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Longer titles found: Siberian Turkic languages (view), Common Turkic languages (view), List of alphabets used by Turkic languages (view), Middle Turkic languages (view), List of Turkic languages (view), Turkic Languages (journal) (view)

searching for Turkic languages 150 found (777 total)

alternate case: turkic languages

Faux Cyrillic (587 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article

(USSR Turkic languages) for F, Ә (USSR Turkic languages) or Є (Ukrainian) for E, Ө (USSR Turkic languages) for O, Һ (Some USSR Turkic languages) for H
Ye (Cyrillic) (371 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
and /ɛ/ in Russian loanwords and transcriptions of foreign names. In Turkic languages utilizing the Cyrillic script, such as Kazakh, Kyrgyz and Uzbek, Ye
Bashkir alphabet (1,015 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Bashkir alphabet (Bashkir: башҡорт яҙыуы) is a writing system used for the Bashkir language. During its existence, it changed script several times. Currently
Uyghur Cyrillic alphabet (266 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Uyghur Cyrillic alphabet (lat. Uyghur Kiril Yëziqi or UKY, cyr. Уйғур Кирил Йезиқи) is a Cyrillic-derived alphabet used for writing the Uyghur language
Od iyesi (625 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Уот Иччи) is the Turkic and Mongolian spirit or deity of fire. In Turkic languages, Od (or Ot) means fire, and iye is the familiar spirit of any natural
Languages of Romania (748 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
In Romania there are several spoken languages. Beside Romanian, the countrywide official language, other spoken languages are spoken and sometimes co-official
Yabaku (137 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
own languages, while Kyrgyzes, Kyfchaks, Oguzes..." have their own "Türkic" languages, and the languages of Yemeks and Bashkirts are close to them. Maħmūd
Kyrgyz alphabets (437 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
"Şaar" (city) in Kyrgyz corresponds to Şahar/Şähär/Şəhər in other Turkic languages.) К (K) – ك changes into ق (Q) if precedes or succeeds by letters а
Tatar alphabet (1,728 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Two scripts are currently used for the Tatar language: Arabic (in China), Cyrillic (in Russia and Kazakhstan). Before 1928, the Tatar language was usually
Ablative case (1,212 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The ablative case (sometimes abbreviated abl, pronounced /ˈæb.lə.tɪv/) is a grammatical case for nouns, pronouns and adjectives in the grammars of various
Yaña imlâ alphabet (167 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Yaña imlâ (Tatar: Яңа имля, pronounced [jʌˈŋɑ imˈlʲæ]; lit. "New orthography") was a modified variant of Arabic script that was in use for the Tatar language
Su iyesi (813 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
In Turkic mythology, Su Iyesi (Tatar: Су Иясе or Su İyäse; Chuvash: Шыв Ийӗ; Sakha: Уу Иччи; literally "water master") is a water spirit. It corresponds
Abessive case (856 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
In linguistics, abessive (abbreviated ABE or ABESS), caritive and privative (abbreviated PRIV) is the grammatical case expressing the lack or absence of
Cappadocian Greek (3,278 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Cappadocian, also known as Cappadocian Greek or Asia Minor Greek, is a mixed language spoken in Cappadocia (Central Turkey). The language originally diverged
Turkmenian kulan (1,635 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Turkmenian kulan (Equus hemionus kulan), also called Transcaspian wild ass, Turkmenistani onager or simply the kulan, is a subspecies of onager (Asiatic
Abel Pavet de Courteille (411 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Abel Jean Baptiste Michel Pavet de Courteille (23 June 1821 – 12 December 1889) was a 19th-century French orientalist, specialized in the study of Turkish
Chinese Tatars (320 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
declined in the USSR in the 1930s. Being surrounded by speakers of other Turkic languages, Chinese Tatar partially reverses the Tatar high vowel inversion. They
Hendiadys (918 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Pontificii Instituti Biblici. Rome, 1963. §460 Johanson, Lars (1998). The Turkic languages. Johanson, Lars, 1936-, Csató, Éva Ágnes. London: Routledge. p. 50
