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Longer titles found: Babylonia (disambiguation) (view), Babylonia (gastropod) (view), Babylonia ambulacrum (view), Babylonia areolata (view), Babylonia borneensis (view), Babylonia feicheni (view), Babylonia formosae (view), Babylonia japonica (view), Babylonia kirana (view), Babylonia leonis (view), Babylonia lutosa (view), Babylonia perforata (view), Babylonia pieroangelai (view), Babylonia spirata (view), Babylonia umbilifusca (view), Babylonia valentiana (view), Babylonia zeylanica (view), Babyloniaca (view), Babylonian (view), Babylonian Almanac (view), Babylonian Castle Saga (view), Babylonian Chronicles (view), Babylonian Jewry Heritage Center (view), Babylonian Map of the World (view), Babylonian Theodicy (view), Babylonian War (view), Babylonian astrology (view), Babylonian astronomical diaries (view), Babylonian astronomy (view), Babylonian calendar (view), Babylonian captivity (view), Babylonian captivity (disambiguation) (view), Babylonian cosmology (view), Babylonian cuneiform numerals (view), Babylonian law (view), Babylonian mathematics (view), Babylonian religion (view), Babylonian revolts (484 BC) (view), Babylonian star catalogues (view), Babylonian vocalization (view), Neo-Babylonian Empire (view), Fate/Grand Order - Absolute Demonic Front: Babylonia (view), First Babylonian Empire (view), Middle Babylonian period (view), Talmudic Academies in Babylonia (view), Medo-Babylonian conquest of the Assyrian Empire (view), Jewish–Babylonian war (view), List of Fate/Grand Order - Absolute Demonic Front: Babylonia episodes (view), Old Babylonian (view), Yadua the Babylonian (view), Phoenicia under Babylonian rule (view), Pseudoscilla babylonia (view), Turris babylonia (view), Apamea (Babylonia) (view), Terebra babylonia (view), Spectamen babylonia (view), Symbra (Babylonia) (view)

searching for Babylonia 69 found (2698 total)

alternate case: babylonia

Maremar (176 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article

Maremar (Hebrew: מרימר) was a Babylonian rabbi, of the sixth generation of amoraim (late 4th-early 5th centuries). He was close to Mar Zutra. They constructed
Rabin (amora) (300 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
encountered Rabbi Yochanan and Reish Lakish. Along with Rav Dimi, he moved to Babylonia bringing many halachic traditions from the rabbis of the Land of Israel;
Mari bar Rachel (223 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Rav Mari bar Rachel bat Shmuel, also known as Mari Breh deBat Shmuel was a Babylonian rabbi from the third and fourth generations of amoraim. Unusually
Rav Shizbi (176 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
R. Shezbi (or R. Shezbi; Hebrew: רב שיזבי) was a Babylonian rabbi, of the fourth generation of amoraim. It is told that Rav Chisda was accustomed to pass
Hiyya b. Abin Naggara (219 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
(Naggara = "the carpenter"), and who came from Nerash or Nerus (נרשאה) in Babylonia. It is said that Rav Huna once passed the door of R. Abin and, when seeing
Mar Zutra (170 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
For the 30th Exilarch Amora sage of Babylon, leader of the rebel against Kavadh I, see: Mar-Zutra II. For the Savora sage, son of the 30th Exilarch, see:
Rav Giddel (392 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Rav Giddel (or Gidal or Giddul; Hebrew: רב גידל) was a second generation Amora sage of Babylon and the Land of Israel. Rav was his principle teacher. Dozens
Ravina I (378 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Ravina I (Hebrew: רבינא‎; died c. AD 420) was a Babylonian Jewish Talmudist and rabbi, of the 5th and 6th generation of amoraim. His father seems to have
Hanina of Sura (157 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Rav Hanina of Sura (Hebrew: רב חנינא מסורא) was a Babylonian Amora of the fifth generation. Like other Babylonian rabbis his title was "Rav", but this
Hiyya bar Ashi (285 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Hiyya bar Ashi (or Rav Hiyya bar Ashi; Hebrew: רב חייא בר אשי) was a second and third generation Amora sage of Babylon. In his youth he studied under Rav
Rav Papi (117 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
For rabbis of the Land of Israel (third generation of amoraim) with similar names, see Hanina b. Papi or Hanina ben Pappa. For a Babylonian rabbi (fifth
