why are manhole covers round?

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pages: 242 words: 71,938

The Google Resume: How to Prepare for a Career and Land a Job at Apple, Microsoft, Google, or Any Top Tech Company by Gayle Laakmann Mcdowell

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barriers to entry, cloud computing, game design, information retrieval, job-hopping, side project, Silicon Valley, Steve Jobs, why are manhole covers round?

The Three Types of Cover Letter The Structure Five Traits of a Strong Cover Letter An A+ Cover Letter References Your Questions Answered Additional Resources Chapter 7: Interview Prep and Overview What Are Tech Companies Looking For? How to Prepare Working with Your Recruiter Communication and Behavior Special Interview Types After the Interview Your Questions Answered Additional Resources Chapter 8: Interview Questions General Advice Acing the Standard Questions Behavioral and Résumé Questions Estimation Questions Design Questions Brainteasers: Why Are Manhole Covers Round? Answering the Tough Questions Your Questions Answered Additional Resources Chapter 9: The Programming Interview How They Differ: Microsoft, Google, Amazon, and Apple How to Prepare Memory Usage Coding Questions Algorithm Questions: Five Ways to Create an Algorithm Object-Oriented Design Scalability Questions Testing Interviews Example Problems Your Questions Answered Additional Resources Chapter 10: Getting into Gaming The Culture: Is It All Fun and Games?

Design a TV remote for six-year-olds. 2. Design an ATM for the blind. 3. If you had an infinite amount of money, how would you design a bathroom? 4. Most people hate bank web sites. Design a web site for a new bank. 5. Design the heating/air-conditioning controls for a car. Assume that you’re designing from scratch: no one has ever seen a car’s air-conditioning/heating controls. Brainteasers: Why Are Manhole Covers Round? Once standard at Microsoft and many other companies, brainteasers have dropped in popularity substantially. Interviewers are instead encouraged to ask behavioral or skill-specific interview questions. Unfortunately, they still pop up from time to time, either because no one can decide exactly what a brainteaser is, or because some interviewers still feel that these questions are an effective way of measuring intelligence.

 

pages: 230 words: 71,320

Outliers: The Story of Success by Malcolm Gladwell

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affirmative action, Bill Gates: Altair 8800, computer age, medical residency, popular electronics, Silicon Valley, Steve Ballmer, Steve Jobs, union organizing, upwardly mobile, why are manhole covers round?

Elite universities often require that students take an intelligence test (such as the American Scholastic Aptitude Test) for admission. High-tech companies like Google or Microsoft carefully measure the cognitive abilities of prospective employees out of the same belief: they are convinced that those at the very top of the IQ scale have the greatest potential. (At Microsoft, famously, job applicants are asked a battery of questions designed to test their smarts, including the classic “Why are manhole covers round?” If you don't know the answer to that question, you're not smart enough to work at Microsoft.*) If I had magical powers and offered to raise your IQ by 30 points, you'd say yesrightYou'd assume that would help you get further ahead in the world. And when we hear about someone like Chris Langan, our instinctive response is the same as Terman's instinctive response when he met Henry Cowell almost a century ago.

 

pages: 380 words: 118,675

The Everything Store: Jeff Bezos and the Age of Amazon by Brad Stone

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3D printing, airport security, AltaVista, Amazon Mechanical Turk, Amazon Web Services, bank run, Bernie Madoff, big-box store, Black Swan, book scanning, Brewster Kahle, call centre, centre right, Clayton Christensen, cloud computing, collapse of Lehman Brothers, crowdsourcing, cuban missile crisis, Danny Hillis, Douglas Hofstadter, Elon Musk, facts on the ground, game design, housing crisis, invention of movable type, inventory management, James Dyson, Jeff Bezos, Kevin Kelly, Kodak vs Instagram, late fees, loose coupling, low skilled workers, Maui Hawaii, Menlo Park, Network effects, new economy, optical character recognition, pets.com, Ponzi scheme, quantitative hedge fund, recommendation engine, Renaissance Technologies, RFID, Rodney Brooks, search inside the book, shareholder value, Silicon Valley, Silicon Valley startup, six sigma, skunkworks, Skype, statistical arbitrage, Steve Ballmer, Steve Jobs, Steven Levy, Stewart Brand, Thomas L Friedman, Tony Hsieh, Whole Earth Catalog, why are manhole covers round?

“If I’m able to join a company like yours at this early stage, I’d feel like I get to participate in something historic.” Bezos almost started yelling. “That is exactly how we think at Amazon.com! You watch. There will be a proliferation of companies in this space and most will die. There will be only a few enduring brands, and we will be one of them.” After a few moments of silence, Bezos asked, “So, why are manhole covers round?” “Jeff, if you want to get to the airport on time, you cannot ask me a question like that.” Bezos let loose a gunfire burst of laughter, startling Birtwistle, who almost veered off the highway. “No, seriously,” Bezos said. “How would you solve that problem?” “They’re round because it makes them easier to roll into place?” “That is incorrect, but it is not a bad guess,” Bezos said.1 When Birtwistle graduated from Harvard, he joined Amazon, along with Kilar and Andy Jassy, who years later would run Amazon’s pioneering cloud business.