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searching for Arab–Byzantine wars 215 found (672 total)

alternate case: arab–Byzantine wars

Michael of Synnada (525 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article

Michael of Synnada or Michael the Confessor (Greek: Μιχαὴλ ὁ ὁμολογητής; died 23 May 826) was a metropolitan bishop of Synnada from 784/7 to 815. He represented
Battle of Garigliano (587 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Battle of Garigliano was fought in 915 between Christian forces and the Saracens. Pope John X personally led the Christian forces into battle. The
George Maniakes (585 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
George Maniakes (Greek: Γεώργιος Μανιάκης, transliterated as Georgios Maniaces, Maniakis, or Maniaches, Italian: Giorgio Maniace; died 1043) was a prominent
Leo IV the Khazar (596 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Leo IV the Khazar (Greek: Λέων Δ΄ ὁ Χάζαρος, Leōn IV ho Khazaros; 25 January 750 – 8 September 780) was Byzantine emperor from 775 to 780 AD. He was born
Giustiniano Participazio (485 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Giustiniano Participazio (Latin: Agnellus Iustinianus Particiacus; died 829) was the eleventh (traditional) or ninth (historical) Doge of Venice from 825
Bakjur (915 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Bakjur was a Circassian military slave (mamluk or ghulam) who served the Hamdanids of Aleppo and later the Fatimids of Egypt. He seized control of Aleppo
Leo Apostyppes (338 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Leo Apostyppes or Apostoupes (Greek: Λέων ὁ Ἀποστύππης/Ἀποστούπης) was a Byzantine military leader active in the 880s. He appears in 880, as military governor
Manjutakin (788 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Manjutakin (Arabic: منجوتكين‎) was a military slave (ghulam) of the Fatimid Caliph al-Aziz (r. 975–996). Of Turkic origin, he became one of the leading
Tervel of Bulgaria (1,104 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Khan Tervel (Bulgarian: Тервел) also called Tarvel, or Terval, or Terbelis in some Byzantine sources, was the khan of Bulgaria during the First Bulgarian
Hisham ibn Abd al-Malik (1,758 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Hisham ibn Abd al-Malik (Arabic: هشام بن عبد الملك‎, romanized: Hishām ibn ʿAbd al-Malik; 691 – 6 February 743), usually known simply as Hisham, was the
Asad ibn al-Furat (254 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Asad Ibn Al-Furat (Arabic: أسد بن الفرات‎; 759–828) was a jurist and theologian in Ifriqiya, who played an important role in the Arab conquest of Sicily
Battle of Caltavuturo (509 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Battle of Caltavuturo was fought in 881 or 882 between the Byzantine Empire and the Aghlabid emirate of Ifriqiya, during the Muslim conquest of Sicily
Muhammad ibn Marwan (738 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Abu Abd al-Rahman Muḥammad ibn Marwān ibn al-Ḥakam (Arabic: محمد بن مروان‎) (died 719/720) was an Umayyad prince and one of the most important generals
Adi ibn Hatim (510 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Adi ibn Hatim (Arabic: عدي بن حاتم الطائي‎) was a leader of the Arab tribe of Tayy, and one of the companions of Muhammad. He was the son of the poet Hatim
Umar al-Aqta (1,337 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
general John Kourkouas in 934. Like many other protagonists of the ArabByzantine Wars, ʿUmar figures in both Arab and Byzantine legend. In the Arab epic
Battle of Ostia (341 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The naval Battle of Ostia took place in 849 in the Tyrrhenian Sea between Muslim pirates and an Italian league of Papal, Neapolitan, Amalfitan, and Gaetan
Ahmad ibn Ziyadat Allah ibn Qurhub (925 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Ahmad ibn Ziyadat Allah ibn Qurhub, commonly known simply as Ibn Qurhub, ruled Sicily in rebellion against the Fatimid Caliphate, from 913–916. He launched
Leo III the Isaurian (1,535 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Leo III the Isaurian (Greek: Λέων Γ ὁ Ἴσαυρος, romanized: Leōn ho Isauros; c. 685 – 18 June 741), also known as the Syrian, was Byzantine Emperor from
Niketas Ooryphas (654 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Niketas Oryphas or Oöryphas (Greek: Νικήτας ὁ Ὀρύφας or Ὠορυφᾶς, fl. 860–873) was a distinguished Byzantine official, patrikios, and admiral under the
Yazid ibn Abi Sufyan (1,021 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Yazid ibn Abi Sufyan (Arabic: يزيد بن أبي سفيان‎, romanized: Yazīd ibn Abī Sufyān) was a leading Arab general at the time of the Islamic conquest of Syria
Theodore (brother of Heraclius) (893 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Theodore (Latin: Theodorus, Greek: Θεόδωρος; fl. c. 610 – 636) was the brother (or half-brother) of the Byzantine emperor Heraclius (r. 610–641), a curopalates
John Kaminiates (244 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
John Kaminiates (Greek: Ιωάννης Καμινιάτης, fl. tenth century) was a Greek resident of Thessalonica when the city, then one of the largest in the Byzantine
Smbat VI Bagratuni (62 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Smbat VI Bagratuni (ca. 670 – 726) was a member of the Bagratuni family who was presiding prince of Armenia from 691 to 711. During his reign, he frequently
Husayn ibn Numayr al-Sakuni (432 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Al-Ḥuṣayn ibn Numayr al-Sakūnī (died 5/6 August 686) was a leading general of the early Umayyad Caliphate, from the Sakun subtribe of the Kindah. A man
John I Tzimiskes (1,396 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
John I Tzimiskes (Greek: Ἰωάννης ὁ Τζιμισκής, romanized: Iōánnēs ho Tzimiskēs; c. 925 – 10 January 976) was the senior Byzantine Emperor from 11 December
Marianos Argyros (1,631 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Marianos Argyros (Greek: Μαριανός Ἀργυρός, fl. 944 – 16 August 963) was a Byzantine aristocrat and member of the Argyros family. A monk, in 944 he supported
