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Longer titles found: Anatolia (disambiguation) (view), Anatolia (journal) (view), Anatolia College (view), Anatolia College in Merzifon (view), Anatolia Eyalet (view), Anatolia Party (view), Anatoliadelphyidae (view), Anatoliadelphys (view), Anatolian (view), Anatolian Arabic (view), Anatolian Baghdad Railways (view), Anatolian Biogeographic Region (view), Anatolian Black cattle (view), Anatolian Bulgarians (view), Anatolian Eagle (view), Anatolian Express (view), Anatolian Greeks (view), Anatolian Hieroglyphs (Unicode block) (view), Anatolian High School (view), Anatolian Journal of Cardiology (view), Anatolian Leopard (film) (view), Anatolian Plate (view), Anatolian Plateau (view), Anatolian Ringbeater (view), Anatolian Seljuks family tree (view), Anatolian Studies (view), Anatolian Tigers (view), Anatolian beyliks (view), Anatolian blues (view), Anatolian boar (view), Anatolian conifer and deciduous mixed forests (view), Anatolian crested newt (view), Anatolian diagonal (view), Anatolian hieroglyphs (view), Anatolian hunter-gatherers (view), Anatolian hypothesis (view), Anatolian languages (view), Anatolian lizard (view), Anatolian peoples (view), Anatolian rock (view), Anatolian rock lizard (view), Anatolian rug (view), Anatolian vole (view), Central Anatolia Region (view), Southeastern Anatolia Region (view), Eastern Anatolia Region (view), Southeast Anatolia Region (statistical) (view), Central Anatolia Region (statistical) (view), Central East Anatolia Region (statistical) (view), Northeast Anatolia Region (statistical) (view), West Anatolia Region (statistical) (view), Sora (Anatolia) (view), Prehistory of Anatolia (view), Zeita (Anatolia) (view), Metropolis (Anatolia) (view), Mongol invasions of Anatolia (view), History of Anatolia (view), Byzantine Anatolia (view), Classical Anatolia (view), Trans-Anatolian gas pipeline (view), Southeastern Anatolia Project (view), Great Anatolia Party (view), Once Upon a Time in Anatolia (view), Timeline of Anatolian history (view), Pala (Anatolia) (view)

searching for Anatolia 43 found (11992 total)

