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searching for Tuna (Polynesian mythology) 8 found (11 total)

alternate case: tuna (Polynesian mythology)

Sina and the Eel (757 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article

Machine. O le Tala ia Sina ma lana Tuna (Sina and the Eel) Craig, Robert D. (2004). Handbook of Polynesian Mythology. ABC-CLIO. p. 88. ISBN 978-1-57607-894-5
Kohara (134 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
In Polynesian mythology, Kohara is the goddess of tuna, and is considered the "mother of all tuna fish". The word also means "to throw a flash of lightning
Hina (goddess) (1,467 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Sina, Tina and Hina. In addition to the usual meaning of "Mother", Polynesian mythology Hina is the name of several different goddesses. Among the Iwi
Tuvaluan mythology (1,541 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Flounder". Retrieved 2 December 2012.  Living Heritage Archived October 29, 2012, at the Wayback Machine. O le Tala ia Sina ma lana Tuna (Sina and the Eel)
Riri-tuna-rai (29 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Riri-tuna-rai is the goddess of the coconut in the mythology of Easter Island. She is married to Atua-metua. Robert D. Craig: Dictionary of Polynesian Mythology
Ul de Rico (664 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Richard Adams' short novel The Legend of Te Tuna, a story based on characters from Polynesian mythology. His paintings complemented Adams' poetic verse
Hawaii (15,012 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
ancient Hawaiian people. It is considered a variant of a more general Polynesian mythology that developed a unique character for several centuries before circa
Tokelau (5,706 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
have been a "nexus" into Eastern Polynesia. Inhabitants followed Polynesian mythology with the local god Tui Tokelau; and developed forms of music (see