Abu Ayyub al-Ansari (1,534 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Abu Ayyub al-Ansari (Arabic: أبو أيوب الأنصاري‎, Turkish: Ebu Eyyûb el-Ensarî, died c. 674) — born Khalid bin Zayd bin Kulayb bin Thaalba in Yathrib —
Marianos Argyros (1,631 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Marianos Argyros (Greek: Μαριανός Ἀργυρός, fl. 944 – 16 August 963) was a Byzantine aristocrat and member of the Argyros family. A monk, in 944 he supported
Himerios (admiral) (494 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Himerios (Greek: Ὶμέριος), also Himerius, was a Byzantine administrator and admiral of the early 10th century, best known as the commander of the Byzantine
Chrysocheir (554 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Chrysocheir (Greek: Χρυσόχειρ), also known as Chrysocheres, Chrysocheris, or Chrysocheiros (Χρυσόχερης/Χρυσόχερις/Χρυσόχειρος), all meaning "goldhand"
Al-Hasan ibn Qahtaba (497 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Al-Hasan ibn Qahtaba ibn Shabib al-Ta'i (Arabic: الحَسَن بن قَحْطَبَة بن شبيب الطائي‎) was a senior military leader in the early Abbasid Caliphate. He
Theodore Trithyrius (370 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Theodore Trithyrius (Greek: Θεόδωρος Τριθύριος; died 636), commonly known by his title as Theodore the Sacellarius, was a Byzantine treasurer of the state
Katakalon Kekaumenos (494 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Katakalon Kekaumenos (Greek: Κατακαλὼν Κεκαυμένος) was a prominent Byzantine general of the mid-11th century. Katakalon Kekaumenos was born in Koloneia
Nasar (496 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Nasar (Greek: Νάσαρ), originally baptized Basil (Greek: Βασίλειος), was a distinguished Byzantine military leader in the Byzantine–Arab conflicts of the
Michael III (2,076 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Michael III (Greek: Μιχαήλ; January 840 – 24 September 867) was Byzantine Emperor from 842 to 867. Michael III was the third and traditionally last member
Usama ibn Zayd (1,108 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Usama ibn Zayd (Arabic: أُسَامَة ٱبْن زَيْد‎) was an early Muslim and companion of the Islamic prophet Muhammad. He was the son of Zayd ibn Harithah, Muhammad's
Al-Mu'izz li-Din Allah (1,657 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Abu Tamim Ma'ad al-Muizz li-Din Allah (Arabic: ابو تميم معد المعزّ لدين الله‎, romanized: Abū Tamīm Maʿad al-Muʿizz li-Dīn Allāh, lit. 'Glorifier of the
Theophilos (emperor) (1,924 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Theophilos (Greek: Θεόφιλος; sometimes Latinized or Anglicized as Theophilus or Theophilo; c. 812  – 20 January 842) was the Byzantine Emperor from 829
Constantine IV (1,398 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Constantine IV (Greek: Κωνσταντῖνος, romanized: Kōnstantinos; c. 650-685), called the Younger (Greek: ὁ νέος, ho neos) and sometimes incorrectly Pogonatos
Ali ibn Yahya al-Armani (634 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
'Alī ibn Yaḥyā al-Armanī (Arabic: علي بن يحيى الأرمني‎) was a famed Muslim military commander of the mid-9th century, involved in the border warfare with
Leo Phokas the Younger (440 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Leo Phokas or Phocas (Greek: Λέων Φωκᾶς, c. 915–920 – after 971) was a prominent Byzantine general who scored a number of successes in the eastern frontier
Uqba ibn Amir (483 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Uqba ibn Amir al-Juhani (Arabic: عقبة بن عامر الجهني‎‎, romanized: ʿUqba ibn ʿĀmir al-Juhanī; died 677/78) was a companion of the Islamic prophet Muhammad
Constantine Kontomytes (271 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Constantine Kontomytes or Contomytes (Greek: Κωνσταντῖνος ὁ Κοντομύτης, fl. 841–860) was a Byzantine general and nobleman. As the governor (strategos)
Rashid al-Dawla Mahmud (643 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Rashid al-Dawla Mahmud, full name Mahmud bin Shibl al-Dawla Nasr bin Salih bin Mirdas (Arabic: محمود بن نصر بن صالح المرداسي‎) also known as Abu Salama
Miqdad ibn Aswad (1,256 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Miqdad ibn Amr al-Bahrani (Arabic: ٱلْمِقْدَاد ٱبْن عَمْروْ ٱلْبَهْرَانِيّ‎, al-Miqdād ibn ʿAmr al-Bahrānīy), better known as al-Miqdad ibn al-Aswad al-Kindi
Abdallah ibn Abd al-Malik (668 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
ʿAbdallāh ibn ʿAbd al-Malik ibn Marwān (Arabic: عبد الله بن عبد الملك‎) (in Greek sources Ἀβδελᾶς, Abdelas) was an Umayyad prince, the son of Caliph Abd
Heraclius (brother of Tiberius III) (613 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Heraclius (Greek: Ἡράκλειος, Herakleios) was the brother of the Byzantine emperor Tiberius III (r. 698–705) and the Byzantine Empire's leading general
Ahmad ibn al-Hasan al-Kalbi (269 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Ahmad or Muhammad ibn al-Hasan al-Kalbi (Arabic: محمد بن الحسن الكلبي‎) was the second Kalbid Emir of Sicily. He was the son of the first Kalbid emir,
Khalid ibn Barmak (1,622 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Khalid ibn Barmak (Arabic: خالد بن برمك‎; c. 706/07–781/82) was the first prominent member of the Barmakid family, which converted to Islam and became
Umar ibn Hubayra (926 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Umar ibn Hubayra al-Fazari (Arabic: عمر بن هبيرة الفزاري‎, romanized: ʿUmar ibn Hubayra al-Fazārī; fl. 710–724/726) was a prominent Umayyad general and
Rustam ibn Baradu (542 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Rustam ibn Baradu (Arabic: رستم بن بردو‎) or Rustum ibn Bardu, surnamed al-Farghani ("from Farghana"), was a military commander for the Abbasid Caliphate
Theoktiste of Lesbos (396 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Theoktiste of Lesbos (Greek: Θεοκτίστη η Λεσβία) is a saint of the Eastern Orthodox Church and the Catholic Church. According to her hagiography, she was
Sa'id ibn Hamdan (700 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Sa'id ibn Hamdan (Arabic: ابو علاء سعيد بن حمدان‎, romanized: Abu ʿAlāʾ Saʿīd ibn Ḥamdān) was an early member of the Hamdanid dynasty who served as provincial
Michael Spondyles (445 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Michael Spondyles (Greek: Μιχαὴλ Σπονδύλης, Italian: Michele Sfrondilo) was a high-ranking Byzantine courtier who became governor of Antioch, and then
