Find link

language:

jump to random article

Find link is a tool written by Edward Betts.

Longer titles found: 9th century BC (view), 9th century in England (view), 9th century in Ireland (view), 9th century in Lebanon (view), 9th century in Serbia (view), 9th century in Wales (view), 9th century in architecture (view), 9th century in poetry (view), Christianity in the 9th century (view), List of political entities in the 9th century (view), List of state leaders in the 9th century (view), Emperor Xuanzong of Tang (9th century) (view), List of political entities in the 9th century BC (view)

searching for 9th century 537 found (17023 total)

Ragnar Lodbrok (4,820 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article

raids against the British Isles and the Holy Roman Empire during the 9th century. He also appears in Norse legends, and according to the legendary sagas
Photios I of Constantinople (4,816 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Catholic Church. Photios is one of the most famous figures not only of 9th-century Byzantium but of the entire history of the Byzantine Empire. One of the
Ancient Greek (4,804 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Ancient Greek includes the forms of the Greek language used in ancient Greece and the ancient world from around 1500 BC to 300 BC. It is often roughly
Muhammad ibn Musa al-Khwarizmi (7,481 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
9th-century mathematician and astronomer
Pope Leo III (1,581 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Pope Leo III (died 12 June 816) was bishop of Rome and ruler of the Papal States from 26 December 795 to his death. Protected by Charlemagne from the supporters
Pope Adrian III (406 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Pope Adrian III or Hadrian III (Latin: Adrianus or Hadrianus; died July 885) was the bishop of Rome and ruler of the Papal States from 17 May 884 to his
Ivar the Boneless (1,670 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
9th century Norse viking leader of the Suðreyjar or Kingdom of the Isles/Hebrides
Alfred the Great (15,375 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
London from the Vikings. Details of his life are described in a work by 9th-century Welsh scholar and bishop Asser. Alfred had a reputation as a learned
Pope Leo IV (1,048 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Pope Leo IV (790 – 17 July 855) was the bishop of Rome and ruler of the Papal States from 10 April 847 to his death. He is remembered for repairing Roman
Lazarus Zographos (1,062 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
(Greek: Λάζαρος), surnamed Zographos (Ζωγράφος, "the Painter"), is a 9th-century Byzantine Christian saint. He is also known as Lazarus the Painter and
Huichang Persecution of Buddhism (1,536 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Huichang Persecution of Buddhism (Chinese: 会昌毁佛) was initiated by Emperor Wuzong (Li Chan) of the Tang dynasty during the Huichang era (841–845). Among
Abu Hanifa Dinawari (1,365 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
uncertain; he was seemingly born during the first or second decade of the 9th-century. He was instructed in the two main traditions of the Abbasid-era grammarians
Jezebel (3,073 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
author of Kings was drawing on other earlier sources. A seal from the 9th century BCE, discovered in 1964, has a partially damaged inscription of "YZBL"
Ingólfr Arnarson (496 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
9th century Norse explorer
Theophanes the Confessor (1,353 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
the Patrician Theophylact Simocatta 8th century Hippolytus of Thebes 9th century Theophanes the Confessor George Syncellus Nikephoros I of Constantinople
Pope Paschal I (1,334 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Pope Paschal I (Latin: Paschalis I; died 824) was the bishop of Rome and ruler of the Papal States from 25 January 817 to his death in 824. Paschal was
Charles the Fat (3,557 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Charles III (839 – 13 January 888), also known as Charles the Fat, was the emperor of the Carolingian Empire from 881 to 888. A member of the Carolingian
Phocaea (1,452 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
indicate Aeolian presence as late as the 9th century BC, and Ionian presence as early as the end of the 9th century BC. From this an approximate date of settlement
Naddodd (373 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
[ˈnɑdːɑðr]; Icelandic: Naddoður [ˈnatːɔːðʏr̥]; Faroese: Naddoddur; fl. c. 9th century) was a Norse Viking who is credited with the discovery of Iceland. Naddodd
Pope Nicholas I (2,368 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Pope Nicholas I (Latin: Nicolaus I; c. 800 – 13 November 867), called Nicholas the Great, was the bishop of Rome and ruler of the Papal States from 24
Twenty-third Dynasty of Egypt (1,334 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Twenty-third Dynasty of Egypt (notated Dynasty XXIII, alternatively 23rd Dynasty or Dynasty 23) is usually classified as the third dynasty of the ancient
Pope Stephen IV (814 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Pope Stephen IV (Latin: Stephanus IV; c. 770 – 24 January 817) was the bishop of Rome and ruler of the Papal States from June 816 to his death. Stephen
Slavs in Lower Pannonia (4,807 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
the Slavic inhabitants lived under Avar rule. By the beginning of the 9th century, that state was destroyed and replaced by the supreme rule of the Frankish
Al-Kindi (6,059 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Theory and Coding. Springer. p. 122. Al Kindi, an Arab scientist from 9th century is considered the father of cryptology, his book on this subject being
Leo VI the Wise (2,183 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Lazaros in Larnaca was constructed during the rule of Leo VI in the late 9th century, and it was built after the relics of St. Lazaros were transported from
Al-Shafi'i (4,068 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Abū ʿAbdillāh Muḥammad ibn Idrīs al-Shāfiʿī (Arabic: أَبُو عَبْدِ ٱللهِ مُحَمَّدُ بْنُ إِدْرِيسَ ٱلشَّافِعِيُّ, 767–19 January 820 CE) was an Arab Muslim
Jayanta Bhatta (895 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
10th century CE. However, most reliable estimates place him around the 9th century CE.[citation needed] Kādambarikathāsāra provides some information about
Garðar Svavarsson (488 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Garðarr Svavarsson (Old Norse: [ˈɡɑrðˌɑrː ˈswɑwɑrsˌson]; Modern Icelandic: Garðar Svavarsson [ˈkarðˌaːr ˈsvaːvar̥sˌsɔːn]; Modern Swedish: Gardar Svavarsson)
Pallava dynasty (5,252 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
parts of the Tamil region for about 600 years, until the end of the 9th century. Throughout their reign, they remained in constant conflict with both
Michael of Synnada (526 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Michael of Synnada or Michael the Confessor (Greek: Μιχαὴλ ὁ ὁμολογητής; died 23 May 826) was a metropolitan bishop of Synnada from 784/7 to 815. He represented
Pope John VIII (1,370 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
to his death. He is often considered one of the ablest popes of the 9th century. John devoted much of his papacy attempting to halt and reverse the Muslim
Al-Tabari (5,709 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Ibn Ishaq Al-Waqidi Abu Mikhnaf Sayf ibn Umar Al-Mada'ini Ibn Lahi'a 9th century Ibn ʽAbd al-Hakam Khalifah ibn Khayyat Ibn Hisham Ya'qubi Al-Tabari Al-Baladhuri
Asser (4,145 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
9th-century Bishop of Sherborne, writer, and monk
Pedubast I (785 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Pedubast I was an Upper Egyptian Pharaoh of ancient Egypt during the 9th century BC. Based on lunar dates which are known to belong to the reign of his
Edmund the Martyr (5,700 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
'Anglia', appear on the coins of only Edmund and Æthelstan, another 9th century king of the East Angles; the letters appear on Edmund's coins as part
Nennius (1,508 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Nennius – or Nemnius or Nemnivus – was a Welsh monk of the 9th century. He has traditionally been attributed with the authorship of the Historia Brittonum
Kassia (2,475 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Women writers of the Middle Ages 8th century Khosrovidukht Sahakdukht 9th century Kassia 10th century Hrotsvitha 11th century Ava 12th century Anna Komnene
Lothair I (1,444 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Lothair I or Lothar I (Dutch and Medieval Latin: Lotharius; German: Lothar; French: Lothaire; Italian: Lotario) (795 – 29 September 855) was emperor (817–855
Great Moravia (15,661 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
some of its letters. Early Cyrillic alphabet was developed during the 9th century AD at the Preslav Literary School in Bulgaria, and became official for
Ionian League (597 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Ionian League (Ancient Greek: Ἴωνες, Íōnes; κοινὸν Ἰώνων, koinón Iōnōn; or κοινὴ σύνοδος Ἰώνων, koinē sýnodos Iōnōn; Latin: commune consilium), also
Athaliah (840 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Athaliah (Hebrew: עֲתַלְיָה‎, Modern: ʻAtalya, Tiberian: ʿĂṯalyā, Greek: Γοθολία Gotholía; Latin: Athalia) was the daughter of either king Omri, or of
Ya'qubi (472 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Ibn Ishaq Al-Waqidi Abu Mikhnaf Sayf ibn Umar Al-Mada'ini Ibn Lahi'a 9th century Ibn ʽAbd al-Hakam Khalifah ibn Khayyat Ibn Hisham Ya'qubi Al-Tabari Al-Baladhuri
Björn Ironside (2,502 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
was the son of notorious Viking king Ragnar Lodbrok and lived in the 9th century, being dated between 855 and 858. Björn Ironside is said to have been
Rurik (1,236 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Rurik of Ladoga (also Ryurik; Old East Slavic: Рюрикъ Rjurikŭ, from Old Norse Hrøríkʀ; Belarusian: Рурык; Russian, Ukrainian: Рюрик; c. 824–879), according
Muslim ibn al-Hajjaj (1,108 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Abū al-Ḥusayn ‘Asākir ad-Dīn Muslim ibn al-Ḥajjāj ibn Muslim ibn Ward ibn Kawshādh al-Qushayrī an-Naysābūrī (Arabic: أبو الحسين عساكر الدين مسلم بن الحجاج
Tulunids (3,086 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Abbasids restored the Tulunid domains to their control. In the late 9th century, internal conflict amongst the Abbasids made control of the outlying
Lusitania (2,223 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
superseded by the theme system in c. 640–660, although in Asia Minor and parts of Greece they survived under the themes until the early 9th century.
