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searching for Babylonian 172 found (6850 total)

alternate case: babylonian

Capricorn (astrology) (507 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article

the lower body and tail of a fish. Later known as Ea in Akkadian and Babylonian mythology, Enki was the god of intelligence (gestú, literally "ear"),
Redemption (theology) (1,184 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
Babylonian Talmud, Tractate Chullin, 35b Babylonian Talmud, Tractate Moed Katan, 12a for example Babylonian Talmud, Tractate Temurah, 31a Babylonian Talmud
Artaxerxes I (1,631 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Quadrilingual inscription of Artaxerxes on an Egyptian alabaster vase (Old Persian, Elamite, Babylonian and Egyptian).
Flood myth (3,772 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
through to the Old Babylonian Period, and argues that the flood narrative was only added in texts written during the Old Babylonian Period. When it comes
Artaxerxes II (2,971 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Artaxerxes II Mnemon /ˌɑːrtəˈzɜːrksiːz/ (Old Persian: 𐎠𐎼𐎫𐎧𐏁𐏂𐎠, romanized: Artaxšaçāʰ, lit. 'whose reign is through truth'; Ancient Greek: Ἀρταξέρξης
Noah (6,047 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Babylonian Period in "The Death of Bilgamesh" and eventually was imported and standardized in the Epic of Gilgamesh probably in the Middle Babylonian
Ashur-uballit I (517 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
established Kurigalzu II on the Babylonian throne, in the first of what would become a series of Assyrian interventions in Babylonian affairs. From the Amarna
Gemara (1,590 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Caesarea, and was published between about 350–400 CE. The Talmud Bavli (Babylonian Talmud) was published about 500 CE by scholars of Babylonia, primarily
Anzû (1,271 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
versions: an Old Babylonian version of the early second millennium [BC], giving the hero as Ningirsu; and 'The Standard Babylonian' version, dating to
Enlil (4,355 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
the Sumerian pantheon, but he was later worshipped by the Akkadians, Babylonians, Assyrians, and Hurrians. Enlil's primary center of worship was the Ekur
Geonim (1,737 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
transliterated Gaonim, singular Gaon) were the presidents of the two great Babylonian Talmudic Academies of Sura and Pumbedita, in the Abbasid Caliphate, and
Orodes III of Parthia (192 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Orodes III (also spelled Urud III; Parthian: 𐭅𐭓𐭅𐭃 Wērōd) was king of the Parthian Empire from 4 to 6. Albeit he was an Arsacid, his lineage is unknown
Noah's Ark (5,646 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
with the number 60, the same number characterizing the vessel of the Babylonian flood hero. Its three internal divisions reflect the three-part universe
Utu (2,078 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Utu, later worshipped by the East Semitic Akkadian-speaking Babylonians as Shamash, was the ancient Mesopotamian sun god, god of justice, morality, and
Darius II (905 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
the names Xerxes II nor Sogdianus occur in the dates of the numerous Babylonian tablets from Nippur; here effectively the reign of Darius II follows immediately
Artabanus III of Parthia (152 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Artabanus III (Parthian: 𐭍𐭐𐭕𐭓 Ardawān), incorrectly known in older scholarship as Artabanus IV, was a Parthian prince who competed against his brother
Phraates V (1,358 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Phraates V (Parthian: 𐭐𐭓𐭇𐭕 Frahāt), also known by the diminutive version of his name, Phraataces (also spelled Phraatakes), was the King of Kings of
Antiochus III the Great (3,043 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
may have borne a non-dynastic name (starting with Ly-), according to a Babylonian chronicle. He succeeded, under the name Antiochus, his brother Seleucus
Torah study (4,203 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
100a Babylonian Talmud, Berakhot 61b Babylonian Talmud, Avodah Zarah, 3b Babylonian Talmud, Hagigah 5b Babylonian Talmud, Shabbat 83b Babylonian Talmud
Seleucus III Ceraunus (135 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Seleucus III Soter, called Seleucus Ceraunus (Greek: Σέλευκος Γ΄ ὁ Σωτήρ, ὁ Κεραυνός; c. 243 BC – April/June 223 BC, ruled December 225 – April/June 223
Iraqi nationalism (2,426 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
