778 – 16 October 1865) was an Irish poet, animal rights writer and controversialist. Drummond, eldest son of William
Royal Military Academy, Woolwich (2,757 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Royal Military Academy (RMA) at Woolwich, in south-east London, was a British Army military academy for the training of commissioned officers of the
John Bond (jurist) (358 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
John Bond LL.D. (1612–1676) was an English jurist, Puritan clergyman, member of the Westminster Assembly, and Master of Trinity Hall, Cambridge. He was
Henry Pelham (1,876 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Henry Pelham FRS (25 September 1694 – 6 March 1754) was a British Whig statesman, who served as Prime Minister of Great Britain from 27 August 1743 until
Thomas Lovell (1,048 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Sir Thomas Lovell, KG (died 1524) was an English soldier and administrator, Speaker of the House of Commons, Secretary to the Treasury and Chancellor of
Copley Medal (2,597 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
May 2020. "Oxford DNB article:Gray, Stephen (subscription needed)". Oxford University Press. 2004. Retrieved 2009-01-29. "Oxford DNB article:Desaguliers
John Burke (genealogist) (784 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
John Burke (12 November 1786 – 27 March 1848) was an Irish genealogist, and the original publisher of Burke's Peerage. He was the father of Sir Bernard
York House, Twickenham (948 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
York House is a historic stately home in Twickenham, England, and currently serves as the Town Hall of the London Borough of Richmond upon Thames. It is
Richard Brinsley Sheridan (2,350 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Richard Brinsley Butler Sheridan (30 October 1751 – 7 July 1816) was an Irish satirist, a playwright, poet, and long-term owner of the London Theatre Royal
John Thomas (bishop of Salisbury) (370 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
John Thomas (1691–1766) was an English Bishop of Lincoln and Bishop of Salisbury. Born on 23 June 1691, he was the son of a drayman in Nicholson's brewery
James Granger (1,500 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
James Granger (1723–1776) was an English clergyman, biographer, and print collector. He is now known as the author of the Biographical History of England
1814 (4,108 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
1814 (MDCCCXIV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar, the 1814th
Edward Churton (634 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Edward Churton (26 January 1800 – July 1874) was an English churchman and Spanish scholar. He was born on 26 January 1800 at Middleton Cheney, Northamptonshire
Lazarus Seaman (771 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
University of Cambridge. Dictionary of National Biography; s:Seaman, Lazarus (DNB00). http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=66643  This article
Ironmaster (894 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
An ironmaster is the manager, and usually owner, of a forge or blast furnace for the processing of iron. It is a term mainly associated with the period
Henry Ashworth (nonconformist) (825 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Henry Ashworth (4 September 1794 – 17 May 1880) was an English cotton manufacturer, friend of Richard Cobden, and founding member of the Anti-Corn Law
Gilbert Sheldon (1,296 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Gilbert Sheldon (19 June 1598 – 9 November 1677) was the Archbishop of Canterbury from 1663 until his death. He was born in Stanton, Staffordshire in the
John Spencer-Churchill, 7th Duke of Marlborough (784 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
John Winston Spencer-Churchill, 7th Duke of Marlborough KG PC (2 June 1822 – 4 July 1883), styled Earl of Sunderland from 1822 to 1840 and Marquess of
Margaret of Denmark, Queen of Scotland (823 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Margaret of Denmark (23 June 1456 – 14 July 1486) was Queen of Scotland from 1469 to 1486 by marriage to King James III. She was the daughter of Christian I
Mariot Arbuthnot (694 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Admiral Mariot Arbuthnot (1711 – 31 January 1794) was a British admiral, who commanded the Royal Navy's North American station during the American War
John Sandale (401 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
John Sandale (or Sandall) was a Gascon medieval Lord High Treasurer, Lord Chancellor and Bishop of Winchester. Sandale inherited the manor of Wheatley
Richard Vaughan (bishop) (444 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
English Protestantism, C. 1530-1700 (2001), p. 164. s:Hill, Robert (d.1623) (DNB00) Francis J. Bremer, Tom Webster, Puritans and Puritanism in Europe and
William Berkeley (governor) (1,590 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Sir William Berkeley (/ˈbɑːrkliː/; 1605 – 9 July 1677) was a colonial governor of Virginia, and one of the Lords Proprietors of the Colony of Carolina;
Richard Clayton (Dean of Peterborough) (345 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Richard Clayton (died 1612) was an English churchman and academic, Master of Magdalene College, Cambridge and St John's College, Cambridge and Dean of
Simon Haynes (priest) (490 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Simon Haynes or Heynes (died 1552) was Dean of Exeter between 1537 and 1552. Haynes was educated at Queens' College, Cambridge. He graduated B.A. in 1516
Samuel Bradford (603 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Samuel Bradford (20 December 1652 – 17 May 1731) was an English churchman and whig, bishop successively of Carlisle and Rochester. He was the son of William
Battle of Aberdeen (1646) (440 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
The Battle of Aberdeen was fought on 14 May 1646 during the Wars of the Three Kingdoms. George, Marquis of Huntly the commander of a Royalist army, defeated
John Dryden (4,822 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
John Dryden (/ˈdraɪdən/; 19 August [O.S. 9 August] 1631 – 12 May  [O.S. 1 May] 1700) was an English poet, literary critic, translator, and playwright who
Thomas Musgrave (bishop) (700 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Thomas Musgrave (30 March 1788 – 4 May 1860) was Archbishop of York from 1847 to 1860. Musgrave was the son of W. Peet Musgrave, a wealthy tailor and woollen-draper
John May (bishop) (665 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
John May (Meye) (died 1598) was an English academic and churchman, who became bishop of Carlisle. He was a native of Suffolk and brother of William May
Francis White (bishop) (811 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Francis White (c. 1564 – 1638) was an English bishop and controversialist. He was son of Peter White (died 19 December 1615), vicar of Eaton Socon, Bedfordshire
William Richardson (antiquary) (791 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
William Richardson FSA (1698–1775) was an English academic and antiquary, Master of Emmanuel College, Cambridge from 1736. Born at Wilshamstead, on 23
Bandon, County Cork (2,408 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Bandon (/ˈbæn.dən/; Irish: Droichead na Bandan) is a town in County Cork, Ireland. It lies on the River Bandon between two hills. The name in Irish means
William Ayermin (731 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
William Ayermin (or Ayermine) (died 27 March 1336) was a medieval Bishop of Norwich. Ayermin, was descended from a family settled at Osgodby, Lincolnshire
Andrew Fuller (1,115 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Andrew Fuller (6 February 1754 – 7 May 1815) was an English Particular Baptist minister and theologian. Known as a promoter of missionary work, he also
Matthew Hutton (archbishop of York) (939 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Christianity portal Matthew Hutton (1529–1606) was archbishop of York from 1595 to 1606. Hutton, the son of Matthew Hutton of Priest Hutton, in the parish
John May (bishop) (665 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
John May (Meye) (died 1598) was an English academic and churchman, who became bishop of Carlisle. He was a native of Suffolk and brother of William May
William Richardson (antiquary) (791 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
William Richardson FSA (1698–1775) was an English academic and antiquary, Master of Emmanuel College, Cambridge from 1736. Born at Wilshamstead, on 23
John William Cousin (246 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
John William Cousin (1849–1910) was a British writer, editor and biographer. He was one of six children born to William and Anne Ross Cousin, his mother
John Napier (2,891 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
John Napier of Merchiston (/ˈneɪpɪər/; 1 February 1550 – 4 April 1617), nicknamed Marvellous Merchiston, was a Scottish landowner known as a mathematician
John Donne (4,935 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
John Donne (/dʌn/ DUN; 22 January 1572 – 31 March 1631) was an English poet, scholar, soldier and secretary born into a Catholic family, a remnant of the
Ine of Wessex (4,371 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Ine, also rendered Ini or Ina, (Latin: Inus; c. AD 670 – after 726) was King of Wessex from 689 to 726. At Ine's accession, his kingdom dominated much
Edward Chandler (bishop) (452 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Edward Chandler (c. 1668 – 20 July 1750) was an English bishop. He was educated at Emmanuel College, Cambridge, and in 1693 became a Master of Arts (Cambridge)
George Murray (bishop of Rochester) (557 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
George Murray (12 January 1784 – 16 February 1860) was an Anglican bishop. He was Bishop of Rochester from 1827 until his death in 1860. He was previously
Ervin Horn (110 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
After that he spent five seasons in Løv-Ham. After retiring he worked in DnB, and after fourteen years there he became CFO of the shipping company Østensjø
John Machin (419 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
John Machin (bapt. c. 1686 – June 9, 1751), a professor of astronomy at Gresham College, London, is best known for developing a quickly converging series
Edmund Castle (222 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Edmund Castle (1698–1750) was an English churchman and academic, Master of Corpus Christi College, Cambridge from 1745, and Dean of Hereford in 1749. Castle
List of fellows of the Royal Society elected in 1809 (183 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Fellows of the Royal Society elected in 1809. Charles Frederick Barnwell (1781–1849) Robert Bingley (died 1847) William Thomas Brande (1788–1866) James
John Moore (archbishop of Canterbury) (947 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Christianity portal John Moore (26 April 1730 – 18 January 1805) was Archbishop of Canterbury in the Church of England. Moore was the son of Thomas Moore
Albinus (abbot) (223 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Albinus (died 732) was an abbot of St Augustine's Abbey, Canterbury. He assisted Bede in the compilation of his Historia Ecclesiastica, and what we know
Hugh Weston (652 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Hugh Weston (c.1505 – 1558) was an English churchman and academic, dean of Westminster and Dean of Windsor, and Rector of Lincoln College, Oxford. He was
Browne Willis (921 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Browne Willis (16 September 1682 – 5 February 1760) was an antiquary, author, numismatist and politician who sat in the House of Commons from 1705 to 1708
William George (priest) (417 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
William George (died 1756) was an English churchman and academic, Provost of King's College, Cambridge from 1743 and Dean of Lincoln from 1748. Born in
Pew (1,484 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
A pew (/ˈpjuː/) is a long bench seat or enclosed box, used for seating members of a congregation or choir in a church, synagogue or sometimes a courtroom
John Montagu, 2nd Duke of Montagu (834 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
John Montagu, 2nd Duke of Montagu, KG, GMB, PC (1690 – 5 July 1749), styled Viscount Monthermer until 1705 and Marquess of Monthermer between 1705 and
Thomas Savage (bishop) (570 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Dr Thomas Savage (1449, Clifton, Cheshire – 3 September 1507, Cawood, Yorkshire) was a prelate and diplomat during the Tudor period. Savage served as Chaplain
Dun & Bradstreet (1,519 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
DNB, was retired. On July 1, 2020, Dun & Bradstreet re-listed shares on the New York Stock Exchange, once again trading under the ticker symbol DNB.