Sajid dynasty (1,079 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Khorramdin in Azerbaijan, and later served the caliphs. Toward the end of the 9th century, as the central authority of the Abbasid Caliphate weakened, Muhammad
Amoghavarsha (1,659 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Narasimhacharya 1988, p. 2. Reu 1997, p. 72. Reu 1997, p. 35-36. From the notes of 9th-century Arab traveller Suleiman (Kamath 2001, p80) Vijapur, Raju S. "Reclaiming
Middle Francia (691 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Middle Francia (Latin: Francia media) was a short-lived Frankish kingdom which was created in 843 by the Treaty of Verdun after an intermittent civil war
Arnulf of Carinthia (2,726 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
pg. 26 Mann III, pg. 243 "Ethics and politics of Great Moravia of the 9th century Vasil Gluchman" (PDF). Archived (PDF) from the original on 2022-10-09
Christianization of Bohemia (534 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Christianization of Bohemia refers to the spread of the Christian religion in the lands of medieval Bohemia. As in many other countries, Christianity
Bagan (3,525 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
scholarship however holds that Bagan was founded in the mid-to-late 9th century by the Mranma (Burmans), who had recently entered the Irrawaddy valley
Awantipora (635 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
named after the Kashmiri king Avantivarman and has the ruins of two 9th century Hindu temples built by him. Awantipora tehsil is a subdistrict of Pulwama
Cyril and Methodius (6,631 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Cyril and Methodius at the Preslav Literary School at the end of the 9th century. After the death of Cyril, Clement of Ohrid accompanied Methodius from
Hunayn ibn Ishaq (3,755 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Hunayn ibn Ishaq al-Ibadi (also Hunain or Hunein) ( Arabic: أبو زيد حنين بن إسحاق العبادي; ʾAbū Zayd Ḥunayn ibn ʾIsḥāq al-ʿIbādī (809–873) was an influential
Sahih Muslim (1,236 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Sahih Muslim (Arabic: صحيح مسلم, romanized: Ṣaḥīḥ Muslim) is a 9th-century hadith collection and a book of sunnah compiled by the Persian scholar Muslim
Irene of Athens (3,106 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Irene of Athens (Greek: Εἰρήνη, Eirénē; 750/756 – 9 August 803), surname Sarantapechaina (Σαρανταπήχαινα), was Byzantine empress consort to Emperor Leo
Sigurd Snake-in-the-Eye (1,375 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
semi-legendary Viking warrior and Danish king active from the mid to late 9th century. According to multiple saga sources and Scandinavian histories from the
Kūkai (4,144 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Kūkai (空海; 27 July 774 – 22 April 835), born Saeki no Mao (佐伯 眞魚), posthumously called Kōbō Daishi (弘法大師, "The Grand Master who Propagated the Dharma")
Kingdom of Kent (4,191 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
AD until it was fully absorbed into the Kingdom of Wessex in the late 9th century and later into the Kingdom of England in the early 10th century. Under
Alcuin (4,578 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Alcuin of York (/ˈælkwɪn/; Latin: Flaccus Albinus Alcuinus; c. 735 – 19 May 804) – also called Ealhwine, Alhwin, or Alchoin – was scholar, clergyman, poet
Thekla (daughter of Theophilos) (1,119 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Thekla (Greek: Θέκλα; c. 831 – c. 870), latinized as Thecla, was a princess of the Amorian dynasty of the Byzantine Empire. The daughter and eldest child
Anno Domini (3,888 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
devised in 525 by Dionysius Exiguus, but was not widely used until the 9th century. Traditionally, English follows Latin usage by placing the "AD" abbreviation
Louis the Pious (5,277 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Louis the Pious (German: Ludwig der Fromme; French: Louis le Pieux; 16 April 778 – 20 June 840), also called the Fair, and the Debonaire, was King of the
Shoshenq III (442 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
King Usermaatre Setepenre Shoshenq III of the 22nd Dynasty ruled for 39 years according to contemporary historical records. Two Apis Bulls were buried
Pope John IX (537 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Pope John IX (Latin: Ioannes IX; died January 900) was the bishop of Rome and ruler of the Papal States from January 898 to his death. Little is known
Nabu-shuma-ukin I (345 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
duration of his reign is unknown but was probably at the beginning of the 9th century BC. His rule marks a temporary resurgence in the fortunes of Babylonia
Ralpacan (1,873 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Tritsuk Detsen (Tibetan: ཁྲི་གཙུག་ལྡེ་བཙན, Wylie: khri gtsug lde btsan), better known by his nickname Ralpachen (Tibetan: རལ་པ་ཅན, Wylie: ral pa can) (c
Hamdan Qarmat (1,948 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Map of Iraq in the later 9th century
Argead dynasty (1,960 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Argead dynasty (Greek: Ἀργεάδαι, Argeádai), also known as the Temenid dynasty, was an ancient Macedonian royal house of Dorian Greek provenance. They
Theodora (wife of Theophilos) (5,274 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Theodora (Greek: Θεοδώρα; c. 815 – c. 867), sometimes called Theodora the Armenian or Theodora the Blessed, was Byzantine empress as the wife of Byzantine
Lunar eclipses by century (892 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
This article gives statistics for lunar eclipses grouped by century. Detailed information about tetrads, timing, and other facts can be found at the linked
Abu Ma'shar al-Balkhi (1,535 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Abu Ma'shar al-Balkhi, Latinized as Albumasar (also Albusar, Albuxar; full name Abū Maʿshar Jaʿfar ibn Muḥammad ibn ʿUmar al-Balkhī أبو معشر جعفر بن محمد
Thābit ibn Qurra (3,005 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Thābit ibn Qurra (full name: Abū al-Ḥasan ibn Zahrūn al-Ḥarrānī al-Ṣābiʾ, Arabic: أبو الحسن ثابت بن قرة بن زهرون الحراني الصابئ, Latin: Thebit/Thebith/Tebit);
Louis the German (2,455 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Wandelbert presents his martyrology to a king, probably Louis the German, in a 9th-century illustration
Adad-nirari III (408 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Adad-nirari III (also Adad-narari) was a King of Assyria from 811 to 783 BC. Note that this assumes that the longer version of the Assyrian Eponym List
Leo V the Armenian (1,529 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Leo V the Armenian (Greek: Λέων ὁ ἐξ Ἀρμενίας, Leōn ho ex Armenias; c. 775 – 25 December 820) was the Byzantine emperor from 813 to 820. A senior general
Nikephoros I of Constantinople (787 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
the Patrician Theophylact Simocatta 8th century Hippolytus of Thebes 9th century Theophanes the Confessor George Syncellus Nikephoros I of Constantinople
Twenty-second Dynasty of Egypt (317 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
uncertain, although he is now thought to have governed Egypt early in the 9th century BC for a short time between Osorkon I and Takelot I. The next ruler at
Pope Adrian II (564 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Pope Adrian II (Latin: Adrianus II; also Hadrian II; 792 – 14 December 872) was the bishop of Rome and ruler of the Papal States from 867 to his death
Rudaki (2,246 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Rudaki (also spelled Rodaki; Persian: رودکی; 858 – 940/41) was a Persian poet, singer and musician, who served as a court poet under the Samanids. He is
Al-Tirmidhi (2,401 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Abū ʿĪsā Muḥammad ibn ʿĪsā as-Sulamī aḍ-Ḍarīr al-Būghī at-Tirmidhī (Arabic: أبو عيسى محمد بن عيسى السلمي الضرير البوغي الترمذي; Persian: ترمذی, Termezī;
Ansgar (1,620 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Ansgar (8 September 801 – 3 February 865), also known as Anskar, Saint Ansgar, Saint Anschar or Oscar, was Archbishop of Hamburg-Bremen in the northern
Virasena (483 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Acharya Virasena (792-853 CE), also known as Veerasena, was a Digambara monk and belonged to the lineage of Acharya Kundakunda. He was an Indian mathematician
Charlemagne (17,786 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
estates that were governed in accordance with the Capitulare de villis. A 9th-century document detailing the inventory of an estate at Asnapium listed amounts
Heraklion (3,518 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Heraklion or Iraklion (/hɪˈrækliən/ hih-RAK-lee-ən; Greek: Ηράκλειο, Irákleio, pronounced [iˈraklio]) is the largest city and the administrative capital
Isa ibn Aban (463 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Abu Musa ʿĪsā b. Abān was an early Sunni Islamic scholar who followed the Hanafi madhhab. Although none of his own works have survived to today, he was
Baba-aha-iddina (569 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Bāba-aḫa-iddina, typically inscribed mdBA.Ú-PAB-AŠ "Bau has given me a brother,” ca. 812 BC, was the 9th king of the Dynasty of E, a mixed dynasty of kings
Pope Boniface VI (236 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Pope Boniface VI (Latin: Bonifatius VI; 806 – April 896) was the bishop of Rome and ruler of the Papal States in April 896. He was a native of Rome. His
Dungal of Bobbio (395 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Dungal of Bobbio (fl. 811–828) was an Irish monk, teacher, astronomer, and poet. He was to live at Saint-Denis, Pavia, and Bobbio. He may be the same person
Byzantine Empire under the Nikephorian dynasty (369 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Following the deposition of the Byzantine empress Irene of Athens, the throne of the Byzantine Empire passed to a relatively short-lived dynasty, the Nikephorian
Pope Marinus I (468 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Pope Marinus I (/məˈraɪnəs/; died 15 May 884) was the bishop of Rome and ruler of the Papal States from 882 until his death. Controversially at the time
Borobudur (10,628 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Borobudur, Javanese: ꦕꦤ꧀ꦝꦶꦧꦫꦧꦸꦝꦸꦂ, romanized: Candhi Barabudhur) is a 9th-century Mahayana Buddhist temple in Magelang Regency, not far from the town of
Theodore the Studite (4,455 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Charles Loring Brace tells us in Gesta Christi that it was not until the 9th century that the first recorded stand against slavery itself was taken by Theodore:
Ali al-Hadi (2,697 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
ʿAlī ibn Muḥammad al-Hādī (Arabic: عَلِيّ ٱبْن مُحَمَّد ٱلْهَادِي‎; 828 – 868 CE) was a descendant of the Islamic prophet Muhammad and the tenth of the
Pope Boniface VI (236 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Pope Boniface VI (Latin: Bonifatius VI; 806 – April 896) was the bishop of Rome and ruler of the Papal States in April 896. He was a native of Rome. His
Dungal of Bobbio (395 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Dungal of Bobbio (fl. 811–828) was an Irish monk, teacher, astronomer, and poet. He was to live at Saint-Denis, Pavia, and Bobbio. He may be the same person
County of Portugal (1,460 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The County of Portugal (Portuguese: Condado de Portugal, Condado Portucalense, Condado de Portucale; in documents of the period the name used was Portugalia)
Pope Adrian II (564 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Pope Adrian II (Latin: Adrianus II; also Hadrian II; 792 – 14 December 872) was the bishop of Rome and ruler of the Papal States from 867 to his death
Arunachalesvara Temple (3,653 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
poets known as the nayanars and classified as Paadal Petra Sthalam. The 9th-century Saiva saint poet Manikkavasagar composed the Tiruvempaavai here. The
Shiva Sutras of Vasugupta (603 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
as Kashmir Shaivism. They are attributed to the sage Vasugupta of the 9th century C.E. Vasugupta is said to have lived near Mahadeva Mountain in the valley
Ahmad ibn Hanbal (7,351 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Ahmad ibn Hanbal al-Dhuhli (Arabic: أَحْمَد بْن حَنْبَل الذهلي, romanized: Aḥmad ibn Ḥanbal al-Dhuhlī; November 780 – 2 August 855 CE/164–241 AH), was
Ibn Hisham (984 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Ibn Ishaq Al-Waqidi Abu Mikhnaf Sayf ibn Umar Al-Mada'ini Ibn Lahi'a 9th century Ibn ʽAbd al-Hakam Khalifah ibn Khayyat Ibn Hisham Ya'qubi Al-Tabari Al-Baladhuri
Mesopotamia (theme) (547 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
870. It is thus possible that Mesopotamia was constituted in the late 9th century out of an Armenian principality as a division (tourma) of some neighbouring
Siculo-Arabic (1,258 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
were spoken in the Emirate of Sicily (which included Malta) from the 9th century, persisting under the subsequent Norman rule until the 13th century.
Hvitserk (264 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Hvitserk (Hvítserkr, "White-Shirt") was one of the sons of the legendary 9th-century Viking Ragnar Lothbrok and his wife Aslaug. Hvitserk is attested to by
Byzantine Empire under the Nikephorian dynasty (369 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Following the deposition of the Byzantine empress Irene of Athens, the throne of the Byzantine Empire passed to a relatively short-lived dynasty, the Nikephorian
Abbas ibn Firnas (1,554 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
9th century astronomer and physician
Book of Kells (8,686 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
late 8th century and the Book of Armagh (dated to 807–809) to the early 9th century. Scholars place these manuscripts together based on similarities in artistic
Family tree of the Twenty-first, Twenty-second, and Twenty-third Dynasties of Egypt (255 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Twenty-first, Twenty-second, and Twenty-third Dynasties ruled Egypt from the 10th century through the 8th century BC. The family tree of the Twenty-first
Al-Battani (2,182 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Abū ʿAbd Allāh Muḥammad ibn Jābir ibn Sinān al-Raqqī al-Ḥarrānī aṣ-Ṣābiʾ al-Battānī (Arabic: محمد بن جابر بن سنان البتاني) (Latinized as Albategnius, Albategni
Guthred (712 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Guthred Hardacnutsson (Old Norse: Guðrøðr; Latin: Guthfridus; born c.844 - died 24 August 895 AD) was the Christian king of Viking Northumbria from circa
Hasan al-Askari (3,306 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Hasan ibn Ali ibn Muhammad (Arabic: حَسَن ٱبْن عَلِيّ ٱبْن مُحَمَّدُ, romanized: Ḥasan ibn ʿAlī ibn Muḥammad; c. 846 – 874), better known as Hasan al-Askari
Guthrum (1,835 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
English: Guðrum, c. 835 – c. 890) was King of East Anglia in the late 9th century. Originally a native of what is now Denmark, he was one of the leaders
Al-Baladhuri (770 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
ibn Jābir al-Balādhurī (Arabic: أحمد بن يحيى بن جابر البلاذري) was a 9th-century Muslim historian. One of the eminent Middle Eastern historians of his
Pope Theodore II (900 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Pope Theodore II (Latin: Theodorus II; 840 – December 897) was the bishop of Rome and ruler of the Papal States for twenty days in December 897. His short
Yahya ibn Ma'in (784 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Yaḥyā ibn Maʻīn (Arabic: يحيى بن معين) (774-847), was a great classical Islamic scholar in the field of hadith of Persian origin. He was a close friend
Ahab (2,002 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Ahab (Hebrew: אַחְאָב‎, Modern: ʾAḥʾav, Tiberian: ʾAḥʾāḇ; Akkadian: 𒀀𒄩𒀊𒁍 Aḫâbbu [a-ḫa-ab-bu]; Koinē Greek: Ἀχαάβ Achaáb; Latin: Achab) was the seventh
Pope Sergius II (572 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Pope Sergius II (Latin: Sergius II; died 27 January 847) was the bishop of Rome and ruler of the Papal States from January 844 to his death in 847. Sergius
Rabanus Maurus (1,734 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
of Elder Futhark with Anglo-Saxon runes and is preserved in 8th and 9th-century manuscripts mainly from the southern part of the Carolingian Empire (Alemannia
Tuotilo (763 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Tuotilo (died 27 April 915) was a Frankish monk at the Abbey of Saint Gall. He was a composer, and according to Ekkehard IV a century later, also a poet
Donald II of Scotland (810 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Donald II (died 900), was King of the Picts or King of Alba in the late 9th century. He was the son of Constantine I (Causantín mac Cináeda). Donald is given
Yahya ibn Aktham (1,063 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Abu Muhammad Yahya ibn Aktham (Arabic: أبو محمد يحيى بن أكثم, died 857) was a ninth century Arab Islamic jurist. He twice served as the chief judge of
Al-Farghani (1,760 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Abbasid court in Baghdad, and one of the most famous astronomers in the 9th century. Al-Farghani composed several works on astronomy and astronomical equipment
Semiramis (3,500 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Semiramis (/səˈmɪrəmɪs, sɪ-, sɛ-/; Syriac: ܫܲܡܝܼܪܵܡ Šammīrām, Greek: Σεμίραμις, Arabic: سميراميس Samīrāmīs, Armenian: Շամիրամ Šamiram) was the semi-legendary
Pope Romanus (639 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Pope Romanus (fl. 867–897) was the bishop of Rome and ruler of the Papal States from August to November 897. His short reign occurred during a period of
Aalst, Belgium (2,280 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
the Middle Ages. The first historical records on Aalst date from the 9th century, when it was described as the villa Alost, a dependency of the Abbey
Jehoshaphat (1,989 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Jehoshaphat (/dʒəˈhɒʃəfæt/; alternatively spelled Jehosaphat, Josaphat, or Yehoshafat; Hebrew: יְהוֹשָׁפָט‎, Modern: Yəhōšafat, Tiberian: Yŏhōšāp̄āṭ, "Yahweh
Marduk-balassu-iqbi (1,119 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
of Adad-eṭir, mentioning a Marduk-balāssu-iqbi, a 9th century BC monument. Reign Late 9th century BC Predecessor Marduk-zakir-šumi I Successor Baba-aha-iddina
Abu al-Abbas Iranshahri (622 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Abu al-Abbas Iranshahri (Persian: حکیم ایرانشهری) was a 9th-century Persian philosopher, mathematician, natural scientist, historian of religion, astronomer
Jabir ibn Hayyan (9,598 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
the 9th century. Moreover, an important part of the corpus deals with early Shi'ite religious philosophy that is elsewhere only attested in late 9th-century
Akranes (397 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
was settled in the 9th century; however, it did not receive a municipal charter until 1942. Akranes was settled in the 9th century by the brothers Þormóður
List of solar eclipses in the Middle Ages (433 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
This is a list of selected solar eclipses in the Middle Ages, in particular those with historical significance. Below is a list of all total eclipses longer
Ignatios of Constantinople (581 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
St. Ignatius or Ignatios (Greek: Ιγνάτιος), (c. 798 – 23 October 877) was a Patriarch of Constantinople from July 4, 847, to October 23, 858, and from
Pope Benedict III (534 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Pope Benedict III (Latin: Benedictus III; died 17 April 858) was the bishop of Rome and ruler of the Papal States from 29 September 855 to his death. Little
Shāriyah (554 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Shāriyah (Arabic: شارِية, born c. 815 in al-Basra; died c. 870 C.E.) was an ‘Abbasid qayna (enslaved singing-girl), who enjoyed a prominent place in the
Louis the Younger (1,374 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Louis the Younger (830/835 – 20 January 882), sometimes Louis the Saxon or Louis III, was the second eldest of the three sons of Louis the German and Emma
Nabu-apla-iddina (1,075 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
took place during his reign with many older works being recopied. The 9th century BC was marked by a recovery of sorts after terrible instability of the
Paschasius Radbertus (2,437 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Paschasius Radbertus (785–865) was a Carolingian theologian and the abbot of Corbie, a monastery in Picardy founded in 657 or 660 by the queen regent Bathilde
Constantine (son of Leo V) (1,011 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Constantine. The honorific despotes, which appears on several coins of 9th-century co-emperors, was still not a formal title. Co-emperors have also been
Michael III (2,517 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
vital role his reign played in the resurgence of Byzantine power in the 9th century. He was also the youngest person to bear the imperial title, as well
Ibn Majah (693 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Abū ʿAbd Allāh Muḥammad ibn Yazīd Ibn Mājah al-Rabʿī al-Qazwīnī (Arabic: ابو عبد الله محمد بن يزيد بن ماجه الربعي القزويني; (b. 209/824, d. 273/887) commonly
Al-Amin (2,291 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Abu Musa Muhammad ibn Harun al-Rashid (Arabic: أبو موسى محمد بن هارون الرشيد, romanized: Abū Mūsā Muḥammad ibn Hārūn al-Rashīd; April 787 – 24/25 September
Babak Khorramdin (3,168 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Map of Azerbaijan in the 9th century.