Ay Ata (542 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Ay Ata (Turkish & Azerbaijani: Ay Ata, Cyrillic: Ай Ата; sometimes Ay Tanrı or Ay Dede, or Turkish: Ay Dede, Turkmen: Aý Däde, Azerbaijani: Ay Dədə) is
Nikolai Baskakov (linguist) (2,088 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Türkic languages" (1975), "Historical typological morphology of Türkic languages" (1979), and "Historical typological phonology of Türkic languages"
Altay Sarsenuly Amanzholov (253 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Altay Sarsenuly Amanzholov (Kazakh: Алтай Сәрсенұлы Аманжолов, Altaı Sársenuly Amanjolov; February 6, 1934 – August 10, 2012)[citation needed] was a Kazakh
Iranian Azerbaijanis (10,112 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
org. Archived from the original on 2007-12-01. Michael Knüppel, E. "Turkic Languages of Persia". Encyclopædia Iranica. Archived from the original on 2013-09-21
Kumalak (413 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
forty-one beans, stones, or sheep dung ("kumalak" means sheep dung in the Turkic languages) sorted into piles, and has been used for hundreds of years in the
Nikolai Dmitriev (1,644 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
the Turkic languages. That led to the comparative and comparative-historical methods as the main tool in studies of the structure of Turkic languages; and
Yurt (1,979 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
A traditional yurt (from the Turkic languages) or ger (Mongolian) is a portable, round tent covered with skins or felt and used as a dwelling by several
Pe (Persian letter) (184 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
languages, Uyghur, Urdu, Sindhi, Kashmiri, Kuryan, Shina language, and Turkic languages (before the Latin and Cyrillic scripts were adopted but not in Arabic
Accusative case (1,414 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Greek, German, Polish, Russian), in the Finno-Ugric languages,in all Turkic languages, and in Semitic languages (such as Arabic). Balto-Finnic languages
Accusative case (1,414 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Greek, German, Polish, Russian), in the Finno-Ugric languages,in all Turkic languages, and in Semitic languages (such as Arabic). Balto-Finnic languages
Vilhelm Thomsen (452 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Vilhelm Ludwig Peter Thomsen (25 January 1842 – 12 May 1927) was a Danish linguist and Turkologist. He initially began studying theology at the Danish
Haloxylon (574 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
dictionary, the name saksaul borrowed in the XIX century from the Turkic languages. The species of genus Haloxylon are shrubs or small trees 1–8 metres
Baghatur (813 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Timurid dynasties etc. The word was also introduced into many non-Turkic languages as a result of the Turco-Mongol conquests, and now exists in different
Danube (6,302 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Ages, the Greek Tiras was borrowed into Italian as Tyrlo and into Turkic languages as Tyrla, the latter further borrowed into Romanian as a regionalism
Sumbar River (269 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
It a tributary of the Atrek. The name Sari-su means yellow water in Turkic languages, but is applied to a number of other rivers as well. It used to be
Yeralash (394 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
camp. The word eralash means "mixed, mishmash" and is taken from the Turkic languages. The Yeralash TV show is aired on the Channel One and features mostly
Semyon Novgorodov (1,016 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Semyon Andreyevich Novgorodov (Yakut: Семен Андреевич Новгородов, Semen Andreyevich Novgorodov, the older orthography Yakut: Сэмэн Ноҕоруодап, Semen Noğoruodap
List of Jewish diaspora languages (729 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
This is a list of languages and groups of languages that developed within Jewish diaspora communities through contact with surrounding languages. Kayla[citation
Languages of Iraq (567 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Linguistique), p. 346 Hendrik Boeschoten. 1998. "The Speakers of Turkic Languages," The Turkic Languages, ed. Lars Johanson and Éva Ágnes Csató, Routledge, pp.