civilization that spread civilization to other parts of the world. The Babylonian ruler Nebuchadnezzar II and Kurdish Muslim leader(sudam) Saladin during
Hyspaosines (1,338 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
BC, was in the possession of Babylonia. The events are recorded in the Babylonian astronomical Diaries. The menace and proximity of the Parthians caused
Mishnah (6,179 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
smallest. A popular mnemonic consists of the acronym "Z'MaN NaKaT." The Babylonian Talmud (Hagiga 14a) states that there were either six hundred or seven
Joshua ben Levi (1,486 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Megillah 74c. Babylonian Talmud Pesachim 85b; Sotah 38b Babylonian Talmud Eruvin 19a Babylonian Talmud Sanhedrin 91b Psalm 95:7.; Babylonian Talmud Sanhedrin
Taxation districts of the Achaemenid Empire (240 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Herodotus' Histories. The quantities of silver are given in Babylonian talent (1 Babylonian talent=about 30.3 kg), while the quantities of gold (India
Ahasuerus (1,598 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Vulgate) is a name applied in the Hebrew Bible to three rulers and to a Babylonian official (or Median king) in the Book of Tobit. It's believed that the
Pacorus II (2,015 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Pacorus II (also spelled Pakoros II; 𐭐𐭊𐭅𐭓) was the King of Kings of the Parthian Empire from 78 to 110. He was the son and successor of Vologases I
The Beast (Revelation) (5,060 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
The Beast (Greek: Θηρίον, Thērion) may refer to one of two beasts described in the Book of Revelation. The first beast comes "out of the sea" and is given
Vonones II (375 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Vonones II was a Parthian prince who ruled as king of Media Atropatene and briefly as king of the Parthian Empire. Vonones was not from the ruling branch
Orodes I of Parthia (1,339 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
mentioned as king of the Arsacid dynasty in a Babylonian report of the lunar eclipse of 11 April 80 BC. Babylonian chronicles also made mention of his sister-queen
Ishtar Gate (3,528 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
States. King Nebuchadnezzar II reigned 604–562 BCE, the peak of the Neo-Babylonian Empire. He is known as the biblical conqueror who captured Jerusalem.
Mithridates IV of Parthia (622 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Mithridates IV (also spelled Mithradates IV; Parthian: 𐭌𐭄𐭓𐭃𐭕 Mihrdāt) was a Parthian king from to 57 to 54 BC. He was the son and successor of Phraates
David Icke (12,001 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
modified human–Archon hybrid race of shape-shifting reptilians – the Babylonian Brotherhood, Illuminati or "elite" – manipulate events to keep humans
Behistun Inscription (3,120 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
three different cuneiform script languages: Old Persian, Elamite, and Babylonian (a variety of Akkadian). The inscription is to cuneiform what the Rosetta
Daniel (biblical figure) (3,218 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
but the rabbis reckoned him to be the most distinguished member of the Babylonian diaspora, unsurpassed in piety and good deeds, firm in his adherence to
Iter-pisha (488 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
1833–1831 BC (middle chronology), was the 12th king of Isin during the Old Babylonian period. The Sumerian King List tells us that "the divine Īter-pīša ruled
Rabbah bar bar Hana (1,013 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
16b–17a Babylonian Talmud Pesahim 51a Babylonian Talmud Berakhot 12a Babylonian Talmud Bava Batra 73a, b Babylonian Talmud Ta'anit 7a Babylonian Talmud
Seleucus IV Philopator (645 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Seleucus IV Philopator (Greek: Σέλευκος Δ΄ Φιλοπάτωρ; c. 218 – 3 September 175 BC), ruler of the Hellenistic Seleucid Empire, reigned from 187 BC to 175
Ninurta-tukulti-Ashur (806 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
was driven from Assur and sought refuge in the city of Sišil, on the Babylonian border, the scene of the final dénouement. There is some conjecture that
Diogenes of Babylon (884 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
the public domain: Schmitz, Leonhard (1870). "Diogenes (3. Surnamed the Babylonian)". In Smith, William (ed.). Dictionary of Greek and Roman Biography and
Antiochus V Eupator (524 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Antiochus V Eupator (Greek: Αντίοχος Ε' Ευπάτωρ), whose epithet means "of a good father" (c. 172 BC – 161 BC) was a ruler of the Greek Seleucid Empire