Mazyar (1,381 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Mazyar (Middle Persian: Māh-Izād; Mazandarani/Persian: مازیار, romanized: Māzyār) was an Iranian prince from the Qarinvand dynasty, who was the ruler (ispahbadh)
Kenneth MacAlpin (3,045 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
generally accepted by most modern-day historians. In the first half of the 9th century, the geopolitical situation in Dál Riada deteriorated. Almost the entire
Ibrahim al-Nazzam (609 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Abū Isḥāq Ibrāhīm Ibn Sayyār Ibn Hāni‘ an-Naẓẓām (Arabic: أبو إسحاق بن سيار بن هانئ النظام) (c. 775 – c. 845) was an Arab Mu'tazilite theologian and poet
Shāriyah (554 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Shāriyah (Arabic: شارِية, born c. 815 in al-Basra; died c. 870 C.E.) was an ‘Abbasid qayna (enslaved singing-girl), who enjoyed a prominent place in the
Gunavarma I (120 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Dynasty King Ereganga Neetimarga II (also called Ereyappa) in the late 9th century and early 10th century period. Kamath (2001), p50 Narasimhacharya (1988)
Emperor Montoku (1,495 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Emperor Montoku (文徳天皇, Montoku-tennō) (August 826 – 7 October 858) was the 55th emperor of Japan, according to the traditional order of succession. Montoku's
Qin (state) (5,306 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Qin 秦 *Dzin 9th century BC–207 BC Capital Qin (秦) Quanqiu (犬丘) Qian (汧) Pingyang (平陽) Yong (雍) Yueyang (櫟陽) Xianyang (咸陽) Religion Chinese folk religion
Paschasius Radbertus (2,437 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Paschasius Radbertus (785–865) was a Carolingian theologian and the abbot of Corbie, a monastery in Picardy founded in 657 or 660 by the queen regent Bathilde
Swithun (2,109 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
9th-century Bishop of Winchester
Nabu-apla-iddina (1,075 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
took place during his reign with many older works being recopied. The 9th century BC was marked by a recovery of sorts after terrible instability of the
Mosque of Ibn Tulun (1,602 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Mosque of Ibn Tulun (Arabic: مسجد إبن طولون, romanized: Masjid Ibn Ṭūlūn) is located in Cairo, Egypt. It is one of the oldest mosques in Egypt as well
Pope Joseph I of Alexandria (171 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Saint Joseph I of Alexandria (Abba Yousab), 52nd Pope of Alexandria and Patriarch of the See of St. Mark. He was the son of one of the rich nobles of Menouf
Sedulius Scottus (1,896 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
teacher, Latin grammarian, and scriptural commentator who lived in the 9th century. During the reign of the Emperor Lothair (840–855), he was one of a colony
Geometric art (1,949 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Geometric art is a phase of Greek art, characterized largely by geometric motifs in vase painting, that flourished towards the end of the Greek Dark Ages
Aud the Deep-Minded (Ketilsdóttir) (1,140 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
djuptenkte), also known as Unn, Aud Ketilsdatter or Unnur Ketilsdottir, was a 9th-century settler during the age of Settlement of Iceland. Aud was the second daughter
Tønsberg (4,130 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
generally regarded as the oldest city in Norway, founded by Vikings in the 9th century. Tønsberg was established as a municipality on 1 January 1838 (see
Ishaq ibn Hunayn (124 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Abū Yaʿqūb Isḥāq ibn Ḥunayn (Arabic: إسحاق بن حنين) (c. 830 Baghdad, – c. 910-1) was an influential Arab physician and translator, known for writing the
Santa Maria in Domnica (1,004 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
included mosaic decoration. Pope Paschal I is credited with Rome's early 9th century age of renovation and artistic splendor. Benedict, legate to the Latin
Ibn Duraid (2,293 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Abū Bakr Muhammad ibn al-Ḥasan ibn Duraid al-Azdī al-Baṣrī ad-Dawsī Al-Zahrani (أبو بكر محمد بن الحسن بن دريد بن عتاهية الأزدي البصري الدوسي الزهراني)
Glagolitic script (4,810 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Slavic alphabet. It is generally agreed to have been created in the 9th century by Saint Cyril, a monk from Thessalonica. He and his brother Saint Methodius
Etruscan civilization (9,822 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
phase of the Bronze Age (13th–11th century BC) to the Iron Age (10th–9th century BC). This is evidence that the Etruscan civilization, which emerged around
Hastein (2,045 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Hæsting and alias Alsting) was a notable Viking chieftain of the late 9th century who made several raiding voyages. Little is known of Hastein's early
Is acher in gaíth in-nocht (202 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
"Is acher in gaíth in-nocht..." is an anonymous 9th-century poem in Old Irish. The poem exists uniquely as a marginal entry in the Stiftsbibliothek MS
Bad Nauheim (1,177 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Bad Nauheim is a town in the Wetteraukreis district of Hesse state of Germany. As of 2020, Bad Nauheim has a population of 32,493. The town is approximately
Oseberg Ship (1,893 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
younger woman's teeth showed signs that she used a metal toothpick, a rare 9th century luxury. Both women had a diet composed mainly of meat, another luxury
Theophilos (emperor) (1,988 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Theophilos (Greek: Θεόφιλος; sometimes Latinized or Anglicized as Theophilus or Theophilo; c. 812  – 20 January 842) was the Byzantine Emperor from 829
Christianization of Moravia (747 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Christianization of Moravia refers to the spread of the Christian religion in the lands of medieval Moravia (Great Moravia). What modern historians
Basilika (1,123 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
in common use and Court documents were written in it. However, by the 9th century the use of Latin was obsolete, which in turn made the Corpus Juris Civilis
Amlaíb Conung (4,699 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Amlaíb Conung (Old Norse: Óláfr [ˈoːˌlɑːvz̠]; died c. 874) was a Viking leader in Ireland and Scotland in the mid-late ninth century. He was the son of
Ali ibn al-Fadl al-Jayshani (2,116 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
al-Sanadiqi, an Isma'ili missionary, who sometime in the second half of the 9th century "based himself in Mudhaykhira, acquired many followers and conquered
Urartu (8,354 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
the historic Armenian Highlands. The kingdom rose to power in the mid-9th century BC, but went into gradual decline and was eventually conquered by the
Marduk-zakir-shumi I (1,448 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Marduk-zâkir-šumi, inscribed mdAMAR.UTU-za-kir-MU in a reconstruction of two kinglists, “Marduk pronounced the name,” was a king of Babylon from 855 to
Al-Jahiz (4,108 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Abū ʿUthman ʿAmr ibn Baḥr al-Kinānī al-Baṣrī (Arabic: أبو عثمان عمرو بن بحر الكناني البصري), commonly known as al-Jāḥiẓ (Arabic: الجاحظ, The Bug Eyed,
Ahmad ibn Abi Du'ad (3,217 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Abu 'Abdallah Ahmad ibn Abi Du'ad al-Iyadi (Arabic: أبو عبد الله أحمد بن أبي دؤاد الإيادي, romanized: ʾAbū ʿAbd Allāh ʾAḥmad ibn ʾAbī Duʾād al-ʾIyādī)
Fadl al-Sha'irah (404 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Fadl al-Qaysi or Faḍl al-Shāʻirah (Arabic: فضل الشاعرة "Faḍl the Poet"; d. 871) was one of "three early ʻAbbasid singing girls ... particularly famous
Saare County (1,500 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Europe in the 9th century
Sayyida Nafisa (1,084 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Sayyida Nafisa (d. 208 AH / 830 CE), the full name As-Sayyidah Nafīsah bint Amīr al-Muʾminīn Al-Ḥasan al-Anwar ibn Zayd al-Ablaj ibn Al-Hasan ibn ʿAlī
Antony II of Constantinople (192 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Antony II Kauleas (Greek: Αντώνιος Β΄ Καυλέας, romanized: Antōnios II Kauleas), (died 1 February 901) was Patriarch of Constantinople from 893 to February
Inan bint Abdallah (766 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
ʽInān bint ʽAbdallāh (Arabic: عنان بنت عبد الله, died 841) was a prominent poet of the Abbasid period, even characterised by the tenth-century historian
Patriarch Christopher I of Alexandria (36 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Christopher I served as Greek Patriarch of Alexandria between 817 and 841. "Christophorus I (817–841)". Official web site of the Greek Orthodox Patriarchate
Werferth (139 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Werferth was an English bishop of Worcester. Werferth was consecrated either in 872 or between 869 and 872. A contemporary and friend of Alfred the Great
Æthelwold ætheling (5,245 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Æthelwold (/ˈæθəlwoʊld/) or Æthelwald (died 13 December 902) was the younger of two known sons of Æthelred I, King of Wessex from 865 to 871. Æthelwold
Theophylact (son of Michael I) (649 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Theophylact or Theophylaktos (Greek: Θεοφύλακτος; c. 793 – 15 January 849) was the eldest son of the Byzantine emperor Michael I Rangabe (r. 811–813) and
Tolan (medieval poet) (173 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
Tolan (fl. 9th century AD), also romanized as Tholan, was an early medieval south Indian poet remembered for composing Malayalam passages of the art-form
Al-Hassaf (404 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Al-Ḫaṣṣāf (Arabic: الحصّاف) (died 874, full name Abū-Bakr Aḥmad Ibn-ʿUmar Ibn-Muhair aš-Šaibānī al-Ḫaṣṣāf) was a Hanafite law scholar at the court of the
Pope Eugene II (1,157 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Pope Eugene II (Latin: Eugenius II; died 27 August 827) was the bishop of Rome and ruler of the Papal States from 6 June 824 to his death. A native of
Boris I of Bulgaria (3,537 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
he had the title Khan or Kanasubigi, and after that Knyaz. The early 9th century marked the beginning of a fierce rivalry between the Greek East and Latin
Adad-nirari II (344 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Adad-nirari II (reigned from 911 to 891 BC) was the first King of Assyria in the Neo-Assyrian period. Adad-nirari II's father was Ashur-dan II, whom he
Muhammad al-Jawad (3,627 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Muhammad ibn Ali al-Jawad (Arabic: محمد بن علي الجواد, romanized: Muḥammad ibn ʿAlī al-Jawād, c. 8 April 811 – 29 November 835) was a descendant of the
Inan bint Abdallah (766 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
ʽInān bint ʽAbdallāh (Arabic: عنان بنت عبد الله, died 841) was a prominent poet of the Abbasid period, even characterised by the tenth-century historian
Carloman of Bavaria (2,695 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Carantania and eastern regions in the second half of the 9th century
Saare County (1,500 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Europe in the 9th century
Is acher in gaíth in-nocht (202 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
"Is acher in gaíth in-nocht..." is an anonymous 9th-century poem in Old Irish. The poem exists uniquely as a marginal entry in the Stiftsbibliothek MS
List of solar eclipses in antiquity (950 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
This is a list of selected solar eclipses from antiquity, in particular those with historical significance. Eclipses on this list were not only recorded
Theophylact (son of Michael I) (649 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Theophylact or Theophylaktos (Greek: Θεοφύλακτος; c. 793 – 15 January 849) was the eldest son of the Byzantine emperor Michael I Rangabe (r. 811–813) and
Sevanavank (601 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
563917; 45.010808Coordinates: 40°33′50″N 45°00′39″E / 40.563917°N 45.010808°E / 40.563917; 45.010808 Architecture Style Armenian Completed 9th century
Han Yu (3,126 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Han Yu (Chinese: 韓愈; 768 – 25 December 824), courtesy name Tuizhi (Chinese: 退之), and commonly known by his posthumous name Han Wengong (韓文公), was a Chinese
Methodios I of Constantinople (413 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
St. Methodios I or Methodius I (Greek: Μεθόδιος Α΄), (788/800 – June 14, 847) was Ecumenical Patriarch of Constantinople from March 4, 843 to June 14,
Stephen I of Constantinople (215 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Stephen I (Greek: Στέφανος Α΄, Stephanos I) (November 867 – 18 May 893) was the Ecumenical Patriarch of Constantinople from 886 to 893. Born at Constantinople
Dido (5,203 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
the local populace. On paleographic grounds, the stone is dated to the 9th century BC. (Cross's translation, with a longer discussion of the Nora stone