Revolt of Tyre (996–998) (236 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
The Revolt of Tyre was an anti-Fatimid rebellion by the populace of the city of Tyre, in modern Lebanon. It began in 996, when the people, led by an ordinary
Yazid ibn Mazyad al-Shaybani (437 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Yazid ibn Mazyad al-Shaybani (Arabic: يزيد بن مزيد الشيباني‎, romanized: Yazīd ibn Mazyad al-Shaybānī; died 801) was an Arab general and governor who served
Al-Qasim ibn Harun al-Rashid (544 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Al-Qasim ibn Harun al-Rashid (Arabic: القاسم بن هارون الرشيد‎) was the third son of the Abbasid caliph Harun al-Rashid (r. 786–809), and for a time third-in-line
Abu Firas al-Hamdani (1,379 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Al-Harith ibn Abi’l-ʿAlaʾ Saʿid ibn Hamdan al-Taghlibi (932–968), better known by his nom de plume of Abu Firas al-Hamdani (Arabic: أبو فراس الحمداني‎)
Theophobos (965 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Theophobos (Greek: Θεόφοβος) or Theophobus, originally Nasir (ناصر), Nasr (نصر), or Nusayr (نصیر), was an Iranian commander of the Khurramites who converted
Nicholas Picingli (462 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Nicholas Epigingles (Greek: Νικόλαος Ἐπιγίγγλης), better known by his Latinized surname Picingli, was a Byzantine general active in southern Italy and
Revolt of Tyre (996–998) (236 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
The Revolt of Tyre was an anti-Fatimid rebellion by the populace of the city of Tyre, in modern Lebanon. It began in 996, when the people, led by an ordinary
Sa'id ibn Hamdan (700 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Sa'id ibn Hamdan (Arabic: ابو علاء سعيد بن حمدان‎, romanized: Abu ʿAlāʾ Saʿīd ibn Ḥamdān) was an early member of the Hamdanid dynasty who served as provincial
Elpidius (rebel) (558 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Elpidius or Elpidios (Greek: Ἐλπίδιος) was a Byzantine aristocrat and governor of Sicily, who was accused of conspiring against Empress Irene of Athens
Antony the Younger (609 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Saint Antony the Younger (Greek: Ἀντώνιος ὁ νέος, 785 – 11 November 865) was a Byzantine military officer who became a monk and saint. He is commemorated
42 Martyrs of Amorium (627 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The 42 Martyrs of Amorium (Greek: οἰ ἅγιοι μβ′ μάρτυρες τοῦ Ἀμορίου) were a group of Byzantine senior officials taken prisoner by the Abbasid Caliphate
Abu'l-Qasim Ali ibn al-Hasan al-Kalbi (473 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Abu'l-Qasim Ali ibn al-Hasan al-Kalbi (Arabic: أبو القاسم علي بن الحسن الكلبي‎, romanized: Abū al-Qāsim ʿAlī ibn al-Ḥasan al-Kalbī), known to the Byzantine
Niketas Chalkoutzes (298 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
between the Byzantines and the Arabs. Miniature from the Madrid Skylitzes Allegiance  Byzantine Empire Rank General Battles/wars ArabByzantine wars
Leon I of Abkhazia (304 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Leon I of Abkhazia, hereditary prince (Eristavi) of Abkhazia, ruling between 720–740 and a vassal to the Byzantine Emperor. The Divan of the Abkhazian
Umm Hakim (469 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Umm Hakim bint Al-Harith was a female companion of prophet Muhammad and later a wife of Umar, the second caliph of Islam. She was daughter of Harith al
Yazaman al-Khadim (743 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Yazaman or Yazman, surnamed al-Khadim ("the eunuch") (died 23 October 891) was governor of Tarsus for the Abbasids and chief military leader in the Muslim
Gennadius (7th century) (770 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Gennadius (Greek: Γεννάδιος, died c. 665), sometimes referred to as Gennadius II (his 6th-century predecessor being Gennadius I), was a Byzantine general
Elias of Enna (474 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Saint Elias of Enna, born John Rachites (Greek: Ἰωάννης Ῥαχίτης; 822/823 in Enna – August 17, 903 in Thessaloniki), is venerated as a saint by the Catholic
Karbeas (828 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Karbeas (Greek: Καρβέας), also Karbaias (Καρβαίας), was a Paulician leader, who, following the anti-Paulician pogroms in 843, abandoned his service in
Niketas the Persian (345 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Niketas was a 7th-century Byzantine officer. He was the son and heir of the Sassanid Persian general and briefly shahanshah, Shahrbaraz. Niketas was the
Abu'l-Fawaris Muhammad ibn Nasir al-Dawla (189 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Abū'l-Fawāris Muḥammad ibn Nāṣir al-Dawla was a Hamdanid prince, active as a governor and general for his uncle, Sayf al-Dawla, Emir of Aleppo. Abu'l-Fawaris
Ya'qub ibn Ishaq al-Tamimi (349 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Ya'qub ibn Ishaq al-Tamimi (Arabic: يعقوب بن إسحاق التميمي‎) was a naval commander in Fatimid service who led a major raid against the Italian coasts,
Alexios Mosele (Caesar) (818 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Alexios Mosele (Greek: Ἀλέξιος Μωσηλέ) or Musele/Mousele (Μουσελέ) was a Byzantine aristocrat and general, chosen by Emperor Theophilos (r. 829–842) for
Michael Melissenos (330 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Michael Melissenos (Greek: Μιχαὴλ Μελισσηνός) was a notable Byzantine aristocrat and general during the reign of Emperor Constantine V (r. 741–775). Michael
Constantine Dalassenos (duke of Antioch) (1,376 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Constantine Dalassenos (Greek: Κωνσταντίνος Δαλασσηνός, romanized: Kōnstantinos Dalassēnos) was a prominent Byzantine aristocrat of the first half of the
Ujayf ibn Anbasa (475 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Ujayf ibn Anbasa (Arabic: عجيف بن عنبسة‎) (died 838) was one of the senior-most military leaders of the Abbasid Caliphate under the caliphs al-Ma'mun and