Amestris (594 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Amestris (Greek: Άμηστρις, Amēstris, perhaps the same as Άμαστρις, Amāstris, from Old Persian Amāstrī-, "strong woman"; died c. 424 BC) was a Persian queen
Hiyya bar Joseph (629 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Hiyya bar Joseph (or Rav Hiyya bar Yosef; Hebrew: רבי חייא בר יוסף) was a Babylonian rabbi of the 3rd century (second generation of amoraim). In Babylonia
Darius the Mede (2,047 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Persians. The story concludes: "That very night Belshazzar the Chaldean (Babylonian) king was killed, and Darius the Mede received the kingdom." In the story
Hanina of Sura (157 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Hanina of Sura (Hebrew: רב חנינא מסורא) was a Babylonian Amora of the fifth generation. Like other Babylonian rabbis his title was "Rav", but this is sometimes
Sogdianus (380 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Sogdianus (/ˌsɔːɡdiˈeɪnəs/ or /ˌsɒɡdiˈeɪnəs/) was briefly a ruler of the Achaemenid Empire for a period in 424–423 BC. His short rule—lasting not much
Rav Ashi (1,296 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
was a Babylonian Jewish rabbi, of the sixth generation of amoraim. He reestablished the Academy at Sura and was the first editor of the Babylonian Talmud
Rav Safra (278 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Rav Safra (Hebrew: רב ספרא; around 280-338) was a Babylonian rabbi, of the fourth generation of amoraim. Safra studied under R. Abba, then went abroad
Jesus in the Talmud (10,496 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
include: Babylonian Sanhedrin 107b – "not as Yehoshua b. Perahya who pushed Jesus the Nazarene away" (Editions or MSs: Barco, Vilna) Babylonian Sotah 47a
Ancient Mesopotamian underworld (3,332 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
the daughter of An. Pazuzu is a demonic god who was well known to the Babylonians and Assyrians throughout the first millennium BC. He is shown with "a
Darius III (3,081 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
instances of Babylonian figures having two names, often a Babylonian and Aramaic name. One Persian magnate is also attested with a Babylonian and Iranian
Alexander IV of Macedon (931 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Alexander IV (Greek: Ἀλέξανδρος Δ΄; 323/322– 309 BC), sometimes erroneously called Aegus in modern times, was the son of Alexander the Great (Alexander III
Vonones I (988 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
S2CID 164436127. Bigwood, Joan M. (2008). "Some Parthian Queens in Greek and Babylonian Documents". Iranica Antiqua. 43: 235–274. doi:10.2143/IA.43.0.2024050
Amoraim (1,065 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
I, who codified the Babylonian Talmud around 500 CE. In total, 761 amoraim are mentioned by name in the Jerusalem and Babylonian Talmuds. 367 of them
Isaac b. Judah (405 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Rav Isaac son of Rav Judah (Hebrew: רב יצחק בריה דרב יהודה) was a Babylonian rabbi who lived in the 4th century (fourth generation of amoraim). His father
Vardanes I (964 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Vardanes I was a king of the Parthian Empire from 40 to 46 AD. He was the heir apparent of his father Artabanus II (r. 12–40), but had to continually fight
Rav Mesharshiya (280 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Mesharshya, or Rav Mesharsheya, or Rav Mesharshia; Hebrew: רב משרשיא) was a Babylonian rabbi, of the fifth generation of amoraim. It would appear that "Rav Acha
Melchizedek (5,562 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
literature — specifically Targum Jonathan, Targum Yerushalmi, and the Babylonian Talmud — presents the name מלכי־צדק)) as a nickname title for Shem. Joseph
Artabanus I of Parthia (893 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Artabanus I (Parthian: 𐭍𐭐𐭕𐭓 Ardawān), incorrectly known in older scholarship as Artabanus II, was king of the Parthian Empire, ruling briefly from
Check mark (457 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
earliest usages of a check mark as an indication of completion is on ancient Babylonian tablets "where small indentations were sometimes made with a stylus, usually
Jeremiah bar Abba (472 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Jeremiah bar Abba (or Rav Yirmeyah bar Abba ; Hebrew: רב ירמיה בר אבא) was a Babylonian rabbi who lived around the mid-3rd century (second generation of amoraim)
Demetrius I Soter (663 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
160 BC. Demetrius acquired his surname of Soter, or Savior, from the Babylonians, whom he delivered from the tyranny of the Median satrap, Timarchus.