Al-Hassaf (404 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Al-Ḫaṣṣāf (Arabic: الحصّاف) (died 874, full name Abū-Bakr Aḥmad Ibn-ʿUmar Ibn-Muhair aš-Šaibānī al-Ḫaṣṣāf) was a Hanafite law scholar at the court of the
Carolingian Empire (7,023 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Pisa Republic of Ancona Southern Italy (774–1139) Sardinia (from the 9th century) Judicates Agugliastra Arborea Cagliari Gallura Logudoro Oristano Republic
Tarasios of Constantinople (771 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Saint Tarasios (also Saint Tarasius; Greek: Ἅγιος Ταράσιος; c. 730 – 25 February 806) was the Ecumenical Patriarch of Constantinople from 25 December 784
Murcia (6,517 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Murcia (/ˈmʊərsiə/, US also /ˈmɜːrʃ(i)ə/, Spanish: [ˈmuɾθja] (listen)) is a city in south-eastern Spain, the capital and most populous city of the autonomous
Upton-upon-Severn (886 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Upton-upon-Severn (or Upton on Severn, etc. and locally simply Upton) is a town and civil parish in the Malvern Hills District of Worcestershire, England
Saint Bega (2,104 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Saint Bega was reputedly a saint of the Early Middle Ages; an Irish princess who became an anchoress and valued her virginity. Promised in marriage to
Emperor Saga (1,856 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Emperor Saga (嵯峨天皇, Saga-tennō, October 3, 786 – August 24, 842) was the 52nd emperor of Japan, according to the traditional order of succession. Saga's
Muhammad ibn Wasif (293 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
died 909 CE) was an Iranian poet and secretary who flourished in the 9th century in the service of the Saffarid dynasty of Sistan. He is considered to
Adad-nirari II (344 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Adad-nirari II (reigned from 911 to 891 BC) was the first King of Assyria in the Neo-Assyrian period. Adad-nirari II's father was Ashur-dan II, whom he
Olaf the White (677 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
hinn Hvíti) was a viking sea-king who lived in the latter half of the 9th century. Olaf was born around 820, in Ireland. His father was the Hiberno-Norse
Treaty of Verdun (1,054 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Treaty of Verdun (French: Traité de Verdun), agreed in August 843, divided the Frankish Empire into three kingdoms among the surviving sons of the
Al-Zubayr ibn Bakkar (354 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Ibn Ishaq Al-Waqidi Abu Mikhnaf Sayf ibn Umar Al-Mada'ini Ibn Lahi'a 9th century Ibn ʽAbd al-Hakam Khalifah ibn Khayyat Ibn Hisham Ya'qubi Al-Tabari Al-Baladhuri
Louis the Child (719 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Louis the Child (893 – 20/24 September 911), sometimes called Louis III or Louis IV, was the king of East Francia from 899 until his death and was also
Dál Riata (6,884 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
the great Pictish defeat of 839 at the hands of the Vikings. In the 9th century, the Picts were becoming Gaelicized, and it is suggested that there was
Louis II of Italy (1,245 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Louis II (825 – 12 August 875), sometimes called the Younger, was the king of Italy and emperor of the Carolingian Empire from 844, co-ruling with his
Malcolm I of Scotland (972 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Máel Coluim mac Domnaill (anglicised Malcolm I; died 954) was king of Alba (before 943 – 954), becoming king when his cousin Constantine II abdicated to
Lagertha (1,172 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Lagertha, according to legend, was a Viking ruler and shield-maiden from what is now Norway, and the onetime wife of the famous Viking Ragnar Lodbrok.
Patriarch Eustatius of Alexandria (34 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Eustatius served as Greek Patriarch of Alexandria between 813 and 817. "Eustathius (813–817)". Official web site of the Greek Orthodox Patriarchate of
Al-Mutawakkil (4,966 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Abū al-Faḍl Jaʿfar ibn Muḥammad al-Muʿtaṣim bi-ʾllāh (Arabic: جعفر بن محمد المعتصم بالله; March 822 – 11 December 861), better known by his regnal name
Thorstein the Red (444 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Thorstein the Red or Thorstein Olafsson was a viking chieftain who flourished in late ninth-century Scotland. He was born around 850 AD and was the son
Danelaw (4,527 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
originated from the invasion of the Great Heathen Army into England in the 9th century, although the term was not used to describe a geographic area until the
Grimbald (305 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Saint Grimbald (or Grimwald) (c. 820s – 8 July 901) was a 9th-century Benedictine monk at the Abbey of Saint Bertin near Saint-Omer, France. Although
Al-Nasa'i (1,057 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Al-Nasāʾī (214 – 303 AH; c. 829 – 915 CE), full name Abū ʿAbd al-Raḥmān Aḥmad ibn Shuʿayb ibn ʿAlī ibn Sīnān al-Nasāʾī, (variant: Abu Abdel-rahman Ahmed
Ashurnasirpal II (2,734 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Ashur-nasir-pal II (transliteration: Aššur-nāṣir-apli, meaning "Ashur is guardian of the heir") was king of Assyria from 883 to 859 BC. Ashurnasirpal II
Ali ibn Sahl Rabban al-Tabari (1,804 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Abu al-Hasan Ali ibn Sahl Rabban al-Tabari (Persian: علی ابن سهل ربن طبری) (c. 838 – c. 870 CE; also given as 810–855 or 808–864 also 783–858), was a Persian
Kogo Shūi (478 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Kogo Shūi (古語拾遺) is a historical record of the Inbe clan of Japan written in the early Heian period (794–1185). It was composed by Inbe no Hironari (斎部広成)
Benedict of Aniane (867 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Benedict of Aniane (Latin: Benedictus Anianensis; German: Benedikt von Aniane; c. 747 – 12 February 821 AD), born Witiza and called the Second Benedict
Shamash-mudammiq (454 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Šamaš-mudammiq, inscribed mdŠamaš-mumudammiq (mdUTU-mu-SIG5), meaning “Šamaš shows favor,” was the 4th king of Babylon in a sequence designated as the
Tukulti-Ninurta II (262 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Tukulti-Ninurta II was King of Assyria from 890 BC to 884 BC. He was the second king of the Neo Assyrian Empire. His father was Adad-nirari II, the first
Pope Gregory IV (2,142 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Pope Gregory IV (Latin: Gregorius IV; died 25 January 844) was the bishop of Rome and ruler of the Papal States from October 827 to his death. His pontificate
Kingdom of the Isles (7,098 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Scotland" whose heir, Thórir, took an army to Ireland in 848. In the 9th century, the first references to the Gallgáedil (i.e., "foreign Gaels") appear
Bulgar–Serb War (839–842) (793 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
defeat of the Bulgars, who had become one of the greater powers in the 9th century showed that Serbia was an organized state, fully capable of defending
Bulgar–Serb War (853) (428 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
(853) Part of the Bulgarian–Serbian Wars (medieval) Serb lands in the 9th century Belligerents First Bulgarian Empire Serbian Principality Commanders and
Kukulkan (1,477 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
a historical person by Maya writers of the 16th century, the earlier 9th-century texts at Chichen Itza never identified him as human and artistic representations
Rollo (3,444 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Henry II of England, a descendant of Rollo. Rollo was born in the mid-9th century; his place of birth is almost definitely located in the region of Scandinavia
Islamic Golden Age (12,980 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
existence", in his Kitāb al-Hayawān (Book of Animals), written in the 9th century. In the 13th century, Nasir al-Din al-Tusi believed that humans were
Patriarch Michael I of Alexandria (36 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Michael I served as Greek Patriarch of Alexandria between 860 and 870. "Michael I (860–870)". Official web site of the Greek Orthodox Patriarchate of Alexandria
Ketill Flatnose (2,069 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Flatnose (Old Norse: Flatnefr), was a Norse King of the Isles of the 9th century. The story of Ketill and his daughter Auðr (or Aud) was probably first
Islamic Golden Age (12,980 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
existence", in his Kitāb al-Hayawān (Book of Animals), written in the 9th century. In the 13th century, Nasir al-Din al-Tusi believed that humans were
Kukulkan (1,477 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
a historical person by Maya writers of the 16th century, the earlier 9th-century texts at Chichen Itza never identified him as human and artistic representations
Muhammad bin Dawud al-Zahiri (2,241 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
the works of Dawud's father, rather than Shafi'is work or even post-9th century works on the topic. This not only contradicts the common theme within
Pope Gregory IV (2,142 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Pope Gregory IV (Latin: Gregorius IV; died 25 January 844) was the bishop of Rome and ruler of the Papal States from October 827 to his death. His pontificate
Habash al-Hasib al-Marwazi (740 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Ahmad ibn 'Abdallah Habash Hasib Marwazi (766 - d. after 869 in Samarra, Iraq ) was a north-eastern Iranian astronomer, geographer, and mathematician from
Muhammad al-Shaybani (1,097 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Abū ʿAbd Allāh Muḥammad ibn al-Ḥasan ibn Farqad ash-Shaybānī (Arabic: أبو عبد الله محمد بن الحسن بن فرقد الشيباني; 749/50 – 805), the father of Muslim
Patriarch Michael I of Alexandria (36 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Michael I served as Greek Patriarch of Alexandria between 860 and 870. "Michael I (860–870)". Official web site of the Greek Orthodox Patriarchate of Alexandria
List of Kurdish poets and authors (562 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The following is a list of Kurdish poets and authors: Balool Evdilsemedê Babek (972–1019) Ali Hariri (1009–1079/80) Mele Perîşan (1356–1431) Mela Huseynê
Ali al-Rida (5,758 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Ali ibn Musa al-Rida (Arabic: عَلِيّ ٱبْن مُوسَىٰ ٱلرِّضَا, romanized: Alī ibn Mūsā al-Riḍā, c. 1 January 766 – 6 June 818), also known as Abū al-Ḥasan
Sahih al-Bukhari (2,893 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
9th-century collection of Islamic hadith
Kingdom of Israel (united monarchy) (5,579 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
United Monarchy in the 10th century BCE should actually be dated to the 9th century BCE.: 59–61  This model placed the biblical kingdom in Iron Age I, suggesting
Æthelred, Lord of the Mercians (4,231 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Æthelred, Lord of the Mercians (or Ealdorman Æthelred of Mercia; died 911) became ruler of English Mercia shortly after the death or disappearance of its
Dadivank (1,272 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
first century AD. However, the monastery is only first mentioned in the 9th century. In July 2007, the grave said to belong to St. Dadi was discovered under
Tibetan Empire (5,233 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
into the Red Fort during the imperial period which continued to the 9th century. The beginning of the imperial period is marked in the reign of the 33rd
Pope Cosmas II of Alexandria (24 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Pope Cosmas II of Alexandria was the Coptic Pope of Alexandria and Patriarch of the See of St. Mark (851–858). v t e
885 in Japan (44 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Events in the year 885 in Japan. Monarch: Kōkō January 18 – Emperor Daigo (died 930) Nipon o daï itsi ran; ou, Annales des empereurs du Japon (in French)
Sahl ibn Bishr (510 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Sahl ibn Bishr al-Israili (c. 786–c. 845), also known as Rabban al-Tabari and Haya al-Yahudi ("the Jew"), was a JewishSyriac Christian astrologer, astronomer
Kannada (8,527 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Old Kannada flourished in the 6th-century Ganga dynasty and during the 9th-century Rashtrakuta Dynasty. Kannada has an unbroken literary history of over
Pope Jacob of Alexandria (64 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Pope James of Alexandria was the 50th Pope of Alexandria and Patriarch of the See of St. Mark. Pope Jacob ordained Abuna Yohannes as the head of the Ethiopian
Gokstad ship (1,911 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Gokstad ship is a 9th-century Viking ship found in a burial mound at Gokstad in Sandar, Sandefjord, Vestfold, Norway. It is displayed at the Viking
Jehoram of Israel (499 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Jehoram (Hebrew: יְהוֹרָם Yəhōrām; also Joram) was the ninth king of the northern Kingdom of Israel (2 Kings 8:16, 2 Kings 8:25–28). He was the son of
