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Longer titles found: Timeline of Ulster Volunteer Force actions (view)

searching for Ulster Volunteer Force 30 found (683 total)

alternate case: ulster Volunteer Force

Máire Drumm (351 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article

Máire Drumm (22 October 1919 – 28 October 1976) was the vice-president of Sinn Féin and a commander in Cumann na mBan. She was killed by Ulster loyalists
36th (Ulster) Division (2,862 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
called the Ulster Division, it was made up of mainly members of the Ulster Volunteer Force, who formed thirteen additional battalions for three existing regiments:
Larne gun-running (2,558 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Captain Wilfrid Spender for the Ulster Unionist Council to equip the Ulster Volunteer Force. The operation involved the smuggling of almost 25,000 rifles and
George Richardson (Indian Army officer) (579 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
Anglo-Afghan War and Boxer Rebellion, and later as commander of the Ulster Volunteer Force in Ireland. Born in 1847, Richardson was the son of Major General
Malcolm McKeown (437 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Malcolm McKeown was an Ulster loyalist paramilitary during The Troubles in Northern Ireland, and later an organised crime figure. During The Troubles,
Ulster Imperial Guards (152 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
the Ulster Imperial Guards outnumbered the attempt to revive the Ulster Volunteer Force and held an armoury of former UVF guns in Tamar Street in East Belfast
List of pals battalions (2,022 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Rifles had nine battalions raised in a similar fashion from the Ulster Volunteer Force. In all, 142 "service" battalions and 68 "reserve" battalions were
Samuel Irwin (294 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Victoria Hospital, Belfast, but during World War I he worked at the Ulster Volunteer Force Hospital, serving in the Royal Army Medical Corps. He was the chair
Volunteer (Irish republican) (658 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
Volunteers were formed in 1913, in reaction to the formation of the Ulster Volunteer Force earlier that year, to protect the interests of Irish nationalists
Workman, Clark and Company (202 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
p. 3. Retrieved 30 May 2015. Timothy Bowman. Carson's Army: The Ulster Volunteer Force, 1910-22. pp. 25, 29. Published Manchester University Press. 2007
Langeland (360 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Frederick Hugh Crawford for the Ulster Unionist Council to equip the Ulster Volunteer Force in Ireland. Danish customs officials suspected that the cargo might
Frederick H. Crawford (995 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
alleged to have signed in his own blood. With the formation of the Ulster Volunteer Force (UVF) in 1913, he was made their Director of Ordnance. During the
Independent Monitoring Commission (1,008 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Sixth Report: a special report on the "violent feud between the Ulster Volunteer Force and the Loyalist Volunteer Force" 19 October 2005: Seventh Report
William Adair (286 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
role in the Ulster Unionist Party and was commander of the Antrim Ulster Volunteer Force. In 1914, he took charge of the landing and dispersal of guns during
ReMastered: The Miami Showband Massacre (201 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Miami Showband on 31 July 1975 by the loyalist paramilitary group Ulster Volunteer Force (UVF). The Miami Showband were at the time one of Ireland's most
Ulster Covenant (1,301 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
1912 Ulster Covenant by Joseph E.A. Connell Jr". 6 March 2013. "Ulster Volunteer Force". South Belfast Friends of the Somme Association. Retrieved 29 September
Samuel Cleland Davidson (1,917 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
and he was a staunch supporter of Edward Carson and the original Ulster Volunteer Force opposing home rule for Ireland. However, he never indulged in sectarian
Edward Carson (4,305 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Volunteers, the first loyalist paramilitary group. From it the Ulster Volunteer Force was formed in January 1913 to undergo military training and purchase
Irish War of Independence (14,608 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Volunteers were formed by Eoin MacNeill in response to the paramilitary Ulster Volunteer Force that had been founded earlier in the year to fight against Home
Southern Ireland (1921–22) (1,542 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
weapons from German arms dealer Bruno Spiro and established the Ulster Volunteer Force (UVF) to prevent Home Rule in Ulster. In response to this, nationalists
William Gibson (Ulster Unionist Party politician) (189 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
Election, Hansard, 8 April 1895 Timothy Bowman, Carson's Army: the Ulster Volunteer Force, 1910-22, p.98 Constantine FitzGibbon, Red Hand: The Ulster Colony
History of Northern Ireland (8,191 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
"volunteer armies" were recruited and armed, firstly the unionist Ulster Volunteer Force (UVF), and in response, the nationalist Irish Volunteers. But events
History of Northern Ireland (8,191 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
"volunteer armies" were recruited and armed, firstly the unionist Ulster Volunteer Force (UVF), and in response, the nationalist Irish Volunteers. But events
107th (Ulster) Brigade (1,042 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
of the New Armies raised by Kitchener. It consisted of the old Ulster Volunteer Force, which had originally been raised to resist the imposition of Home
Government of Ireland Act 1914 (2,187 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Unionist Council reorganised their volunteers into a paramilitary Ulster Volunteer Force (UVF), whose members threatened to resist by physical force the
Partition of Ireland (10,621 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
to the Third Home Rule Bill, which was then in preparation. The Ulster Volunteer Force (UVF) imported 25,000 rifles and three million rounds of ammunition
England national football team results (unofficial matches) (1,111 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
Fundraising benefit match for the Prisoners of War Fund and the Ulster Volunteer Force Hospital. Newcastle United's Bill McCracken, an Ulsterman, helped
Charles Clements, 5th Earl of Leitrim (754 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Lieutenant of the City of Londonderry in 1904. Leitrim commanded the Ulster Volunteer Force in County Donegal, and arranged to run guns into the county in his
Wilfrid Spender (1,043 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Edward Carson. He invited Spender to Belfast to help organise the Ulster Volunteer Force, a paramilitary group to resist Home Rule.[citation needed] During
The Troubles in Newry (1,425 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Army sniper while on mobile patrol in Newry. 29 November 1974 - Ulster Volunteer Force (UVF) carried out a bomb attack on Hughes Bar, Church Street, Newry