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searching for Byzantine–Bulgarian wars 104 found (297 total)

alternate case: byzantine–Bulgarian wars

Smilets of Bulgaria (394 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article

Smilets (Bulgarian: Смилец) reigned as tsar of Bulgaria from 1292 to 1298. founder of the Smilets dynasty. Although Smilets is credited with being descended
Mitso Asen of Bulgaria (344 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Mitso Asen (Bulgarian: Мицо Асен) or Micho Asen (Мичо Асен) was the tsar of Bulgaria from 1256 until 1257. Mitso Asen ascended the throne by virtue of
Asparuh of Bulgaria (822 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Asparuh (also Ispor; Bulgarian: Аспарух, romanized: Asparuh or (rarely) Bulgarian: Исперих, romanized: Isperih) was а ruler of Bulgars in the second half
Gavril Radomir of Bulgaria (375 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Gavril Radomir (Bulgarian: Гаврил Радомир; Greek: Γαβριὴλ Ρωμανός, romanized: Gavriil Romanos; anglicized as "Gabriel Radomir"; died 1015) was the emperor
George II of Bulgaria (293 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
George Terter II (Bulgarian: Георги Тертер II) reigned as tsar of Bulgaria between 1322 and 1323. The exact date of his birth is unknown, but he was born
George I of Bulgaria (660 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
George Terter I (Bulgarian: Георги Тертер I), of the Terter dynasty ruled as tsar of Bulgaria 1280–1292. He was born in Cherven. The date of his birth
Vineh of Bulgaria (203 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Vineh (also spelled Vinekh; Bulgarian: Винех) was ruler of Bulgaria in the mid-8th century. According to the Nominalia of the Bulgarian khans, Vineh reigned
Kormisosh (298 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Kormisosh (Bulgarian: Кормисош) was a ruler of Bulgaria during the 8th century. The Namelist of Bulgarian Rulers states that he belonged to the Ukil (or
Presian I of Bulgaria (789 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Presian (Bulgarian: Пресиян, Персиян, Пресиан) was the khan of Bulgaria in 836–852. He ruled during an extensive expansion in Macedonia. The composite
Michael I Rangabe (668 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Michael I Rhangabe (Greek: Μιχαὴλ Ῥαγγαβέ; c. 770 – 11 January 844) was Byzantine emperor from 811 to 813. Michael was the son of the patrician Theophylact
Krum (1,443 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Krum (Bulgarian: Крум, Greek: Κροῦμος/Kroumos), often referred to as Krum the Fearsome (Bulgarian: Крум Страшни) was the Khan of Bulgaria from sometime
Bulgar–Serb War (853) (428 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
The Bulgarian-Serbian War of 853 was fought between the First Bulgarian Empire and the Serbian Principality. It was the second conflict of the medieval
Nikephoros I (947 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Nikephoros I or Nicephorus I (Greek: Νικηφόρος; 750 – 26 July 811) was Byzantine emperor from 802 to 811. Having served Empress Irene as genikos logothetēs
Eustathios Daphnomeles (751 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Map of the ByzantineBulgarian wars in the time of Emperor Basil II and Tsar Samuel of Bulgaria
Tervel of Bulgaria (1,104 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Khan Tervel (Bulgarian: Тервел) also called Tarvel, or Terval, or Terbelis in some Byzantine sources, was the khan of Bulgaria during the First Bulgarian
Malamir of Bulgaria (502 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Malamir (Bulgarian: Маламир) was the ruler of Bulgaria in 831–836. Malamir was a son of Omurtag and a grandson of Krum. His name may be of Slavic origin