Saint Kenelm (2,198 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
9th-century King of Mercia and saint
Arib al-Ma'muniyya (882 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
ʿArīb al-Ma’mūnīya (Arabic: عريب المأمونية, b. 181/797–98, d. 277/890–91) was a qayna (slave trained in the arts of entertainment) of the early Abbasid
826 in Japan (18 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Events in the year 826 in Japan. Monarch: Junna January 22 – Emperor Montoku (died 858) v t e
List of Abbasid caliphs (1,017 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Abbasid caliphs were the holders of the Islamic title of caliph who were members of the Abbasid dynasty, a branch of the Quraysh tribe descended from
829 in Japan (149 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Events in the year 829 in Japan. Monarch: Emperor Junna January 23 - Buddhist monk Kūkai establishes a private school known as the Shugei Shuchi Institute
Codex Cairensis (649 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Codex Cairensis (also: Codex Prophetarum Cairensis, Cairo Codex of the Prophets) is a Hebrew manuscript containing the complete text of the Hebrew
Nesitanebetashru (245 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Nesitanebetashru (ns-t3-nb.t-ỉšrw) was the name of two ancient Egyptian women. The name means “belonging to the lady of the ashru”; the ashru or isheru
Patriarch Politianus of Alexandria (112 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Politianus served partas Greek Patriarch of Alexandria between 768 and 813. According to Eutychius, Politianus was a physician by training, visited Baghdad
Guy III of Spoleto (1,134 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Guy III of Spoleto (German: Wido, Italian: Guido; died 12 December 894) was the margrave of Camerino from 880 and then duke of Spoleto and Camerino from
Osorkon I (1,060 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Sekhemkheperre Osorkon I was an ancient Egyptian pharaoh of the 22nd Dynasty. Osorkon's territory included much of the Levant. The Osorkon Bust found at
Ulayya bint al-Mahdi (1,027 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Ulayya bint al-Mahdi (Arabic: عُلَيّة بنت المهدي, romanized: ʿUlayya bint al-Mahdī, 777–825) was an Abbasid princess, noted for her legacy as a poet and
Flann mac Lonáin (691 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Flann mac Lonáin (died 896) was an Irish poet. Flann mac Lonáin was a famed and at times controversial poet. He was the Chief Ollam of Ireland He seems
Rus' Khaganate (4,849 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
during a poorly documented period in the history of Eastern Europe in the 9th century AD. It was suggested[when?] that the Rus' Khaganate was a state, or a
Barróg (1,226 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
figures in recognisable backhold clinches dating as far back as the 9th century AD. The characteristic backhold grip is mentioned in two separate 15th-century
858 in Japan (66 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Events in the year 858 in Japan. October 7 – Emperor Montoku dies after an 8-year reign. He is succeeded by his 8-year-old son Seiwa as the 56th emperor
Eohric of East Anglia (384 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Eohric (died 902) was a Danish Viking king of East Anglia. The name Eohric is the Old English form of the Old Norse Eiríkr. Little is known of Eohric or
Tatev Monastery (3,394 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Tatev Monastery (Armenian: Տաթևի վանք, romanized: Tat'evi vank') is a 9th-century Armenian Apostolic monastery located on a large basalt plateau near the
Karomama II (184 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Karomama II (full name Karomama Meritmut; also known as Karomama D, Merytmut II) was an ancient Egyptian queen, Great Royal Wife of pharaoh Takelot II
Mashallah ibn Athari (2,275 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
introduced astrology and astronomy to Baghdad in the late 8th and early 9th century. The bibliographer ibn al-Nadim in his Fihrist, described him "as virtuous
Veszprém (1,566 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
when the Hungarians first occupied the area. The castle was probably a 9th-century Frankish fortress. The castles of Veszprém, Esztergom and Székesfehérvár
Aditya I (256 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Aditya I (Tamil: ஆதித்த சோழன்) (c. 870/71 – c. 907 CE), the son of Vijayalaya, was the Chola king who extended the Chola dominions by the conquest of the
Wulfsige of Sherborne (455 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
9th-century Bishop of Sherborne
List of kingdoms in pre-colonial Africa (1,592 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
(9th century CE) Kingdom of Semien (325-1627 CE) Kingdom of Belgin (9th century CE) Kingdom of Jarin (9th century CE) Kingdom of Qita'a (9th century CE)
Collectio canonum quadripartita (2,820 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Collectio canonum quadripartita (also known as the Collectio Vaticana or, more commonly, the Quadripartita) is an early medieval canon law collection
Croatian–Bulgarian wars (907 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
and Byzantium against the Bulgarian Empire. During the middle of the 9th century, Bulgaria was the dominant power in the central, eastern, and northern
Karomama I (332 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Queen Karomama I was an Egyptian queen, married to Osorkon II. She was part of the Twenty-second Dynasty of Egypt. Karomama was likely a daughter of Pharaoh
Aditya I (256 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Aditya I (Tamil: ஆதித்த சோழன்) (c. 870/71 – c. 907 CE), the son of Vijayalaya, was the Chola king who extended the Chola dominions by the conquest of the
Ibn Abd al-Hakam (702 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Muhammad were the leading Egyptian authorities of their time (early 9th century) on Malikite Islamic law. After the father's death, the family were persecuted
Sena I of Anuradhapura (57 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Sena I was King of Anuradhapura in the 9th century, whose reign lasted from 846 to 866. He succeeded his brother Aggabodhi IX as King of Anuradhapura
826 in Japan (18 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Events in the year 826 in Japan. Monarch: Junna January 22 – Emperor Montoku (died 858) v t e
Pope Valentine (615 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Pope Valentine (Latin: Valentinus; died 10 October 827) was the bishop of Rome and ruler of the Papal States for two months in 827. He was unusually close
Candi of Indonesia (7,467 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
9th century Prambanan, 9th century, the largest Hindu Temple in Indonesia Sojiwan, 9th century, near Prambanan Banyunibo, 9th century Sambisari, 9th century
Shammuramat (4,006 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Shammuramat (Akkadian: Sammu-rāmat or Sammu-ramāt), also known as Sammuramat or Shamiram, was a powerful queen of the Neo-Assyrian Empire. Beginning her
House of Wisdom (6,521 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Abū al‐Qāsim, Aḥmad ibn Mūsā ibn Shākir (d. 9th century) and al-Ḥasan ibn Mūsā ibn Shākir (d. 9th century) are widely known for their Book of Ingenious
Andlau (3,274 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
resignation and the purity of her soul. She died before the end of the 9th century and was buried in a side chapel of the Andlau church. A century and a
Abu Zayd al-Balkhi (1,698 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
between them. Abu Zayd al-Balkhi initially wrote about phobia in the 9th century, calling it Fazaa'. As of today, it is still defined in a similar manner
Abu Bakr al-Razi (9,480 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
to the early existence of the disease are found in an account by the 9th-century Persian physician Rhazes, by whom its symptoms were clearly described
Bretwalda (1,703 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
capitalised) is an Old English word. The first record comes from the late 9th-century Anglo-Saxon Chronicle. It is given to some of the rulers of Anglo-Saxon
Pandya dynasty (8,713 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
of the Kalabhra dynasty in south India. From the 6th century to the 9th century CE, the Chalukyas of Badami or Rashtrakutas of the Deccan, the Pallavas
Takelot I (1,217 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Hedjkheperre Setepenre Takelot I was an ancient Libyan ruler who was pharaoh during the Twenty-second Dynasty of Egypt. Takelot I was the son of Osorkon
Guy III of Spoleto (1,134 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Guy III of Spoleto (German: Wido, Italian: Guido; died 12 December 894) was the margrave of Camerino from 880 and then duke of Spoleto and Camerino from
Jinasena (849 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Jinasena (c. 9th century CE) was a monk and scholar in the Digambara tradition of Jainism. He was patronized by the Rashtrakuta king Amoghavarsha I. He
Al-Wathiq (4,114 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Abū Jaʿfar Hārūn ibn Muḥammad (Arabic: أبو جعفر هارون بن محمد المعتصم; 17 April 812 – 10 August 847), better known by his regnal name al-Wāthiq bi’llāh
Piast dynasty (1,368 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Semovit filius Past Ckosisconis, Pazt filius Chosisconisu Duke 9th century 9th century 9th century A legendary ruler of the Polans Polans (Tribe) Piast the
Zheng (state) (883 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Zheng (/dʒɛŋ/; Chinese: 鄭; Old Chinese: *[d]reng-s) was a vassal state in China during the Zhou Dynasty (1046–221 BCE) located in the centre of ancient
Principality of Nitra (3,583 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Slavic polity encompassing a group of settlements that developed in the 9th century around Nitra in present-day Slovakia. Its history remains uncertain because
Malayalam (13,108 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
from early Middle Tamil and separated from it sometime after the c. 9th century CE. A second view argues for the development of the two languages out
Ja'far ibn Yahya (463 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Jaʽfar ibn Yahya Barmaki, Jafar al-Barmaki (Persian: جعفر بن یحیی برمکی, Arabic: جعفر بن يحيى, Jaʽfar bin yaḥyā) (767–803) also called Aba-Fadl, was a
Pope Michael II of Alexandria (93 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Pope Michael II of Alexandria (Abba Khail II), was the 53rd Pope of Alexandria and Patriarch of the See of St. Mark. General Meinardus, Otto F.A. (2002)
Al-Waqidi (2,226 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Ibn Ishaq Al-Waqidi Abu Mikhnaf Sayf ibn Umar Al-Mada'ini Ibn Lahi'a 9th century Ibn ʽAbd al-Hakam Khalifah ibn Khayyat Ibn Hisham Ya'qubi Al-Tabari Al-Baladhuri
Sridhara (377 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Śrīdhara, Śrīdharācāryya or Śrīdhara Acharya (c. 870 CE – c. 930 CE) was an Indian mathematician, Sanskrit pandit and philosopher. He was born in Bhuriśreṣṭi
Al-Asmaʿi (3,882 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
‘Alī, calligrapher Abū ibn Muḥammad ibn Abi ‘Uyaynah (late 8th -early 9th century). Salm ibn Qutaybah ibn Muslim al-Bāhilī. (d.766); governor of al-Baṣrah
858 in Japan (66 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Events in the year 858 in Japan. October 7 – Emperor Montoku dies after an 8-year reign. He is succeeded by his 8-year-old son Seiwa as the 56th emperor
Feudalism (6,016 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
decentralization of an empire: especially in the Carolingian Empire in 9th century AD, which lacked the bureaucratic infrastructure[clarification needed]
Aban al-Lahiqi (402 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Aban b. 'Abd al-Hamid al-Lahiqi (al-Raqashi) (Persian: ابان لاحقی) of Basra (c. 750–815 or 816) was a Persian court poet of the Barmakids in Baghdad. He
Jōgan (523 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Jōgan (貞観) was a Japanese era name (年号, nengō, "year name") after Ten'an and before Gangyō. This period spanned the years from April 859 through April
Normandy (administrative region) (682 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
from the settlement of the territory by Vikings ("Northmen") from the 9th century, and confirmed by treaty in the 10th century between King Charles III
Era of Fragmentation (743 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Era of Fragmentation (Tibetan: སིལ་ཆད་དུ་འཆད་པ; Chinese: 吐蕃分裂時期) was an era of disunity in Tibetan history lasting from the death of the Tibetan Empire's
Uzhhorod (2,578 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
modern Uzhhorod in the second half of the first millennium AD. During the 9th century a fortified castle changed into a fortified early feudal town-settlement
Shalmaneser III (1,505 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
The Black Obelisk of Shalmaneser III, 9th century BC, from Nimrud, Iraq. The British Museum.