Charles Macintosh (521 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Charles Macintosh FRS (29 December 1766 – 25 July 1843) was a Scottish chemist and the inventor of waterproof fabric. The Mackintosh raincoat (the variant
Robert Beaumont (Master of Trinity College) (596 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Robert Beaumont (died 1567) was Master of Trinity College Cambridge from 1561 to 1567 and twice Vice-Chancellor of the University of Cambridge (1564, 1566)
Robert Scott (philologist) (291 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Robert Scott (26 January 1811 – 2 December 1887) was a British academic philologist and Church of England priest. Scott was ordained in 1835 and held the
Leicester Mercury (1,104 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Leicester Mercury is a British regional newspaper for the city of Leicester and the neighbouring counties of Leicestershire and Rutland. The paper
Samuel Ward (scholar) (1,139 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Samuel Ward (1572–1643) was an English academic and a master at the University of Cambridge. He served as one of the delegates from the Church of England
Joseph Lister (5,085 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Joseph Lister, 1st Baron Lister KCVO, OM, PC, PRS, FRCSE, FFPS (5 April 1827 – 10 February 1912), was a British surgeon and a pioneer of antiseptic surgery
Humphrey Gower (518 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Humphrey Gower (1638–1711) was an English clergyman and academic, Master of Jesus College, Cambridge, and then St. John's College, Cambridge, and Lady
Geoffrey Blythe (262 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Geoffrey Blythe (died c. 1530) was the Bishop of Coventry and Lichfield. Blythe was born at Norton in Derbyshire (now part of Sheffield) to William Blythe
Navan (1,461 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Navan (/ˈnævən/ NAV-ən; Irish: An Uaimh [ənˠ ˈuəvʲ], meaning "the Cave") is the county town of County Meath, Ireland. In 2016, it had a population of 30
William Buckmaster (358 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
William Buckmaster (died 1545) was an English cleric and academic, three times vice-chancellor of the University of Cambridge. Buckmaster graduated at
Liquid funk (624 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Liquid funk, liquid drum & bass, liquid DnB, liquid or sometimes just melodic drum & bass is a subgenre of drum and bass. While it uses similar basslines
Falklands Crisis of 1770 (1,305 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Falklands Crisis of 1770 was a diplomatic standoff between Great Britain and Spain over possession of the Falkland Islands in the South Atlantic Ocean
Thomas Howard, 2nd Duke of Norfolk (2,127 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Thomas Howard, 2nd Duke of Norfolk KG PC (1443 – 21 May 1524), styled Earl of Surrey from 1483 to 1485 and again from 1489 to 1514, was an English nobleman
Joseph Timothy Haydn (287 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Joseph Timothy Haydn (died 17 January 1856), compiler of dictionaries, was well known as the author of the "Dictionary of Dates", 1841 (19th edition, 1889)
Sir William Dawes, 3rd Baronet (766 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Sir William Dawes, 3rd Baronet (12 September 1671 – 30 April 1724), was an Anglican prelate. He served as Bishop of Chester from 1708 to 1714 and then
Robert Butts (bishop) (419 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Robert Butts (1684–1748) was an English churchman and strong partisan of the administration of Sir Robert Walpole, successively Bishop of Norwich and Bishop
Edmund Boldero (332 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Edmund Boldero (1608–1679) was an English royalist clergyman and academic, Master of Jesus College, Cambridge from 1663. He was a native of Bury St. Edmunds
List of fellows of the Royal Society elected in 1857 (138 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Fellows of the Royal Society elected in 1857. Lionel Smith Beale (1828–1906) George Boole (1815–1864) George Bowdler Buckton (1818–1905) Thomas Davidson
Nicholas Clagett (257 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Nicholas Clagett (born 1685/6, died 1746) was an English bishop. Claggett was from a clerical family of Bury St Edmunds. He went up to Trinity College
William Saywell (433 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
William Saywell (1643–1701) was an English churchman and academic, known as a controversialist, archdeacon of Ely, and Master of Jesus College, Cambridge
George Bradshaw (1,170 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
George Bradshaw (29 July 1800 – 6 September 1853) was an English cartographer, printer and publisher. He developed Bradshaw's Guide, a widely sold series
Lancelot Andrewes (3,071 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Lancelot Andrewes (1555 – 25 September 1626) was an English bishop and scholar, who held high positions in the Church of England during the reigns of Elizabeth
Christopher Wordsworth (divine) (359 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Christopher Wordsworth (9 June 1774 – 2 February 1846), was an English divine and scholar. Born in Cockermouth, Cumberland, he was the youngest brother
Punch and Judy (4,201 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Punch and Judy is a traditional puppet show featuring Mr. Punch and his wife Judy. The performance consists of a sequence of short scenes, each depicting
Osbert Salvin (501 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Osbert Salvin FRS (25 February 1835 – 1 June 1898) was an English naturalist, ornithologist, and herpetologist best known for co-authoring Biologia Centrali-Americana
List of fellows of the Royal Society elected in 1869 (277 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Fellows of the Royal Society elected in 1869. Samuel White Baker (1821–1893) John Jeremiah Bigsby (1792–1881) Charles Chambers (1834–1896) William Esson
John Kemp (739 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
John Kemp (c. 1380 – 22 March 1454) was a medieval English cardinal, Archbishop of Canterbury, and Lord Chancellor of England. Kemp was son of Thomas Kempe
Yazman Tehsil (138 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Union Councils. Villages in the area include Chak No 113/DNB and Chak No 108/DNB. Chak 108/DNB has a Governmental Primary School and a private school named
Thomas Westfield (586 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Thomas Westfield (1573 – 25 June 1644) was an English churchman, Bishop of Bristol and member of the Westminster Assembly. He was born in the parish of
Thomas Robert Malthus (5,650 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Thomas Robert Malthus FRS (/ˈmælθəs/; 13/14 February 1766 – 23 December 1834) was an English cleric, scholar and influential economist in the fields of
William Stanley (priest) (710 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
William Stanley (1647–1731) was an English churchman and college head, Master of Corpus Christi College, Cambridge, Archdeacon of London and Dean of St
1608 in Scotland (169 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Events in the year 1608 in Scotland. Monarch – James VI Tullibole Castle constructed The Lanark Silver Bell (horse racing trophy) established James Steuart
Thomas Ruthall (686 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Thomas Ruthall (also spelled Ruthal, Rowthel or Rowthall; died 4 February 1523) was an English churchman, administrator and diplomat. He was a leading
George Montaigne (361 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
George Montaigne (or Mountain; 1569 – 24 October 1628) was an English bishop. Montaigne was born in 1569 at Cawood, Yorkshire. He was educated at Queens'
Earl of Eglinton (574 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Earl of Eglinton is a title in the Peerage of Scotland. In 1859, the thirteenth Earl of Eglinton, Archibald Montgomerie, was also created Earl of Winton
Gilbert Ironside the younger (551 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Gilbert Ironside the younger (1632 – 27 August 1701) was an English churchman and academic, Warden of Wadham College, Oxford from 1667, Bishop of Bristol
John Smith (Chancellor of the Exchequer) (808 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
John Smith (1656–1723) of Tedworth House, Hampshire, was an English politician who sat in the English and British House of Commons between 1678 and 1723
Royal Botanical Gardens, Peradeniya (702 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Royal Botanic Gardens, Peradeniya are about 5.5 km to the west of the city of Kandy in the Central Province of Sri Lanka. It attracts 2 million visitors
George Corrie (priest) (448 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
George Elwes Corrie (1793–1885) was an English churchman and academic, Master of Jesus College, Cambridge from 1849. He was born at Colsterworth, Lincolnshire
Robert Tounson (332 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
A Cambridge Alumni Database. University of Cambridge. s:Hyde, Alexander (DNB00)  This article incorporates text from a publication now in the public domain: "Townson
George Bass (2,217 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
George Bass (/bæs/; 30 January 1771 – after 5 February 1803) was a British naval surgeon and explorer of Australia. Bass was born on 30 January 1771 at
Edward Rainbowe (1,037 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Edward Rainbowe or Rainbow (1608–1684) was an English academic, Church of England clergyman and a noted preacher. He was Master of Magdalene College, Cambridge
Paulinus of York (2,052 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Paulinus (died 10 October 644) was a Roman missionary and the first Bishop of York. A member of the Gregorian mission sent in 601 by Pope Gregory I to
Nathaniel Lloyd (218 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Sir Nathaniel Lloyd (1669–1745) was an English jurist and Master of Trinity Hall, Cambridge. Born in the Savoy Hospital 29 November 1669, eldest son of
John Gostlin (354 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
John Gostlin or Gostlyn MD (c. 1566 – 21 October 1626) was an English academic and physician, Master of Gonville and Caius College, Cambridge from 1619
January 5 (7,905 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
January 5 is the fifth day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 360 days remain until the end of the year (361 in leap years). 1477 – Battle of Nancy:
1609 in Scotland (117 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Events in the year 1609 in Scotland. Monarch – James VI Establishment of the titles of Lord Dingwall and Lord Cranstoun, two titles in the Peerage of Scotland
James Murray, 2nd Duke of Atholl (729 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
James Murray, 2nd Duke of Atholl KT PC (28 September 1690 – 8 January 1764), styled Marquess of Tullibardine between 1715 and 1746, was a Scottish peer
Boston, Lincolnshire (7,584 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Boston is a port and market town in Lincolnshire, on the east coast of England, about 100 miles (160 km) north of London. It is the largest town of the
John Sharp (bishop) (1,002 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
John Sharp (16 February 1645 – 2 February 1714), English divine who served as Archbishop of York. Memoirs of the Secret Services of John Macky Esq.: John
List of fellows of the Royal Society elected in 1900 (316 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Fellows of the Royal Society elected in 1900. George James Burch (1852–1914) Tannatt William Edgeworth David (1858–1934) John Bretland Farmer (1865–1944)
Thomas Bainbrigg (240 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Thomas Bainbrigg (Bainbridge) (died 1646) was an English college head. A northerner, he was possibly from Kirkby Lonsdale. He graduated B.A. at Christ's
John Graham (bishop) (721 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
The Rev. John Graham (23 February 1794, Durham – 15 June 1865, Chester) was an English churchman and academic. He was master of Christ's College, Cambridge
Thomas Howard, 3rd Duke of Norfolk (3,220 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Thomas Howard, 3rd Duke of Norfolk KG PC (1473 – 25 August 1554), was a prominent English politician and nobleman of the Tudor era. He was an uncle of
John Prideaux (1,166 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Vivian, Heraldic Visitations of Devon, p.616 s:Prideaux, John (1578-1650) (DNB00) Hugh Trevor-Roper, Archbishop Laud, p. 44. Trevor-Roper, Laud, p. 116
Guy Carleton (bishop) (314 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Christianity portal Guy Carleton (1605–1685) was an Anglican clergyman. He was Dean of Carlisle from 1660 to 1671, Bishop of Bristol from 1672 to 1679