Marcel Erdal (74 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Marcel Erdal (born January 1st, 1945) is a linguist and Turkologist, professor and head of the Turcology department at the Goethe University in Frankfurt
Zeynep Korkmaz (360 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Zeynep Korkmaz (born 5 July 1922) is a prominent Turkish scholar and dialectologist. Korkmaz was born in Nevşehir on 5 July 1922. Her parents are Yusuf
Nikolay Ilminsky (172 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Nikolai Ivanovich Il'minskii (Russian: Николай Иванович Ильминский; 1822–1891) was a Russian turkologist. Following a highly successful career as an academic
Ibn Taghribirdi (574 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
"Taghribirdi" is cognate to modern Turkish "Tanrıverdi" and means god-given in Turkic languages. Al-Nujūm al-Zāhirah fī Mulūk Miṣr wa-al-Qāhirah (النجوم الزاهرة في
Yevgeny Polivanov (415 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Yevgeny Dmitrievich Polivanov (Russian: Евге́ний Дми́триевич Полива́нов; 12 March [O.S. 28 February] 1891 – 25 January 1938) was a Soviet linguist, orientalist
Barak Kol (300 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
mountains Gora Akdongul and Gora Baygetobe. Köl is the word for lake in Turkic languages, and Baraq was a khan of the Chagatai Khanate, a great-great-grandson
Şükrü Halûk Akalın (312 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Şükrü Halûk Akalın (born 22 January 1956) is a Turkish academic and bureaucrat who served as head of the Turkish Language Association (TLA) from 2001 to
Nikolai Ivanovich Ashmarin (41 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Nikolai Ivanovich Ashmarin (Russian: Никола́й Ива́нович Ашма́рин) (September 22 [O.S. October 4] 1870, Yadrin, Kazan Governorate – August 26, 1933) was
Mount Kapaz (313 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
borrowed from the Alparak lake (now Göygöl) translated from ancient Turkic languages as "the place covered by dam" (Al - below, lower part, space in front
Turks in the Tang military (2,725 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
the Tang garrisons of Central Asia settled in the region, spreading Turkic languages in an area that had been predominantly Indo-European. The empire of
Franciscus a Mesgnien Meninski (508 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Franciscus à Mesgnien Meninski (first name spelled also Francisci[dubious – discuss], François and Franciszek) (1623–1698) was the author of a multi-volume
Vowel harmony (4,782 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
fairly accurate descriptor for the articulatory parameters involved. Turkic languages inherit their systems of vowel harmony from Proto-Turkic, which already
Aktash (55 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Aktash, which means 'white rock' in many Turkic languages, may refer to: Aktash River, a river in the Republic of Dagestan, Russia Ak-Tash (disambiguation)
Gagauz people (3,197 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
somewhat dubious. The Gagauz language belongs to the Oghuz branch of the Turkic languages, which also includes the Azerbaijani, Turkish, and Turkmen languages
Yugur (890 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
com/chapter-11 Aslı Göksel, Celia Kerslake, ed. (2000). Studies on Turkish and Turkic Languages: Proceedings of the Ninth International Conference on Turkish Linguistics
Participle (5,168 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
A participle (PTCP) is a linguistics term for a certain class of nonfinite verb forms whose sentence function varies according to the contextual structure
Zero copula (1,875 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Zero copula is a linguistic phenomenon whereby the subject is joined to the predicate without overt marking of this relationship (like the copula "to be"
Zero copula (1,875 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Zero copula is a linguistic phenomenon whereby the subject is joined to the predicate without overt marking of this relationship (like the copula "to be"
Kaşgarli Mahmut Prize (92 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Prize was a one-time literary prize awarded in 2008 to authors in the Turkic languages area of Turkey and Central Asia as a UNESCO project on the 1000th anniversary
Karancs (161 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
dark green (almost black) colour. In Pecheneg and the other Middle Turkic languages, the word kara meant 'black'. Another possible etymology is that the
Kormos (683 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
mythology and can also refer to ghosts or demons. "Kormos" means in Turkic languages "does not see" or "blind." "Blind" is also understood of as "mentally
Basmyl (2,230 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
own languages, while Kyrgyzes, Kyfchaks, Oguzes..." have their own "Türkic" languages, and the languages of Yemeks and Bashkirts are close to them. The
List of European literatures (119 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