Croatian–Bulgarian wars (907 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
and Byzantium against the Bulgarian Empire. During the middle of the 9th century, Bulgaria was the dominant power in the central, eastern, and northern
Mar Sabor and Mar Proth (1,007 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
that Christians were on the Malabar Coast in 9th century AD. Kollam Syrian copper plates, a 9th-century royal grant from Kerala, mentions that certain
Jehu (1,618 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Judah, and became subject to Assyria. The author of the Tel Dan Stele (9th century BCE, found in 1993 and 1994) claimed to have slain both Ahaziah of Judah
Aggabodhi IX of Anuradhapura (57 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Aggabodhi IX was King of Anuradhapura in the 9th century, whose reign lasted from 843 to 846. He succeeded his father Dappula III as King of Anuradhapura
Árpád (2,686 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Árpád (Hungarian pronunciation: [ˈaːrpaːd]; c. 845 – c. 907) was the head of the confederation of the Magyar tribes at the turn of the 9th and 10th centuries
Kōnin (era) (373 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Kōnin (弘仁) was a Japanese era name (年号,, nengō,, lit. "year name") after Daidō and before Tenchō. This period spanned the years from September 810 through
Pope Shenouda I of Alexandria (370 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Pope Shenouda I of Alexandria was the 55th Coptic Pope of Alexandria and Patriarch of the See of St. Mark (859–880). He is commemorated in the Coptic Synaxarion
Abbasid architecture (4,834 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
built at relatively low cost, as most clearly exemplified by Samarra, a 9th-century capital city made up of vast palaces and monumental mosques spread across
The Last Kingdom (TV series) (2,766 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
The Last Kingdom is a British historical fiction television series based on Bernard Cornwell's The Saxon Stories series of novels. The series was developed
Book of Armagh (1,184 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
also known as the Canon of Patrick and the Liber Ar(d)machanus, is a 9th-century Irish illuminated manuscript written mainly in Latin. It is held by the
Santa Prassede (1,729 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Basilica of Saint Praxedes (Latin: Basilica Sanctae Praxedis, Italian: Basilica di Santa Prassede all’Esquillino), commonly known in Italian as Santa
Historia Brittonum (4,577 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
9th-century history of the peoples of Great Britain
Enryaku (543 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Enryaku (延暦) was a Japanese era name (年号, nengō, "year name") after Ten'ō and before Daidō. This period spanned the years from August 782 through May 806
Tenchō (369 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Tenchō (天長) was a Japanese era name (年号,, nengō,, lit. "year name") after Kōnin and before Jōwa. This period spanned the years from January 824 through
Al-Ḥajjāj ibn Yūsuf ibn Maṭar (222 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Al-Ḥajjāj ibn Yūsuf ibn Maṭar (786–833 CE) was a mathematician and translator. Almost nothing is known about his life, except that he was active in Baghdad
Santa Prassede (1,729 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Basilica of Saint Praxedes (Latin: Basilica Sanctae Praxedis, Italian: Basilica di Santa Prassede all’Esquillino), commonly known in Italian as Santa
Al-Waqidi (2,226 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Ibn Ishaq Al-Waqidi Abu Mikhnaf Sayf ibn Umar Al-Mada'ini Ibn Lahi'a 9th century Ibn ʽAbd al-Hakam Khalifah ibn Khayyat Ibn Hisham Ya'qubi Al-Tabari Al-Baladhuri
Harun al-Rashid (6,319 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Abu Ja'far Harun ibn Muhammad al-Mahdi (Arabic: أبو جعفر هارون ابن محمد المهدي) or Harun ibn al-Mahdi (Arabic: هَارُون ابْنِ ٱلْمَهْدِيّ, romanized: Hārūn
Mahinda III of Anuradhapura (57 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Mahinda III was King of Anuradhapura in the 9th century, whose reign lasted from 812 to 816. He succeeded his father Dappula II as King of Anuradhapura
Carloman II (373 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Carloman II (c. 866 – 6 December 884) was the King of West Francia from 879 until his death. A member of the Carolingian dynasty, he and his elder brother
Ninju (368 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Ninju (仁寿) was a Japanese era name (年号, nengō, "year name") after Kashō and before Saikō. This period spanned the years from April 851 through November
Fedelmid mac Crimthainn (987 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Fedelmid mac Crimthainn was the King of Munster between 820 and 846. He was numbered as a member of the Céli Dé, an abbot of Cork Abbey and Clonfert Abbey
Hungarian conquest of the Carpathian Basin (12,720 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
that the ethnic changes induced by the Hungarian Conquest in the late 9th century were accompanied by a similar change in the stables of the Carpathian
Harith al-Muhasibi (633 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
al-Muḥāsibī (Arabic: المحاسبي) was an Arab philosopher, and considered to be the founder of the Baghdad School of Islamic philosophy, and a teacher of
Notker the Stammerer (2,101 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Notker the Stammerer (c. 840 – 6 April 912), Notker Balbulus, or simply Notker, was a Benedictine monk at the Abbey of Saint Gall active as a poet, scholar
Kumararama (975 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Sivaratri Location Location Samarlakota State Andhra Pradesh Country India Architecture Type Chalukya and Kakatiya Completed 9th century Temple(s) One
Mar Sabor and Mar Proth (1,007 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
that Christians were on the Malabar Coast in 9th century AD. Kollam Syrian copper plates, a 9th-century royal grant from Kerala, mentions that certain
Hrafna-Flóki Vilgerðarson (686 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
ˈwilˌɡerðɑz̠ˌson]; Modern Icelandic: [ˈr̥apna-ˌflouːcɪ ˈvɪlˌcɛrðarˌsɔːn]; born 9th century) was the first Norseman to intentionally sail to Iceland. His story is
Third Intermediate Period of Egypt (1,807 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Third Intermediate Period of ancient Egypt began with the death of Pharaoh Ramesses XI in 1077 BC, which ended the New Kingdom, and was eventually
Yahya ibn Sarafyun (182 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Yahya ibn Sarafyun (9th century) a Syriac physician, known in Europe as Johannes Serapion, and commonly called Serapion the Elder to distinguish him from
Popiel (364 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Prince Popiel ІІ (or Duke Popiel) was a legendary 9th-century ruler of two proto-Polish tribes, the Goplans and West Polans. He was the last member of
Al-Mu'tamid (2,307 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Abu’l-ʿAbbās Aḥmad ibn Jaʿfar (Arabic: أبو العباس أحمد بن جعفر; c. 842 – 14 October 892), better known by his regnal name Al-Muʿtamid ʿalā ’llāh (المعتمد
Dalmatia (theme) (1,165 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
Spalatum, Ragusium and Cattaro (now Kotor)). At the turn of the 8th to 9th century, Dalmatia was seized by Charlemagne (r. 768–814), but he returned it
Balinese language (1,132 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Brāhmī script of India. The earliest known inscriptions date from the 9th century AD. Few people today are familiar with the Balinese script. The Balinese
Al-Hakim al-Tirmidhi (2,602 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Persian Muslim mystic of an earlier generation, al-Hakim al-Tirmidhī (9th century C.E.), wrote an autobiography which is much less schematic and more personal
Lothair II (857 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Lothair II (835 – 8 August 869) was the king of Lotharingia from 855 until his death. He was the second son of Emperor Lothair I and Ermengarde of Tours
Shoshenq VI (361 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Shoshenq VI is known to be Pedubast I's immediate successor at Thebes based upon the career of the Letter Writer to Pharaoh Hor IX, who served under Osorkon
Saikō (392 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Saikō (斉衡) was a Japanese era name (年号, nengō, "year name") after Ninju and before Ten'an. This period spanned the years from November 854 through February
Frankish language (4,611 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
was the West Germanic language spoken by the Franks from the 5th to 9th century. After the Salian Franks settled in Roman Gaul, its speakers in Picardy
Hajar Khatoon Mosque (126 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Hajar Khatoon Mosque (in Kurdish: مزگت هاجه رخاتوون, in Persian: مسجد هاجرخاتون) is architecturally a unique and ancient Muslim mosque (now a tourist destination)
Quilon Syrian copper plates (1,179 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Yahiya Thomas of Cana copper plates dated between the mid 4th and early 9th century are a lost set of copper-plate grants issued by an unidentified Chera
Cahal Pech (501 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
situated around a central acropolis. The site was abandoned in the 9th century CE for unknown reasons.[citation needed] The earliest pottery in western
Albubather (127 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Albubather in Latin, was a Persian physician and astrologer of the 9th century. He wrote in Persian and Arabic and is best known for his work De nativitatibus
Ali ibn Isa al-Asturlabi (182 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
al-Asṭurlābī (Arabic: علي بن عيسى) was an Arab astronomer and geographer of the 9th century. He wrote a treatise on the astrolabe and was an opponent of astrology
Daidō (450 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Daidō (大同) was a Japanese era name (年号,, nengō,, lit. "year name") after Enryaku and before Kōnin. This period spanned the years from May 806 through September
Holmul (1,019 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Holmul is a pre-Columbian archaeological site of the Maya civilization located in the northeastern Petén Basin region in Guatemala near the modern-day
Ahmad Nahavandi (138 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Ahmad ibn Muhammad al-Nahawandi (Persian: احمد نهاوندى) was a Persian astronomer of the 8th and 9th centuries. His name indicates that he was from Nahavand
Abu Tammam (880 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
convert born to Christian parents. He is best known in literature by his 9th-century compilation of early poems known as the Hamasah, considered one of the
Hayravank Monastery (490 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
vicinity as well. The church at Hayravank was built during the late 9th century. It is a quatrefoil cruciform central-plan structure with four semi-circular
Kiuic (211 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Kiuic is a Maya archaeological site in the Puuc region of Yucatán, Mexico. Kiuic (/kjuˈiːk/ kyoo-EEK) was a Maya city of the Late and Terminal Maya Classic
Dappula III of Anuradhapura (59 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Dappula III was King of Anuradhapura in the 9th century CE, whose reign lasted from 827 to 843 CE. He succeeded his brother Aggabodhi VIII as King of
Old Church Slavonic (7,472 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
slæˈ-/) was the first Slavic literary language. Historians credit the 9th-century Byzantine missionaries Saints Cyril and Methodius with standardizing
Pannonian Avars (10,973 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
considerable areas of Central and Eastern Europe from the late 6th to the early 9th century. The name Pannonian Avars (after the area in which they settled) is used
Jabril ibn Bukhtishu (320 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Bukhtishu, (Jibril ibn Bakhtisha) also written as Bakhtyshu, was an 8th-9th century physician from the Bukhtishu family of Assyrian Nestorian physicians
Hetaireia (1,313 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Imperial Hetaireia are unclear. The term first appears in the early 9th century, as the bodyguard of Emperor Leo V the Armenian (r. 813–820) on campaign
Hucbald (1,275 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Hucbald (c. 840 or 850 – 20 June 930; also Hucbaldus or Hubaldus) was a Benedictine monk active as a music theorist, poet, composer, teacher, and hagiographer
Jōwa (Heian period) (464 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Jōwa (承和) was a Japanese era name (年号, nengō, "year name") after Tenchō and before Kashō. This period spanned the years from January 834 through July 848
Pope Mark II of Alexandria (163 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Mark II (died 17 April 819) was the 49th Coptic Patriarch of Alexandria from 26 January 799 until his death. During his reign, around 810, the schismatic
Abu al-Arab (367 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Abu al-Arab أبو العرب Born 9th-century Kairouan, Fatimid Caliphate Died c. 945 Kairouan Academic background Academic work Era Islamic Golden Age, Fatimid
Al-Tabarani (294 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
9th-century Muslim hadith scholar
869 Jōgan earthquake (1,202 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Archaeological investigations have identified the remains of 8th and 9th century buildings beneath the town, covered by sediments dated to the middle
Abdallah ibn al-Mu'tazz (949 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Abdallah ibn al-Mu'tazz (Arabic: عبد الله بن المعتز, romanized: ʿAbd Allāh ibn al-Muʿtazz; 861 – 17 December 908) was the son of the caliph al-Mu'tazz
Tahir ibn Husayn (1,533 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Map of Iraq and surrounding regions in the early 9th-century
Pope Simeon II of Alexandria (250 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Pope Simeon II of Alexandria, 51st Pope of Alexandria and Patriarch of the See of St. Mark. This saint was the son of Orthodox Christian parents of the
West Francia (2,173 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
In medieval history, West Francia (Medieval Latin: Francia occidentalis) or the Kingdom of the West Franks (Latin: regnum Francorum occidentalium) refers
Pope Simeon II of Alexandria (250 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Pope Simeon II of Alexandria, 51st Pope of Alexandria and Patriarch of the See of St. Mark. This saint was the son of Orthodox Christian parents of the
Liu Zongyuan (561 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Liu Zongyuan (Chinese: 柳宗元; pinyin: Liǔ Zōngyuán; 773 – 28 November 819) was a Chinese philosopher, poet, and politician who lived during the Tang Dynasty
Salmawaih ibn Bunan (281 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Salmawaih ibn Bunan (died 840) was an Assyrian Nestorian Christian physician who translated works of Galen from Greek into Arabic. He flourished at the
Al-Mahani (1,206 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
born in Mahan, Persia (hence the Nisba Al-Mahani). He was active in the 9th century CE or 3rd century AH, lived in Baghdad c. 860 and died c. 880. From a
History of Islam in southern Italy (5,707 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