Mu'awiya ibn Hudayj (359 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Mu'awiya ibn Hudayj ibn Jafna ibn Qatira al-Tujibi al-Kindi was a general of the Kindah tribe under Muawiyah I in Ifriqiya. He led 10,000 troops in the
Mufarrij ibn Daghfal ibn al-Jarrah (2,489 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Mufarrij ibn Daghfal ibn al-Jarrah al-Tayyi (fl. ca. 977–1013), in some sources erroneously called Daghfal ibn Mufarrij, was an emir of the Jarrahid family
Gregory the Patrician (1,062 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Gregory the Patrician (Greek: Γρηγόριος, Latin: Flavius Gregorius, died 647) was a Byzantine Exarch of Africa (modern Tunisia and eastern Algeria). A relative
Al-Harith ibn Hisham (595 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Al-Ḥārith ibn Hishām ibn al-Mughīra ibn ʿAbd Allāh (died 634, 636 or 639), was a companion of Muhammad, a noble of the Banu Makhzum and a participant in
Ahmad ibn Kayghalagh (1,083 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Ahmad ibn Kayghalagh (Arabic: أحمد بن كيغلغ‎) was an Abbasid military officer of Turkic origin who served as governor in Syria and Egypt. He was ousted
Niketas Abalantes (536 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Niketas, possibly surnamed Abalantes (Greek: Νικήτας [Αβαλάντης]), was a Byzantine military commander who in 964 led a major expedition against the Fatimid
Eustathios Argyros (general under Leo VI) (1,278 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Eustathios Argyros (Greek: Εὐστάθιος Ἀργυρός; died ca. 910) was a Byzantine aristocrat and one of the most prominent generals under Emperor Leo VI the
Basil I (2,864 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Basil I the Macedonian (Greek: Βασίλειος ὁ Μακεδών, Basíleios ō Makedṓn, 811 – 29 August 886), was a Byzantine Emperor who reigned from 867 to 886. Born
Abu Taghlib (1,973 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Fadl Allah Abu Taghlib al-Ghadanfar ʿUddat al-Dawla (Arabic: فضل الله أبو تغلب الغضنفر عدة الدولة‎, romanized: Faḍl Allāh ʿAbu Taghlib al-Ghaḍanfar ʿUddat
Michael Bourtzes (1,933 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Michael Bourtzes (Greek: Μιχαήλ Βούρτζης, Arabic: Miḥā’īl al-Burdjī; ca. 930/35 – after 996) was a leading Byzantine general of the latter 10th century
Harthama ibn A'yan (825 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Harthama ibn A'yan (Arabic: هرثمة بن أعين‎; died June 816) was a Khurasan-born general and governor of the early Abbasid Caliphate, serving under the caliphs
Leo Argyros (9th century) (207 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Leo Argyros (Greek: Λέων Ἀργυρός) was a Byzantine aristocrat and general active in the middle of the 9th century, and the founder of the noble family of
Bardas Parsakoutenos (448 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Bardas Parsakoutenos (Greek: Βάρδας Παρσακουτηνός) was a Byzantine commander and nephew of Emperor Nikephoros II Phokas. The family's surname (erroneously
Abdallah ibn Ali (1,435 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Abu Muhammad Abdallah ibn Ali (Arabic: عبد الله بن علي‎; c. 712 – 764 CE) was a member of the Banu Abbas, who played a leading role in its rise to power
Ibn az-Zayyat (governor of Tarsus) (254 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Ibn az-Zayyat (Arabic: إبن الزيات‎) was the governor of Tarsus from ca. 956 until 962 for the Hamdanid emir Sayf al-Dawla. He was appointed to the post
Sergios Niketiates (563 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Sergios Niketiates (Greek: Σέργιος Νικητιάτης, fl. c. 843) was a senior Byzantine official and member of the Amorian dynasty. He is celebrated as a saint
Nikephoros Parsakoutenos (340 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Nikephoros Parsakoutenos (Greek: Νικηφόρος Παρσακουτηνός) was a Byzantine nobleman and nephew of Emperor Nikephoros II Phokas (r. 963–969). The family's
Theodoulos Parsakoutenos (272 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Theodoulos Parsakoutenos (Greek: Θεόδουλος Παρσακουτηνός) was a Byzantine general who married into the Phokas clan. He was taken prisoner by the Hamdanid
Abd al-Aziz ibn Shu'ayb (596 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
ʿAbd al-ʿAzīz ibn Shuʿayb ibn ʿUmar al-Qurṭubī al-Ballūṭī (Arabic: عبد العزيز بن شعيب بن عمر القرطبي البلوطي‎), known as Kouroupas (Greek: Κουρουπᾶς) in
Theophylact Dalassenos (514 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Theophylact Dalassenos (Greek: Θεοφύλακτος Δαλασσηνός; born before ca. 990 – after 1039) was a Byzantine aristocrat who occupied a series of senior military
Theophilos Kourkouas (748 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Theophilos Kourkouas (Greek: Θεόφιλος Κουρκούας, fl. ca. 920–960s) was a distinguished Byzantine general in the 10th century. He was also the grandfather
Muflih al-Saji (453 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Muflih al-Saji (Arabic: مفلح الساجي‎) was a Muslim commander and governor of Adharbayjan (Iranian Azerbaijan) from c. 929 to c. 935. As his nisba indicates
Bushra al-Thamali (238 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Bashir or Bushra al-Thamali (Arabic: بشرى الثملي‎, romanized: Bushrā al-Thamalī) was an Abbasid military commander and governor (wali or amir) of Tarsus
Justinian II (2,604 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Justinian II (Greek: Ἰουστινιανός, romanized: Ioustinianos; 668/9 – 4 November 711), surnamed Rhinotmetos or Rhinotmetus (ὁ Ῥινότμητος, "the slit-nosed")
Abdallah ibn Qais (127 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Abdallah ibn Qais (Arabic: عبد الله بن قيس‎) (Κάϊσος, Kaisos and Ἀβδελᾶς, Abdelas in Greek sources) was an Ummayad military leader active against the Byzantine
Theodore Parsakoutenos (401 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Theodore Parsakoutenos (Greek: Θεόδωρος Παρσακουτηνός) was a Byzantine general in the 960s and nephew of Emperor Nikephoros II Phokas. The family's surname
Thamal al-Dulafi (958 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Thamal al-Dulafi (Arabic: ثمل الدلفي‎, romanized: Thamal al-Dulafī; fl. 917/8–932) was an Abbasid military commander and longtime governor (wali or amir)
