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searching for The Abbey (novel) 548 found (762 total)

alternate case: the Abbey (novel)

Redwall (novel) (2,206 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article

driven out of the abbey but ends up being attacked and maimed by the adder Asmodeus who appears as a local legend and terror throughout the novel and picks
Brother Odd (312 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
is a novel by Dean Koontz, published in 2006. The novel is the third book in Koontz's series focusing on a young man named Odd Thomas. The novel begins
The Children of the Abbey (126 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Children of the Abbey is a novel by the Irish romantic novelist Regina Maria Roche. It first appeared in 1796, in London in 4 volumes, and related
A Canticle for Leibowitz (5,102 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
wrote another installment of the Abbey of Saint Leibowitz saga, Saint Leibowitz and the Wild Horse Woman. A full-length novel (455 pages) significantly longer
Regina Maria Roche (452 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
popularity of her third novel, The Children of the Abbey, rivaled that of Ann Radcliffe’s The Mysteries of Udolpho. The Children of the Abbey was one of the period’s
Cadfael (3,629 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
north of the shire, often bending the Abbey rule to travel with or visit him. Beringar, introduced in the second novel, One Corpse Too Many (1979), is Cadfael's
Redwall (2,978 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
1986, as well as the name of the Abbey featured in the book and the name of an animated TV series based on three of the novels (Redwall, Mattimeo, and Martin
Loamhedge (1,174 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
try to break into the Abbey. After an escapade of using a ladder to scale one of the windows, one sea rat manages to enter the Abbey and is about to kill
Abbey Series (1,470 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Abbey Series of British novels by Elsie J. Oxenham comprises 38 titles which were published between 1914 and 1959. The first title, Girls of the Hamlet
Tom Murphy (playwright) (884 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
(born 23 February 1935) is an Irish dramatist who has worked closely with the Abbey Theatre in Dublin and with Druid Theatre, Galway. Born in Tuam, County
Gothic fiction (10,733 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
the minds of the reader. As with many of the buildings in Gothic novels, the abbey also has a series of tunnels. These tunnels serve as both a hiding
Diary of a Drug Fiend (1,082 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
mystic Aleister Crowley's first published novel, and is also reportedly the earliest known reference to the Abbey of Thelema in Sicily. The story is widely
Borstal Boy (play) (190 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
the 1958 autobiographical novel of Irish nationalist Brendan Behan of the same title. The play debuted in 1967 at the Abbey Theatre in Dublin, with Frank
Niall Williams (591 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Initiative' was staged at The Abbey Theatre in Dublin. His second play, 'A Little Like Paradise' was produced on the Peacock stage of The Abbey Theatre in 1995
La Abadía del Crimen (967 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
game was released as La abadía del crimen. "The Abbey of Crime" was the original working title of the novel The Name of the Rose, but it was finally rejected
The Holy Thief (5,602 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Carlton Media for ITV. Heavy rains flood the river which in turn floods the Abbey, threatening the precious reliquary of Saint Winifred. When the waters
A Morbid Taste for Bones (4,692 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
endings to all parties, in Wales and in the Abbey. This novel was listed on the 1990 list of The Top 100 Crime Novels of All Time by the Crime Writers Association
The Bell (novel) (2,112 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Court as a guest while studying 14th-century manuscripts belonging to the Abbey. Dora left her husband six months earlier, but he has persuaded her to
A Rare Benedictine: The Advent of Brother Cadfael (1,408 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
and donate the proceeds to the Abbey. Fully in sympathy with Elfgiva and Alard, Cadfael allows her to disappear from the Abbey with the candlesticks. Hamo
Cadfael (TV series) (1,751 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
broadcast on ITV between 1994 and 1998, based on The Cadfael Chronicles novels written by Ellis Peters. Produced by ITV Central, it starred Derek Jacobi
Minette Walters (1,045 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
death of her father from kidney failure in 1960, Minette spent a year at the Abbey School in Reading, Berkshire, before being granted a free Foundation Scholarship
The Hermit of Eyton Forest (4,188 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
that he is orphaned, and lord of Eaton manor. Richard is educated at the Abbey per his father's wish. His grandmother, Dame Dionisia Ludel does not believe
Melk Abbey (627 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
sexes. Since 1625 the abbey has been a member of the Austrian Congregation, now within the Benedictine Confederation. In his novel The Name of the Rose
The Heretic's Apprentice (4,493 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
history. He arrives at the Abbey to resolve the heresy accusations hanging over Elave. He is reasonable and decisive in this novel. Kirkus Reviews has
Mattimeo (952 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
with plans to kidnap Mattimeo in a bid to shake the very foundations of the Abbey and its inhabitants. Slagar the fox hated Redwall Abbey—its peaceable
The Pilgrim of Hate (3,511 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