Thomas Campion (1,380 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Thomas Campion (sometimes Campian; 12 February 1567 – 1 March 1620) was an English composer, poet, and physician. He wrote over a hundred lute songs, masques
War Office (2,324 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The War Office was a Department of the British Government responsible for the administration of the British Army between 1857 and 1964, when its functions
Richard Steward (796 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Richard Steward or Stewart (1593? – 1651) was an English royalist churchman, clerk of the closet to Charles I and designated Dean of St. Paul's and Westminster
Clement Corbet (285 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
from Thomas Baker. Dictionary of National Biography; s:Corbet, Clement (DNB00). "Corbet, Clement (CRBT592C)". A Cambridge Alumni Database. University
Simony (1,191 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Simony (/ˈsɪməni/) is the act of selling church offices and roles or sacred things. It is named after Simon Magus, who is described in the Acts of the
John Coldwell (367 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
John Coldwell (c.1535–1596) was an English physician and bishop. He was born at Faversham. He graduated B.A. at St. John's College, Cambridge, in 1555
Bungay (1,211 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Bungay (/ˈbʌŋɡi/) is a market town, civil parish and electoral ward in the English county of Suffolk. It lies in the Waveney valley, 5.5 miles (9 km) west
Pedro Gilbert (408 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Pedro Gilbert or Don Pedro Gibert (c. 1800 – June 11, 1835) was an early 19th-century pirate, who was one of the few remaining pirates continuing to raid
Thomas Chubb (1,232 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Thomas Chubb (29 September 1679 – 8 February 1747) was a lay English Deist writer born near Salisbury. He saw Christ as a divine teacher, but held reason
Walter Blandford (308 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Walter Blandford (1616 in Melbury Abbas, Dorset, England – 1675) was an English academic and bishop. A Fellow of Wadham College, Oxford at the time of
William Capell, 3rd Earl of Essex (519 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
William Capell, 3rd Earl of Essex, KG PC (11 January 1697 – 8 January 1743) was an English courtier and diplomat. He was the son of the 2nd Earl of Essex
Charles James Blomfield (985 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Charles James Blomfield (29 May 1786 – 5 August 1857) was a British divine and classicist, and a Church of England bishop for 32 years. Blomfield was born
Timothy Pont (618 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Rev Timothy Pont (c. 1560–c.1627) was a Scottish minister, cartographer and topographer. He was the first to produce a detailed map of Scotland. Pont's
Richard Howland (675 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Richard Howland (1540–1600) was an English churchman and academic, Master of Magdalene College, Cambridge, and of St John's College, Cambridge, and bishop
List of fellows of the Royal Society elected in 1890 (374 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Fellows of the Royal Society elected in 1890. Benjamin Baker (1840–1907) Robert Holford Macdowall Bosanquet (1841–1912) Samuel Hawksley Burbury (1831–1911)
William Beale (college head) (439 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
William Beale (died 1651) was an English royalist churchman, Master in turn of Jesus College, Cambridge and St John's College, Cambridge. He was subjected
Alexander Hyde (432 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Alexander Hyde (1598–1667) was an English royalist clergyman, Bishop of Salisbury from 1665 to 1667. Hyde was born at Salisbury in 1598, the second-born
List of fellows of the Royal Society elected in 1880 (330 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Fellows of the Royal Society elected in 1880. Thomas Clifford Allbutt (1836–1925) John Attfield (1835–1911) Thomas George Baring (1826–1904) Alexander
William Whittlesey (355 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
William Whittlesey (or Whittlesea) (died 5 June 1374) was a Bishop of Rochester, then Bishop of Worcester, then finally Archbishop of Canterbury. He also
List of fellows of the Royal Society elected in 1800 (352 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Fellows of the Royal Society elected in 1800. Arthur Annesley (1744–1816) Codrington Edmund Carrington (1769–1849) Henry Cecil (1754–1804) Alexander Crichton
Warrington Academy (727 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Warrington Academy, active as a teaching establishment from 1756 to 1782, was a prominent dissenting academy, that is, a school or college set up by those
John Worthington (academic) (726 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
John Worthington (1618–1671) was an English academic. He was closely associated with the Cambridge Platonists. He did not in fact publish in the field
James Collinson (371 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
James Collinson (9 May 1825 – 24 January 1881) was a Victorian painter who was a member of the Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood from 1848 to 1850. He was born
Christopher Bethell (322 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Christopher Bethell (21 April 1773 – 19 April 1859) was Bishop of Bangor. Bethell was the second son of the Reverend Richard Bethell, the rector of St
94th Regiment of Foot (1760) (234 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
The 94th Regiment of Foot was a British Army regiment formed in Wales in January 1760. It saw action in North America later in the year during the French
Roger Kelke (816 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Roger Kelke (1524–1576) was an English churchman and academic, a Marian exile and Master of Magdalene College, Cambridge from 1558 and Archdeacon of Stow
Thomas Thurlow (bishop) (297 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Thomas Thurlow (1737–1791) was an English bishop. Thurlow studied at Magdalen College, Oxford as a demy 1755–1759, graduating B.A. 1758, M.A. 1761, B.D
List of fellows of the Royal Society elected in 1897 (346 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
This page lists fellows of the Royal Society elected in 1897. Robert Bell (1841–1917) William Henry Broadbent (1835–1907) Charles Chree (1860–1928) Henry
Thomas Paske (539 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Thomas Paske (died 1662) was an English clergyman and academic, deprived as a royalist. He was perhaps son of William Paske, vicar of Hendon, Middlesex
Theophilus Dillingham (257 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Theophilus Dillingham (1613–1678) was an English churchman and academic, Master of Clare Hall, Cambridge and Archdeacon of Bedford. The son of Thomas Dillingham
Robert Sanderson (theologian) (355 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Robert Sanderson (19 September 1587 – 29 January 1663) was an English theologian and casuist. He was born in Sheffield in Yorkshire and grew up at Gilthwaite
Hædde (310 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Hædde (died 705) was a medieval monk and Bishop of Winchester. Hædde is believed to have been born in Headingley, Leeds, and became a monk of Whitby Abbey
William Pole (antiquary) (2,188 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Sir William Pole (1561–1635) of Colcombe House in the parish of Colyton, of Southcote in the parish of Talaton and formerly of Shute House in the parish
William Coleridge, 5th Baron Coleridge (353 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
William Duke Coleridge, 5th Baron Coleridge (born 18 June 1937) is an hereditary peer who lives in Ottery St Mary in Devon, England. The son of Richard
William Fuller (bishop) (642 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
William Fuller (1608–1675) was an English churchman. He was dean of St Patrick's Cathedral, Dublin (1660), bishop of Limerick (1663), and bishop of Lincoln
Henry King (poet) (804 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Henry King (1592 – 30 September 1669) was an English poet who served as Bishop of Chichester. The elder son of John King, Bishop of London, and his wife
Henry V of England (4,232 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Henry V (16 September 1386 – 31 August 1422), also called Henry of Monmouth, was King of England from 1413 until his death in 1422. Despite his relatively
Charles Sumner (bishop) (667 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Charles Richard Sumner KG (22 November 1790 – 15 August 1874) was a Church of England bishop. Charles Sumner was a brother of John Bird Sumner, Archbishop
John Bowle (bishop) (258 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
John Bowle (died 9 October 1637) was an English churchman and bishop of Rochester. A native of Lancashire, he was educated at Trinity College, Cambridge
John Thomas (bishop of Rochester) (559 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
John Thomas (14 October 1712 – 22 August 1793) was an English churchman, Bishop of Rochester from 1774. Born in Carlisle, Cumbria, he was the eldest son
William Legge, 2nd Earl of Dartmouth (634 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
William Legge, 2nd Earl of Dartmouth, PC, FRS (20 June 1731 – 15 July 1801), styled as Viscount Lewisham from 1732 to 1750, was a British statesman who
DNB Arena (Stavanger) (1,210 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
DNB Arena is an indoor ice hockey rink in Stavanger, Norway, and home to the GET-ligaen side Stavanger Oilers. Opened ahead of the 2012–13 season, the
James Burrough (architect) (734 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Sir James Burrough (1 September 1691 – 7 August 1764) was an English academic, antiquary, and amateur architect. He was Master of Gonville and Caius College
Thomas Fairfax (3,198 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Thomas Fairfax, 3rd Lord Fairfax of Cameron (17 January 1612 – 12 November 1671), also known as Sir Thomas Fairfax, was an English nobleman, peer, politician
Richard Willis (bishop) (474 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Richard Willis (1664–1734) was an English bishop. Willis was born in Ribbesford, Worcestershire, where his father was a tanner. He was educated at Bewdley
Augustine Lindsell (453 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Augustine Lindsell (died 6 November 1634) was an English classical scholar and Bishop of Hereford. In church matters he was advanced by Richard Neile,
William Frere (417 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
William Frere (28 November 1775 – 25 May 1836), was an English lawyer and academic, a law-serjeant and Master of Downing College, Cambridge. Frere was
Robert Mapletoft (582 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Robert Mapletoft (25 January 1609 – 20 August 1677) was an English churchman and academic, Master of Pembroke College, Cambridge and Dean of Ely. He was
Kunnskapsforlaget (166 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
version was transferred to Institusjonen Fritt Ord og Sparebankstiftelsen DnB in 2011. Kunnskapsforlaget is the largest dictionary publisher in Norway
Richard Reynolds (bishop) (286 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Richard Reynolds (1674–1743) was an English bishop of Lincoln. He was baptised at Leverington, near Wisbech, Cambridgeshire, on 17 July 1674, son of Richard
William Nicholson (bishop of Gloucester) (738 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
William Nicholson (1 November 1591 – 5 February 1672) was an English clergyman, a member of the Westminster Assembly and Bishop of Gloucester. The son
Royal African Company (2,499 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Royal African Company (RAC) was an English mercantile (trading) company set up in 1660 by the royal Stuart family and City of London merchants to trade
John Burdon (bishop) (482 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
John Shaw Burdon (simplified Chinese: 包尔腾; traditional Chinese: 包爾騰; 1826 – 5 January 1907) was a British Christian missionary to China with the Church
John Moore (bishop of Ely) (837 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
John Moore (1646–1714) was Bishop of Norwich (1691–1707) and Bishop of Ely (1707–1714) and was a famous bibliophile whose vast collection of books forms
Clan Anstruther (739 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Clan Anstruther is a Scottish clan. The clan originated from the town of Anstruther, which was adopted as a familial name. The name is Gaelic in origin:
Joseph Wilcocks (277 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Joseph Wilcocks (19 December 1673 – 28 February 1756) was an English churchman, bishop of Gloucester, and bishop of Rochester and dean of Westminster.