Rabbah Jose (268 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Joseph; or רב יוסי, or רבה יוסף, other variations listed below) was a Babylonian rabbi, considered to belong to the eighth generation of amoraim, and to
Rav Shizbi (176 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
R. Shezbi (or R. Shezbi; Hebrew: רב שיזבי) was a Babylonian rabbi, of the fourth generation of amoraim. It is told that Rav Chisda was accustomed to pass
Arses of Persia (758 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Arses (Old Persian: *R̥šā, lit. 'the hero'; Ancient Greek: Ἀρσής, romanized: Arsḗs), also known by his regnal name Artaxerxes IV (/ˌɑːrtəˈzɜːrksiːz/; Old
Rav Karna (107 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
was a rabbi of Babylonia, of the first generation of amoraim. In the Babylonian Talmud he appears simply as Karna; in the Jerusalem Talmud he is entitled
Xerxes II (300 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Xerxes II (/ˈzɜːrksiːz/; Old Persian: 𐎧𐏁𐎹𐎠𐎼𐏁𐎠, romanized: Xšayār̥šā; Ancient Greek: Ξέρξης, romanized: Xérxēs; d. 424 BC) was a Persian king who
Ashur-resh-ishi I (823 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
King List and its fragmentary copies give him as a contemporary of the Babylonian kings Ninurta-nādin-šumi, c. 1132–1126 BC, Nebuchadnezzar I, c. 1126–1103
Artaxerxes III (3,636 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Ochus (Greek: Ὦχος, Ôchos; Babylonian: Ú-ma-kuš), better known by his dynastic name of Artaxerxes III (Old Persian: 𐎠𐎼𐎫𐎧𐏁𐏂𐎠, romanized: Artaxšaçāʰ
Intolerance (film) (3,015 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
the St. Bartholomew's Day massacre of 1572, and (4) a Babylonian story: the fall of the Babylonian Empire to Persia in 539 BC. Each story had its own distinctive
Hanina bar Papi (247 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Kiddushin 81a Babylonian Talmud, Kiddushin 39b Babylonian Talmud, Kiddushin 142b, Bava Kamma 117b Babylonian Talmud, Yebamot 48b Babylonian Talmud, Beitzah
Gotarzes II (1,191 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Gotarzes II (Parthian: 𐭂𐭅𐭕𐭓𐭆 Gōtarz) was king of the Parthian Empire from 40 to 51. He was an adopted son of Artabanus II. When his father died in
Belshazzar's feast (2,087 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
the Medes and the Persians. That very night Belshazzar the Chaldean (Babylonian) king was killed, and Darius the Mede received the kingdom. — Daniel 5:30–31
Rav Kahana III (347 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Kahana of Pum-Nahara"; appearing in the Talmud merely as Rav Kahana) was a Babylonian rabbi, of the third and fourth generation of amoraim, who headed the Yeshiva
Samuel b. Abbahu (104 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
DeRav Abbahu, or רב שמואל בר רבא, read as Rav Shmuel Bar Rabbah) was a Babylonian rabbi, of the eighth and last generation of amoraim, and the first generation
East Syriac Rite (5,821 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Edessan Rite, Assyrian Rite, Persian Rite, Chaldean Rite, Nestorian Rite, Babylonian Rite or Syro-Oriental Rite, is an Eastern Christian liturgical rite that
Antiochus II Theos (1,107 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Antiochus II Theos (Greek: Ἀντίοχος Β΄ ὁ Θεός, Antíochos II ho Theós; 286 – July 246 BC) was a Greek king of the Hellenistic Seleucid Empire who reigned
Aha bar Jacob (79 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Aha bar Jacob (or R. Aha bar Ya'akov; Hebrew: רבי אחא בר יעקב‎) was an Babylonian rabbi of the third and fourth generations of amoraim. He was one of the
Numerical analysis (4,210 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
goes back to the earliest mathematical writings. A tablet from the Yale Babylonian Collection (YBC 7289), gives a sexagesimal numerical approximation of
Rav Kahana IV (180 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Batra 22a, 88a Shabbat 136a Meilah 19a Babylonian Talmud, Shabbat 89a Babylonian Talmud, Berakhot 24a; Babylonian Talmud, Menachot 106a Yevamot 101b Ketuvot
Pumbedita (517 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
academy scholarship that, together with the city of Sura, gave rise to the Babylonian Talmud. The academy there was founded by Judah ben Ezekiel in the late
Antiochus (son of Antiochus III the Great) (369 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Antiochus (221 BC–193 BC) was a Seleucid prince, first-born child to the Seleucid monarchs Antiochus III the Great and Laodice III, and his father's first
Adda bar Ahavah (771 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
fourth centuries), frequently quoted in both the Jerusalem Talmud and the Babylonian Talmud. He is said to have been born on the day that Rabbi Judah haNasi
Demetrius II Nicator (1,548 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
F32.16; van der Spek, Robertus (August 1997). "New Evidence from the Babylonian Astronomical Diaries Concerning Seleucid and Asarcid Chronology". Archiv
Targum (2,277 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
religious leaders. Some subsequent Jewish traditions (beginning with the Babylonian Jews) accepted the written targumim as authoritative translations of the
Rav Rahumi III (116 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
read as Rav Rahumi, or Hebrew: רב ריחומי, read as Rav Rihumai) was a Babylonian rabbi of the 5th century (eighth and last generation of amoraim, and first
Mutakkil-Nusku (435 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
sufficiently long to be the recipient of a letter or letters from the Babylonian king, presumed to be Ninurta-nādin-šumi, in which he was lambasted and
Mari bar Rachel (223 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Mari bar Rachel bat Shmuel, also known as Mari Breh deBat Shmuel was a Babylonian rabbi from the third and fourth generations of amoraim. Unusually, his
Ravina II (505 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
(Hebrew: רב אבינא בר רב הונא or רבינא האחרון; died 475 CE or 500 CE) was a Babylonian rabbi of the 5th century (seventh and eighth generations of amoraim).