Malamir of Bulgaria (502 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Malamir (Bulgarian: Маламир) was the ruler of Bulgaria in 831–836. Malamir was a son of Omurtag and a grandson of Krum. His name may be of Slavic origin
Theodore Svetoslav of Bulgaria (1,177 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Theodore Svetoslav (Bulgarian: Тодор Светослав, Todor Svetoslav and also Теодор Светослав, Teodor Svetoslav) ruled as emperor (tsar) of Bulgaria from 1300
Ivaylo of Bulgaria (1,010 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Ivaylo (died 1281), also spelled Ivailo (Bulgarian: Ивайло), was a rebel leader who ruled briefly as tsar of Bulgaria. In 1277, he spearheaded a peasant
Constantine Diogenes (955 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Map of the ByzantineBulgarian wars in the time of Emperor Basil II and Tsar Samuel of Bulgaria
Ivan Stephen of Bulgaria (832 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Ivan Stefan (Bulgarian: Иван Стефан; in English also John Stephen) (c. 1300/1301–1373 (?)) ruled as emperor (tsar) of Bulgaria for eight months from 1330
Peter Delyan (1,205 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Petar II Delyan (reigned 1040–1041) (Bulgarian: Петър II Делян, Greek: Πέτρος Δελεάνος) was the leader of an uprising against Byzantine rule in the Theme
Ivanko (Bulgarian boyar) (215 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Ivanko (Bulgarian: Иванко) killed Ivan Asen I, ruler of the renascent Second Bulgarian Empire, in 1196. The murder occurred when Asen angrily summoned
Constantine Angelos Doukas (496 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Constantine Angelos Doukas, Latinized as Angelus Ducas (Greek: Κωνσταντίνος Ἂγγελος Δούκας, romanized: Kōnstantinos Angelos Doukas), was a usurper who
Telets of Bulgaria (285 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Telets (Bulgarian: Телец), a member of the Ugain clan, was the ruler of Bulgaria from 762 to 765. Byzantine sources[which?] indicate that Telets replaced
Ivan Asen III of Bulgaria (490 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Ivan Asen III (Bulgarian: Иван Асен III, also Йоан Асен III, Ioan Asen III, and in English John Asen III), ruled as tsar of Bulgaria 1279–1280. Ivan Asen
Georgi Voyteh (325 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Georgi Voyteh (Bulgarian: Георги Войтех) was an 11th-century Bulgarian aristocrat from Skopje who started a major uprising in Byzantine Bulgaria against
Dobromir Chrysos (441 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Dobromir, known to the Byzantines as Chrysos (Macedonian: Добромир Хрс, Bulgarian: Добромир Хриз, Greek: Δοβρομηρός Χρύσος), was a leader of the Vlachs
Constantine VI (1,178 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Constantine VI (Greek: Κωνσταντῖνος, Kōnstantinos; 14 January 771 – before 805) was Byzantine emperor from 780 to 797. The only child of Emperor Leo IV
John I Tzimiskes (1,418 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
John I Tzimiskes (Greek: Ἰωάννης ὁ Τζιμισκής, romanized: Iōánnēs ho Tzimiskēs; c. 925 – 10 January 976) was the senior Byzantine emperor from 969 to 976
Nikephoros Xiphias (906 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Map of the ByzantineBulgarian wars in the time of Emperor Basil II and Tsar Samuel of Bulgaria
Michael Lachanodrakon (1,122 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Michael Lachanodrakon (Greek: Μιχαήλ Λαχανοδράκων; died 20 July 792) was a distinguished Byzantine general and fanatical supporter of Byzantine Iconoclasm
Theodore Sigritsa (145 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Theodore Sigritsa (Bulgarian: Теодор Сигрица) or Sigritzes (died 924) was a Bulgarian military commander and noble, kavkhan (first minister) of Emperor