Royal Naval Academy (690 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Royal Naval Academy was a facility established in 1733 in Portsmouth Dockyard to train officers for the Royal Navy. The founders' intentions were to
Humphrey Gilbert (3,743 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Sir Humphrey Gilbert (c. 1539 – 9 September 1583) of Compton in the parish of Marldon and of Greenway in the parish of Churston Ferrers, both in Devon
Samuel Fell (569 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Samuel Fell D.D. (1584 – 1 February 1649) was an English academic and clergyman, Dean of Christ Church, Oxford and Vice-Chancellor of the University of
William Becket (265 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Collection of Chirurgical Tracts, 1740. These references are found in the DNB article referred to above. Attribution  This article incorporates text from
Thomas Dale (1,432 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Sir Thomas Dale (died 19 August 1619) was an English naval commander and deputy-governor of the Virginia Colony in 1611 and from 1614 to 1616. Governor
Samuel Taylor Coleridge (8,345 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Samuel Taylor Coleridge (/ˈkoʊlərɪdʒ/; 21 October 1772 – 25 July 1834) was an English poet, literary critic, philosopher and theologian who, with his friend
Robert Hay Drummond (1,730 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Robert Hay (10 November 1711 – 10 December 1776), known later as Robert Hay-Drummond of Cromlix and Innerpeffray, was Archbishop of York from 1761 to 1776
Edmund Staunton (615 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
published at the end of Richard Mayo's biography in 1671. s:Staunton, Edmund (DNB00) http://oll.libertyfund.org/?option=com_staticxt&staticfile=show
Edward Phelips (speaker) (786 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Sir Edward Phelips (ca. 1555/1560 – 1614) was an English lawyer and politician, the Speaker of the English House of Commons from 1604 until 1611, and subsequently
Martin Davy (437 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Martin Davy (1763–1839) was an English physician and academic, Master of Caius College, Cambridge from 1803. In later life he was also a cleric. Davy's
John Millar (philosopher) (937 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
John Millar of Glasgow (22 June 1735 – 30 May 1801) was a Scottish philosopher, historian and Regius Professor of Civil Law at the University of Glasgow
Willoughbyland (1,135 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Willoughbyland was a short-lived early English colony in what is now Suriname. It was founded in 1650 by Lord Willoughby when he was the Royalist Governor
William Wollaston (1,342 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
William Wollaston (/ˈwʊləstən/; 26 March 1659 – 29 October 1724) was a school teacher, Church of England priest, scholar of Latin, Greek, and Hebrew, theologian
William Burley (303 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
William Burley (died 10 August 1458) was MP for Shropshire nineteen times and Speaker of the House of Commons of England. He was the eldest son of John
John Lonsdale (630 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
John Lonsdale (17 January 1788 – 19 October 1867) was the third Principal of King's College, London, and later served as Bishop of Lichfield. He was educated
Henry Harvey (lawyer) (258 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Henry Harvey LL.D. (died 1585) was an English lawyer, who became Master of Trinity Hall, Cambridge, and established the London premises (for two centuries)
William Nicholson (bishop of Gloucester) (738 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
William Nicholson (1 November 1591 – 5 February 1672) was an English clergyman, a member of the Westminster Assembly and Bishop of Gloucester. The son
Francis Hare (bishop) (1,154 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Francis Hare (1671–1740) was an English churchman and classical scholar, bishop of St Asaph from 1727 and bishop of Chichester from 1731. Born on 1 November
Clan Spalding (838 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Clan Spalding is a highland Scottish clan and sept of Clan Murray. The clan does not have a chief recognised by the Lord Lyon King of Arms so the clan
Robert Hay Drummond (1,730 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Robert Hay (10 November 1711 – 10 December 1776), known later as Robert Hay-Drummond of Cromlix and Innerpeffray, was Archbishop of York from 1761 to 1776
Roger Flower (344 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Roger Flower or Flore (died 1427) was an English politician, 12 times MP for Rutland and four times Speaker of the House of Commons. He was son of William
Joshua Hoyle (469 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Joshua Hoyle (died 6 December 1654) was a Professor of Divinity at Trinity College, Dublin and Master of University College, Oxford during the Commonwealth
John Thomas (bishop of Rochester) (559 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
John Thomas (14 October 1712 – 22 August 1793) was an English churchman, Bishop of Rochester from 1774. Born in Carlisle, Cumbria, he was the eldest son
Thomas Byng (277 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Thomas Byng (or Bynge) (died 1599) was an English academic and lawyer, Master of Clare Hall, Cambridge from 1571. He matriculated as a sizar at Peterhouse
DNB Arena (Stavanger) (1,210 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
DNB Arena is an indoor ice hockey rink in Stavanger, Norway, and home to the GET-ligaen side Stavanger Oilers. Opened ahead of the 2012–13 season, the
Thomas Winniffe (597 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Thomas Winniffe (1576–1654) was an English churchman, the Bishop of Lincoln from 1642 to 1654. He was born and baptised at Sherborne, Dorset, in 1576,
Edward Perowne (212 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Edward Henry Perowne (8 January 1826 in Burdwan, India – 5 February 1906, in Cambridge) was an English clergyman and college head, Master of Corpus Christi
Thomas Cook (960 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Thomas Cook (22 November 1808 – 18 July 1892) was an English businessman. He is best known for founding the travel agency Thomas Cook & Son. Thomas Cook
William French (educator) (417 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
William French, D.D. (1786–1849) was master of Jesus College, Cambridge. French was the son of a rich yeoman at Eye, Suffolk. He was sent to Ipswich Grammar
Christopher Wordsworth (1,170 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Christopher Wordsworth (30 October 1807 – 20 March 1885) was an English bishop in the Anglican Church and man of letters. Wordsworth was born in London
Martin Davy (437 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Martin Davy (1763–1839) was an English physician and academic, Master of Caius College, Cambridge from 1803. In later life he was also a cleric. Davy's
William Cleaver (302 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
William Cleaver (1742–1815) was an English churchman and academic, Principal of Brasenose College, Oxford, and bishop of three sees. He was the eldest
John Peachell (570 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
John Peachell (1630–1690) was an English academic, Master of Magdalene College, Cambridge, and Vice-Chancellor of the University of Cambridge at the moment
Alien priory (796 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Alien priories were religious establishments in England, such as a monastery or convent, which were under the control of another religious house outside
John Warner (bishop) (1,093 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
John Warner (1581 – 14 October 1666) was an English churchman, Bishop of Rochester and royalist. Son of Harman Warner of London, merchant tailor, he was
William Wollaston (1,342 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
William Wollaston (/ˈwʊləstən/; 26 March 1659 – 29 October 1724) was a school teacher, Church of England priest, scholar of Latin, Greek, and Hebrew, theologian
Simeon Ashe (507 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Simeon Ashe or Ash (died 1662) was an English nonconformist clergyman, a member of the Westminster Assembly and chaplain to the Parliamentary leader Edward
Solemn League and Covenant (703 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Solemn League and Covenant was an agreement between the Scottish Covenanters and the leaders of the English Parliamentarians in 1643 during the First
Thomas Manningham (410 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Thomas Manningham (1651?-1722) was an English churchman, bishop of Chichester from 1709. He was born about 1651 in the parish of St. George, Southwark
William Strong (priest) (348 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
William Strong (died 1654) was an English clergyman and then pastor of an independent congregation, and member of the Westminster Assembly. He was born
Anthony Musgrave (1,481 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Sir Anthony Musgrave GCMG (31 August 1828 – 9 October 1888) was a colonial administrator and governor. He died in office as Governor of Queensland in 1888
Frank Nicholls (741 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Frank Nicholls (1699 – 7 January 1778) was a physician. He was elected a Fellow of the Royal Society in 1728. He was made reader of anatomy at Oxford University
Thomas Young (bishop) (698 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Christianity portal Thomas Young (1507–1568) was a Bishop of St David's and Archbishop of York (1561–1568). He was the son of John Young and Eleanor his
William Rutty (320 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
William Rutty M.D. (1687–1730) was an English physician. He was born in London, and entered Christ's College, Cambridge in 1707, graduating M.B. in 1712
Henry Phipps, 1st Earl of Mulgrave (904 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
General Henry Phipps, 1st Earl of Mulgrave, GCB, PC (14 February 1755 – 7 April 1831), styled The Honourable Henry Phipps until 1792 and known as The Lord
John Boxall (561 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
John Boxall (died 1571) was an English churchman and secretary of state to Mary I of England. He was a native of Bramshott in Hampshire. After studying
William Becket (265 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Collection of Chirurgical Tracts, 1740. These references are found in the DNB article referred to above. Attribution  This article incorporates text from
John Edward Gray (1,898 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
John Edward Gray, FRS (12 February 1800 – 7 March 1875) was a British zoologist. He was the elder brother of zoologist George Robert Gray and son of the
Kingswood School (2,828 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Kingswood School is an independent day and boarding school located in Bath, Somerset, England. The school is coeducational and educates over 1,000 children
Robert Plumptre (520 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Robert Plumptre (1723–1788) was an English churchman and academic, President of Queens' College, Cambridge from 1760. He was the youngest of ten children
Nicholas Hare (245 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Sir Nicholas Hare of Bruisyard, Suffolk (c. 1484 – 31 October 1557) was Speaker of the House of Commons of England between 1539 and 1540. He was born the
Daniel Cawdry (497 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Dictionary of National Biography. London: Smith, Elder & Co. 1885–1900. DNB article on Brabourne.  This article incorporates text from a publication
HM Treasury (1,609 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Her Majesty's Treasury (HM Treasury), sometimes referred to as the Exchequer, or more informally the Treasury, is the department of the Government of the
Thomas Chaucer (968 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Thomas Chaucer (c. 1367 – 18 November 1434) was an English courtier and politician. The son of the poet Geoffrey Chaucer and his wife Philippa Roet, Thomas
William de Shareshull (647 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Sir William de Shareshull KB (1289/1290–1370) was an English lawyer and Chief Justice of the King's Bench from 26 October 1350 to 5 July 1361. He achieved
John Harris (Warden) (401 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
answers, were published by Henry Jeanes (1653). s:Harris, John (1588?-1658) (DNB00) Kirby, p. 326. http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=42044
Edmund Law (1,621 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Edmund Law (6 June 1703 – 14 August 1787) was a priest in the Church of England. He served as Master of Peterhouse, Cambridge, as Knightbridge Professor
James Paterson (journalist) (562 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
James Paterson (18 May 1805 – 6 May 1876) was a Scottish journalist on numerous newspapers, writer and antiquary. His works are popular history, rather
Robert Creighton (603 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Robert Creighton or Crichton (1593–1672) was a Scottish royalist churchman who became Bishop of Bath and Wells. He was son of Thomas Creighton and Margaret
William Cowper (2,542 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
William Cowper (/ˈkuːpər/ KOO-pər; 26 November 1731 – 25 April 1800) was an English poet and hymnodist. One of the most popular poets of his time, Cowper
George Davys (476 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
George Davys (1780–1864) was an English cleric, tutor to Victoria of the United Kingdom, and later Bishop of Peterborough. He was previously Dean of Chester
Thomas Coleman (456 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
History (2000), p. 171. Dictionary of National Biography;s:Coleman, Thomas (DNB00). Lamont, p. 126. Lamont, pp. 146-7. Lamont, p. 176. Lamont p. 129. William
List of fellows of the Royal Society elected in 1849 (539 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Fellows of the Royal Society elected in 1849. John Couch Adams (1819–1892) Thomas Andrews (1813–1885) Francis Thornhill Baring (1796–1866) Charles Barry