Hiyya bar Ashi (285 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
התלמוד Babylonian Talmud, Zevachim 94a Babylonian Talmud, Berakhot 11b Babylonian Talmud Berakhot 14b Babylonian Talmud, Hullin 127b i.e. Babylonian Talmud
Seleucus II Callinicus (1,322 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Seleucus II Callinicus Pogon (Greek: Σέλευκος Β΄ ὁ Καλλίνικος ὁ Πώγων; Kallinikos means "beautifully triumphant"; Pogon means "the Beard"; July/August
Maremar (176 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Maremar (Hebrew: מרימר) was a Babylonian rabbi, of the sixth generation of amoraim (late 4th-early 5th centuries). He was close to Mar Zutra. They constructed
Shila of Kefar Tamarta (205 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
name, but in the Babylonian Talmud the name of his home in Judea is always added, in order to distinguish him from an older Babylonian amora who bore the
Worshipper of Larsa (280 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Mesopotamian statuette on display in Room 227 at the Louvre Museum, of the paleo-Babylonian era (2004-1595 BCE). It depicts a bearded man, kneeling and performing
Mari bar Rachel (223 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Mari bar Rachel bat Shmuel, also known as Mari Breh deBat Shmuel was a Babylonian rabbi from the third and fourth generations of amoraim. Unusually, his
Kohlit (259 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
66a (b. Qiddushin 66a; that is chapter 66a of tractate Kiddushin of the Babylonian Talmud) as an area east of the Jordan River where Alexander Jannaeus had
Enlil-nasir I (85 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
He is mentioned in the Synchronistic King list, but the name of the Babylonian counterpart is illegible. A. K. Grayson (1972). Assyrian Royal Inscriptions
Phraates II (1,912 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
the reign of Phraates was the title of "King of the Lands" (attested in Babylonian cuneiform tablets as šar mātāti), which was rarely used by the Seleucid
Neo-Assyrian Text Corpus Project (89 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
by Vammalan Kirjapaino Oy, Finland), c 1996. Novotny, J. The Standard Babylonian Etana Epic, by Jamie R. Novotny, (University of Helsinki, Ibid.), c 2001
Judah b. Meremar (357 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Meremar, or Rab Judah;, or Judah b. Amemar, Hebrew: יהודה בר מרימר) was a Babylonian rabbi, of the seventh generation of amoraim. He was the son of Maremar
Canon of Kings (810 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
our knowledge of ancient chronology. The Canon derives originally from Babylonian sources. Thus, it lists Kings of Babylon from 747 BC until the conquest
Savoraim (591 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Gemara. Much of classical rabbinic literature generally holds that the Babylonian Talmud was redacted into more or less its final form around 550 CE. The
Rav Papi (80 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Rav Papi (or Rav Pappai; Hebrew: רב פפי‎) was an Babylonian rabbi, of the fifth generation of amoraim. Rav Papi was the son-in-law of Rabbi Isaac Nappaha
Sura (city) (494 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
together with the yeshivas in Pumbedita and Nehardea, gave rise to the Babylonian Talmud. According to Sherira Gaon, Sura (Aramaic: סורא‎) was identical
Rav Berona (140 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
R. Berona (or Rav Bruna, Beruna or Baruna; Hebrew: רב ברונא) was a Babylonian rabbi of the third century (second generation of amoraim). His principle
Middle Eastern philosophy (1,545 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Egyptian philosophy, Babylonian philosophy, Jewish philosophy, Iranian/Persian philosophy, and Islamic philosophy. The origins of Babylonian philosophy, in
Hiyya b. Abin Naggara (219 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
other uses: instead of "Abin" - "Avin"; Hebrew: רב חייא בר אבין) was a Babylonian rabbi of the fourth generation of amoraim. He was the son of R. Abin Naggara
Timarchus (429 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Timarchus or Timarch was a usurper in the Seleucid empire between 163–160 BC. A Greek nobleman, possibly from Miletus in Asia Minor, Timarchus was a friend
Rabbi Hilkiah (102 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
times in the Jerusalem Talmud and the Midrash Aggadah, and once in the Babylonian Talmud. He was the pupil of R. Pinchas and a colleague of R. Shimon ben
List of ancient tribes in Thrace and Dacia (3,808 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Illyria The Cambridge Ancient History, Volume 3, Part 2: The Assyrian and Babylonian Empires and Other States of the Near East, from the Eighth to the Sixth