Michael II Asen (1,406 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Michael II Asen (Bulgarian: Михаил II Асен; c. 1239 – December 1256/January 1257) was emperor (tsar) of Bulgaria from 1246 to 1256 or 1257. He was the
Michael IV the Paphlagonian (1,745 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Michael IV the Paphlagonian (Greek: Μιχαὴλ (Δ´) ὁ Παφλαγών, Mikhaēl ho Paphlagōn; c. 1010 – 10 December 1041) was Byzantine Emperor from 11 April 1034
Omurtag of Bulgaria (1,745 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Omurtag (or Omortag) (Bulgarian: Омуртаг; original Greek: Μορτάγων and Ομουρτάγ) was a Great Khan (Kanasubigi) of Bulgaria from 814 to 831. He is known
John Chryselios (464 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
John Chryselios (Greek: Ἰωάννης Χρυσήλιος) was a provincial magnate in late 10th-century Dyrrhachium, and the father-in-law of Tsar Samuel of Bulgaria
Ivats (235 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Ivats (Bulgarian: Ивац) or Ibatzes was a Bulgarian noble and military commander in the late 10th and early 11th century. He served three Bulgarian Emperors
Nikephoros Tarchaneiotes (507 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Nikephoros Tarchaneiotes (Greek: Νικηφόρος Ταρχανειώτης) was a 13th-century Byzantine aristocrat and general. Nikephoros Tarchaneiotes was a scion of the
David Arianites (474 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
David Areianites or Arianites (Greek: Δαυίδ Ἀρ[ε]ιανίτης) was a high-ranking Byzantine commander of the early 11th century. The origin of the surname is
Isaac II Angelos (2,437 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Isaac II Angelos (Greek: Ἰσαάκιος Κομνηνός Ἄγγελος, Isaakios Komnenos Angelos; September 1156 – January 1204) was Byzantine Emperor from 1185 to 1195,
Alusian of Bulgaria (472 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Alusian (Bulgarian: Алусиан, Greek: Ἀλουσιάνος) was a Bulgarian and Byzantine noble who ruled as emperor (tsar) of Bulgaria for a short time in 1041. Alusian
Aldimir (1,128 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Aldimir (Bulgarian: Алдимир) or Eltimir (Елтимир) (fl. 1280–1305) was a Bulgarian noble of the 13th–14th century. A member of the Terter dynasty and a
Theophylact Botaneiates (413 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Theophylact Botaneiates (Greek: Θεοφύλακτος Βοτανειάτης, Theophylaktos Botaneiates) was an 11th-century Byzantine general and governor of Thessalonica
Pothos Argyros (Domestic of the Schools) (552 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Pothos Argyros (Greek: Πόθος Ἀργυρός; fl. c. 910 – after 958) was a Byzantine general active in the first half of the 10th century. He was the eldest son
Alexios Mosele (admiral) (171 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Alexios Mosele (Greek: Ἀλέξιος Μωσηλέ), or Musele/Mousele (Greek: Μουσηλέ), was a Byzantine admiral (droungarios tou ploimou) in the early reign of Emperor
Romanos I Lekapenos (2,118 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Romanos I Lekapenos (Greek: Ρωμανός Λεκαπηνός; c. 870 – 15 June 948), Latinized as Romanus I Lecapenus, was a Byzantine naval admiral who became Byzantine
Marmais (242 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Marmais (Bulgarian: Мармаис; died 924) was a Bulgarian military commander, nobleman and komita (duke) of a western Bulgarian region (Sredets or Macedonia)
Constantine IV (1,656 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Constantine IV (Latin: Constantinus; Greek: Κωνσταντῖνος, romanized: Kōnstantinos; c. 650–685), called the Younger (Greek: ὁ νέος, romanized: ho neos)
Nicholas Picingli (462 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Nicholas Epigingles (Greek: Νικόλαος Ἐπιγίγγλης), better known by his Latinized surname Picingli, was a Byzantine general active in southern Italy and