This is a list of European literatures. The literatures of Europe are compiled in many languages; among the most important of the modern written works
Somfai Kara David (152 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Somfai Kara David (born 21 April 1969, Budapest, Hungary) is a Hungarian academic of Linguistics and Ethnography currently working in the Hungarian Academy
Cyrillic alphabets (4,156 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Н Ӊ Ӈ О   П   Р Ҏ С   Т   У     Ф Х   Ц   Ч   Ш Щ Ъ Ы Ь Ҍ Э Ӭ Ю Я Turkic languages Bashkir А Ә Б В Г Ғ Д   Ҙ Е   Ё Ж   З   И       Й К Ҡ Л   М   Н Ң  
Lajos Ligeti (328 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Hungarian orientalist and philologist, who specialized in Mongolian and Turkic languages. After completing his secondary studies in his native town, he entered
Anatolia (6,086 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
between the late 13th and early 20th centuries. However, various non-Turkic languages continue to be spoken by minorities in Anatolia today, including Kurdish
Qurbān-ʻAlī Khālidī (319 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
the imam of a mosque in Tacheng. Khālidī's writings utilize several Turkic languages, including Tatar, Ottoman Turkish, Chagatai, and vernacular Kazakh
Armeno-Turkish alphabet (196 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Armeno-Turkish alphabet is a version of the Armenian alphabet sometimes used to write Ottoman Turkish until 1928, when the Latin-based modern Turkish
Danil (147 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
given name meaning "The Creator's Gift" in certain dialects of the Turkic languages and "God is my Judge" in Hebrew. It is as a variant of the Russian
Stary Oskol (1,489 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
people of Ros and the Arabs took this word to their arsenal. But in the Turkic languages there is no clear pronunciation of the sound “R”, and it is replaced
List of universities in Turkmenistan (218 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
University of Oil and Gas (2008-2012) Encyclopaedia of modern Asia: Turkic languages to Zuo Zongtang "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2011-07-26
Ň (246 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
descender (Ң ң). In Janalif, it corresponds to the letter Ꞑ. In other Turkic languages with the velar nasal, it corresponds to the letter Ñ. It is also used
Sonqor (197 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Mage Publishers. p. 293. ISBN 978-1933823232. http://www.iranicaonline.org/articles/turkic-languages-overview Website of CHHTO of Kermanshah Iran portal
Galugah (157 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Caucasus. Brill. 8 (2): 289–291. doi:10.1163/1573384043076045. JSTOR 4030997. Encyclopædia Iranica :TURKIC LANGUAGES OF PERSIA: AN OVERVIEW Iran portal
Muhakamat al-Lughatayn (689 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
flexible words. Turkic languages have nine words used to identify separate species of duck, which illustrates the capacity of the Turkic languages to make more
Echo word (581 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
countries. Some reduplicative patterns in Persian and in Turkish and other Turkic languages have sometimes been classified as echo word formation as well. A doctoral
Gədəbəy (432 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
words "ket", "gedik" (hill) and "bek" (guard, guardian) in ancient Turkic languages, "observation station", "guard station". Gedebey lies at the northern
Taklamakan Desert (1,879 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Moscow. p. 408. Jarring, Gunnar (1997). "The Toponym Takla-makan". Turkic Languages. 1: 227–40. Tamm (2011), p. 139. "Takla Makan Desert at TravelChinaGuide
Khorasani Turks (235 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Nader Shah Khorasani Turkic language Qarai Turks Iranicaonline The Turkic Languages, By Lars Johanson, Éva Ágnes Csató Johanson, page 13, Routledge, 2015
Khatun (434 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
historical sketch" in Johanson, Lars; Csató, Éva Ágnes (2015). The Turkic Languages. Taylor & Francis. ISBN 978-1-136-82534-7., page 5 Clauson, Gerard
Mirfatyh Zakiev (1,010 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
most full and logically faultless monograph about the syntax of the Türkic languages". Zakiev published several hundred scientific works, including thirty-five
Bugac (344 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
stories of the Oghuz Turks are collected, mentions Bughachuk, which in Turkic languages is also spelled 'Buğac'. Therefore, many people tend to believe that
Nushibi (1,424 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Steppes, (January 2011), p. 24 Golden, Peter B., “Oq and Oğur ~ Oğuz”, Turkic Languages, 16/2 (2012). p. 8 of 29 Shimin, Geng (耿世民) (2005). 古代突厥文碑铭研究 (Studies
Qomrud (528 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
it was 1,922 (443 households). [1] 70% of the village population is Turkic languages, 5-10% of the Afghan population and 20% to 25% of it are Persian languages