Artabanus II of Parthia (1,677 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Artabanus II (also spelled Artabanos II or Ardawan II; Parthian: 𐭍𐭐𐭕𐭓 Ardawān), incorrectly known in older scholarship as Artabanus III, was King of
Ashur-dan I (603 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
difference. The Synchronistic King List and a fragmentary copy give his Babylonian contemporaries as Zababa-šum-iddina, c. 1158 BC, and Enlil-nādin-aḫe,
Abin I (340 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Yochanan bar Nafcha. Abin's sayings are mentioned many times in the Babylonian Talmud, mainly as an halakhic inquiry (Hebrew :בעי). As he lived in the
Nirgal Vallis (731 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
42° west longitude. It is 610 km long and is named after Nergal, the Babylonian god of war and counterpart to the Roman god of war Mars. Nirgal Vallis
Ashur-dan I (603 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
difference. The Synchronistic King List and a fragmentary copy give his Babylonian contemporaries as Zababa-šum-iddina, c. 1158 BC, and Enlil-nādin-aḫe,
Rabbi Ammi (1,624 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
known as amoraim, who lived in the Land of Israel and Babylonia. In the Babylonian Talmud the first form only is used; in the Jerusalem Talmud all three
Hezekiah (Amora) (274 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
also: Babylonian Talmud, Avodah Zarah 46a Babylonian Talmud, Hullin 106a Babylonian Talmud, Avodah Zarah 38a Babylonian Talmud, Zevahim 15a Babylonian Talmud
Antiochus IV Epiphanes (2,705 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Antiochus IV Epiphanes (/ænˈtaɪ.əkəs ɛˈpɪfəniːz, ˌæntiˈɒkəs/; Ancient Greek: Ἀντίοχος ὁ Ἐπιφανής, Antíochos ho Epiphanḗs, "God Manifest"; c. 215 BC – November/December
Ecbatana (1,500 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Ecbatana (/ɛkˈbætənə/; Old Persian: 𐏃𐎥𐎶𐎫𐎠𐎴 Hagmatāna or Haŋmatāna, literally "the place of gathering"; Elamite: 𒀝𒈠𒁕𒈾 Ag-ma-da-na; Middle Persian:
Hamadan (1,835 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Hamadan (pronounced [hæmedɒːn]) or Hamedan (Persian: همدان‎, Hamedān) (Old Persian: Haŋgmetana, Ecbatana) is the capital city of Hamadan Province of Iran
Shamshi-Adad V (353 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
stipulated a treaty with the Babylonian king Marduk-zakir-shumi I. In 814 BC, he won the Battle of Dur-Papsukkal against the Babylonian king Marduk-balassu-iqbi
Huna bar Nathan (263 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
נתן‎, read as Rav Huna bereih deRav Natan (רב הונא בריה דרב נתן) was a Babylonian rabbi and exilarch, of the fifth and sixth generations of amoraim. Huna's
Iggeret of Rabbi Sherira Gaon (1,414 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
the Pumbedita Academy by Sherira Gaon, the Chief Rabbi and scholar of Babylonian Jewry, to Rabbi Jacob ben Nissim of Kairouan, in which he methodologically
Rabbah Tosafa'ah (368 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Rabbah Tosafa'ah (Hebrew: רבה תוספאה‎ or Hebrew: רבא תוספאה‎) was a Babylonian rabbi, of the eighth generation of amoraim. Opinions differ on the origin
Hagigah (184 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
contains three chapters, spanning 27 pages in the Vilna edition of the Babylonian Talmud, making it relatively short. The second chapter contains much estoric
Rami b. Abba (221 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Rami bar Abba II (Hebrew: רמי בר אבא (השני)) was a Babylonian rabbi, of the sixth generation of amoraim. Once Rami wanted to build a new synagogue, by
Antiochus (son of Seleucus IV) (431 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Antiochus (Greek: Ἀντίοχος; c. 180 – 170 BC) was a Hellenistic monarch of the Seleucid Empire reigning between 175 and 170 BC. Antiochus' year of birth
Philip III of Macedon (1,389 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Filippos III Arrhidaeos (Ancient Greek: Φίλιππος Γ΄ ὁ Ἀρριδαῖος; c. 359 BC – 25 December, 317 BC), latinised Philip Arrhidaeus, reigned as king of Macedonia
Ziusudra (1,304 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Ziusudra (Old Babylonian: 𒍣𒌓𒋤𒁺 zi-ud-su₃-ra₂, Neo-Assyrian: 𒍣𒋤𒁕 zi-sud-da, Greek: Ξίσουθρος, translit. Xísouthros) of Shuruppak (c. 2900 BC) is
Persian Sibyl (335 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
The Persian Sibyl - also known as the Babylonian, Hebrew or Egyptian Sibyl - was the prophetic priestess presiding over the Apollonian oracle. The word