following centuries are scarce. Because of the Saracen attacks in the 9th century, Tharros was abandoned in favor of Oristano after more than 1,800 years
Ninna (499 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Ninna (仁和) was a Japanese era name (年号, nengō, "year name") after Gangyō and before Kanpyō. This period spanned the years from February 885 through April
Vientiane (2,961 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
17.967; 102.600 Country  Laos Prefecture Vientiane Prefecture Settled 9th century Area  • Total 3,920 km2 (1,510 sq mi) Elevation 174 m (570 ft) Population
Al-Ruhawi (664 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Ishāq bin Ali al-Rohawi (Arabic: إسحاق بن علي الرهاوي) was a 9th-century author of the first medical ethics book in Arabic medicine. His Ethics of the
Kumudendu (239 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Kumudendu Personal Born 9th century CE Died 9th century CE Religion Jainism Sect Digambara Notable work(s) Siribhoovalaya Religious career Disciples Amoghavarsha
Steed-Kisker culture (533 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Steed-Kisker culture is a cultural phase (name that archaeologists give to a group of culturally similar peoples) that is part of the larger Central
Book of Obadiah (1,319 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The book of Obadiah is a book of the Bible whose authorship is attributed to Obadiah, a prophet who lived in the Assyrian Period. Obadiah is one of the
Ahmad ibn Fadlan (2,547 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
9th century Al-Khwārizmī Abu Hanifa Dinawari Ya'qubi Sulaiman al-Tajir 10th century Ibn Khordadbeh Ahmad ibn Rustah Ahmad ibn Fadlan Abu Zayd al-Balkhi
Abu Ahmad Monajjem (211 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Abu Ahmad Yahya ibn Ali ibn Yahya ibn Abi Mansur Aban al-Monajjem (Arabic: ابواحمد یحیی ابن علی ابن یحیی ابن ابی منصور آبان المنجم) (b. 241/855-56, died
Emperor Seiwa (1,711 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Emperor Seiwa (清和天皇, Seiwa-tennō, May 10, 850 – January 7, 881) was the 56th emperor of Japan, according to the traditional order of succession. Seiwa's
Mahāvīra (mathematician) (1,283 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Mahāvīra (or Mahaviracharya, "Mahavira the Teacher") was a 9th-century Jain mathematician possibly born in Mysore, in India. He authored Gaṇitasārasan̄graha
Princely Abbey of Corvey (1,993 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
"one of the most privileged Carolingian monastic sanctuaries in the 9th-century Duchy of Saxony". It soon became famous for its school, which produced
Emperor Yōzei (1,737 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Emperor Yōzei (陽成天皇, Yōzei-tennō, January 2, 869 – October 23, 949) was the 57th emperor of Japan, according to the traditional order of succession. Yōzei's
Muhammad ibn Isma'il (671 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Abū ʿAbd Allāh Muḥammad ibn Ismāʿīl (Arabic: محمد بن إسماعيل بن جعفر الصادق), also known in his own time as al-Maymūn and hence sometimes incorrectly identified
Byzantine architecture (4,168 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
sanctuaries of the period, including the Cattolica di Stilo in southern Italy (9th century), the monastery church of Hosios Lukas in Greece (c. 1000), Nea Moni
Samos (theme) (722 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
province, located in the eastern Aegean Sea, established in the late 9th century. As one of the Byzantine Empire's three dedicated naval themes (Greek:
Ahmad ibn Yusuf (420 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Abu Ja'far Ahmad ibn Yusuf ibn Ibrahim ibn Tammam al-Siddiq Al-Baghdadi (Arabic: أبو جعفر أحمد بن يوسف بن ابراهيم بن تمام الصديق البغدادي; 835–912), known
Kagura-den (138 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
ceremonies. It was originally just a temporary stage; first mentioned in a 9th-century text describing a maidono built in front of Hirano Shrine. In about a
Uí Ímair (3,100 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
including the Hebrides and some part of Northern England, from the mid 9th century.[citation needed] The dynasty lost control of York in the mid 10th century
Diamond Sutra (2,883 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
This article contains special characters. Without proper rendering support, you may see question marks, boxes, or other symbols. The Diamond Sutra (Sanskrit:
Pope Formosus (1,355 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Pope Formosus (c. 816 – 896) was the bishop of Rome and ruler of the Papal States from 6 October 891 until his death on 4 April 896. His reign as pope
Kievan Rus' (11,843 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Map of 8th- to 9th-century Rus' by Leonard Chodzko (1861) Map of 9th-century Rus' by Antoine Philippe Houze (1844) Map of 9th-century Rus' by F. S. Weller
Ten'an (503 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Ten'an (天安) was a Japanese era name (年号, nengō, "year name") after Saikō and before Jōgan. This period spanned the years from February 857 through April
Omri (1,562 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Hebrew: עָמְרִי‎, ‘Omrī; Akkadian: 𒄷𒌝𒊑𒄿 Ḫûmrî [ḫu-um-ri-i]; fl. 9th century BC) was, according to the Hebrew Bible, the sixth king of Israel. He
Antony I of Constantinople (269 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Antony I Kassymatas (Greek: Αντώνιος Α΄ Κασσυματάς, romanized: Antōnios I Kassymatas), (? – 21 January 837) Ecumenical Patriarch of Constantinople from
De Gradibus (185 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
De Gradibus was an Arabic book published by the Arab physician Al-Kindi (c. 801–873 CE). De gradibus is the Latinized name of the book. An alternative
Paramara dynasty (5,981 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Rashtrakutas, they were most probably subordinates of the Rashtrakutas in the 9th century. Historical evidence suggests that between 808 and 812 CE, the Rashtrakutas
Janamejaya (1,291 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Janamejaya Kuru King King of Kuru Kingdom Reign 12th-9th century BCE Predecessor Parikṣit Successor Ashwamedhadatha Dynasty Kuru Father Parikṣit Religion
Einhard (1,478 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Einhard (also Eginhard or Einhart; Latin: E(g)inhardus; c. 775 – 14 March 840) was a Frankish scholar and courtier. Einhard was a dedicated servant of
Hincmar (2,056 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Hincmar (/ˈhɪŋkmɑːr/; French: [ɛ̃kmaʁ]; Latin: Hincmarus; 806 – 21 December 882), archbishop of Reims, was a Frankish jurist and theologian, as well as
John VII of Constantinople (496 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
John VII, surnamed Grammatikos or Grammaticus, i.e., "the Grammarian" (Greek: Ιωάννης Ζ΄ Γραμματικός, Iōannīs VII Grammatikos), (? – before 867) was Ecumenical
Essen Abbey (1,105 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Essen Abbey (Stift Essen) was a community of secular canonesses for women of high nobility that formed the nucleus of modern-day Essen, Germany. It was
Heahmund (190 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
9th-century Bishop of Sherborne
Vikings (TV series) (5,803 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Vikings is a historical drama television series created and written by Michael Hirst for the History channel, a Canadian network. Filmed in Ireland, it
Ibn Hawshab (3,083 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
class=notpageimage| Main towns in Yemen in the 9th century
Æthelwulf, King of Wessex (10,622 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
for the success of his son, Alfred the Great. At the beginning of the 9th century, England was almost completely under the control of the Anglo-Saxons
Kʼinich Yat Ahk II (1,650 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Kʼinich Yat Ahk II (Mayan pronunciation: [kʼinitʃ jat akh]), also known as Ruler 7, was the last ajaw of Piedras Negras, an ancient Maya settlement in
Emperor Junna (1,102 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Emperor Junna (淳和天皇, Junna-tennō, c. 786 – 11 June 840) was the 53rd emperor of Japan, according to the traditional order of succession. Junna reigned
Pakbirra Jain temples (366 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
from 6th to 13th century. The Pakbirra Jain complex dates back to c. 9th century. The temple complex consist of three stone temples, the smallest in eastern
Nikephoros I (940 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Nikephoros I or Nicephorus I (Greek: Νικηφόρος; 750 – 26 July 811) was Byzantine emperor from 802 to 811. Having served Empress Irene as genikos logothetēs
Croatian interlace (353 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Croatian interlace or Croatian wattle, known as the pleter or troplet in Croatian, is a type of interlace, most characteristic for its three-ribbon
Dublin (15,108 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Dublin (/ˈdʌblɪn/; Irish: Baile Átha Cliath, pronounced [ˈbˠalʲə aːhə ˈclʲiə] or [ˌbʲlʲaː ˈclʲiə]) is the capital and largest city of Ireland. On a bay
Rashtrakuta dynasty (8,540 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
hand and left foot was severed, leaving that person disabled. By the 9th century, kings from all the four castes had occupied the highest seat in the
Jameh Mosque of Atigh (280 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Jameh Mosque of Atigh is a 9th-century mosque in Shiraz, the capital of Fars Province, Iran, Atigh Jameh mosque (Atiq Mosque) the oldest mosque of Shiraz
Emperor Junna (1,102 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Emperor Junna (淳和天皇, Junna-tennō, c. 786 – 11 June 840) was the 53rd emperor of Japan, according to the traditional order of succession. Junna reigned
Ælla of Northumbria (1,382 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Northumbria, a kingdom in medieval England, during the middle of the 9th century. Sources on Northumbrian history in this period are limited, and so Ælla's
Anastasius Bibliothecarius (957 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
such that he appears to be the most learned ecclesiastic of Rome in the 9th century. During the pontificate of Pope Nicholas I (858–867) Anastasius was abbot
Elah (king) (109 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Elah (Hebrew: אֵלָה ’Ēlā; Greek: Ἠλά; Latin: Ela) was the fourth king of Israel, the son and successor of Baasha. William F. Albright has dated his reign
Kʼinich Yat Ahk II (1,650 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Kʼinich Yat Ahk II (Mayan pronunciation: [kʼinitʃ jat akh]), also known as Ruler 7, was the last ajaw of Piedras Negras, an ancient Maya settlement in
Pakbirra Jain temples (366 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
from 6th to 13th century. The Pakbirra Jain complex dates back to c. 9th century. The temple complex consist of three stone temples, the smallest in eastern
Pope Leo V (419 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Pope Leo V was the bishop of Rome and nominal ruler of the Papal States from July 903 to his death in February 904. He was pope immediately before the
Croatian interlace (353 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Croatian interlace or Croatian wattle, known as the pleter or troplet in Croatian, is a type of interlace, most characteristic for its three-ribbon
Navalinga Temple (412 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
The Navalinga temple is a cluster of Hindu temples built in the 9th century, during the reign of King Amoghavarsha I or his son Krishna II of the Rashtrakuta
Piast the Wheelwright (419 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Piast Oracz or Piast) was a semi-legendary figure in medieval Poland (9th century AD), and the presumed founder of the Piast dynasty that would rule the
Essen Abbey (1,105 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Essen Abbey (Stift Essen) was a community of secular canonesses for women of high nobility that formed the nucleus of modern-day Essen, Germany. It was
Ahmad al-Wafi (384 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Abū Aḥmad ʿAbd Allāh ibn Muḥammad ibn Ismāʿīl (Arabic: عبد اللّه بن محمد بن إسماعيل, born 766–828 CE/149–212 AH in Salamiyah, Syria; Imamate 809–828 CE/193–212
Rameshvara Temple, Narasamangala (265 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
district, Karnataka state, India. The temple was constructed during the 9th century rule of the Western Ganga Dynasty of Talakad. The temple plan is simple
Ceolberht (74 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
9th-century Bishop of London
Sunan Abu Dawood (1,246 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
9th-century collection of Islamic hadith
Annales Bertiniani (1,317 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
annals is one of five major independent narrative accounts of the late 9th century. The others are: The Annals of Fulda (838-901) The Annals of St. Vaast
Ibrahim al-Mawsili (690 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Abū Isḥāq Ibrāhīm al-Mawṣilī (Arabic: أبو إسحاق إبراهيم الموصلي; 742–804) was an Arab musician of Persian origin who was among the greatest composers of
Yusuf al-Khuri (248 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Yusuf al-Khuri (Arabic: يوسف الخوري), also known as Yusuf al-Khuri al-Qass (d. 912), was a Christian priest, physician, mathematician, and translator of
Lotharingia (1,766 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Lotharingia (Latin: regnum Lotharii, regnum Lothariense, Lotharingia; French: Lotharingie; German: Reich des Lothar, Lotharingien, Mittelreich; Dutch:
Idris II of Morocco (477 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Idris bin Idris (Arabic: إدريس بن إدريس) known as Idris II (Arabic: إدريس الثاني) (August 791 – August 828), was the son of Idris I, the founder of the
Gottschalk of Orbais (1,685 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Gottschalk (Latin: Godescalc, Gotteschalchus) of Orbais (c. 808 – 30 October 868 AD) was a Saxon theologian, monk and poet. Gottschalk was an early advocate
Cairo Geniza (2,827 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Coordinates: 30°00′21″N 31°13′52″E / 30.0058°N 31.2310°E / 30.0058; 31.2310 The Cairo Geniza, alternatively spelled Genizah, is a collection of some
Gahagan Mounds Site (564 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Gahagan Mounds Site (16RR1) is an Early Caddoan Mississippian culture archaeological site in Red River Parish, Louisiana. It is located in the Red
Deorwulf (64 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
9th-century Bishop of London
Asad ibn al-Furat (256 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Asad Ibn Al-Furat (Arabic: أسد بن الفرات; c.759 – c.828) was a jurist and theologian in Ifriqiya, who played an important role in the Arab conquest of
Hisham ibn al-Kalbi (289 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Ibn Ishaq Al-Waqidi Abu Mikhnaf Sayf ibn Umar Al-Mada'ini Ibn Lahi'a 9th century Ibn ʽAbd al-Hakam Khalifah ibn Khayyat Ibn Hisham Ya'qubi Al-Tabari Al-Baladhuri
The Book of Sulaym ibn Qays (764 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
a case study have been dated to c. 762-780 and to the late 8th/early 9th century, respectively. Sources indicate that the book was well known, but not
Mar Sabor and Mar Proth Church, Akaparambu (491 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Mar Sabor & Mar Afroth church Akaparambu is one of the ancient churches in Kerala. In ancient records the church is referred to as the Akaparambu Valiyapally