Theodorokanos (389 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Map of the ByzantineBulgarian wars in the time of Emperor Basil II and Tsar Samuel of Bulgaria
Tihomir (Bulgarian noble) (315 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Tihomir (Bulgarian: Тихомир; Greek: Τειχομηρὁς, romanized: Teichomeros) was an 11th-century Bulgarian military commander of Dyrrhachium, who had been sent
Basil Vatatzes (620 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Basil Vatatzes (Greek: Βασίλειος Βατάτζης, romanized: Vasileios Vatatzēs, fl. c. 1187–1194) was a Byzantine military commander, and likely the father of
John Doukas (sebastokrator) (1,508 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
John Doukas, Latinized as Ducas (Greek: Ἰωάννης Δούκας, romanized: Iōannēs Doukas; c. 1125/27 – c. 1200), was the eldest son of Constantine Angelos by
Alexios Aspietes (355 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Alexios Aspietes (Greek: Ἀλέξιος Ἀσπιέτης, fl. 1159–1205) was a Byzantine governor and military leader who was captured by the Bulgarians, and led an anti-Bulgarian
Joannicius the Great (876 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Joannicius the Great (Greek: Όσιος Ιωαννίκιος ο Μέγας; born 762, Bithynia - November 4, 846 in Antidium) was a Byzantine Christian saint, sage, theologian
Konstantin Tih (2,516 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Konstantin Tih (Bulgarian: Константин Тих Асен) or Constantine I Tikh (Константин I), was the tsar of Bulgaria from 1257 to 1277, he was offered the throne
Leo Argyros (10th century) (540 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Leo Argyros (Greek: Λέων Ἀργυρός) was a Byzantine aristocrat and general active in the first decades of the 10th century. He was the son of the magistros
Alexius Slav (432 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Alexius Slav (Bulgarian: Алексий Слав, Greek: Ἀλέξιος Σθλαῦος; fl. 1208–28) was a Bulgarian nobleman (bolyarin), a member of the Asen dynasty, and a nephew
Isaac Komnenos Vatatzes (782 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Isaac Komnenos Vatatzes (Greek: Ἰσαάκιος Κομνηνός Βατάτζης; died 1196) was a Byzantine aristocrat and military commander, who was the son-in-law of Emperor
John Kantakouzenos (Caesar) (483 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
John Kantakouzenos (Greek: Ἰωάννης Καντακουζηνός; fl. 1183–86) was a military commander and an early member of the Kantakouzenos family. The contemporary
Malamirovo inscription (384 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Malamirovo or Hambarli Inscription is a Bulgarian Greek inscription of around 813 AD, commemorating Bulgarian victories of Krum over the Byzantines, now
Aaron (son of Ivan Vladislav) (1,108 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Aaron (Church Slavonic: А҆арѡ́нъ; Bulgarian: Аарон; Ancient Greek: Ἀαρών) was a younger son of the last Tsar of the First Bulgarian Empire, Ivan Vladislav
Presian (son of Ivan Vladislav) (695 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Presian, sometimes referred to as Presian II (Bulgarian: Пресиян II; Greek: Προυσιάνος, romanized: Prousianos) was probably the oldest son of the last
Ivan Asen I of Bulgaria (2,884 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Ivan Asen I, also known as Asen I or John Asen I (Bulgarian: Иван Асен I; died in 1196), was emperor or tsar of Bulgaria from 1187/1188 to 1196 as co-ruler
Hranislav (709 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Hranislav (Bulgarian: Хранислав; Medieval Greek: Χρανίσθλαβος, Chranisthlavos) (fl. 1278–1304) was a Bulgarian military commander who was a close associate