Aha b. Rava (134 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Aha b. Rava (or Rav Aha b'reih deRava; Hebrew: רב אחא בריה דרבא‎) was a Babylonian rabbi (sixth and seventh generation of amoraim). His name indicates that
Mar Zutra (138 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Mar Zutra (Hebrew: מר זוטרא‎, died 417 CE) was a Babylonian rabbi, of the sixth generation of amoraim. He was a student of Rav Papa, whom he frequently
Rav Shmuel bar Yehudah (191 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Rav Shmuel bar Yehudah (Hebrew: רב שמואל בר יהודה) was a Babylonian amora of the third generation. He was born to a family of converts, and studied under
Tumtum (Judaism) (1,042 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
appears 17 times in the Mishna; 23 times in the Tosefta; 119 times in the Babylonian Talmud; 22 times in the Jerusalem Talmud and hundreds of times in midrash
Amarna letters (2,268 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
establishing both the history and the chronology of the period. Letters from the Babylonian king, Kadashman-Enlil I, anchor the timeframe of Akhenaten's reign to
Rav Giddel (392 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
List:Gidal or Giddul (B; 2) Babylonian Talmud, Shabbat 7a; Yebamoth, 90b; Avodah Zarah 50a i.e. Babylonian Talmud, Menahoth 21b Babylonian Talmud, Yebamot 64b
List of Chaldean Catholic patriarchs of Babylon (1,108 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
This is a list of the Chaldean Catholicoi-Patriarchs of Babylon, the leaders of the Chaldean Catholic Church and one of the Patriarchs of the east of the
Zambiya (352 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Studies in Old Babylonian history. Nederlands Historisch-Archaeologisch Instituut te İstanbul. p. 15. Douglas Frayne (1990). Old Babylonian period (2003-1595
Ta'anit (Talmud) (870 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
as well as many narratives and legends. The following sayings from the Babylonian Gemara may be cited here: "Why is learning compared to a fire? Because
Shimon ben Pazi (101 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Yehoshua ben Levi. He is commonly called Rabbi Shimon ben Pazi in the Babylonian Talmud, and Rabbi Simon in the Jerusalem Talmud and midrashim. He lived
Bardiya (2,577 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
if. Aeschylus Pers. 778 For the chronology, see Parker & Dubberstein, Babylonian Chronology. Behistun Inscription i.14 Herodotus III.79 Ctesias Pers. 15
Ravina I (378 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Ravina I (Hebrew: רבינא‎; died c. AD 420) was a Babylonian Jewish Talmudist and rabbi, of the 5th and 6th generation of amoraim. His father seems to have
Yoma (403 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
and has a Gemara ("Completion") from both the Jerusalem Talmud and the Babylonian Talmud. The first chapter is regarding the seven days before Yom Kippur
Jose ben Abin (372 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
thorough knowledge not only of the Judean customs and halakhot, but of the Babylonian, a fact that has led some scholars to maintain that Jose must have resided
Anah (1,655 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Hit. The town was called (d)Ha-na-atKI in cuneiform texts from the Old Babylonian period, A-na-at by the scribes of Tukulti-Ninurta c. 885 BC,[citation
Targum Jonathan (776 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
otherwise referred to as Targum Yonasan/Yonatan, is the official eastern (Babylonian) targum (Aramaic translation) to the Nevi'im. It is not to be confused
Alexander Balas (2,211 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Alexander I Theopator Euergetes, surnamed Balas (Ancient Greek: Ἀλέξανδρος Βάλας, romanized: Alexandros Balas), was the ruler of the Greek Seleucid kingdom
Amytis of Media (213 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Amytis married Nebuchadnezzar to formalize the alliance between the Babylonian and Median dynasties. Tradition relates that Amytis' yearning for the
Yevamot (299 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Niddah, is considered one of the three most difficult tractates in the Babylonian Talmud. A Hebrew mnemonic for the three is עני (ani, meaning "poverty")
Rav Yemar (63 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Rav Yemar (or Rav Yeimar or Rav Jemar; Hebrew: רב יימר‎) was an Babylonian rabbi, of the sixth and seventh generations of amoraim. According to Sherira
Vologases I of Parthia (2,492 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Vologases I (Parthian: 𐭅𐭋𐭂𐭔 Walagash) was the King of Kings of the Parthian Empire from 51 to 78. He was the son and successor of Vonones II (r. 51)
Pesachim (3,508 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