Basil Hexamilites (276 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Basil Hexamilites (Greek: Βασίλειος Ἑξαμιλίτης, fl. 956) was a Byzantine military leader who won a major victory against the Hamdanid navy of Tarsus. As
Bishr al-Afshini (405 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Bishr al-Afshini (Arabic: بشر الأفشيني‎) was a military commander for the Abbasid Caliphate and the governor (wali) of Tarsus from 912/3 until at least
Euphemius (Sicily) (1,628 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Euphemius or Euphemios (Greek: Εὐφήμιος) was a Byzantine commander in Sicily, who rebelled against the imperial governor in 826 CE, and invited the Aghlabids
Ibn al-Dahhak (110 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Ibn al-Dahhak (died 927) was a Kurdish chieftain, who abandoned Islam, converted to Christianity and entered the service of the Byzantine emperor Romanos
Zuhayr ibn Qays (688 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Zuhayr ibn Qays al-Balawī (Arabic: زهير بن قيس البلوي‎) (died 688) was a companion of the Islamic prophet Muhammad and an Arab commander who fought in
Tughj ibn Juff (852 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Ṭughj ibn Juff ibn Yiltakīn ibn Fūrān ibn Fūrī ibn Khāqān (died 906) was a Turkic military officer who served the Abbasid Caliphate and the autonomous
Muhammad ibn Ali al-Armani (117 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Muhammad ibn Ali al-Armani (Arabic: محمد بن علي الأرمني‎) was the son of the Abbasid military commander Ali al-Armani ("Ali the Armenian"), celebrated
Shu'ayb ibn Ahmad (161 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Shu'ayb ibn Ahmad (Arabic: شعيب بن أحمد‎) was the eighth Emir of Crete, reigning from c. 940–943. The surviving records on the internal history and rulers
Romanos Kourkouas (525 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Romanos Kourkouas (Greek: Ῥωμανός Κουρκούας) was a Byzantine aristocrat and senior military leader in the mid-10th century. Romanos was a scion of the
Abdallah al-Khazin (98 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Abdallah al-Khazin was a military commander who served the Ikhshidids of Egypt. In 956/7, he conquered the town of Ibrim in Nubia, while in 956/7, 960/1
Umayr ibn al-Hubab al-Sulami (999 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
ʿUmayr ibn al-Ḥubāb al-Sulamī (Arabic: عمير بن الحباب السلمي‎) (died 689) was a chieftain of the Banu Sulaym tribe, an erstwhile Umayyad general and a
Abu'l-Asha'ir Ahmad ibn Nasr (315 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Abu'l-Asha'ir Ahmad ibn Nasr (Arabic: أبو الأشاعر أحمد بن نصر‎) (died 2 November 906) was a military commander for the Abbasid Caliphate and the governor
Sa'id al-Dawla (1,175 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Abu'l-Fada'il Sa'id al-Dawla (Arabic: أبو الفضائل سعيد الدولة‎) was the third Hamdanid ruler of the Emirate of Aleppo. He succeeded his father Sa'd al-Dawla
Bagrat II Bagratuni (1,314 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Bagrat II Bagratuni (Armenian: Բագրատ Բ Բագրատունի, Arabic: Buqrāṭ ibn Ashūṭ; died after 851) was an Armenian noble of the Bagratid (Bagratuni) family
Habib ibn Maslama al-Fihri (1,266 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Ḥabīb ibn Maslama al-Fihrī (Arabic: حبيب بن مسلمة الفهري‎; c. 617–c. 662) was an Arab general during the Early Muslim conquests, under Mu'awiyah ibn Abi
Qarghuyah (516 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Qarghuyah or Qarquya was an important Arab administrator in the Hamdanid Dynasty under Sayf al-Dawla, who would go on to control Aleppo himself and even
Ahmad ibn Tughan al-Ujayfi (707 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Ahmad ibn Tughan al-Ujayfi (Arabic: أحمد بن توغان العجيفي‎) was the governor of Tarsus, Antioch, and the Abbasid Caliphate's borderlands in Cilicia (al-thughur
Nasr al-Thamali (255 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Naṣr al-Thamalī (Arabic: نصر الثملي‎) was an Abbasid military commander and governor (wali or amir) of Tarsus and the borderlands with the Byzantine Empire
Muqallid ibn Kamil (432 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Muqallid ibn Kamil ibn Mirdas (Arabic: مقلد بن كامل بن مرداس‎) (fl. 1030–1050) was a member of the Mirdasid dynasty, a commander of the Banu Kilab and
Eustathios Argyros (admiral under Leo VI) (627 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Eustathios [Argyros] (Greek: Εὐστάθιος [Ἀργυρός]) was a Byzantine admiral under Emperor Leo VI the Wise (r. 886–912). Eustathios Argyros first appears
Photeinos (strategos) (281 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Photeinos (Greek: Φωτεινός) was a Byzantine commander and governor active in the 820s. He is first mentioned following the Muslim conquest of the island
Damian of Tarsus (629 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Damian of Tarsus (Arabic: دميانه الطرسوسي‎, romanized: Damyanah al-Tarsusi; died 924), surnamed Ghulam Yazman ("slave/page of Yazman"), was a Byzantine
Yusuf ibn Umar ibn Shu'ayb (331 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Yusuf ibn Umar ibn Shu'ayb (Arabic: يوسف بن عمر بن شعيب‎) was the fifth Emir of Crete, reigning from c. 910–915. The surviving records on the internal
Constantine Phokas (357 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Constantine Phokas (Greek: Κωνσταντῖνος Φωκᾶς; died 953/954) was a Byzantine aristocrat and general. Constantine was the youngest son of Bardas Phokas
Abdallah al-Khazin (98 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Abdallah al-Khazin was a military commander who served the Ikhshidids of Egypt. In 956/7, he conquered the town of Ibrim in Nubia, while in 956/7, 960/1
Basil Lekapenos (1,872 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Basil Lekapenos (Greek: Βασίλειος Λεκαπηνός, romanized: Basíleios Lekapēnós; c. 925 – c. 985), also called the Parakoimomenos (ό παρακοιμώμενος) or the
Habib ibn Maslama al-Fihri (1,266 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Ḥabīb ibn Maslama al-Fihrī (Arabic: حبيب بن مسلمة الفهري‎; c. 617–c. 662) was an Arab general during the Early Muslim conquests, under Mu'awiyah ibn Abi