Dungan language (1,808 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Islam-influenced terminology, based on loanwords from Arabic, Persian and Turkic languages, as well as translations of them into Chinese. The Hui traders in the
Monik Charette (985 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Linguistics and Phonetics 2: 275-291. 1994 "Vowel Harmony and Switching in Turkic languages". SOAS Working Papers in Linguistics and Phonetics 4: 31-52. Also in
GHA (124 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Authority Glasgow Housing Association Gha, a letter used in various Turkic languages Gha (Indic), a glyph in the Brahmic family of scripts Ghadamès language
Minorities in Iraq (3,780 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
on Turkish and Turkic Languages, Otto Harrassowitz Verlag, ISBN 3-447-04293-1 Boeschoten, Hendrik (1998), "Speakers of Turkic Languages", in Johanson,
Wensu County (319 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
in the Western Regions. Wensu means "ten water" in Uyghur and other Turkic languages. In Uyghur, the county is called Aksu Konaxahar (阿克苏阔纳协海尔) meaning
Kyzaghan (146 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
a red horse. The word Kyzaghan (Kızağan) means angry or fierce in Turkic languages. The root of word is “Kız”. This root contains the meaning of red color
Kyrgyz phonology (742 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
(1998), "21 Kirghiz", in Johanson, Lars; Csató, Eva Á. (eds.), The Turkic Languages, Taylor & Francis, pp. 344–356, ISBN 978-0415412612 Linebaugh, Gary
Flag of Uzbekistan (769 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
majority of the population of Uzbekistan are Turkic peoples who speak Turkic languages. White is a symbol of peace, purity, and kindness. White also means
Kosa (folklore) (260 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
naming a spring month Koça. "Koç" is still the word for "ram" in the Turkic languages, as well as Turkish and Azerbaijanese. Also, Koçan or Koç Ayı is a
Khanate (disambiguation) (36 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
khanate is a state under the rule of a khan ("ruler" in Mongolic and Turkic languages). Khanate can also refer to: Khanate (band), an American metal band
Alash (81 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Alash may be a transliteration from various Turkic languages into English of the following terms: "Alash", the second name for the Kazakhs and the national
Alexander Samoylovich (992 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
majored in Arabo-Persian-Turkic-Tatar languages. From 1907 he taught Turkic languages at St. Petersburg University, and in 1920 joined Vasily Bartold and
Aimaq dialect (462 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
have coincided in western Persian (probably under the influence of Turkic languages like Azeri and Turkmen). Aimaq people Hazaragi dialect Aimaq dialect
QWERTZ (1,631 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
disunification of "Ș" (S-comma) and "Ț" (T-comma) with "Ş" (S-cedilla; used in Turkic languages) and "Ţ" (T cedilla), the characters with cedilla were used in the
Advanced and retracted tongue root (847 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
frontness such as voicing stop consonants before front vowels in the Oghuz Turkic languages or in Adjarian's law: the fronting of vowels after voiced stops in
Bolad (given name) (81 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
(alternatively spelled Pulad, Pulat, Polat, or Polad in Persian and Turkic languages) is common given name among the Inner Asian peoples. The meaning of
Sonqor County (569 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
original (Excel) on 2011-11-11. http://www.iranicaonline.org/articles/turkic-languages-overview Unlike many other dynasties founded by warlords and military
Elteber (435 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Verlag, Wiesbaden, 2016. Ervand Sevortjan. Etymological Dictionary of Turkic Languages (in Russian), volume 1, Moscow: Nauka, 1974. "*tep- / *dēp-" in Sergei
Tamgaly (210 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
petrogylphs from the Iron Age. The name Tamgaly in Kazakh and other Turkic languages means "painted or marked place". List of World Heritage Sites in Kazakhstan)
Black Mountain (822 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Dhaka (Black Mountain of Hazara) Kara Dag (disambiguation), same in Turkic languages Montenegro (disambiguation), which has the same meaning in many Romance
List of world news channels (554 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
World TRT Al Arabiya - - - - - TRT Türk TRT Avaz (Bosnian and various Turkic languages with subtitles in Turkish) PTV (Pakistan) PTV World - - - - - PTV News
He (letter) (848 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
script) form of hāʾ, called in Urdu do cashmī he ('two-eyed he'): Many Turkic languages of Central Asia like Uyghur as well as Kurdish use the modification
Köl (34 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Köl is a word meaning "lake" in several Turkic languages. For a list of places with köl in the name, see All pages with titles containing Köl KÖL is a