political and popular approval to replace him. Even in such troubled times, the Abbey holds the feast in honour of its own Saint Winifred, whose remains were
The Devil's Novice (3,542 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
must choose a side. A sturdy younger son of a local manor arrives at the Abbey at Shrewsbury, to be a novice. Brother Cadfael and Abbot Radulfus must
Tintern Abbey (2,853 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
For other uses, see Tintern Abbey (disambiguation). For the abbey of the same name in co. Wexford, Ireland, see Tintern Abbey (County Wexford). Tintern
Brinsley MacNamara (245 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
of several novels, the most well-known of which was his first, The Valley of the Squinting Windows (1918). His acting career with the Abbey Theatre began
Saint Peter's Fair (3,754 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
chapter at the Abbey. After acting to secure the rights of future abbots, he donates ten percent to the rebuilding of the town. The novel ends with the
Anandamath (1,338 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
about the novel. For the film based on it, see Anand Math. Anandamath (Bengali: আনন্দমঠ Anondomôţh; first English publication title: The Abbey of Bliss)
Elsie J. Oxenham (3,430 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
series The Abbey Girls. By the end of this book, the cousins Joan and Joy Shirley are living in Abinger Hall, in the gardens of which the Abbey is situated
Elizabeth Taylor (novelist) (1,482 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
inspector, and his wife Elsie May Fewtrell, Elizabeth was educated at The Abbey School, Reading and then worked as a governess, tutor and librarian. She
The Monk (8,762 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
is an extremely devout monk about 30 years old. He was found left at the Abbey doorstep when he was too young to tell his tale. The monks consider him
Tintern (1,231 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
navigable and tidal River Wye was in use in Roman times, close to the site of the abbey. After the Romans withdrew from Wales, the kingdom of Gwent emerged, and
Dracula (1996 play) (1,820 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
published in 1996, by American playwright Steven Dietz of Bram Stoker's novel by the same name. Though it has never run on Broadway, the author lists
Bobbio Abbey (1,335 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
which the monastery in Umberto Eco's novel The Name of the Rose was based, together with Sacra di San Michele. The abbey was dissolved under the French administration
The Romance of the Forest (2,460 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
trampling of horses near the abbey". The riders introduce themselves as the Marquis de Montalt, who is the owner of the abbey, and his attendants, one
Michael Colgan (actor) (317 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Love Song directed by Bille Eltringham. He also spent a year working in the Abbey Theatre in Dublin and has appeared in several television productions,
T. C. Murray (447 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
7 March 1959) was an Irish dramatist who was closely associated with the Abbey Theatre. He was born in Macroom, County Cork, and educated at St Patrick's
Irish theatre (2,477 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Hiberno-English, the Abbey was to create a style that held a strong fascination for future Irish dramatists. Indeed, it could almost be said that the Abbey created
Outcast of Redwall (968 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Bella, from the Abbey when he attempts (and fails) to poison Friar Bunfold. Bryony, feeling his banishment was unjust, leaves the abbey to track the
The Name of the Rose (3,478 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
based on the events of the book. Murder in the Abbey (2008), an adventure video game loosely based upon the novel. Developed by Alcachofa Soft and published
Silverthorn (novel) (997 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Silverthorn is a novel by Raymond E. Feist, the sequel to Magician. Released in 1985, it was followed by A Darkness at Sethanon, the final book in The
1905 in Ireland (616 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Synge's historical play The Well of the Saints is first performed at the Abbey Theatre, Dublin, by the Irish National Theatre Society. 23 May - George
Monk's Hood (4,885 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
plots of her novels. For example, in The Sanctuary Sparrow (Morrow, 1984), the jongleur Liliwin seeks sanctuary from his pursuers in the abbey church. The
The Potter's Field (Peters novel) (3,503 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
at Saint Peter's Fair in August 1143. By early October, the monks of the Abbey of Saint Peter and Saint Paul are in the newly acquired Potter's Field
Salamandastron (1,430 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Salamandastron is a fantasy novel by Brian Jacques, published in 1992. It is the fifth book published and eighth chronologically in the Redwall series
Salamandastron (1,430 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Salamandastron is a fantasy novel by Brian Jacques, published in 1992. It is the fifth book published and eighth chronologically in the Redwall series
An Excellent Mystery (4,640 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Anarchy. The burning of Winchester, the abbey at Wherwell and of Andover, are real events important to the plot of the novel. King Stephen is imprisoned. His
The Rose Rent (3,320 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
three weeks. She gave their home in the Foregate to the Abbey, half her patrimony, in a charter. The Abbey pays a single white rose from the garden, delivered
Padraic Colum (1,885 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
also joined the Gaelic League and was a member of the first board of the Abbey Theatre. He became a regular user of the National Library of Ireland,