Rav Mesharshiya (280 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Rav Mesharshiya (or R. Mesharshya, or Rav Mesharsheya, or Rav Mesharshia; Hebrew: רב משרשיא) was a Babylonian rabbi, of the fifth generation of amoraim
Rav Yemar (86 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
For other chazal sages with similar names, see: Yemar of Difte, Yemar b. Shelmia, Yemar b. Shazbi, Yemar b. Hashwa, and Yemar Saba. Rav Yemar (or Rav Yeimar
Rabbah Jose (268 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Rabban Yosi (Hebrew: רבה יוסי‎, read as Rava Yossi; Also cited as רב יוסף, English: R. Joseph; or רב יוסי, or רבה יוסף, other variations listed below)
Albert Socin (415 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Stumme). Palestine and Syria with the chief routes through Mesopotamia and Babylonia; handbook for travellers; by Karl Baedeker. With 20 maps, 52 plans, and
Rabbah b. Shela (338 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
For the 1st generation Amora of Babylon, see Rav Shela. Rabbah b. Shela (or Rabbah b. Shila or R. Abba b. Shila or Rabbah son of R. Shila or simply Rabbah)
Rafram II (127 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
For the sixth generation Amora sage of Babylon, also Academy of Pumbedita's Dean, with a similar name, see: Rafram I (Rafram b. Papa). Rafram (II) (Hebrew:
Rami b. Abba (221 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Rami bar Abba II (Hebrew: רמי בר אבא (השני)) was a Babylonian rabbi, of the sixth generation of amoraim. Once Rami wanted to build a new synagogue, by
Huna ben Joshua (316 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Huna ben Joshua (Hebrew: רב הונא בריה דרב יהושע‎, read as Rav Huna BeReia DeRav Yehoshua; died 410) was a Babylonian rabbi, of the fifth generation of
Gemara (1,589 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
was studied exhaustively by generation after generation of rabbis in Babylonia and the Land of Israel. Their discussions were written down in a series
Babylónia (271 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Babylónia (Babel) is a song by Marika Gombitová released on OPUS in 1990. The music composed Gombitová, while Kamil Peteraj contributed with lyrics as
Sheshet (935 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Rav Sheshet (Hebrew: רב ששת) was a Babylonian amora of the third generation. His name is sometimes pronounced Shishat or Barchichat. He was a colleague
Mar son of Ravina (457 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Mar son of Ravina (Amoraic: מר בריה דרבינא, Mar Breih deRavina) was a Babylonian rabbi who lived around the late third century (fourth generation of amoraim)
Amemar (530 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Amemar (Hebrew: אמימר‎) was a Babylonian rabbi, of the fifth and sixth generation of amoraim. His name is a compound word, formed of the personal name
Rav Zevid (336 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
For the Amora sage also of Babylon, and the same Amora generation, with a similar name, see: R. Zebid of Nehardea. Rav Zevid (or Rav Zebid; Hebrew: רב
Rabbah Tosafa'ah (368 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Rabbah Tosafa'ah (Hebrew: רבה תוספאה‎ or Hebrew: רבא תוספאה‎) was a Babylonian rabbi, of the eighth generation of amoraim. Opinions differ on the origin
Mar son of Ravina (457 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Mar son of Ravina (Amoraic: מר בריה דרבינא, Mar Breih deRavina) was a Babylonian rabbi who lived around the late third century (fourth generation of amoraim)
Raba Bar Jeremiah (230 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Abba or Raba (Rabbah) Bar Jeremiah (cited in the Jerusalem Talmud as R. Abba bar Jeremiah; Hebrew: רבה בר ירמיה or רבי אבא בר ירמיה) was Babylonian rabbi
Rav Nachman bar Yitzchak (859 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
You might be looking for Nachman bar Huna or Nachman bar Yaakov. Rav Nachman bar Yitzchak (Hebrew: רב נחמן בר יצחק; died 356 CE) was a Babylonian rabbi
Mar bar Rav Ashi (416 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
For the sixth generation Amora sage of Babylon, see Rav Ashi (his father). Mar bar Rav Ashi (Hebrew: מר בר רב אשי‎) was Babylonian rabbi who lived in the
Idi b. Abin Naggara (381 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