Sunzha River (333 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
disputed. The most probable of versions name Sunzha has come from Mongol-Turkic languages in the deformed type. It is known, that Mongols called it Suinchie
Varlyq (201 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Iranian Azerbaijani poets and writers in 1979. Its main focus is on Turkic languages spoken in Iran, such as Azerbaijani, Turkmen, Qashqai, Khorasani, Sonqori
Varlyq (201 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Iranian Azerbaijani poets and writers in 1979. Its main focus is on Turkic languages spoken in Iran, such as Azerbaijani, Turkmen, Qashqai, Khorasani, Sonqori
Gerd Jendraschek (310 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Gerd. 2001. Semantic and structural properties of Turkish ideophones. Turkic Languages 5: 88-103. Jendraschek, Gerd. 2002. The struggle against monolingualism
Center for Middle Eastern Studies at the University of Chicago (527 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
studies, Islamic art and archaeology, and Arabic, Persian, Hebrew, or Turkic languages (Anatolian Turkish, Uzbek, Kazakh), and their accompanying literatures
Non-Sinoxenic pronunciations (1,594 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
exchanges with Chinese culture occurred (e.g. Mongolian, Central Asian or Turkic languages), but the adoption of the Chinese writing system did not occur. This
İye (682 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
subject to worship. The term means owner, master, lord, possessor in Turkic languages. Ezen (familiar spirit, protector spirit) has the same meaning (owner
Kermanshah Province (1,730 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Encyclopædia Iranica. Retrieved 6 May 2012. Michael Knüppel, E. "TURKIC LANGUAGES OF PERSIA". Encyclopædia Iranica. Retrieved 19 September 2013. "Sub-national
Şahbuzkənd (391 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
out from the components of the Şah (high, large), buz // bus (in the Turkic languages, "the ledge, the mountain"), təpə "hill" and means "the high mountain"
Tonyukuk (1,175 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Turkic Narrative: Pragmatics, Reported Speech and Managing Information. Turkic languages. 10.2, 2006. pp 155–186. Tonyukuk Inscriptions complete text Tonyukuk’s
Bekir (207 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Bekir Çoban-zade (1893–1937), Crimean Tatar poet and professor of Turkic languages Bekir Coşkun, Turkish journalist Bekir Sıtkı Erdoğan (1926-2014), Turkish
Chagan (123 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
(叉干镇), town in Jilin, China Dolon (air base) in Kazakhstan, also called Chagan Khagan, a title of imperial rank in the Mongolian and Turkic languages
Shor (266 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
for bull or ox. Shor may also refer to: Shor language, one of the Turkic languages Shor people, an indigenous ethnic group of southern Siberia Shor is
Toquz Oghuz (497 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
net/OT/ot5.htm[permanent dead link] Golden, B. P. "Oq and Oğur ~ Oğuz", Turkic Languages, 16/2 (2012), p. 183–188 [1] Ergin 1970:81 Gündüz 2002/2:263 Colin
Ayla (name) (530 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
light around the moon". The name may also be encountered in other Turkic languages as, for example, an Azeri name. Since Ayla is reserved for the feminine
Padshah Begum (575 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
It is the feminine equivalent of the title baig or bey, which in Turkic languages means chief or commander. It usually refers to the wife or daughter
Karacaoğlan (599 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
hundred of his poems have survived to this day. He died in 1679. List of Turkic languages poets Turna Çabuk, Feriha. "17.yy aşıklarından Gevheri,Kayıkçı Kul
Ili River (1,240 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
river can be traced back to the Mahmud al-Kashgari's dictionary of Turkic languages, the Dīwānu l-Luġat al-Turk (written in 1072–74). In the book, the
Shad (prince) (567 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article
Russian) Golden P.B., "Turks and Iranians: An historical sketch", The Turkic Languages, ed. L. Johanson, E. A. Csato, 1998, p. 3 of 22. Golden P.B., "Khazar
Vladimir Minorsky (798 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
published 1931–1967, with passages in Arabic, Gûrâni-Kurdish, Persian, and Turkic languages. A History of Sharvan and Darband in the 10th-11th Centuries, Cambridge
İske imlâ alphabet (563 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
akin to English, this allowed for more similar orthography between Turkic languages, because words looked more similar even when vowels vary, such as in
Kadi Burhan al-Din (789 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
www.iranicaonline.org. Retrieved 23 April 2018. https://www.princeton.edu/~turkish/aatt/azeri.htm, American Association of Teachers of Turkic Languages
Ezāfe (1,052 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Besides Persian, ezafe is found in other Iranian languages as well as in Turkic languages, which have historically borrowed many phrases from Persian. Ottoman