Muqallid ibn Kamil (432 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Muqallid ibn Kamil ibn Mirdas (Arabic: مقلد بن كامل بن مرداس‎) (fl. 1030–1050) was a member of the Mirdasid dynasty, a commander of the Banu Kilab and
Ali ibn Yusuf ibn Umar (272 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Ali ibn Yusuf ibn Umar (Arabic: علي بن يوسف بن عمر‎) was the sixth Emir of Crete, reigning from c. 915–925. The surviving records on the internal history
Neboulos (393 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Neboulos (Greek: Νέβουλος) was a South Slavic or Bulgar military commander in the service of the Byzantine emperor Justinian II (r. 685–695 and 705–711)
Abu'l-Asha'ir Ahmad ibn Nasr (315 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Abu'l-Asha'ir Ahmad ibn Nasr (Arabic: أبو الأشاعر أحمد بن نصر‎) (died 2 November 906) was a military commander for the Abbasid Caliphate and the governor
Ahmad ibn Tughan al-Ujayfi (707 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Ahmad ibn Tughan al-Ujayfi (Arabic: أحمد بن توغان العجيفي‎) was the governor of Tarsus, Antioch, and the Abbasid Caliphate's borderlands in Cilicia (al-thughur
Rashiq al-Nasimi (714 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Rashiq al-Nasimi (Arabic: رشيق النسيمي‎) was the governor of Tarsus for the Hamdanid emir Sayf al-Dawla from 962 until the city's surrender to the Byzantine
Abd al-Rahman ibn Khalid (1,150 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Abd al-Rahman ibn Khalid ibn al-Walid (Arabic: عبدالرحمن بن خالد‎, romanized: ʿAbd al-Raḥmān ibn Khālid ibn al-Walīd; 616–666) was the governor of Homs
Yazid ibn Abi Kabsha al-Saksaki (215 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Yazid ibn Abi Kabsha al-Saksaki (Arabic: يزيد بن أبي كبشة السكسكي‎) was an Arab military commander and provincial governor for the Umayyad Caliphate. He
Abdallah II of Ifriqiya (275 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Abu 'l-Abbas Abdallah II (Arabic: أبو العباس عبد الله‎, Abū l-ʿAbbās ʿAbd Allāh; died 27 July 903) was the Emir of Ifriqiya from 902 to 903. Mounting reports
Makroioannes (190 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The patrikios Makroioannes (Greek: Μακροϊωάννης; "long John", evidently a sobriquet) was a Byzantine naval commander who commanded the fleet in the expedition
Thabit ibn Nasr (334 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Thabit ibn Nasr ibn Malik al-Khuza'i (Arabic: ثابت بن نصر الخزاعي‎) (died 813/14) was an Abbasid general and governor of the Cilician frontier zone (al-thughur
Ali ibn Ahmad (201 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Ali ibn Ahmad (Arabic: علي بن أحمد‎) was the ninth Emir of Crete, reigning from c. 943–949. The surviving records on the internal history and rulers of
Al-Hasan ibn al-Abbas (246 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Al-Ḥasan ibn al-ʿAbbās (Arabic: الحسن بن العباس‎) was an Aghlabid military commander who fought in Sicily against the Byzantine Empire. He was appointed
Manuel the Armenian (2,002 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Manuel the Armenian was a prominent Byzantine general of Armenian origin, active from circa 810 until his death. After reaching the highest military ranks
Nikephoros Ouranos (1,702 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Nikephoros Ouranos (Greek: Νικηφόρος Οὐρανός; fl. c. 980 – c. 1010), Latinized as Nicephorus Uranus, was a high-ranking Byzantine official and general
Itakh (723 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Aytākh or Ītākh al-Khazarī (Arabic: إيتاخ الخزري‎) was a leading commander in the Turkic army of the Abbasid caliph al-Mu'tasim (r. 833-842 C.E.). As the
Ahmad ibn Umar (244 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Ahmad ibn Umar ibn Shu'ayb (Arabic: أحمد بن عمر بن شعيب‎) was the seventh Emir of Crete, reigning from c. 925–940. The surviving records on the internal
Yahya ibn al-Hakam (1,077 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Yaḥyā ibn al-Ḥakam ibn Abī al-ʿĀs (Arabic: يحيى بن الحكم بن أبي العاص‎) (died before 700) was an Umayyad statesman during the caliphate of his nephew,
Thumama ibn al-Walid (315 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Thumāma ibn al-Walīd ibn Qa‘qā al-‘Absi‘ (Arabic: ثمامة بن الوليد بن قعقاع العبسي‎) was an Arab general of noble lineage from Syria, who served the Abbasid
Humayd ibn Ma'yuf al-Hajuri (539 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Ḥumayd ibn Ma'yūf al-Ḥajūrī (Arabic: حميد بن معيوف الحجوري‎) was an Arab commander in Abbasid service in the early 9th century. Humayd hailed from an Arab
John Rhadenos (284 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The patrikios John Rhadenos (Greek: Ἰωάννης Ῥαδηνός, also Ῥαδινός, Ῥωδινός in the sources; fl. 917–921/22) was a Byzantine official and military leader
Husayn ibn Hamdan (2,066 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Husayn ibn Hamdan ibn Hamdun ibn al-Harith al-Taghlibi (Arabic: حسين بن حمدان بن حمدون بن الحارث التغلبي‎) was an early member of the Hamdanid family,
Muflih (eunuch) (272 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Muflih, surnamed al-Aswad ("the Black") and al-Khadim ("the servant"), was the chief court eunuch under the Abbasid caliph al-Muqtadir (r. 908–932). By
Badr al-Hammami (769 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Badr ibn ʿAbdallāh al-Ḥammāmī (Arabic: بدر بن عبدالله الحمّامي‎) also known as Badr al-Kabīr ("Badr the Elder"), was a general who served the Tulunids
Urkhuz ibn Ulugh Tarkhan (367 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Urkhuz ibn Ulugh Tarkhan or ibn Yulugh was a Turkish general of the Abbasid Caliphate and governor of Tarsus and of the borderlands with the Byzantine
Safwan ibn Muattal (852 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Ṣafwān ibn al-Muʿaṭṭal al-Sulamī (Arabic: صفوان بن المعطل السلمي‎) (d. 638 or 679) was a sahabi (companion) of the Islamic prophet Muhammad and an Arab
Abu Thabit (280 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Abu Thabit (Arabic: أبو ثابت‎) served briefly as governor of Tarsus for the Abbasid Caliphate in 900. Governor Ibn al-Ikhshad left him behind in the city
Michael Toxaras (189 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Michael Toxaras (Greek: Μιχαήλ Τοξαρᾶς) was a Byzantine diplomat. Toxaras is mentioned for the first time as a member of an embassy sent to the Abbasid