Krakra of Pernik (391 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Krakra of Pernik (Bulgarian: Кракра Пернишки, Krakra Pernishki), also known as Krakra Voevoda or simply Krakra, was an 11th-century feudal lord in the
Demetrios Angelos Doukas (991 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Demetrios Angelos Doukas (Greek: Δημήτριος Ἀγγελοδούκας), was ruler of Thessalonica with the title of Despot as a vassal of the Empire of Nicaea from 1244
Michael Shishman of Bulgaria (2,857 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Michael Asen III (Bulgarian: Михаил Асен III, Mihail Asen III, commonly called Michael Shishman (Михаил Шишман, Mihail Šišman)), ruled as tsar of Bulgaria
Eustathios Argyros (admiral under Leo VI) (628 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Eustathios Argyros (Greek: Εύστάθιος Άργυρός) was a Byzantine admiral under Emperor Leo VI the Wise (r. 886–912). Eustathios Argyros first appears during
Elemag (206 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Elemag (Greek: Ἐλεμάγος) or Elinag Phrantzes (Ἐλίναγος ὁ Φραντζὴς) was, according to the history of John Skylitzes, the governor of Belegrada (modern Berat
Özbeg Khan (3,143 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Sultan Giyas al-Din Mohammed Öz Beg (Tatar: غیاث الدین محمد اوزبیک خان, romanized: Giyasuddin Möxämmät Üzbäk Xan), better known as Uzbeg, Uzbek or Ozbeg
Ivan Vladislav of Bulgaria (2,538 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Ivan Vladislav (Church Slavonic: Їѡаннъ Владиславъ; Bulgarian: Иван/Йоан Владислав; died February 1018) ruled as emperor (tsar) of the First Bulgarian
John the Rhaiktor (551 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
John the Rhaiktor (Greek: Ἰωάννης ὁ ῥαίκτωρ; fl. 922–947) was a Byzantine official, who served as the chief minister (paradynasteuon) of the empire in
Peter the Patrician (9th century) (407 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Peter was a senior Byzantine military commander at the turn of the 9th century, who later became a monk and was canonized by the Church. He is venerated
Constantine Aspietes (252 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Constantine Aspietes (Greek: Κωνσταντῖνος Ἀσπιέτης, fl. 1167–1190/1) was a Byzantine general active in the late 12th century. A member of the Aspietes
John Bogas (106 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
John Bogas was a 10th-century Byzantine general. In 917 he was sent to the Pechenegs to form an alliance against Bulgaria during the War of 913–927 but
Nestoritsa (299 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Nestoritsa (Bulgarian: Несторица) was a Bulgarian noble and general during the reign of Emperors Samuil (997-1014); Gavril Radomir (1014–1015) and Ivan
John Garidas (554 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
John Garidas (Greek: Ἰωάννης Γαριδᾶς, fl. 900–919) was a Byzantine military officer who played an important role in the court politics of the early 10th
Ashot Taronites (694 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Ashot Taronites (Greek: Ἀσώτιος Ταρωνίτης, romanized: Asōtios Tarōnitēs; Armenian: Աշոտ, romanized: Ašot; fl. c. 995 – c. 997/8) was a Byzantine nobleman
Manuel Kamytzes (2,824 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Manuel Kamytzes Komnenos Doukas Angelos (Greek: Μανουήλ Καμύτζης Κομνηνός Δούκας Ἄγγελος; c. 1150 – after 1202) was a Byzantine general who was active
Kaloyan of Bulgaria (3,615 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Kaloyan or Kalojan, also known as Ioannitsa or Johannitsa (Bulgarian: Калоян, Йоаница; c. 1170 – October 1207), was emperor or tsar of Bulgaria from 1196
George Sursuvul (437 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
George Sursuvul (Bulgarian: Георги Сурсувул) or Sursubul was first minister and regent of the First Bulgarian Empire during the reigns of Simeon I (r.