İske imlâ alphabet (563 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
akin to English, this allowed for more similar orthography between Turkic languages, because words looked more similar even when vowels vary, such as in
Al Ana (485 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Mongolian: Гал "Qal", Oirat: Һал, Persian: آل, Russian: Алы) means in Turkic languages, red color, fire or evil. And Ana is contains the meaning of mother
Areal feature (1,258 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
L), usually contrasting with palatalized /lʲ/ in Slavic, Baltic and Turkic languages of Eastern Europe. Possibly the Satem sound change. Development of
Emblem of the Dagestan Autonomous Soviet Socialist Republic (505 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
which was the motto "Workers of all countries, unite!" in Russian and Turkic languages. The name of the republic was written in gold letters on the gear oval:
Gagauz alphabet (449 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
On the other hand, unlike Crimean Tatar, Turkish, and some other Turkic languages, Gagauz does not have the letter ⟨ğ⟩, which had become completely silent
Shule Kingdom (953 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
According to Mahmud al-Kashgari within Kashgar's vicinity, some non-Turkic languages like the Kanchaki and Sogdian were still used in some areas. It is
Lake Karachay (1,180 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
karachay means "black water" or "black sea" in several Northwestern Turkic languages, including Tatar. Built in total secrecy between 1946 and 1948, the
Dongxiangs (1,696 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
foreign loan words borrowed from Arabic, Chinese, Persian, and a few Turkic languages. The Dongxiang people also have a rich tradition of oral literature
Chinese Islamic cuisine (2,071 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Christian; Lars Johanson; Éva Ágnes Csató Johanson (29 April 2015). The Turkic Languages. Routledge. pp. 204–. ISBN 978-1-136-82527-9. Martine Robbeets (24
School of Language and History – Geography (150 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Anthropology Archaeology Linguistics Ancient languages and culture Turkic languages and literature Turkish language and literature Western languages and
Irtysh River (2,021 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
From its origins as the Kara-Irtysh (Vast Irtysh, kara means Vast in Turkic languages but also black. But in the context and geographic terms usually refers
Stepanavan (1,675 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
was founded in 1810 as Jalaloghli, literally meaning son of Jalal in Turkic languages. The name is derived from the Armenian noble family of Hasan-Jalalyan
Olzhas Suleimenov (457 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
письменностей) [The Turks in Prehistory (on the origin of the ancient Turkic languages and scripts)] (in Russian). Алматы: Атамұра. 2002. ISBN 9965-05-662-5
Sosruko (196 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
who stole fire from the giant. The name etymologically came from Turkic languages: Nogai suslan- "to look menacing", suslä "menacing, gloomy" (hence
Seyhan Erözçelik (452 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
collections. He had also written poems in the Bartin dialect and in other Turkic languages, and had brought a modern approach to the classical Ottoman rhyme,
Black Sea–Caspian Steppe (2,160 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Kaganate took over the lower Volga – perhaps the first appearance of Turkic languages in this area. The obscure Sabir people (c. 460 – 700s), who may have
Instrumental case (2,397 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
yayan ("by foot", "on foot"). It became less productive in most Oghuz Turkic languages. The conjunction ile ("with") in Turkish has semantically expanded
Diwan (poetry) (1,389 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
both of whom offered strong arguments for the poetic status of the Turkic languages as against the much-venerated Persian. Partly as a result of such arguments
Uyghur Arabic alphabet (717 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Johanson, Éva Ágnes Csató; Johanson, Lars (1 September 2003). The Turkic Languages. Taylor & Francis. pp. 387–. ISBN 978-0-203-06610-2. Benson, Linda;
Oil wrestling (865 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
The Turkish word for wrestling can be traced back to the old Oghuz Turkic languages, which originate from the Eurasian steppes, where wrestling has also
Cyrillic digraphs (1,501 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
for front vowels for other Dagestanian languages and also the local Turkic languages Kumyk and Nogay. ⟨Ӏ⟩ digraphs for ejectives is common across the North
Boyan (given name) (485 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article
Этимологический словарь тюркских языков [Etymological Dictionary of Turkic Languages] (in Russian), 2, Moscow: Nauka, pp. 27–29 Gluhak, Alemko (1993), Hrvatski