a long time ago in a galaxy far, far away

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pages: 252 words: 80,636

Bureaucracy by David Graeber

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3D printing, a long time ago in a galaxy far, far away, Affordable Care Act / Obamacare, airport security, Albert Einstein, banking crisis, barriers to entry, borderless world, Bretton Woods, British Empire, collateralized debt obligation, Columbine, conceptual framework, Corn Laws, David Graeber, George Gilder, High speed trading, hiring and firing, Kitchen Debate, late capitalism, means of production, music of the spheres, new economy, obamacare, Occupy movement, Parkinson's law, Peter Thiel, planetary scale, price mechanism, Ronald Reagan, self-driving car, Silicon Valley, South Sea Bubble, transcontinental railway, union organizing, urban planning, zero-sum game

Later science fiction futures were largely dystopian, moving from bleak technofascism into some kind of stone-age barbarism, as in Cloud Atlas, or else, studiously ambiguous: the writers remaining coy about the dates, which renders “the future” a zone of pure fantasy, no different really than Middle Earth or Cimmeria. They might even, as with Star Wars, place the future in the past, “a long time ago in a galaxy far, far away.” This Future is, most often, not really a future at all, but more like an alternative dimension, a dream-time, some kind of technological Elsewhere, existing in days to come in the same sense that elves and dragon-slayers existed in the past; just another screen for the projection of moral dramas and mythic fantasies. Science fiction has now become just another set of costumes in which one can dress up a Western, a war movie, a horror flick, a spy thriller, or just a fairy tale.


pages: 281 words: 78,317

But What if We're Wrong? Thinking About the Present as if It Were the Past by Chuck Klosterman

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a long time ago in a galaxy far, far away, Affordable Care Act / Obamacare, British Empire, citizen journalism, cosmological constant, dark matter, Edward Snowden, Elon Musk, Francis Fukuyama: the end of history, Frank Gehry, George Santayana, Gerolamo Cardano, ghettoisation, Howard Zinn, Isaac Newton, non-fiction novel, obamacare, pre–internet, Ralph Nader, Ray Kurzweil, Ronald Reagan, Silicon Valley, Stephen Hawking, the medium is the message, the scientific method, Thomas Kuhn: the structure of scientific revolutions, too big to fail, Y2K

But it’s equally possible to imagine a future where the only culture is niche culture, and commercial success becomes irrelevant (or maybe even an anchor). 18 Yeah, I know: This sentence is fucking confusing. But it’s more straightforward than it seems: Our present time will eventually become the past, hence the designation “present (past).” Our future will eventually become the present, hence “present (future).” It’s kind of like the prologue to Star Wars, where we are told that the following events happened “a long time ago, in a galaxy far, far away.” But the people in Star Wars shoot laser guns and travel at the speed of light, so we are forced to conclude that their past is our future. 19 Here’s a simple way to parse this not-so-simple description: Play the song “Rock and Roll” by Led Zeppelin. Based on a traditional twelve-bar blues progression, “Rock and Roll” is the only song in the Zeppelin catalog that is literally rock and roll music, unless you count “Hot Dog” and “Boogie with Stu.”


pages: 292 words: 81,699

More Joel on Software by Joel Spolsky

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a long time ago in a galaxy far, far away, barriers to entry, Black Swan, Build a better mousetrap, business process, call centre, Danny Hillis, David Heinemeier Hansson, failed state, Firefox, fixed income, George Gilder, Larry Wall, low cost carrier, Mars Rover, Network effects, Paul Graham, performance metric, place-making, price discrimination, prisoner's dilemma, Ray Oldenburg, Ruby on Rails, Sand Hill Road, Silicon Valley, slashdot, social software, Steve Ballmer, Steve Jobs, Superbowl ad, The Great Good Place, type inference, unpaid internship, wage slave, web application, Y Combinator