Leo Choirosphaktes (1,475 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Leo Choirosphaktes, sometimes Latinized as Choerosphactes (Greek: Λέων Χοιροσφάκτης) and also known as Leo Magistros or Leo Magister, was a Byzantine official
Nikulitsa (271 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Nikulitsa (Bulgarian: Никулица) was a Bulgarian noble from Larissa, governor of Servia during the reign of Samuil. He received his name ("little Nicholas")
Martyrs of Adrianople (631 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Martyrs of Adrianople, also known and venerated as the 377 Martyred Companions in Bulgaria, were three hundred and seventy seven Christians who were
Sisinnios Triphyllios (352 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Sisinnios Triphyllios (Greek: Σισίννιος Τριφύλλιος, died 26 July 811) was one of the senior dignitaries of the Roman Empire during the reign of Empress
Basil Apokaukos (264 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Basil Apokaukos or Apokauchos (Greek: Βασίλειος Ἀπόκαυκος/Ἀπόκαυχος) was a Byzantine governor of the Peloponnese at the turn of the 11th century. Basil
Boris I of Bulgaria (3,537 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Boris I, also known as Boris-Mihail (Michael) and Bogoris (Church Slavonic: Борисъ А҃ / Борисъ-Михаилъ Bulgarian: Борис I / Борис-Михаил; died 2 May 907)
Theoktistos (magistros) (348 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Theoktistos (Greek: Θεόκτιστος; fl. 802–821) was a senior Byzantine official who played an important role under the Nikephorian dynasty (802–813). Theoktistos
Thermopylae (1,621 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Thermopylae (/θərˈmɒpɪliː/; Ancient Greek and Katharevousa: Θερμοπύλαι (Thermopylai) [tʰermopýlai], Demotic Greek (Greek): Θερμοπύλες, (Thermopyles) [θermoˈpiles];
Nikephoros II Phokas (3,734 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Nikephoros II Phokas (Νικηφόρος Φωκᾶς; c. 912 – 11 December 969), Latinized Nicephorus II Phocas, was Byzantine emperor from 963 to 969. His career, not
Alexios Gidos (611 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Alexios Gidos (Greek: Ἀλέξιος Γίδος; fl. ca. 1185–1194) was a senior Byzantine general of the late 12th century. He is the first attested member of the
Savoyard crusade (4,409 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Savoyard crusade was a crusading expedition to the Balkans in 1366–67. It was born out of the same planning that led to the Alexandrian Crusade and
Uprising of Petar and Boyan (422 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Peter and Boyan were late-10th century Bulgarian nobles (boyars) from Byzantine-administered northeastern Bulgaria. They are mentioned in Annales seu cronicae
Constantine V (4,621 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Constantine V (Greek: Κωνσταντῖνος, translit. Kōnstantīnos; July 718 – 14 September 775) was Byzantine emperor from 741 to 775. His reign saw a consolidation
Ivan Asen II (4,684 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Ivan Asen II, also known as John Asen II (Bulgarian: Иван Асен II, [iˈvan ɐˈsɛn ˈftɔri]; 1190s – May/June 1241), was Emperor (Tsar) of Bulgaria from 1218
Michael VIII Palaiologos (5,159 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Michael VIII Palaiologos or Palaeologus (Greek: Μιχαὴλ Δούκας Ἄγγελος Κομνηνὸς Παλαιολόγος, romanized: Mikhaēl Doukas Angelos Komnēnos Palaiologos; 1223
Michael IX Palaiologos (5,552 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Michael IX Palaiologos or Palaeologus (Greek: Μιχαήλ Δούκας Ἄγγελος Κομνηνός Παλαιολόγος, Mikhaēl Doukas Angelos Komnēnos Palaiologos; 17 April 1277 –
Theodore II Laskaris (6,146 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Theodore II Doukas Laskaris or Ducas Lascaris (Greek: Θεόδωρος Δούκας Λάσκαρις, romanized: Theodōros Doukas Laskaris; 1221/1222 – 16 August 1258) was Emperor
Byzantine civil war of 1341–1347 (7,773 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Byzantine civil war of 1341–1347, sometimes referred to as the Second Palaiologan Civil War, was a conflict that broke out in the Byzantine Empire
Theodore Komnenos Doukas (8,473 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Theodore Komnenos Doukas (Greek: Θεόδωρος Κομνηνὸς Δούκας, Theodōros Komnēnos Doukas, Latinized as Theodore Comnenus Ducas, died c. 1253) was ruler of
Basil II (9,222 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Basil II Porphyrogenitus (Greek: Βασίλειος Πορφυρογέννητος Basileios Porphyrogennetos; 958 – 15 December 1025), nicknamed the Bulgar Slayer (Greek: ὁ Βουλγαροκτόνος
814 (410 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar. April 13 - ByzantineBulgarian Wars: Over the winter Krum, ruler (khan) of the Bulgarian Empire, had