(Naggara = "the carpenter"), and who came from Nerash or Nerus (נרשאה) in Babylonia. It is said that Rav Huna once passed the door of R. Abin and, when seeing
Ashur-uballit I (517 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
beginning of its emergence as a powerful empire. Later on, due to disorder in Babylonia following the death of the Kassite king Burnaburiash II, Ashur-uballit
Inugami Circus-dan (686 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Ochita Kodomotachi" (地獄に堕ちた子供たち) - 2007.9 "Takaramono" (たからもの) - 2007.10 "BABYLONIA Koi Monogatari" (バビロニア恋物語) 2007.11 "Itsuka" (いつか) 2007.12 "Tsubasa" (翼)
Rav Shmuel bar Yehudah (191 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
to a family of converts, and studied under Rabbi Judah bar Ezekiel in Babylonia. Judah respected him greatly, giving him the nickname Shinena ("sharp
Clay tablet (1,132 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
In the Ancient Near East, clay tablets (Akkadian ṭuppu(m) 𒁾) were used as a writing medium, especially for writing in cuneiform, throughout the Bronze
Donald Alexander Mackenzie (1,324 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Gresham, London. Egyptian Myth and Legend (1913) Myths and Legends of Babylonia and Assyria (1915); online editions: gutenberg.org, sacred-texts.com,
Mesopotamia in Classical literature (338 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
a publication now in the public domain: Chisholm, Hugh, ed. (1911). "Babylonia and Assyria". Encyclopædia Britannica. 3 (11th ed.). Cambridge University
Ashur-rabi II (663 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Synchronistic Kinglist gives his contemporary as Širikti-šuqamuna, a king of Babylonia who reigned just 3 months c. 985 BC. Severe distress and famine was recorded
Shimashki Dynasty (1,184 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
was an early dynasty of the ancient region of Elam, to the southeast of Babylonia, in approximately 2200-1900 BCE. A list of twelve kings of Shimashki is
Zeiri (274 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
lived in the third century (second generation of amoraim). He was born in Babylonia, and later sojourned for a while in Alexandria, before moving to Syria
Eriba-Adad II (560 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Neo-Assyrian Text Corpus Project. p. 400. D. J. Wiseman (1975). "XXXI: Assyria & Babylonia 1200–1000 BC". In I. E. S. Edwards; C. J. Gadd; N. G. L. Hammond; S. Solberger
Tigris and Euphrates (570 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
which harboured several grand ancient civilizations, including Sumer, Babylonia, and Assyria. The Greeks called this area Mesopotamia, which literally
Zemiropsis papillaris (149 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
 papillaris Binomial name Zemiropsis papillaris (G.B. Sowerby I, 1825) Synonyms Babylonia papillaris (G.B. Sowerby I, 1825) Eburna papillaris G.B. Sowerby I, 1825
Ashurnasirpal I (496 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Text Corpus Project. pp. 204–205. D. J. Wiseman (1975). "XXXI: Assyria & Babylonia 1200–1000 BC". In I. E. S. Edwards; C. J. Gadd; N. G. L. Hammond; S. Solberger
Ashurnasirpal I (496 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Text Corpus Project. pp. 204–205. D. J. Wiseman (1975). "XXXI: Assyria & Babylonia 1200–1000 BC". In I. E. S. Edwards; C. J. Gadd; N. G. L. Hammond; S. Solberger
Zerika (252 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
informed of a correction in a halakhic tradition given by Rabbi Ammi. In Babylonia, it was said that he had called Rav Safra's attention to the difference
Zemiropsis rosadoi (97 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
(2003) The genus Babylonia revisited (Mollusca: Gastropoda: Buccinidae). Zoologische Verhandelingen 345: 151–162 page(s): 161 "Babylonia rosadoi". Gastropods
Classical element (4,213 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Classical elements typically refer to water, earth, fire, air, and (later) aether, which were proposed to explain the nature and complexity of all matter
Ahai (274 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
R. Ahai (Hebrew: רב אחאי‎, read as Rav Achai; sometimes recorded as R. Aha, Hebrew: רב אחא, read as Rav Acha) was a Jewish Savora sage of the first generation
Alal (256 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Underworld and took various forms, temptations that the inhabitants of Babylonia were able to reject by means of amulets. The Chaldean-Assyrian art represents