John Dolben (626 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
John Dolben (1625–1686) was an English priest and Church of England bishop and archbishop. He was the son of William Dolben (died 1631), prebendary of
Richard Waldegrave (politician) (322 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Sir Richard Waldegrave (/ˈwɔːlɡreɪv/; c. 1338 – 2 May 1410) was a Member of Parliament for Suffolk and Speaker of the House of Commons during the reign
William Lyford (333 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
William Lyford (1598–1653) was an English nonconformist clergyman, elected to the Westminster Assembly though not sitting in it. Lyford was born at Peasemore
John Dolben (626 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
John Dolben (1625–1686) was an English priest and Church of England bishop and archbishop. He was the son of William Dolben (died 1631), prebendary of
John Ward (academic) (630 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
John Ward (1679?–1758) was an English teacher, supporter of learned societies, and biographer, remembered for his work on the Gresham College professors
John Harris (Warden) (401 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
answers, were published by Henry Jeanes (1653). s:Harris, John (1588?-1658) (DNB00) Kirby, p. 326. http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=42044
John Garvey (bishop) (448 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
John Garvey (1527–1595) was an Irish Protestant Bishop of Kilmore and Archbishop of Armagh. He was eldest son of John O'Garvey of Morisk, County Mayo,
Martin Martin (559 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Martin Martin (Scottish Gaelic: Màrtainn MacGilleMhàrtainn) (? – 9 October 1718) was a Scottish writer best known for his work A Description of the Western
George Davys (476 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
George Davys (1780–1864) was an English cleric, tutor to Victoria of the United Kingdom, and later Bishop of Peterborough. He was previously Dean of Chester
Andrew Perne (Puritan) (230 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Andrew Perne (1596–1654) was an English clergyman of Puritan opinions and member of the Westminster Assembly. He entered Peterhouse, Cambridge as a sizar
Charles Trimnell (422 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Charles Trimnell (1663–1723) was an English bishop. He was a Whig in politics, and known for his attacks on High Church views, writing on the subordination
Edward Blore (1,006 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Edward Blore (13 September 1787 – 4 September 1879) was a 19th-century (Victorian and pre-Victorian) British landscape and architectural artist, architect
Thomas Coleman (456 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
History (2000), p. 171. Dictionary of National Biography;s:Coleman, Thomas (DNB00). Lamont, p. 126. Lamont, pp. 146-7. Lamont, p. 176. Lamont p. 129. William
Will Spens (512 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Sir William Spens, CBE (31 May 1882 – 1 November 1962) was a Scottish educationalist, academic and Master of Corpus Christi College, Cambridge. Born in
Peter Peckard (1,088 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Biography and bibliography - Brycchan Carey 2002. Retrieved on March 29, 2010. DNB "Peckard, Peter (PKRT753P)". A Cambridge Alumni Database. University of Cambridge
Ranulph Crewe (1,253 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Sir Ranulph (or Ralulphe, or Randolph or Randall) Crewe (or Crew) (1558 – 3 January 1646) was an English judge and Chief Justice of the King's Bench. Ranulph
Edward Corbet (366 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Edward Corbet (c. 1603 – 5 January 1658) was an English clergyman, and a member of the Westminster Assembly. He was born at Pontesbury in Shropshire, and
List of fellows of the Royal Society elected in 1889 (555 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Fellows of the Royal Society elected in 1889. John Aitken (1839–1919) Edward Ballard (1820–1897) Alfred Barnard Basset (1854–1930) Horace Tabberer Brown
Lewis de Charleton (742 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Lewis de Charleton (died 23 May 1369) was a medieval Bishop of Hereford in England. Charleton was educated, it is said, at both Oxford and Cambridge, but
William Lloyd (bishop of Norwich) (535 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
William Lloyd (1637 – 1 January 1710) was a Welsh nonjuring bishop. He was born at Bala, Merionethshire, in 1637, son of Edward Lloyd, a clerk there. After
William Lyford (333 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
William Lyford (1598–1653) was an English nonconformist clergyman, elected to the Westminster Assembly though not sitting in it. Lyford was born at Peasemore
HM Treasury (1,609 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Her Majesty's Treasury (HM Treasury), sometimes referred to as the Exchequer, or more informally the Treasury, is the department of the Government of the
Jeremiah Whitaker (242 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
University of Cambridge. Dictionary of National Biography; s: Whitaker, Jeremiah (DNB00).  This article incorporates text from a publication now in the public
Moses Montefiore (2,895 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Sir Moses Haim Montefiore, 1st Baronet, FRS (24 October 1784 – 28 July 1885) was a British financier and banker, activist, philanthropist and Sheriff of
Charles Lyttelton (bishop) (591 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Charles Lyttelton FRS FSA (1714–1768) was an English churchman and antiquary from the Lyttelton family, who served as Bishop of Carlisle from 1762 to 1768
William Barons (337 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
William Barons (also Barnes; died 1505) was the Bishop of London from 1504 to 1505. He was also Master of the Rolls of the Court of Chancery from 1502
Henry Bullock (327 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Henry Bullock (died 1526) was an English clergyman, academic and humanist, a friend of Erasmus and a correspondent of his in the period 1516 to 1518. He
The Modern Cook (2,493 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Modern Cook was the first cookery book by the Anglo-Italian cook Charles Elmé Francatelli (1805–1876). It was first published in 1846. It was popular
Henry Bickersteth, 1st Baron Langdale (752 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Henry Bickersteth, 1st Baron Langdale, PC (18 June 1783 – 18 April 1851) was an English physician, law reformer, and Master of the Rolls from the prominent
William Oldhall (693 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Sir William Oldhall (1390?–1460) was an English soldier and Yorkist supporter, who served as Speaker of the House of Commons of England between 1450–51
Flann mac Lonáin (660 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Flann mac Lonáin (died 896) was an Irish poet. Flann mac Lonáin was a famed and at times controversial poet. He was the Chief Ollam of Ireland He seems
Thomas Horton (Gresham College) (745 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Thomas Horton D.D. (died 1673) was an English clergyman, Professor of Divinity at Gresham College in London, and President of Queens' College, Cambridge
John Young (Regius Professor) (583 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
John Young (1514–1580) was an English Catholic clergyman and academic. He was Master of Pembroke Hall, Cambridge, and was later imprisoned by Elizabeth
John Pratt (judge) (703 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Sir John Pratt PC (1657–1725) was an English judge and politician. He was Lord Chief Justice of England from 15 May 1718 until 2 March 1725. He was appointed
William Baker (bishop of Norwich) (257 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
William Baker (1668 – 4 December 1732) was an English churchman and academic, Warden of Wadham College, Oxford, Bishop of Bangor and bishop of Norwich
Spencer Compton, 2nd Marquess of Northampton (579 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Spencer Joshua Alwyne Compton, 2nd Marquess of Northampton FRS FGS (2 January 1790 – 17 January 1851), known as Lord Compton from 1796 to 1812 and as Earl
List of fellows of the Royal Society elected in 1819 (672 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Fellows of the Royal Society elected in 1819. Clarke Abel (1780–1826) Robert Barlow (1757–1843) Henry Thomas de la Beche (1796–1855) John Brooke (1773–1821)
William Goodwin (priest) (281 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
William Goodwin (died 1620) was an English churchman and academic, Dean of Christ Church, Oxford from 1611. He was a scholar of Westminster School, and
William Courtenay (768 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
William Courtenay (c. 1342 – 31 July 1396) was Archbishop of Canterbury (1381-96), having previously been Bishop of Hereford and Bishop of London. Courtenay
Zouch Tate (249 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Zouch Tate (1606–1650) was an English Member of Parliament. He was the son of Sir William Tate and Elizabeth, daughter of Edward la Zouche, 11th Baron
Edward Hawford (491 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Edward Hawford D.D. (died 1582) was an English churchman and academic, Master of Christ's College, Cambridge from 1559. While Hawford was a somewhat conservative
John Pollard (speaker) (345 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Sir John Pollard (died August 1557) was a Speaker of the House of Commons. He became Speaker in 1553 and was made a Knight Bachelor only a few weeks before
Robert Abbot (bishop) (1,089 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Robert Abbot (1560–1617) was an Anglican clergyman and academic, known as a polemical writer. He served as Master of Balliol College, Oxford, Regius Professor
Richard Byfield (502 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Richard Byfield (1598?–1664) was an English clergyman, Sabbatarian controversialist, member of the Westminster Assembly, and ejected minister. He was 16
Popish Plot (4,838 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Dictionary of National Biography. Oxford University Press.  "Arundell, Henry (DNB00)". Dictionary of National Biography. London: Smith, Elder & Co. 1885–1900
John Bokyngham (529 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
John Bokyngham (or Buckingham; died 1399) was a medieval treasury official and Bishop of Lincoln. Bokyngham entered the treasury and was appointed Chamberlain
Ashurst Gilbert (421 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Ashurst Turner Gilbert (14 May 1786 – 21 February 1870) was an English churchman and academic, Principal of Brasenose College, Oxford from 1822 and bishop
William Knight (bishop) (1,228 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
William Knight (1475/76 – 1547) was the Secretary of State to Henry VIII of England, and Bishop of Bath and Wells. Knight was sent to Rome in 1527 to try
John Pory (Master of Corpus) (430 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
John Pory (1502/03–1570) was an English churchman and academic, Master of Corpus Christi College, Cambridge. Born at Thrapstone, Northamptonshire, Pory
Robert Grove (bishop) (559 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Robert Grove (1634–1696) was an English Bishop of Chichester. Born in London in 1634 or 1635, he was the son of William Grove of Morden, Dorset. In 1645
Henry Pepys (593 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Henry Pepys (/pɛpɪs/; 18 April 1783 – 13 November 1860) was the Church of England Bishop of Sodor and Man in 1840–1841 and of Worcester in 1841–1860. He
Thomas Bickley (258 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Thomas Bickley (1518–1596) was an English churchman, a Marian exile who became Warden of Merton College, Oxford and Bishop of Chichester He was born at
DNB Extension for Education and Research (65 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
The DNB Extension for Education and Research is housed in the Department of Dance at The Ohio State University in Columbus, OH. The DNB Extension was
Charles Lyttelton (bishop) (591 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Charles Lyttelton FRS FSA (1714–1768) was an English churchman and antiquary from the Lyttelton family, who served as Bishop of Carlisle from 1762 to 1768
James Kennedy (bishop) (1,039 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
Thomas Rymer's Fœdera Keith's Scottish Bishops Many details in the 1891 DNB article are inaccurate, esp. dates, and some have been corrected from the
William Knight (bishop) (1,228 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
William Knight (1475/76 – 1547) was the Secretary of State to Henry VIII of England, and Bishop of Bath and Wells. Knight was sent to Rome in 1527 to try
The Examiner (1808–1886) (455 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
The Examiner was a weekly paper founded by Leigh and John Hunt in 1808. For the first fifty years it was a leading intellectual journal expounding radical
Sir Jonathan Trelawny, 3rd Baronet (752 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Sir Jonathan Trelawny, 3rd Baronet (24 March 1650 – 19 July 1721) was a British Bishop of Bristol, Bishop of Exeter and Bishop of Winchester. Trelawny
Henry Hare, 3rd Baron Coleraine (774 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Henry Hare, 3rd Baron Coleraine FRS; FSA (10 May 1693 – 1 August 1749) was an English antiquary and politician who sat in the House of Commons from 1730
Charles Hayes (mathematician) (508 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Charles Hayes (1678–1760) was an English mathematician and chronologist, author of an early book on the method of fluxions. He was also a long-term official
Alexander II of Scotland (1,201 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Alexander II (Mediaeval Gaelic: Alaxandair mac Uilliam; Modern Gaelic: Alasdair mac Uilleim; 24 August 1198 – 6 July 1249) was King of Scotland from 1214
William Wake (482 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
William Wake (26 January 1657 – 24 January 1737) was a priest in the Church of England and Archbishop of Canterbury from 1716 until his death in 1737.