alternate case: anatolia

Anadolu Agency (386 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article

Anadolu Agency (Turkish: Anadolu Ajansı, lit. 'Anatolia Agency'; abbreviated AA) is a state-run news agency headquartered in Ankara, Turkey. The Anadolu
List of districts in Turkey (2,512 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The 81 provinces of Turkey are divided into 973 districts (ilçeler; sing. ilçe). In the early Turkish Republic and in the Ottoman Empire, the corresponding
Alişar Hüyük (752 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
1935 [1] Hans Henning von der Osten and Erich F. Schmidt, Researches in Anatolia 2. The Alishar Hüyük Season of 1927, Part 1, Oriental Institute Publications
Saint Timothy (1,948 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
written by Paul. Timothy was a native of Lystra or of Derbe in Lycaonia (Anatolia). When Paul and Barnabas first visited Lystra, Paul healed a person crippled
Polycarp (1,782 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Polycarp (/ˈpɒlikɑːrp/; Greek: Πολύκαρπος, Polýkarpos; Latin: Polycarpus; AD 69 – 155) was a Christian bishop of Smyrna. According to the Martyrdom of
Ma (goddess) (422 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
festivals. Ma was also seen as a moon goddess, being associated with the Anatolia moon god Mēn, with a temple estate dedicated to Mēn Pharnakou and Selene
Philemon (biblical figure) (168 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Philemon (/fɪˈliːmən, faɪ-/; Greek: Φιλήμων; Philḗmōn) was an early Christian in Asia Minor who was the recipient of a private letter from Paul of Tarsus
Melito of Sardis (2,815 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Sárdeōn; died c. 180) was the bishop of Sardis near Smyrna in western Anatolia, and a great authority in early Christianity. Melito held a foremost place
Margaret the Virgin (1,017 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Margaret, known as Margaret of Antioch in the West, and as Saint Marina the Great Martyr (Greek: Ἁγία Μαρίνα) in the East, is celebrated as a saint on
Moria (nymph) (312 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
In Greek mythology, Moria (Ancient Greek: Μορια means "sacred olive-tree") was a Naiad nymph dwelling by the river Hermus. She was the sister of Tylus
Saint Nicholas (9,152 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
ISBN 978-1-4051-1402-8. The fourth-century Saint Nikolaos of Myra, Greek Anatolia (in present-day Turkey) spread to Europe through the port city of Bari
Archippus (205 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Archippus (/ɑːrˈkɪpəs/; Ancient Greek: Ἄρχιππος, "master of the horse") was an early Christian believer mentioned briefly in the New Testament epistles
Mursili's eclipse (582 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
in Anatolia in the afternoon. It is now more commonly identified as the one of 24 June 1312 BC, which was visible in totality in northern Anatolia in
Phyllis (river god) (64 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
In Greek mythology, Phyllis (Φύλλις) was the god of the homonymous river in Bithynia. By a local meadow nymph, he became father of a son Dipsacus, who
Cilician pirates (2,691 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Cilician pirates dominated the Mediterranean Sea from the 2nd century BC until their suppression by Pompey in 67–66 BC. Because there were notorious pirate
Mesopotamia (theme) (547 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Mesopotamia (Greek: Μεσοποταμία) was the name of a Byzantine theme (a military-civilian province) located in what is today eastern Turkey. It should not
Tertius of Iconium (341 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
According to the New Testament book of Romans, Tertius of Iconium (also Tertios) acted as an amanuensis for Paul the Apostle, writing down his Epistle
Mesopotamia (theme) (547 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Mesopotamia (Greek: Μεσοποταμία) was the name of a Byzantine theme (a military-civilian province) located in what is today eastern Turkey. It should not
Michael of Synnada (526 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Michael of Synnada or Michael the Confessor (Greek: Μιχαὴλ ὁ ὁμολογητής; died 23 May 826) was a metropolitan bishop of Synnada from 784/7 to 815. He represented
Parmenas (93 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Parmenas (Greek: Παρμενᾶς) was one of the Seven Deacons. He is believed to have preached the gospel in Asia Minor. Parmenas suffered martyrdom in 98, under
Epaphroditus (795 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Epaphroditus (Greek: Ἐπαφρόδιτος) is a New Testament figure appearing as an envoy of the Philippian church to assist the Apostle Paul (Philippians 2:25-30)
Epaphroditus (795 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Epaphroditus (Greek: Ἐπαφρόδιτος) is a New Testament figure appearing as an envoy of the Philippian church to assist the Apostle Paul (Philippians 2:25-30)
Ionic Greek (1,270 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
and West Ionic, e, o are not lengthened. (“East” refers to the Ionic of Anatolia, “Central” refers to the Ionic of the Cyclades, and “West” refers to the
Crescens (552 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Crescens was an individual who appears in the New Testament. He is traditionally considered one of the 72 disciples sent out by Jesus in Luke 10. He was
Euphemia (886 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Euphemia (Greek: Εὐφημία; "well-spoken [of]"), known as the All-praised in the Eastern Orthodox Church, is a Christian saint, who was martyred for her
Ala Bridge (229 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Karamanids were a Turkmen beylik which were the main rivals of the Ottomans in Anatolia up to the end of the 15th century. (see Anatolian Beyliks) In the 14th
Bebryces (378 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Bebryces (Greek: Βέβρυκες) were a tribe of people who lived in Bithynia. According to Strabo they were one of the many Thracian tribes that had crossed
Softa Castle (318 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Softa Castle (Turkish: Softa Kalesi) is a ruined castle in Bozyazı ilçe (district) of Mersin Province, Turkey. The castle, to the east of Bozyazı district
Çatıören (318 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Çatıören is an archaeological site in Mersin Province, Turkey. The site is situated in the rural area of Erdemli district of Mersin ProvinceCoordinates:
Anti-Taurus Mountains (142 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Sea and the Mediterranean. Mount Erciyes, the highest peak in central Anatolia, is a massive stratovolcano located in the northern part of the Anti-Taurus
Onesiphorus (541 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Onesiphorus (meaning "bringing profit" or "useful") was a Christian referred to in the New Testament letter of Second Timothy (2 Tim 1:16–18 and 2 Tim
Papias of Hierapolis (4,612 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Papias (Greek: Παπίας) was a Greek Apostolic Father, Bishop of Hierapolis (modern Pamukkale, Turkey), and author who lived c. 60 – c. 130 AD. He wrote
Işıkkale (209 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Işıkkale (meaning the "castle of light") is an ancient settlement in Turkey. Işıkkale is located at 36°26′22″N 34°00′35″E / 36.43944°N 34.00972°E /
Onesimus (903 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Onesimus (Greek: Ὀνήσιμος, translit. Onēsimos, meaning "useful"; died c. 68 AD, according to Catholic tradition), also called Onesimus of Byzantium and
Çandır Castle (544 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
structures date from this period. The fortress controlled two roads to Central Anatolia, one of which leads to the other main Het’umid stronghold, Lampron. Çandır
Stachys the Apostle (209 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Stachys the Apostle (Greek: Στάχυς "ear-spike"; died 54) was the second bishop of Byzantium, from AD 38 to AD 54. He seemed to be closely connected to
Theophanes the Confessor (1,353 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Theophanes the Confessor (Greek: Θεοφάνης Ὁμολογητής; c. 758/760 – 12 March 817/818) was a member of the Byzantine aristocracy who became a monk and chronicler
Tychicus (516 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Tychicus /ˈtɪkɪkəs/ was an Asiatic Christian who, with Trophimus, accompanied the Apostle Paul on a part of his journey from Macedonia to Jerusalem. He
Griphopithecus (122 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Griphopithecus is a prehistoric ape from the Miocene of Turkey and Central Europe. Griphopithecus has been consistently grouped with stem hominoids. The
Basil of Caesarea (5,330 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Basil of Caesarea, also called Saint Basil the Great (Ancient Greek: Ἅγιος Βασίλειος ὁ Μέγας, Hágios Basíleios ho Mégas; Coptic: Ⲡⲓⲁⲅⲓⲟⲥ Ⲃⲁⲥⲓⲗⲓⲟⲥ; 330
Phlegon of Tralles (608 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Phlegon of Tralles (Ancient Greek: Φλέγων ὁ Τραλλιανός Flegon o Trallianos) was a Greek writer and freedman of the emperor Hadrian, who lived in the 2nd
Cassius Dio (1,737 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Lucius Cassius Dio (c. 155 – c. 235), also known as Dio Cassius (Greek: Δίων Κάσσιος Dion Kassios), was a Roman historian and senator of Greek origin.
Battle of Bapheus (727 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Battle of Bapheus occurred on 27 July 1302, between an Ottoman army under Osman I and a Byzantine army under George Mouzalon. The battle ended in a