Ibn Mulhim (632 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Makīn al-Dawla al-Ḥasan ibn ʿAlī ibn Mulhim ibn Dīnār al-ʿUqaylī (Arabic: مكين الدولة الحسن بن علي بن ملهم بن دينار العقيلي‎) (fl. 1053–1062) was a Fatimid
Lu'lu' al-Kabir (1,402 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Abu Muhammad Lu'lu', surnamed al-Kabir ("the Elder") and al-Jarrahi al-Sayfi ("[servant] of the Jarrahids and Sayf al-Dawla"), was a military slave (ghulam)
Atiyya ibn Salih (1,167 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Asad al-Dawla Abū Dhūʿaba ʿAṭiyya ibn Ṣāliḥ (Arabic: عطية بن صالح بن مرداس‎) (died July 1073) was the Mirdasid emir of Aleppo in 1062–1065. Prior to his
Photios (Emirate of Crete) (368 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Photios (Greek: Φώτιος, fl. c. 872/3) was a Byzantine renegade and convert to Islam who served the Emirate of Crete as a naval commander in the 870s. Photios
Al-Husayn ibn Ali al-Maghribi (356 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Abu'l-Qasim al-Husayn ibn Ali al-Maghribi (Arabic: أبو القاسم الحسين بن علي المغربي‎) was a senior statesman of Persian origin in the service of the Abbasid
Al-Hasan ibn Ali al-Kalbi (1,661 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Al-Hasan ibn Ali ibn Abi al-Husayn al-Kalbi (Arabic: ﺍﻟﺤﺴﻦ ﺍﺑﻦ ﻋﻠﻲ ﺍﺑﻦ ﺍﺑﻲ ﺍﻟﺤﺴﻴﻦ الكلبي‎, romanized: al-Ḥasan ibn ʿAlī ibn Abī al-Ḥusayn al-Kalbī), known
Iyad ibn Ghanm (2,329 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
ʿIyāḍ ibn Ghanm ibn Zuhayr al-Fihrī (Arabic: عياض بن غنم بن زهير الفهري‎) (died 641), was an Arab general who played a leading role in the Muslim conquests
Al-Rabi ibn Yunus (465 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Al-Rabīʾ ibn Yūnus ibn ʿAbd Allāh ibn Abī Farwa (Arabic: الربيع بن يونس بن عبدالله بن أبي فروة‎) (c. 730 – 785/6) was a freedman who became one of the
Kesta Styppiotes (452 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Kesta Styppiotes or Stypeiotes (Greek: Κεστά Στυππιώτης/Στυπειώτης; died 11 September 883) was briefly the Domestic of the Schools of the Byzantine Empire
Khaydhar ibn Kawus al-Afshin (3,158 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Ḥaydar ibn Kāwūs (Arabic: حيدر بن كاوس‎, Persian: خِیذَر اِبنِ کاووس‎, romanized: Kheyzar ebn-e Kāvus), better known by his hereditary title of al-Afshīn
Ruwayfi ibn Thabit (78 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Ruwayfi ibn Thabit al-Ansari (7th century) was the deputy commander of Tripoli for the Egypt-based Umayyad commander Mu'awiya ibn Hudayj. He led the Muslim
Maslama ibn Yahya al-Bajali (100 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Maslama ibn Yahya al-Bajali (Arabic: مسلمة بن يحيى البجلي‎) was a Khurasani Arab general and governor of the Abbasid Caliphate. He was the brother of Jibril
Krateros (strategos of the Cibyrrhaeots) (215 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Krateros (Greek: Κρατερός) was a Byzantine naval commander in the 820s. Very little is known about him. Even his name is unclear, as "Krateros" may be
Staurakios Platys (220 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Staurakios Platys (Greek: Σταυράκιος ὁ Πλατύς) was a Byzantine officer who served as the katepano of the Mardaites in the Cibyrrhaeot Theme in ca. 910
Abdallah ibn Malik al-Khuza'i (520 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Abdallah ibn Malik al-Khuza'i (Arabic: عبد الله بن مالك الخزاعي‎) was a senior military leader and provincial governor of the early Abbasid Caliphate.
Al-Fadl ibn Qarin al-Tabari (526 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Al-Fadl ibn Qarin al-Tabari (Arabic: الفضل بن قارن الطبري‎) was a ninth century military commander and provincial governor for the Abbasid Caliphate. He
Abu'l-Faraj al-Tarsusi (188 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Abu'l-Faraj al-Tarsusi was a commander from Tarsus who served the Ikhshidids of Egypt. As his nisba indicates, Abu'l-Faraj was originally from Tarsus,
Al-Walid I (4,583 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Al-Walid ibn Abd al-Malik ibn Marwan (Arabic: الوليد بن عبد الملك ابن مروان‎, romanized: al-Walīd ibn ʿAbd al-Malik ibn Marwān; c. 674 – 23 February 715)
Al-Qa'qa' ibn Amr al-Tamimi (2,070 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Al-Qaʿqāʿ ibn ʿAmr ibn Mālik al-Tamimī (Arabic: القعقاع بن عمرو بن مالك التميمي‎) was an Arab Muslim commander and general in the Rashidun army, he belonged
Nikephoros II Phokas (3,748 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Nikephoros II Phokas (Νικηφόρος Φωκᾶς; c. 912 – 11 December 969), Latinized Nicephorus II Phocas, was Byzantine emperor from 963 to 969. His brilliant
Eustathios (governor of the Cibyrrhaeot Theme) (259 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Eustathios (Greek: Εὐστάθιος) was the Byzantine governor (strategos) of the Cibyrrhaeot Theme in ca. 909–912. Eustathios is only mentioned by the De Administrando
Al-Mansur bi-Nasr Allah (4,516 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Abu Tahir Isma'il (Arabic: أبو طاهر إسماعيل‎, romanized: Abū Ṭāhir ʾIsmāʿīl; January 914 – 18 March 953), better known by his regnal name al-Mansur bi-Nasr
Ibn al-Ikhshad (378 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Ibn al-Ikhshad or Ibn al-Ikhshid (Arabic: إبن الإخشيد‎) was the governor of Tarsus for the Abbasid Caliphate from April 898 until his death in battle against
Mu'izz al-Dawla Thimal (2,217 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Muʿizz al-Dawla Abū ʿUlwān Thimāl ibn Ṣāliẖ ibn Mirdās (Arabic: معز الدولة ثمال بن صالح بن مرداس‎) (died 1062) was the Mirdasid emir of Aleppo from 1042
Salim ibn Asad ibn Abi Rashid (727 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Salim ibn Asad ibn Abi Rashid (Arabic: سالم بن أسد بن أبي راشد‎) was the governor of Sicily for the Fatimid Caliphate for twenty years, from 917 to 937
Peter of Goulaion (234 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Peter of Goulaion (Greek: Πέτρος τοῦ Γουλαίου or ὁ Γουλαιάτης, romanized: Petros tou Goulaiou/ho Goulaiates) was a Byzantine abbot of the early 9th century