William Barons (337 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
William Barons (also Barnes; died 1505) was the Bishop of London from 1504 to 1505. He was also Master of the Rolls of the Court of Chancery from 1502
Henry Hammond (1,755 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Smith, Elder & Co. 1885–1900. Hooper 1890, pp. 242–243. Dr. Buckner in the DNB as in Fell's original life. Thomas Buckner, who died in 1645, was rector
Robert Grove (bishop) (559 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Robert Grove (1634–1696) was an English Bishop of Chichester. Born in London in 1634 or 1635, he was the son of William Grove of Morden, Dorset. In 1645
Thomas Bickley (258 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Thomas Bickley (1518–1596) was an English churchman, a Marian exile who became Warden of Merton College, Oxford and Bishop of Chichester He was born at
William Oldhall (693 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Sir William Oldhall (1390?–1460) was an English soldier and Yorkist supporter, who served as Speaker of the House of Commons of England between 1450–51
Capture of Recife (1595) (1,832 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
The Capture of Recife also known as James Lancaster's 1595 Expedition or Lancaster's Pernambucan expedition was an English military expedition during the
Charles Dod (499 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Charles Roger Phipps Dod (or Dodd) (1793–1855) was an Irish journalist and writer, known for his reference works including the Parliamentary Companion
Robert Phelps (academic) (261 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article
Robert Phelps (1808 – 11 January 1890) served as Master of Sidney Sussex College, Cambridge from 1843 until his death. Phelps was born in 1808 in Devonport
Earl of Mansfield (839 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Earl of Mansfield, in the County of Nottingham, and Earl of Mansfield, in the County of Middlesex, are two titles in the Peerage of Great Britain that
George Heneage (priest) (200 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
George Heneage (1482/3 – 1549) was an English churchman who became Dean of Lincoln. He was the second son of John Heneage of Hainton, near Wragby, Lincolnshire
William Goodwin (priest) (281 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
William Goodwin (died 1620) was an English churchman and academic, Dean of Christ Church, Oxford from 1611. He was a scholar of Westminster School, and
Reginald Courtenay (bishop of Exeter) (494 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Henry Reginald Courtenay (1741–1803) was an English Bishop of Bristol (1794–1797) and Bishop of Exeter 1797–1803. He was the eldest surviving son of Henry
Robert Some (457 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Robert Some (Soame) (1542–1609) was an English churchman and academic. Master of Peterhouse, Cambridge from 1589, Some played a prominent part in the ecclesiastical
Edburga of Minster-in-Thanet (322 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Saint Edburga of Minster-in-Thanet (also known as Eadburh and Bugga) was a princess of Wessex, and abbess of Minster-in-Thanet. She is regarded as a saint
Christopher Urswick (416 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Christopher Urswick (1448 – 1522) was a priest and confessor of Margaret Beaufort. He was Rector of Puttenham, Hertfordshire, and later Dean of Windsor
George Horne (bishop) (1,539 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
George Horne (1 November 1730 – 17 January 1792) was an English churchman, academic, writer, and university administrator. Horne was born at Otham near
Richard Byfield (502 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Richard Byfield (1598?–1664) was an English clergyman, Sabbatarian controversialist, member of the Westminster Assembly, and ejected minister. He was 16
Richard Manningham (580 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Sir Richard Manningham M.D. (1690–1759) was an English physician and man-midwife, now remembered for his involvement in the Mary Toft hoax. The second
Nathaniel Coga (232 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Cantabularian Proctors Parish web site British Isle Genealogy Framlingham Parish  "DNB Wren, Matthew". Dictionary of National Biography. London: Smith, Elder &
George Clement Boase (388 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
George Clement Boase (20 October 1829, in Penzance – 1 October 1897, in Lewisham) was an English bibliographer and antiquary. Boase's father was a banker
Popish Plot (4,838 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Dictionary of National Biography. Oxford University Press.  "Arundell, Henry (DNB00)". Dictionary of National Biography. London: Smith, Elder & Co. 1885–1900
Richard Courtenay (497 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Richard Courtenay (died 15 September 1415) was an English prelate and university chancellor, who served as Bishop of Norwich 1413-15. Courtenay was a son
Roger Goad (461 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Roger Goad (1538–1610) was an English academic theologian, Provost of King's College, Cambridge, and three times Vice-Chancellor of the University of Cambridge
James Hardiman (305 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
James Hardiman (1782–1855), also known as Séamus Ó hArgadáin, was a librarian at Queen's College, Galway. Hardiman is best remembered for his History of
John Underhill (bishop) (389 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
John Underhill (c.1545–1592) was an English academic, involved in controversy, and later Bishop of Oxford. Underhill was born about 1545 at the Cross Inn
Henry Pepys (593 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Henry Pepys (/pɛpɪs/; 18 April 1783 – 13 November 1860) was the Church of England Bishop of Sodor and Man in 1840–1841 and of Worcester in 1841–1860. He
Obadiah Sedgwick (625 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Obadiah Sedgwick (1600?–1658) was an English clergyman of presbyterian views, and a member of the Westminster Assembly. He was son of Joseph Sedgwick,
Dean of Ripon (97 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Dean of Ripon is a senior cleric in the Church of England Diocese of Leeds. The dean is the head of the chapter at Ripon Cathedral – his predecessors
John Edmunds (English academic) (153 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
John Edmunds (died 1544) was master of Peterhouse, Cambridge. Edmunds proceeded B.A. 1503–4, M.A. 1507, was admitted fellow of Jesus College, Cambridge
John Pory (Master of Corpus) (430 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
John Pory (1502/03–1570) was an English churchman and academic, Master of Corpus Christi College, Cambridge. Born at Thrapstone, Northamptonshire, Pory
George Finlay (458 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
George Finlay (21 December 1799 – 26 January 1875) was a Scottish historian. Finlay was born in Faversham, Kent, where his Scottish father, Captain John
David Bryce (1,442 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
David Bryce FRSE FRIBA RSA (3 April 1803 – 7 May 1876) was a Scottish architect. Bryce was born at 5 South College Street in Edinburgh, the son of David
John de Vere, 13th Earl of Oxford (2,466 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
John de Vere, 13th Earl of Oxford KG KB (8 September 1442 – 10 March 1513), the second son of John de Vere, 12th Earl of Oxford, and Elizabeth Howard,
George Huntingford (277 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
George Isaac Huntingford (1748–1832) was successively of Bishop of Gloucester and Bishop of Hereford. Huntingford was educated at Winchester College and
3rd (United Kingdom) Division (3,640 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
The 3rd (United Kingdom) Division is a regular army division of the British Army. It was created in 1809 by Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington, as
Thomas Baylie (275 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
dedicated to Sir Thomas Coventry, keeper of the great seal. s:Baylie, Thomas (DNB00) Thomae Baylaeei Maningfordiensis Ecclesise Pastoris de Merito Mortis Christi
Jerome Beale (270 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Jerome Beale was Master of Pembroke from 1619 to 1630; and Vice-Chancellor of the University of Cambridge in 1622 to 1623. Beale was born in Worcestershire
Edward Pearson (theologian) (638 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article
Edward Pearson (1756–1811) was an English academic and theologian, Master of Sidney Sussex College, Cambridge from 1808. He was born at St. George's Tombland
Dublin Castle (2,490 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Dublin Castle (Irish: Caisleán Bhaile Átha Cliath) is a major Irish government complex, conference centre, and tourist attraction. It is located off Dame
Charles Manners, 6th Duke of Rutland (485 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Charles Cecil John Manners, 6th Duke of Rutland KG (16 May 1815 – 3 March 1888, in Belvoir Castle), styled Marquess of Granby before 1857, was an English
August 22 (4,193 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
August 22 is the 234th day of the year (235th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. 131 days remain until the end of the year. 392 – Arbogast has Eugenius
Lewis Bagot (191 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Lewis Bagot (1 January 1740 – 4 June 1802) was an English cleric who served as the Bishop of Bristol, Norwich, and St Asaph. He was the fifth son of Sir
John Howson (244 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
John Howson (c. 1557 – 6 February 1632) was an English academic and bishop. He was born in the London parish of St Bride's Church, and educated at St Paul's
Henry More (1,950 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Henry More FRS (/ˈmɔːr/; 12 October 1614 – 1 September 1687) was an English philosopher of the Cambridge Platonist school. Henry was born in Grantham,
John Jackson (bishop) (717 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
is derived from Augustus Robert Buckland's article in the DNB: Jackson, John (1811-1885) (DNB00) [1] Papers and correspondence[permanent dead link] Buckland
Nicholas Bullingham (434 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Nicholas Bullingham (or Bollingham) (c. 1520–1576) was an English Bishop of Worcester. Nicholas Bullingham was born in Worcester in around 1520. He was
Edwin Sandys (bishop) (849 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Edwin Sandys (/ˈsændz/; 1519 – 10 July 1588) was an English prelate. He was Anglican Bishop of Worcester (1559–1570), London (1570–1576) and Archbishop
Edmund Beaufort (died 1471) (956 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Edmund Beaufort (c. 1438 – 6 May 1471), styled 3rd Duke of Somerset, was an English nobleman, and a military commander during the Wars of the Roses, in
Parliamentary system (4,035 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
A parliamentary system or parliamentary democracy is a system of democratic governance of a state (or subordinate entity) where the executive derives its
Bickleigh, Mid Devon (610 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Bickleigh is a village and civil parish in the Mid Devon district of Devon, England, about four miles south of Tiverton. It is in the former hundred of
Thomas Richardson (judge) (1,289 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Sir Thomas Richardson (1569 – 4 February 1635) was an English judge and politician who sat in the House of Commons from 1621 to 1622. He was Speaker of
Spencer Cowper (609 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Spencer Cowper (23 February 1670 – 10 December 1728) was an English lawyer and politician who sat in the English and British House of Commons between 1705
Ralph Nicholson Wornum (1,030 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Ralph Nicholson Wornum (1812–1877) was a British artist, art historian and administrator. He was Keeper and Secretary of the National Gallery of London
Gilbert Segrave (220 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Gilbert Segrave (1266 – 1316) was a medieval Bishop of London. He was the son of Nicholas Segrave, 1st Baron Segrave. Segrave obtained the living of Kegworth
Joseph Wigram (431 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Joseph Cotton Wigram (26 December 1798 – 6 April 1867) was a British churchman, Archdeacon of Winchester and bishop of Rochester. Born at Walthamstow,
George Singer (426 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
George John Singer (1786–1817) was an English early pioneer of electrical research, noted for his publications and for lectures delivered privately and
Thomas Lamplugh (506 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Christianity portal Thomas Lamplugh (1615 – 5 May 1691) was an English churchman who became Archbishop of York. He was the son of Christopher Lamplugh
William Greenhill (566 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
William Greenhill (1591–1671) was an English nonconformist clergyman, independent minister, and member of the Westminster Assembly. He was born probably
Richard Pace (594 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Richard Pace (c. 1482 – 28 June 1536) was an English diplomat of the Tudor period. He born in Hampshire and educated at Winchester College under Thomas
Anthony Burges (798 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Intellectual Origins of the English Revolution (1965), p. 108. s:Burgess, Anthony (DNB00) 'Dr Wallis's account of some passages of his own life', in The Works of
Michael Boyle (archbishop of Armagh) (1,094 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Michael Boyle, the younger (c. 1609 – 10 December 1702) was a Church of Ireland bishop who served as Archbishop of Dublin from 1663 to 1679 and Archbishop
Adam Orleton (661 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Adam Orleton (died 1345) was an English churchman and royal administrator. Orleton was born into a Herefordshire family, possibly in Orleton, possibly
Richard Cannon (261 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Richard Cannon (1779–1865) was a compiler of regimental records for the British Army. On 1 January 1802 Cannon was appointed to a clerkship at the Horse
William Bradbridge (629 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