Jameh Mosque of Borujerd (605 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Abi-Dolaf rulers as the governor of Borujerd in the 3rd century A.H. (9th century CE). Judging by the evidences, continuous works of construction, reconstruction
Zachlumia (7,315 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
preserved in the book De Ceremoniis, no later than the first half of the 9th century. A falsified and highly controversial papal charter from 743 also mentions
Abu Sa'id al-Jannabi (2,807 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Abu Sa'id Hasan ibn Bahram al-Jannabi (Arabic: أبو سعيد حسن بن بهرام الجنابي, romanized: Abū Saʿīd Ḥasan ibn Bahrām al-Jannābī; 845/855–913/914) was the
Yahya ibn Abi Mansur (259 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Yahya ibn Abi Mansur (Arabic: یحیی ابن ابی منصور), was a senior Persian official from the Banu al-Munajjim family, who served as an astronomer/astrologer
Altun Ha (2,843 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Altun Ha /ɑːlˈtuːn hɑː/ is the name given to the ruins of an ancient Mayan city in Belize, located in the Belize District about 50 kilometres (31 mi) north
Dappula II of Anuradhapura (202 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Dappula II was King of Anuradhapura in the 9th century, whose reign lasted from 807 to 812. He succeeded his father Mahinda II as King of Anuradhapura
Dhul-Nun al-Misri (937 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Dhūl-Nūn Abū l-Fayḍ Thawbān b. Ibrāhīm al-Miṣrī (Arabic: ذو النون المصري; d. Giza, in 245/859 or 248/862), often referred to as Dhūl-Nūn al-Miṣrī or Zūl-Nūn
Ibn Kullab (747 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
theologian (mutakallim) in Basra and Baghdad in the first half of the 9th century during the time of the Mihna and belonged, according to Ibn al-Nadim
Al-Fath ibn Khaqan (1,471 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Al-Fatḥ ibn Khāqān (Arabic: الفتح بن خاقان) (c. 817/8 – 11 December 861) was an Abbasid official and one of the most prominent figures of the court of
Al-Ma'mun (6,136 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
which used the monsoon wind cycles to trade over vast distances (by the 9th century, Arab sea traders had reached Guangzhou, in China). The maps of the Greeks
Igor of Kiev (782 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Igor of Kiev Rurikovich Born: 9th century  Died: 945 Regnal titles Preceded by Oleg the Seer Prince of Kiev 914–945 Succeeded by Olga as regent
George Syncellus (1,018 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
the Patrician Theophylact Simocatta 8th century Hippolytus of Thebes 9th century Theophanes the Confessor George Syncellus Nikephoros I of Constantinople
Indract of Glastonbury (1,606 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
historian Michael Lapidge has argued that he is most likely to represent a 9th-century abbot of Iona named Indrechtach ua Fínnachta. The cult seems to date
Kashō (775 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Kashō (嘉祥), also known as Kajō, was a Japanese era name (年号, nengō, "year name") after Jōwa and before Ninju. This period spanned the years from June 848
Bodbe Monastery (656 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
from the town of Sighnaghi, Kakheti, Georgia. Originally built in the 9th century, it has been significantly remodeled, especially in the 17th century
Sayil (2,163 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Sayil is a Maya archaeological site in the Mexican state of Yucatán, in the southwest of the state, south of Uxmal. It was incorporated together with Uxmal
Khurramites (1,815 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Khurramites (Persian: خرمدینان Khorram-Dīnân, meaning "those of the Joyful Religion") were an Iranian religious and political movement with its roots
Prambanan (6,150 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Candi Prambanan, Javanese: ꦫꦫꦗꦺꦴꦁꦒꦿꦁ, romanized: Rara Jonggrang) is a 9th-century Hindu temple compound in Special Region of Yogyakarta, Indonesia, dedicated
Sunan ibn Majah (706 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
9th-century collection of Islamic hadith
County of Hainaut (3,844 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
or pagus, which included the Roman towns of Famars and Bavay. In the 9th century, if not earlier, it was also described as a county, which implies that
Sena II of Anuradhapura (198 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Sena II was King of Anuradhapura in the 9th century, whose reign lasted from 853 to 887. He succeeded his uncle Sena I as King of Anuradhapura and was
Mangaladevi Temple (1,143 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
significant antiquity and is believed to have been built during the 9th century by Kundavarman, the most noted king of the Alupa dynasty, under the patronage
Rameshvara Temple, Narasamangala (265 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
district, Karnataka state, India. The temple was constructed during the 9th century rule of the Western Ganga Dynasty of Talakad. The temple plan is simple
Salomon, King of Brittany (922 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Salomon (Breton: Salaün) (died 874) was Count of Rennes and Nantes from 852 and Duke of Brittany from 857 until his death by assassination. He used the
Battle of Dollar (63 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Battle of Dollar was an 875 battle fought in Dollar, Scotland between Danish invaders under Thorstein and the men of Alba under Constantine I. The
Emperor Heizei (1,284 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Emperor Heizei (平城天皇, Heizei-tennō, 773 – August 5, 824), also known as Heijō-tennō, was the 51st emperor of Japan, according to the traditional order
Ceolberht (74 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
9th-century Bishop of London
Kashō (775 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Kashō (嘉祥), also known as Kajō, was a Japanese era name (年号, nengō, "year name") after Jōwa and before Ninju. This period spanned the years from June 848
George Syncellus (1,018 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
the Patrician Theophylact Simocatta 8th century Hippolytus of Thebes 9th century Theophanes the Confessor George Syncellus Nikephoros I of Constantinople
Sunan ibn Majah (706 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
9th-century collection of Islamic hadith
Muhammad I of Córdoba (258 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Muhammad I (822–886) (Arabic: محمد بن عبد الرحمن الأوسط) was the Umayyad emir of Córdoba from 852 to 886 in the Al-Andalus (Moorish Iberia). Muhammad was
Michael I Rangabe (754 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Michael I Rhangabe (Greek: Μιχαὴλ Ῥαγγαβέ; c. 770 – 11 January 844) was Byzantine emperor from 811 to 813. Michael was the son of the patrician Theophylact
Battle of Qarqar (984 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Battle of Qarqar (or Ḳarḳar) was fought in 853 BC when the army of the Neo-Assyrian Empire led by Emperor Shalmaneser III encountered an allied army
List of Icelandic-language poets (388 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Boddason (fl. 9th century) Bragi inn gamli Boddason (Norwegian) Þjóðólfur úr Hvini (fl. 9th century) (Norwegian) Þorbjörn hornklofi (fl. 9th century) (Norwegian)
Harsiese A (575 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
King Hedjkheperre Setepenamun Harsiese, or Harsiese A, is viewed by the Egyptologist Kenneth Kitchen in his Third Intermediate Period of Egypt to be both
Æthelflæd (7,484 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Æthelflæd, Lady of the Mercians (c. 870 – 12 June 918) ruled Mercia in the English Midlands from 911 until her death. She was the eldest daughter of Alfred
Zechariah ben Jehoiada (998 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Zechariah ben Jehoiada is a figure in the Hebrew Bible described as a priest who was stoned to death by Jehoash of Judah and may possibly have been alluded
Ashot I of Armenia (1,938 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
arméniennes (VIIe ‑ IXe siècle)" [Arab Domination and Armenian Freedom (8th-9th Century)]. Histoire du peuple arménien [History of the Armenian People] (in French)
Vilada (129 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Berguedà, Catalonia, of about 500 residents. Its name is documented in the 9th century as Villalata, translated as "ample town". Vilada has no demonym. While
Unification of Norway (994 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Unification of Norway (Norwegian Bokmål: Rikssamlingen) is the process by which Norway merged from several petty kingdoms into a single kingdom, predecessor
List of Polish monarchs (1,130 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Popielids Duke Popiel II c. 9th century c. 9th century Presumed son of Popiel I (1) NN, A German Princess c. 9th century A legendary ruler dethroned by
Burgred of Mercia (467 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
9th-century king of Mercia
Gangyō (910 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Gangyō (元慶), also known as Genkei, was a Japanese era name (年号, nengō, "year name") after Jōgan and before Ninna. This period spanned the years from April
Al-Muhtadi (1,226 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Abū Isḥāq Muḥammad ibn al-Wāthiq (Arabic: أبو إسحاق محمد بن هارون الواثق‎; c. 833 – 21 June 870), better known by his regnal name Al-Muhtadī bi-'llāh (Arabic:
Patriarch Sophronius I of Alexandria (36 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Sophronius I served as Greek Patriarch of Alexandria between 841 and 860. "Sophronius I (841–860)". Official web site of the Greek Orthodox Patriarchate
Leif Erikson (4,674 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Leif Erikson, Leiv Eiriksson, or Leif Ericson, also known as Leif the Lucky (c. 970 – c. 1019 to 1025), was a Norse explorer who is thought to have been
Yahya ibn Abi Mansur (259 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Yahya ibn Abi Mansur (Arabic: یحیی ابن ابی منصور), was a senior Persian official from the Banu al-Munajjim family, who served as an astronomer/astrologer
Siege of Constantinople (860) (1,786 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
obvious parallels with the sequence of events described by Nestor. In the 9th century, a legend sprang up to the effect that an ancient column at the Forum
Book of Joel (1,798 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Book of Joel is collected as one of the twelve minor prophets of the Nevi'im ("Prophets") in the Hebrew Bible, and as a book in its own right in the
Wigstan (798 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
9th-century Mercian and saint
Æthelnoth (bishop of London) (74 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
9th-century Bishop of London
Zwentibold (736 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Zwentibold (Zventibold, Zwentibald, Swentiboldo, Sventibaldo, Sanderbald; c. 870 – 13 August 900), a member of the Carolingian dynasty, was the illegitimate
Al-Mubarrad (3,043 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Al-Mubarrad (المبرد) (al-Mobarrad), or Abū al-‘Abbās Muḥammad ibn Yazīd (c. 826 – c. 898), was a native of Baṣrah. He was a philologist, biographer and
Swithwulf (bishop of Rochester) (67 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
9th-century Bishop of Rochester
Thorney Abbey (728 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
mid-7th century hermitage destroyed by a Viking incursion in the late 9th century. A Benedictine monastery was founded in the 970s, and a huge rebuilding
Manunggul Jar (1,052 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Manunggul Jar is a secondary burial jar excavated from a Neolithic burial site in the Manunggul cave of the Tabon Caves at Lipuun Point in Palawan
Principality of Hungary (3,487 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
state in the Carpathian Basin, established 895 or 896, following the 9th century Hungarian conquest of the Carpathian Basin. The Hungarians, a semi-nomadic
Liu Yuxi (2,127 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Liu Yuxi (Wade-Giles: Liu Yü-hsi; Chinese: 劉禹錫; pinyin: Liú Yǔxī, Liú Yǔxí) (772–842) was a Chinese poet, philosopher, and essayist, active during the
Sena II of Anuradhapura (198 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Sena II was King of Anuradhapura in the 9th century, whose reign lasted from 853 to 887. He succeeded his uncle Sena I as King of Anuradhapura and was
Kingdom of Essex (2,316 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
A genealogy of the Essex royal house was prepared in Wessex in the 9th century. Unfortunately, the surviving copy is somewhat mutilated. At times during
Jehu (prophet) (287 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
was a prophet mentioned in the Hebrew Bible, who was active during the 9th century BC. According to the Bible, Jehu condemned Baasha, king of Israel, and
Abu Hatim Ahmad ibn Hamdan al-Razi (506 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
حاتم احمد بن حمدان الرازی) was a Persian Ismaili philosopher of the 9th century, who died in 322 AH (935 CE). He was also the Da'i al-du'at (chief missionary)
Painting of a Christian figure (1,018 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Christian figure, also known as Fragment of a Christian figure, is a late 9th-century Tang dynasty fragmentary silk painting of a haloed man with crosses on
Odo of France (824 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Odo (French: Eudes; c. 857 – 1 January 898) was the elected King of West Francia from 888 to 898. He was the first king from the Robertian dynasty. Before
Manikkavacakar (1,262 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Maanikkavaasagar (Tamil: மாணிக்கவாசகர், "One whose words are like gems"), was a 9th-century Tamil saint and poet who wrote Tiruvasakam, a book of Shaiva hymns. Speculated
Ibn Karram (2,140 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
9th-century Muslim scholar and Founder of the Karramiyya sect
Siemowit (220 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
ruler of the Piast dynasty. He became the Duke of the Polans in the 9th century after his father, Piast the Wheelwright, son of Chościsko, refused to
Dorëzi Fortress (197 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
southwest of Tirana. It is the oldest in the Tirana County and dates to the 9th century BC. The first archaeological expedition was performed in 1951. The ruins
Halfdan the Black (968 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Halfdan the Black (Old Norse: Halfdanr Svarti; fl. c. 9th century) was a king of Vestfold. He belonged to the House of Yngling and was the father of Harald
Sack of Damietta (853) (1,327 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
1984, pp. 52ff.. For the activities of the Egyptian fleets in the later 9th century, cf. Kubiak 1970, pp. 59–65. Bury, John Bagnell (1912). A History of
Paulicianism (3,669 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
period of relative toleration, renewed Byzantine persecution in the mid 9th century prompted the Paulicians to establish a state centered on Tephrike in
List of Scottish monarchs (4,479 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
when annals switched from Latin to vernacular around the end of the 9th century, by which time the word Alba in Scottish Gaelic had come to refer to