Abdallah ibn Rashid ibn Kawus (310 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Abdallah ibn Rashid ibn Kawus (Arabic: عبدالله بن راشد بن كيوس‎) was the Abbasid governor of Tarsus and the Cilician borderlands (ath-thughur ash-Shamiya)
Jalal al-Mulk Ali ibn Muhammad (421 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Jalal al-Mulk Ali ibn Muhammad ibn Ammar (Arabic: جلال الملك علي بن محمد بن عمارة‎) was the ruler (qadi) of Tripoli during the First Crusade. Ali belonged
Pothos Argyros (11th century) (483 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Pothos Argyros or Argyrus (Greek: Πόθος Ἀργυρός; Italian: Potone Argiro or Poto Argiro) was a Byzantine commander, who served as the catepan of Italy during
Siege of Aleppo (238 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
the ArabByzantine wars Sack of Aleppo (962), during the ArabByzantine wars by general Nikephoros Phokas Siege of Aleppo (969), during the Arab–Byzantine
Al-Aziz Billah (4,669 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Abu Mansur Nizar (Arabic: أبو منصور نزار‎, romanized: Abū Manṣūr Nizār; 10 May 955 – 14 October 996), known by his regnal name as al-Aziz Billah (Arabic:
Abu Sulaym Faraj al-Khadim al-Turki (409 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Abu Sulaym Faraj al-Khadim al-Turki, sometimes erroneously called Faraj ibn Sulaym, was an Abbasid court eunuch and official. In 787, Caliph Harun al-Rashid
Sa'id ibn Salm al-Bahili (446 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Sa'id ibn Salm al-Bahili was an Arab governor and military commander of the early Abbasid Caliphate. Sa'id was the scion of a prominent family of the Bahila
Ashinas (1,850 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Abu Ja'far Ashinas (Arabic: أبو جعفر أشناس‎; died 17 or 19 December 844) was a general of the Abbasid Caliph Al-Mu'tasim. One of the earliest and most
Sa'id ibn Abd al-Malik (1,158 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Sa'id ibn Abd al-Malik ibn Marwan (Arabic: سعيد بن عبد الملك بن مروان‎, romanized: Saʿīd ibn ʿAbd al-Malik ibn Marwān; died 750), also known as Saʿīd al-Khayr
Al-Hasan ibn Ali Kurah (368 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Al-Ḥasan ibn ʻAlī Kūrah (Arabic: الحسن بن علي كراه‎) was a military leader of the Abbasid Caliphate under Caliph al-Mu'tadid. Al-Hasan ibn Ali Kurah first
Al-Hasan ibn Ahmad ibn Abi Khinzir (870 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Al-Hasan ibn Ahmad ibn Abi Khinzir (Arabic: الحسن بن أحمد بن أبي خنزير‎; fl. 909–914) was a Fatimid military commander who served as the first Fatimid
Shibl al-Dawla Nasr (2,765 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Abu Kamil Nasr ibn Salih ibn Mirdas (Arabic: نصر بن صالح بن مرداس‎, romanized: Abū Kāmil Naṣr ibn Ṣāliḥ ibn Mirdās) (died 22 May 1038), also known by his
Harun al-Rashid (5,735 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Harun al-Rashid (/hɑːˈruːn ɑːlrɑːˈʃiːd/; Arabic: هَارُون الرَشِيد‎ Hārūn Ar-Rašīd, "Aaron the Just" or "Aaron the Rightly-Guided"; 17 March 763 or February
Khalil ibn Ishaq al-Tamimi (1,078 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Khalil ibn Ishaq al-Tamimi (Arabic: خليل بن إسحاق التميمي‎) was an Arab military commander, in the service of the Fatimid Caliphate as head of the Arab
Anushtakin al-Dizbari (3,993 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Sharaf al-Maʿālī Abu Manṣūr Anūshtakīn al-Dizbarī (died January 1042) was a Fatimid statesman and general who became the most powerful Fatimid governor
Ibrahim II of Ifriqiya (4,330 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Abu Ishaq Ibrahim II ibn Ahmad (Arabic: أبو اسحاق ابراهيم الثاني‎) (27 June 850 – 23 October 902) was the Emir of Ifriqiya. He ruled from 875 until his
Abu Ubayda ibn al-Jarrah (5,714 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Abū ʿUbayda ʿĀmir ibn ʿAbd Allah ibn al-Jarrāḥ (Arabic: أبو عبيدة عامر بن عبدالله بن الجراح‎‎; 583–639 CE), was one of the Companions of the Islamic prophet
Ja'far ibn Abd al-Wahid ibn Ja'far al-Hashimi (577 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Abu Abdallah Ja'far ibn Abd al-Wahid ibn Ja'far ibn Sulayman ibn Ali al-Hashimi (Arabic: أبو عبد الله جعفر بن عبد الواحد بن جعفر بن سليمان بن علي الهاشمي‎)
Al-Hakim bi-Amr Allah (5,605 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Abū ʿAlī Manṣūr (13 August 985 – 13 February 1021), better known by his regnal name al-Ḥākim bi-Amr Allāh (Arabic: الحاكم بأمر الله‎, lit. 'The Ruler by
Yazid I (7,310 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Yazid ibn Mu'awiya ibn Abi Sufyan (Arabic: يزيد بن معاوية بن أبي سفيان‎, romanized: Yazīd ibn Muʿāwiya ibn ʾAbī Sufyān; 646 – 11 November 683), commonly
Thomas the Slav (5,786 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Thomas the Slav (Greek: Θωμᾶς ὁ Σλάβος, romanized: Thōmas ho Slavos, c. 760 – October 823) was a 9th-century Byzantine military commander, most notable
Ahmad ibn Tulun (6,516 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Ahmad ibn Tulun (Arabic: أحمد بن طولون‎, romanized: Aḥmad ibn Ṭūlūn‎; c. 20 September 835 – 10 May 884) was the founder of the Tulunid dynasty that ruled
Amr ibn al-As (7,517 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Amr ibn al-As al-Sahmi (Arabic: عَمْرِو ابْنِ الْعَاصِ‎, romanized: ʿAmr ibn al-ʿĀṣ al-Sahmī; c. 573 – 664) was the Arab commander who led the Muslim conquest
Basil II (9,055 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Basil II Porphyrogenitus (Greek: Βασίλειος Πορφυρογέννητος, romanized: Basileios Porphyrogennētos; c. 958 – 15 December 1025), nicknamed the Bulgar Slayer
Al-Mu'tasim (10,450 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
which features heavily fictionalized versions of events from the ArabByzantine wars. In it, al-Mu'tasim helps the heroes pursue the traitor and apostate
Battle of Damietta (116 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
of Damietta may refer to: Sack of Damietta (853), a part of the ArabByzantine wars Siege of Damietta (1218–1219), a part of the Fifth Crusade Siege
Siege of Nicaea (disambiguation) (85 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article
of Nicaea may also refer to: Siege of Nicaea (727), part of the ArabByzantine Wars Siege of Nicaea (1113), part of the Byzantine–Seljuk Wars Siege of