William Bradbridge (or Brodebridge) (1501–1578) was an English bishop of Exeter. He was born in London and took his B.A. degree at Magdalen College, Oxford
Thomas Ford (minister) (975 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Thomas Ford (1598–1674) was an English nonconformist minister, a member of the Westminster Assembly and ejected minister of 1662. He was born at Brixton
Roger Hunt (speaker) (301 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Roger Hunt (died c. 1455) was an English MP and Speaker of the House of Commons. He was of obscure origins, but acquired the manor of Molesworth in Huntingdonshire
Molyneux Shuldham, 1st Baron Shuldham (1,074 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Admiral Molyneux Shuldham, 1st Baron Shuldham (c. 1717 – 30 September 1798) was an officer of the British Royal Navy. He served for a time as colonial
Henry Montagu Villiers (380 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Hon. Henry Montagu Villiers (4 January 1813 – 9 August 1861) was a British clergyman of the Church of England from the Villiers family. He was educated
Richard Chancellor (957 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Richard Chancellor (died 10 November 1556) was an English explorer and navigator; the first to penetrate to the White Sea and establish relations with
John Droxford (779 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
John Droxford (sometimes John Drokensford; died 9 May 1329), was a Bishop of Bath and Wells. He was elected 5 February 1309 and consecrated 9 November
Richard Bagot (bishop) (400 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
The Honourable Richard Bagot (22 November 1782 – 15 May 1854) was an English bishop. Bagot was a younger son of William Bagot, 1st Baron Bagot, of Blithfield
Diss (1,814 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Diss is a market town and electoral ward in South Norfolk, England, close to Norfolk's border with Suffolk. It had a population of 7,572 in 2011. Diss
William Warham (859 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
William Warham (c. 1450 – 22 August 1532) was the Archbishop of Canterbury from 1503 to his death. Warham was the son of Robert Warham of Malshanger in
Daniel Waterland (1,327 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Daniel Cosgrove Waterland (14 March 1683 – 23 December 1740) was an English theologian. He became Master of Magdalene College, Cambridge in 1714, Chancellor
Henry Tozer (priest) (379 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Henry Tozer (1602–1650) was an English priest and academic, a Puritan of royalist views, elected to the Westminster Assembly but never sitting there. Born
John Ley (785 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
John Ley (4 February 1583 – 16 May 1662) was an English clergyman and member of the Westminster Assembly. He was born in Warwick and received his early
Lord Lieutenant of Fife (284 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
This is a list of people who have served as Lord Lieutenant of Fife. Colin Lindsay, 3rd Earl of Balcarres 1688 – ? George Lindsay-Crawford, 22nd Earl of
Thomas Walton (291 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Sir Thomas Walton (or Wauton or Waweton) (c. 1370 – c. 1450) was an English MP and Speaker of the House of Commons. He was born the son of John de Walton
William Ritchie (physicist) (396 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
William Ritchie (1790?–1837) was a Scottish physicist. He was noted as an ingenious experimentalist. Born about 1790, he was educated for the Church of
Thomas Chapman (Master of Magdalene College) (204 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Thomas Chapman (1717–1760) was an English churchman and academic, Master of Magdalene College, Cambridge from 1746. Chapman was born at Billingham, County
Giolla Brighde Mac Con Midhe (738 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Giolla Brighde Mac Con Midhe, or Gilbride Mcnamee (c. 1210 – c. 1272) was an Irish poet. Giolla Brighde Mac Con Midhe was hereditary Ollamh to the Cenél
Archdeacon of Northumberland (638 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Gazette. 23 May 1882. p. 2393. ODNB Hutchinson, Hist. &Ant. Durham II 225 DNB "Bouyer, Reynold Gideon" . Dictionary of National Biography. London: Smith
Humphrey Wingfield (949 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Sir Humphrey Wingfield (died 1545) was an English lawyer and Speaker of the House of Commons of England between 1533 and 1536. He was the twelfth son of
Samuel Rayner (499 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Samuel A. Rayner (15 April 1806 – 1879) was an English landscape artist, known for his paintings of buildings and their interiors, including abbeys, churches
Charles Longley (1,117 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Charles Thomas Longley (28 July 1794 – 27 October 1868) was a bishop in the Church of England. He served as Bishop of Ripon, Bishop of Durham, Archbishop
Herbert Palmer (Puritan) (1,145 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
OL 7237141M Dictionary of National Biography; s:Palmer, Herbert (DNB00). "Palmer, Herbert (PLMR615H)". A Cambridge Alumni Database. University
James Vernon (1,212 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
James Vernon (1646–1727) was an English administrator and Whig politician who sat in the English and British House of Commons between 1679 and 1710. He
Ralph Brideoake (346 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Ralph Brideoake (1612/13–1678) was an English clergyman, who became Bishop of Chichester. Born in Cheetham Hill, Manchester, Lancashire and baptised on
FitzRoy Henry Lee (293 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Fitzroy Henry Lee (2 January 1699 – 14 April 1750) was a British officer of the Royal Navy who also served as the Commodore Governor of the Colony of Newfoundland
George Bentham (1,903 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
George Bentham CMG FRS FLS (22 September 1800 – 10 September 1884) was an English botanist, described by the weed botanist Duane Isely as "the premier
Edward Pearson (theologian) (638 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article
Edward Pearson (1756–1811) was an English academic and theologian, Master of Sidney Sussex College, Cambridge from 1808. He was born at St. George's Tombland
Daniel Waterland (1,327 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Daniel Cosgrove Waterland (14 March 1683 – 23 December 1740) was an English theologian. He became Master of Magdalene College, Cambridge in 1714, Chancellor
Charles Longley (1,117 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Charles Thomas Longley (28 July 1794 – 27 October 1868) was a bishop in the Church of England. He served as Bishop of Ripon, Bishop of Durham, Archbishop
John Campbell, 2nd Duke of Argyll (1,308 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Field Marshal John Campbell, 2nd Duke of Argyll, 1st Duke of Greenwich, KG, KT (10 October 1680 – 4 October 1743), styled Lord Lorne from 1680 to 1703
Diss (1,814 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Diss is a market town and electoral ward in South Norfolk, England, close to Norfolk's border with Suffolk. It had a population of 7,572 in 2011. Diss
Henry Wilkinson Cookson (298 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Henry Wilkinson Cookson (10 April 1810 – 30 September 1876) was an English clergyman and academic, who served as Master of Peterhouse, Cambridge from 1847
Richard Sterne (bishop) (305 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Richard Sterne (c. 1596–1683 born in Mansfield, Notts) was a Church of England priest, Archbishop of York from 1664 to 1683. He was educated at Trinity
Molyneux Shuldham, 1st Baron Shuldham (1,074 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Admiral Molyneux Shuldham, 1st Baron Shuldham (c. 1717 – 30 September 1798) was an officer of the British Royal Navy. He served for a time as colonial
Thomas Thirlby (2,726 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Christianity portal Catholicism portal Thomas Thirlby (or Thirleby; c. 1506–1570), was the first and only bishop of Westminster (1540–50), and afterwards
Philip Shuttleworth (420 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Philip Nicholas Shuttleworth (9 February 1782 – 7 January 1842) was an English churchman and academic, Warden of New College, Oxford, from 1822 and Bishop
Thomas Bentham (434 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Thomas Bentham (1513/14–1579) was a scholar and a Protestant minister. One of the Marian exiles, he returned to England to minister to an underground congregation
Tewkesbury Abbey (2,969 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Abbey Church of St Mary the Virgin, Tewkesbury, (commonly known as Tewkesbury Abbey), in the English county of Gloucestershire, is a parish church
William Ritchie (physicist) (396 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
William Ritchie (1790?–1837) was a Scottish physicist. He was noted as an ingenious experimentalist. Born about 1790, he was educated for the Church of
Hugh de Lacy, Lord of Meath (1,347 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Hugh de Lacy, Lord of Meath, 4th Baron Lacy (before 1135 – 25 July 1186), was an Anglo-Norman landowner and royal office-holder. He had substantial land
Bickleigh, Mid Devon (610 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Bickleigh is a village and civil parish in the Mid Devon district of Devon, England, about four miles south of Tiverton. It is in the former hundred of
Meyer Solomon (181 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Michael (Meyer) Solomon was a successful Bishopsgate manufacturer, and was one of the first Jews to be admitted to the freedom of the City of London. Solomon's
Grimbald (281 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Saint Grimbald (or Grimwald) (c. 820s – 8 July 901) was a 9th-century Benedictine monk at the Abbey of Saint Bertin near Saint-Omer, France. Although of
Archdeacon of Northumberland (638 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Gazette. 23 May 1882. p. 2393. ODNB Hutchinson, Hist. &Ant. Durham II 225 DNB "Bouyer, Reynold Gideon" . Dictionary of National Biography. London: Smith
Edward Vaughan (bishop) (410 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Edward Vaughan (or Wagham) (died 1522) was a Welsh bishop of St David's, remembered for construction work in his diocese. He is assumed of Welsh origin
William Juxon (795 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
William Juxon (1582 – 4 June 1663) was an English churchman, Bishop of London from 1633 to 1649 and Archbishop of Canterbury from 1660 until his death
August 22 (4,193 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
August 22 is the 234th day of the year (235th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. 131 days remain until the end of the year. 392 – Arbogast has Eugenius
Nathaniel Hardy (794 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Nathaniel Hardy (1618–1670) was an English churchman, Dean of Rochester from 1660. He was son of Anthony Hardy of London, born in the Old Bailey, 14 September
Robert Reynolds (Attorney General) (1,073 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Sir Robert Reynolds (1601–1678) was an English lawyer and Member of Parliament (MP) Long Parliament who took the parliamentary side on the outbreak of
Battle of Meretun (428 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Battle of Meretun (or Merton) between the Saxon army of Wessex and the Danish Great Heathen Army took place on 22 March 871 at an unknown location
Matthew Nicholas (284 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Matthew Nicholas (1594–1661) was an English Dean of St. Paul's Cathedral, London. He was a younger brother of Sir Edward Nicholas, born on 26 September
Yea River (343 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Yea River, an inland perennial river of the Goulburn Broken catchment, part of the Murray-Darling basin, is located in the lower South Eastern Highlands
Richard Arkwright (2,077 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Sir Richard Arkwright (23 December 1732 – 3 August 1792) was an English inventor and a leading entrepreneur during the early Industrial Revolution. He
William Bateman (2,013 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
William Bateman (c. 1298 – 6 January 1355) was a medieval Bishop of Norwich. Bateman was the son of William Bateman, a Norwich citizen and bailiff who
Edward Kimber (632 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Edward Kimber (1719–1769) was an English novelist, journalist and compiler of reference works. He was son of Isaac Kimber; and in early life apprentice
Robert Harris (minister) (946 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
April 2019. Dictionary of National Biography; s:Harris, Robert (1581-1658) (DNB00). 1812 Chalmers Biography Tract on Preaching, pp. 82-3. The life and death
Thomas Hudson (painter) (355 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Thomas Hudson (1701 – 26 January 1779) was an English portrait painter. Hudson was born in Devon in 1701. His exact birthplace is unknown. He studied under
Morcar (1,087 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Morcar (or Morkere) (Old English: Mōrcǣr) (died after 1087) was the son of Ælfgār (earl of Mercia) and brother of Ēadwine. He was the earl of Northumbria
William John Macleay (879 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Sir William John Macleay (13 June 1820 – 7 December 1891) was a Scottish-Australian politician, naturalist, zoologist, and herpetologist. Macleay was born
Richard Collinson (900 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Sir Richard Collinson KCB (7 November 1811 – 13 September 1883) was an English naval officer and explorer of the Northwest Passage. He was born in Gateshead
Thomas Ford (minister) (975 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Thomas Ford (1598–1674) was an English nonconformist minister, a member of the Westminster Assembly and ejected minister of 1662. He was born at Brixton
Mark Noble (biographer) (1,153 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Mark Noble (1754–1827) was an English clergyman, biographer and antiquary. He was born in Digbeth, Birmingham, the third surviving son of William Heatley
Thomas Napier Thomson (720 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Thomas Napier Thomson (25 February 1798 – 1 February 1869) was a Scottish minister, historian and biographer. While still young he stopped using his middle