Naram-Sin of Assyria (858 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
: 29  The Assyrian King List records that Shamshi-Adad I, “went away to Babylonia in the time of Naram-Sin.” Shamshi-Adad I did not return until he had
List of rabbis (6,484 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
to Rav Ashi in Babylonia (?–420) Rav Ashi, sage, primary redactor of the Talmud in Babylonia (352–427) Ravina II, Amora in Babylonia (?–499) Abudarham
Cassandane (339 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
chronicle of Nabonidus, there was a public mourning after her death in Babylonia lasting for six days. Cassandane reportedly stated that it was more bitter
Ceremonial pole (1,938 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
and New World Civilizations, tree and pole reverence to Anu in ancient Babylonia-Assyria may have evolved from the fire-drill and beam of the oil press
Cassandane (339 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
chronicle of Nabonidus, there was a public mourning after her death in Babylonia lasting for six days. Cassandane reportedly stated that it was more bitter
Aaron ibn Sargado (290 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
סרג'דו)) was a tenth-century AD gaon (Jewish religious leader) in Pumbedita, Babylonia. He was a son of Joseph ha-Kohen. According to the chronicle of Sherira
Huna (196 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Rav Huna (died 322), Jewish Talmudist in Babylonia Rav Huna (c. 216-c. 296), Jewish Talmudist in Babylonia, head of the Academy of Sura Richard Huna
307 BC (294 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Year 307 BC was a year of the pre-Julian Roman calendar. At the time, it was known as the Year of the Consulship of Caecus and Violens (or, less frequently
Mesopotamian prayer (880 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
benedictions. The rulers' (Kings of Babylonia) prayers were made to a variety of deities, for example Marduk (the god of Babylonia), Nabû, Ŝamaš. The kings had
Wiseman hypothesis (1,369 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Originally advocated by P. J. Wiseman (1888–1948) in his New discoveries in Babylonia about Genesis (1936) and republished by Wiseman's son, Donald Wiseman
Ninurta-apal-Ekur (945 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
” although it can only be speculated what he was doing in Karduniaš (Babylonia). The Synchronistic Chronicle continues “But [...] arrived unexpectedly
Jeremiah 29 (1,213 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
narrator": from Jerusalem, Jeremiah sent a letter to the people in the Babylonia exile (verses 1-23) and he responded to a letter about him from Shemaiah
Ummanigash (son of Urtak) (445 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
(Archibald Henry); McClure, M. L. (1903). History of Egypt, Chaldea, Syria, Babylonia and Assyria. London : Grolier Society. Maspero, G. (Gaston); Sayce, A
History of linguistics (5,188 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Linguistics is the scientific study of language. It involves an analysis of language form, language meaning, and language in context. Linguistics began
Jacob Neusner bibliography (16,040 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
1962. Second edition, completely revised, 1970. A History of the Jews in Babylonia. Leiden: Brill, 1965-1970. I-V. Reprinted: Atlanta, 1999: Scholars Press
Ashkenazi Hebrew (2,447 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Crescent, that is to say Judaea, Galilee, Syria, northern Mesopotamia and Babylonia proper. Within the first group of theories, Zimmels believed that the
Simo Parpola (1,849 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Fuchs) The Correspondence of Sargon II, Part III: Letters from Media and Babylonia. State Archives of Assyria 15. Helsinki University Press, 2001. Assyrian
Naarmalcha (116 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
in Arabic: نهر الملك‎ Nahr al-Malik) was a river or canal in central Babylonia that linked Euphrates and Tigris rivers. It corresponds to the older Royal
Sephardi Hebrew (2,002 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
the Fertile Crescent: Judaea, Galilee, Syria, northern Mesopotamia and Babylonia proper. Within the first group of theories, Zimmels believed that the