. . . 177 twenty-three Making Wrong Code Look Wrong . . . . . . . . . 183 part six Starting a Software Business . . . . . . . . . 201 twenty-four Foreword to Eric Sink on the Business of Software . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 203 twenty-five Foreword to Micro-ISV: From Vision to Reality . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 207 twenty-six Hitting the High Notes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 211 part seven Running a Software Business . . . . . . . . . 221 twenty-seven Bionic Office . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 223 twenty-eight Up the Tata Without a Tutu . . . . . . . . . . . . 227 twenty-nine Simplicity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 231 Contents vii thirty Rub a Dub Dub . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 235 thirty-one Top Twelve Tips for Running a Beta Test . . . . . 241 thirty-two Seven Steps to Remarkable Customer Service . . 245 part eight Releasing Software . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 255 thirty-three Picking a Ship Date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 257 thirty-four Camels and Rubber Duckies . . . . . . . . . . . . 263 part nine Revising Software . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 281 thirty-five Five Whys . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 283 thirty-six Set Your Priorities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 289 Index . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 297 JOEL, APRESS, BLOGS, AND BLOOKS “A long time ago in a galaxy far, far away . . .” Well, actually it was late in 2000, during Apress’s first full year of operation. We were a tiny little computer book publisher then, with little name recognition, and we planned to publish only a handful of books that year—roughly as many books for that whole year as Apress now publishes in a single month. I was learning the hard way about how to be a publisher and probably spending way too much time looking at web sites and programming than I should have in response to that.


pages: 602 words: 207,965

Practical Ext JS Projects With Gears by Frank Zammetti

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a long time ago in a galaxy far, far away, Albert Einstein, corporate raider, create, read, update, delete, database schema, en.wikipedia.org, Firefox, full text search, Gordon Gekko, Larry Wall, loose coupling, Ronald Reagan, web application

An application built with Dojo This is in not an exhaustive list, but as you can clearly see, there are quite a few to choose from. This list barely scratches the surface of what’s available today. Of course, while all of these are fine toolkits, we’re here to talk about one that’s not in that list, one that I feel is quite possibly the best available today: Ext JS. 15 16 Ch aPt er 1 ■ INtr ODU C ING W eB DeVeL OP M e N t W I t h e X t JS Enter Ext JS: The best of the bunch A long time ago in a galaxy far, far away (more precisely, early 2006, the planet Earth), a gentleman by the name of Jack Slocum developed a set of extension utilities to the YUI library. These utilities rapidly gained popularity within the YUI community and were quickly organized into an independent library called YUI-Ext. In fall 2006, Jack released the .33 version of this new library under the terms of the Berkeley Software Distribution (BSD) license.


pages: 879 words: 309,222

Nobody's Perfect: Writings From the New Yorker by Anthony Lane

a long time ago in a galaxy far, far away, colonial rule, dark matter, Frank Gehry, haute cuisine, Index librorum prohibitorum, Mahatma Gandhi, Maui Hawaii, moral hazard, Norman Mailer, profit motive, Ronald Reagan, sexual politics, The Great Good Place, trade route, University of East Anglia, Upton Sinclair, urban decay, urban planning

One could argue that the racism of The Mummy is merely period detail, or that the gags zip by so quickly that they don’t have a chance to stick; I find, however, that they hang around while the rest of the movie fades. It’s a shame, because much of The Mummy is a blast, and you cheerfully root for Brendan Fraser; he promises such innocent fun, and yet the film teases the innocence away from him. Lady, there’s something in this movie. In a word, ignorance. MAY 10, 1999 THE PHANTOM MENACE A long time ago, in a galaxy far, far away, people made movies with people in them, and some of those movies made sense. Then something happened, and the people started to vanish from the movies, along with most of the sense. For a while, the spectacle was fun to observe, but slowly the pictures tipped into insanity, or, at any rate, into the hypnotically bad. The joke was that the number of viewers willing to submit to such hypnosis went not down but through the roof.