– rabbinical analysis of and commentary on the Mishnah – in both the Babylonian and Jerusalem Talmud. There is also a Tosefta for this tractate. Apart
Nippur (3,934 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
himself "shepherd of the land of Nippur". With the establishment of the Babylonian empire, under Hammurabi, early in the 2nd millennium BCE, the religious
Sames I (922 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
a very Babylonian (Aramaic) name, his name might have been "Mihrdat" which many of his successors had, but he replaced it with the Babylonian equivalent
Hanina (297 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
"Hoshaiah". JewishEncyclopedia.com. Retrieved 2014-06-29. Babylonian Talmud, Ketubot 56a Babylonian Talmud, Yebamot 58b; Kiddushin 60a Yerushalmi Sukkah 4:2
Agasaya (127 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
there is no solid proof of this. Agasaya later got merged into Ishtar a Babylonian goddess along with many other goddesses; this is likely due to conquering
Mo'ed Katan (327 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
only three chapters, it has a Gemara from both Babylonian Talmud and the Jerusalem Talmud. In the Babylonian Talmud: The first 2 chapters deal with Chol
Rav Yemar (63 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Rav Yemar (or Rav Yeimar or Rav Jemar; Hebrew: רב יימר‎) was an Babylonian rabbi, of the sixth and seventh generations of amoraim. According to Sherira
Rabbah b. Shela (328 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
or R. Abba b. Shila or Rabbah son of R. Shila or simply Rabbah) was a Babylonian rabbi of the 4th century (fourth generation of amoraim). Rabbah was probably
Ninurta-apal-Ekur (945 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Chronology of the ancient Near East as it overlaps the reigns of his Babylonian contemporaries Adad-šuma-uṣur and Meli-Šipak. There is some dispute as
Soncino Press (1,257 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Soncino Press is a Jewish publishing company based in the United Kingdom that has published a variety of books of Jewish interest, most notably English
Berakhot (tractate) (3,664 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
Gemara – rabbinical analysis of and commentary on the Mishnah – in the Babylonian Talmud. There is however Jerusalem Talmud on all the tractates in Seder
Scooby-Doo! Mystery Incorporated (2,464 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
story arc evolves to heavily feature the use of Babylonian mythology, exploring the Anunnaki, the Babylonian and modern pseudo-scientific concepts of Nibiru
Shekalim (Tractate) (218 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
treatise in the Babylonian Talmud, but there is one in the Jerusalem Talmud, and the latter is often printed in the editions of the Babylonian Talmud. There
List of craters on Ganymede (57 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Assyro-Babylonian god of thunder. WGPSN Adapa 73°05′N 31°19′W / 73.08°N 31.32°W / 73.08; -31.32 (Adapa) 57 1979 Adapa, Assyro-Babylonian; lost immortality
Sotah (Talmud) (296 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
nine chapters. The tractate exists in the Mishnah, Tosefta, and both the Babylonian and Jerusalem Talmud. Sotah is also the term used for the woman tried
Phraates IV (2,875 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
2004.0027. Bigwood, Joan M. (2008). "Some Parthian Queens in Greek and Babylonian Documents". Iranica Antiqua. 43: 235–274. doi:10.2143/IA.43.0.2024050
Eruvin (Talmud) (636 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
Yevamot, is considered one of the three most difficult tractates in the Babylonian Talmud. A Hebrew mnemonic for the three is עני (ani, meaning "poverty")
Ark of the Covenant (7,070 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
west side of the Pool of Siloam remains unexcavated. In 587 BC, the Babylonians destroyed Jerusalem and Solomon's Temple. There is no record of what
Hurrian songs (3,187 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
tablets, two from the Late Babylonian and one from the Old Babylonian period (approximately the 18th century BC). Babylonian theory describes intervals
Ikaros (Failaka Island) (345 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
name Ikaros was influenced by the local É-kara temple, dedicated to the Babylonian sun-god Shamash. That both Failaka and the Aegean Icarus housed bull cults
Architectural sculpture (961 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Architectural sculpture is the use of sculptural techniques by an architect and/or sculptor in the design of a building, bridge, mausoleum or other such