Charles Cowper (1,548 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Sir Charles Cowper /ˈkuːpər/, KCMG (26 April 1807 – 19 October 1875) was an Australian politician and the Premier of New South Wales on five occasions
John Wilde (jurist) (1,437 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
John Wilde (or Wylde; 1590–1669) was an English lawyer and politician. As a serjeant-at-law he was referred to as Serjeant Wilde before he was appointed
Richard Curteys (916 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Richard Curteys (c.1532?–1582) was an English churchman. A native of Lincolnshire, after his education at St. John's, Cambridge he was ordained and eventually
George Walker (Puritan) (959 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
George Walker (c.1581–1651) was an English clergyman, known for his strong Puritan views. He was imprisoned in 1638 by William Laud, Archbishop of Canterbury
Deventer (2,415 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Deventer (Dutch pronunciation: [ˈdeːvəntər] (listen); Sallaans: Daeventer) is a city and municipality in the Salland region of the province of Overijssel
John Montagu (Trinity) (400 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
John Montagu or Mountague (c.1655—February 23, 1728/29) was an English churchman and academic. He was the fourth son of Admiral Edward Montagu, 1st Earl
Thomas Weelkes (1,195 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Thomas Weelkes (baptised 25 October 1576 – 30 November 1623) was an English composer and organist. He became organist of Winchester College in 1598, moving
Francis Crossley (842 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Sir Francis Crossley, 1st Baronet, of Halifax (Halifax, 26 October 1817 – 5 January 1872), known to his contemporaries as Frank Crossley, was a British
William Cliffe (291 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
William Cliffe, Clyffe or Clyff (died 1558) was an English churchman and lawyer, dean of Chester from 1547. Cliffe was educated at the University of Cambridge
John Jenkinson (bishop) (400 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
John Banks Jenkinson (2 September 1781 – 7 July 1840) was an English bishop who was the Bishop of St David's from 1825. The second son of John Jenkinson
Cornish dialect (4,383 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Cornish dialect (also known as Cornish English, Cornu-English, Cornish: Sowsnek Kernowek) is a dialect of English spoken in Cornwall by Cornish people
John Elphinstone, 2nd Lord Balmerino (888 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
succeeded him as third Lord. s:Elphinstone, John, second Lord Balmerino (DNB00)  This article incorporates text from a publication now in the public
Johannes Cotto (929 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Johannes Cotto (John Cotton, Johannes Afflighemensis) (fl. c. 1100) was a music theorist, possibly of English origin, most likely working in southern Germany
Richard Woleman (754 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Richard Woleman or Wolman (died 1537) was an English churchman, Archdeacon of Sudbury from 1522; and the Dean of Wells between 1529 and 1537. In 1478 Wolman
John Jenkinson (bishop) (400 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
John Banks Jenkinson (2 September 1781 – 7 July 1840) was an English bishop who was the Bishop of St David's from 1825. The second son of John Jenkinson
Wilhelm Sulpiz Kurz (272 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Wilhelm Sulpiz Kurz (5 May 1834 – 15 January 1878) was a German botanist and garden director in Bogor, West Java and Kolkata. He worked in India, Indonesia
Richard Arkwright (2,077 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Sir Richard Arkwright (23 December 1732 – 3 August 1792) was an English inventor and a leading entrepreneur during the early Industrial Revolution. He
Morcar (1,087 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Morcar (or Morkere) (Old English: Mōrcǣr) (died after 1087) was the son of Ælfgār (earl of Mercia) and brother of Ēadwine. He was the earl of Northumbria
Cornforth (105 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Cornforth is a village in County Durham, England. It is situated a short distance to the north-east of Ferryhill. Before the middle part of the Victorian
William Juxon (795 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
William Juxon (1582 – 4 June 1663) was an English churchman, Bishop of London from 1633 to 1649 and Archbishop of Canterbury from 1660 until his death
William Cliffe (291 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
William Cliffe, Clyffe or Clyff (died 1558) was an English churchman and lawyer, dean of Chester from 1547. Cliffe was educated at the University of Cambridge
John Elphinstone, 2nd Lord Balmerino (888 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
succeeded him as third Lord. s:Elphinstone, John, second Lord Balmerino (DNB00)  This article incorporates text from a publication now in the public
Richard Curteys (916 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Richard Curteys (c.1532?–1582) was an English churchman. A native of Lincolnshire, after his education at St. John's, Cambridge he was ordained and eventually
James Douglas, 14th Earl of Morton (398 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
2004; online edn, Oct 2005. Retrieved 26 August 2008. So also the original DNB "Douglas, James (DGLS720J)". A Cambridge Alumni Database. University of Cambridge
October 19 (3,974 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
October 19 is the 292nd day of the year (293rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. 73 days remain until the end of the year. 202 BC – Second Punic
Sampson Low (1,107 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Sampson Low (1797–1886) was a bookseller and publisher in London in the 19th century. Born in London in November 1797, he was the son of Sampson Low, printer
George Selwyn (bishop of Lichfield) (3,006 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
George Augustus Selwyn (5 April 1809 – 11 April 1878) was the first Anglican Bishop of New Zealand. He was Bishop of New Zealand (which included Melanesia)
George Walker (Puritan) (959 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
George Walker (c.1581–1651) was an English clergyman, known for his strong Puritan views. He was imprisoned in 1638 by William Laud, Archbishop of Canterbury
John Whitgift (1,681 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
John Whitgift (c. 1530 – 29 February 1604) was the Archbishop of Canterbury from 1583 to his death. Noted for his hospitality, he was somewhat ostentatious
John Marshall (biographer) (287 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
John Marshall (c. 1784 – 1837) was an English officer in the Royal Navy who became a biographer of British naval officers. Probably born in 1784, Marshall
Culmstock (425 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Culmstock is a village and civil parish in Mid Devon, England, centred 10 miles from Tiverton and 6 NE of Cullompton. It is laid out on both sides of the
William Carey (bishop) (417 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
William Carey (1769–1846) was an English churchman and headmaster, Bishop of Exeter and Bishop of St Asaph. He was born on 18 November 1769. His success
Merchiston (691 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Merchiston is a residential area around Merchiston Avenue in the south-west of Edinburgh, Scotland. Merchiston Avenue is 1.3 miles Southwest of the West
Henry Percy (Hotspur) (1,885 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Sir Henry Percy KG (20 May 1364 – 21 July 1403), nicknamed Hotspur, was an English knight who fought in several campaigns against the Scots in the northern
Thomas Bedyll (530 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Thomas Bedyll (died 1537) was a divine and royal servant. He was royal chaplain and clerk of the Privy Council of Henry VIII, assisting him with the separation
William Tooker (481 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
William Tooker (or Tucker) (Exeter, 1557 or 1558 – Salisbury, 19 March 1621) was an English churchman and theological writer. Born at Exeter in 1557 or
Norbiton (768 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Norbiton is an area within the Royal Borough of Kingston upon Thames, London. It lies approximately 1 mile (1.6 km) east of Kingston upon Thames town centre
Philip Gidley King (1,504 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Captain Philip Gidley King (23 April 1758 – 3 September 1808) was the third Governor of New South Wales, and did much to organise the young colony in the
Thomas Leverous (207 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Christianity portal Thomas Leverous (1487-1587) was a 16th Century Roman Catholic priest. Leverous was a foster brother to Gerald FitzGerald, the 9th Earl
Bhutan War (936 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Bhutan War (or Duar War) was a war fought between British India and Bhutan in 1864–1865. Britain sent a peace mission to Bhutan in early 1864, in the
Walter Haddon (1,583 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Walter Haddon LL.D. (1515–1572) was an English civil lawyer, much involved in church and university affairs under Edward VI, Queen Mary, and Elizabeth
Henry Wilkinson (1610–1675) (580 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Henry Wilkinson (1610–1675) was an English clergyman, in the Commonwealth period a canon of Christ Church, Oxford, Lady Margaret Professor of Divinity
Thomas Turton (229 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Thomas Turton (25 February 1780 – 7 January 1864) was an English academic and divine, the Bishop of Ely from 1845 to 1864. Thomas Turton was son of Thomas
John Langdon (bishop) (270 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
John Langdon (died 30 September 1434) was a medieval Bishop of Rochester. Langdon was admitted a monk of Christ Church, Canterbury, in 1398. Afterwards
Johannes Cotto (929 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Johannes Cotto (John Cotton, Johannes Afflighemensis) (fl. c. 1100) was a music theorist, possibly of English origin, most likely working in southern Germany
Henry Medley (556 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Henry Medley (1687 – 5 August 1747) was an officer of the Royal Navy, rising to the rank of vice-admiral. Medley entered the Royal Navy in 1703, and in
Edward Smyth (bishop) (375 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Edward Smyth or Smith (1665–1720) was an Irish Protestant churchman, the bishop of Down and Connor from 1699. Born at Lisburn in County Antrim in 1665
John Parsons (bishop) (682 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
John Parsons (baptised 6 July 1761 – 12 March 1819) was an English churchman and academic, Master of Balliol College, Oxford from 1798, and Bishop of Peterborough
Thomas Seymour, 1st Baron Seymour of Sudeley (2,673 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Thomas Seymour, 1st Baron Seymour of Sudeley, KG (c.  1508 – 20 March 1549) was a brother of Jane Seymour, the third wife of King Henry VIII. With his
John Harley (bishop, died 1558) (308 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
Protestantism (DNB), or because he was married, and died in 1558. "CLI - CCLXXXII". Willis, Survey of Hereford Cathedral, p. 521. s:Harley, John (DNB00) "Archived
Dyfnwal Moelmud (329 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Dyfnwal Moelmud (Welsh for "Dyfnwal the Bald and Silent"; Latin: Dunvallo Molmutius) was accounted as an early king and lawmaker among the Welsh, credited
John White (colonist priest) (1,079 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
John White (1575 – 21 July 1648) was the rector of a parish in Dorchester, Dorset, England. He was instrumental in obtaining charters for the New England
William Duesbury (808 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
William Duesbury (1725–1786) was an English enameller, in the sense of a painter of porcelain, who became an important porcelain entrepreneur, founder
Robert Eden, 3rd Baron Auckland (576 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Robert John Eden, 3rd Baron Auckland (10 July 1799 – 25 April 1870), styled The Honourable Robert Eden from birth until 1849, was a British clergyman.
John Hilsey (925 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
John Hilsey (a.k.a. Hildesley or Hildesleigh; died 4 August 1539) was an English Dominican, prior provincial of his order, then an agent of Henry VIII
John of Thoresby (853 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
John of Thoresby (died 6 November 1373) was an English clergyman and politician, who was Bishop of St David's, then Bishop of Worcester and finally Archbishop
James Montague (bishop) (677 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
James Montague (c. 1568 – 20 July 1618) was an English bishop. He was the son of Sir Edward Montagu of Boughton, and grandson of Edward Montagu. He was
William Courthope (officer of arms) (318 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
William Courthope (1808–1866) was an English officer of arms, genealogist and writer, Somerset Herald from 1854. The son of Thomas Courthope and his wife
Christopher Potter (697 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Christopher Potter (1591 – 3 March 1646) was an English academic and clergyman, Provost of The Queen's College, Oxford, controversialist and prominent
Samuel Goodenough (576 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Samuel Goodenough (10 May [O.S. 29 April] 1743 – 12 August 1827) was the Bishop of Carlisle from 1808 until his death in 1827, and an amateur botanist
John Wenlock, 1st Baron Wenlock (1,395 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
John Wenlock, 1st Baron Wenlock KG (c.1400/04 – 4 May 1471) was an English politician, diplomat, soldier and courtier. He fought on the sides of both the
John Blyth (bishop) (208 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
John Blyth or John Blythe (before 1460 – 23 August 1499) was a medieval Bishop of Salisbury. Blyth was Archdeacon of Richmond from 1485 to 1493 and was
Henry Thomas Riley (595 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Henry Thomas Riley (1816–1878) was an English translator, lexicographer, and antiquary. Born in June 1816, he was only son of Henry Riley of Southwark