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searching for this Lime Tree Bower 17 found (28 total)

alternate case: This Lime Tree Bower

This Lime-Tree Bower My Prison (1,571 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article

"This Lime-Tree Bower My Prison" is a poem written by Samuel Taylor Coleridge during 1797. The poem discusses a time in which Coleridge was forced to stay
Conversation poems (4,619 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
(The Eolian Harp, Reflections on having left a Place of Retirement, This Lime-Tree Bower my Prison, Frost at Midnight, Fears in Solitude, The Nightingale:
Blank verse (1,847 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
wrote little of it: Well, they are gone, and here must I remain, This lime-tree bower my prison! I have lost Beauties and feelings, such as would have
Frost at Midnight (1,536 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
the Nurse Presented My Infant to Me". The ideas about nature in This Lime-Tree Bower are transformed into the basis for an education, and Hartley is to
Coleridge Cottage (995 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
It was while he was living in Nether Stowey that Coleridge wrote This Lime-Tree Bower My Prison, The Rime of the Ancient Mariner, part of Christabel, and
Apostrophe (figure of speech) (520 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
Harold's Pilgrimage "Thou glorious sun!" Samuel Taylor Coleridge, "This Lime Tree Bower" "Death, be not proud, though some have called thee / Mighty and
Dublin Fringe Festival (413 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
theatre makers".[citation needed] In the first year, Conor McPherson's This Lime Tree Bower premiered, and in 1996 Enda Walsh's Disco Pigs took off from The
Primary Stages (1,547 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Hatcher from the story by Henry James) Lips (Constance Congdon) This Lime Tree Bower (Conor McPherson) Brutality of Fact (Keith Reddin) Scotland Road
Lime tree in culture (1,439 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Coleridge features linden trees as an important symbol in his poem "This Lime-Tree Bower My Prison" (written 1797; first published 1800). The short poems
T. R. Knight (1,541 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Off-Broadway Source: Internet Off-Broadway Database Marvin's Room (1998) This Lime Tree Bower (1999) as Joe Macbeth (1999) as Donalbain/Messenger "The Refreshment
Mariana (poem) (2,480 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Romantic poems, including "Tintern Abbey" by William Wordsworth or "This Lime-Tree Bower My Prison" by Samuel Taylor Coleridge. There is also a connection
Samuel Taylor Coleridge (8,331 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
this period, he also produced his much-praised "conversation poems" This Lime-Tree Bower My Prison, Frost at Midnight, and The Nightingale. In 1798, Coleridge
Thomas Poole (tanner) (1,720 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
in Poole's book parlour and sometimes writing, as with his poem "This Lime-Tree Bower My Prison", which was composed in Poole's garden. Much local suspicion
Watchet (4,310 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Coleridge Cottage in Nether Stowey and while living there he wrote "This Lime-Tree Bower My Prison", part of "Christabel", Frost at Midnight and The Rime
Kubla Khan (12,922 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
version of the region. "Kubla Khan" was composed in the same year as This Lime-Tree Bower My Prison, and both poems contained images that were used in 14 October
List of National Trust properties in Somerset (2,930 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Coleridge lived at the cottage for three years from 1797 while writing This Lime-Tree Bower My Prison, The Rime of the Ancient Mariner, part of Christabel, and
List of poems by Samuel Taylor Coleridge (584 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Church "Depart in joy from this world's noise and strife" 1797 1836 This Lime-tree Bower my Prison [Addressed to Lamb Charles, Of the India House, London]