The Monks of Thelema (62 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
novel includes descriptions of a sort of "church of Thelema", similar to the Abbey of Thélème, described in Rabelais's Gargantua. Aleister Crowley later
Tewkesbury (2,764 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
the 1930s. The Abbey Mill is also sometimes known as "Abel Fletcher's Mill", but this is simply the name given to it in Dinah Craik's novel John Halifax
Waverley Abbey (2,191 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Farnham, Surrey, about 2 miles (3.2 km) southeast of the town centre, the abbey is situated on a floodplain, surrounded by current and previous channels
Thomas Kilroy (1,051 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Search of an Author (Pirandello) The Abbey Theatre, Dublin, 1996. The Big Chapel'', Faber & Faber, 1971. This novel was awarded the Guardian Fiction
Ring for Jeeves (1,072 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Ring for Jeeves is a novel by P. G. Wodehouse, first published in the United Kingdom on 22 April 1953 by Herbert Jenkins, London and in the United States
Kate Humble (1,270 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Hartley Colliery Disaster. She grew up in Bray in Berkshire and attended the Abbey School in Reading. After leaving school she travelled through Africa from
Billiards at Half-Past Nine (2,004 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
who supported war. Later in the novel, Robert's son Joseph is presented as an architect who helps rebuild the Abbey. After he learns that it was his
The Pearls of Lutra (1,597 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
lizards and corsairs on a murderous mission to Redwall. Back at home, the Abbey dwellers race against time to unravel a fiendishly difficult series of
Whitby (8,840 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
the abbey was an Anglo-Saxon 'double monastery' for men and women. Its first abbess, the royal princess Hild, was later venerated as a saint. The abbey
Croxden Abbey (802 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
daughter house of the abbey in Aunay-sur-Odon, Normandy, the abbey was founded by the de Verdun family in the 12th century. The abbey was dissolved in
The Leper of Saint Giles (4,008 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Chronicles and was first published in 1981. The book includes a map of the Abbey, the town of Shrewsbury, St. Giles, the winding River Severn and its small
The Sanctuary Sparrow (3,304 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Cadfael Chronicles. The story opens during the midnight service at the Abbey, when a young man seeks sanctuary, just seconds ahead of a mob of locals
The Confession of Brother Haluin (3,614 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
monk at the Abbey of Saint Peter and Saint Paul in Shrewsbury, who joined the cloister later in life, about age 40. About 62 or 63 in this novel. Main article:
The Long Patrol (961 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
sun. But there is worrying news. The south wall is collapsing, leaving the Abbey open to invasion. Damug Warfang, at the head of a thousand Rapscallions
Chronicles of Xan (1,085 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
he fears most of all is what he has thought he has seen lurking around the abbey: the Grim Reaper. In hopes of finding Xan's parents and jogging his memory
Elizabeth Meeke (298 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
the pseudonym Gabrielli. Her first published novel was Count St Blanchard in 1795; others include The Abbey of Cluny, The Mysterious Wife, Anecdotes of
One Corpse Too Many (3,863 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Brother Cadfael welcomes the assistance of young Godric, brought to the Abbey by his aunt. Cadfael recognises that Godric is a girl. She is Godith Adeney
Dracula: A Chamber Musical (609 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Chamber Musical is a 1997 Canadian musical adaptation of Bram Stoker's 1897 novel Dracula. The book and lyrics are by Richard Ouzounian and the music and
Dead Man's Ransom (4,228 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Welsh and English. He joined the Abbey in his middle years, where he is the herbalist. He is 61 years old in this novel. Main article: Cadfael Abbot Radulfus:
Brigid Brophy (973 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
as a child she began writing plays. During World War II she attended The Abbey School, Reading, between May 1941 and July 1943, and other schools. She
Lacock Abbey (2,004 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
by Ela, Countess of Salisbury, as a nunnery of the Augustinian order. The abbey remained a nunnery until the suppression of Catholic institutions in England
1998 in Ireland (717 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
the air. 7 October – Marina Carr's drama By the Bog of Cats opens at the Abbey Theatre, Dublin. 24 December – Gay Byrne broadcasts his final radio show
Battle, East Sussex (1,480 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
and dedicated in 1095. The high altar of the Abbey church was reputedly on the spot where Harold died. The Abbey gateway is still the dominant feature of
High Rhulain (894 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
High Rhulain is a children's fantasy novel by Brian Jacques, published in 2005. It is the 18th book in the Redwall series. When young Tiria Wildlough
1982 in Ireland (1,129 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Factory Girls, set in a Donegal shirt factory, was premiered on the Abbey Theatre's Peacock stage in Dublin. 22 April – Graham Reid's play The Hidden
Abbey Connectors (1,755 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
fall into several sub-series, listed here in best reading order, with the Abbey Titles they relate to shown in their place in the mini-series, but without
Mont Saint-Michel (2,964 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
famous abbot of the Mount; Guillaume de Saint Pair, monk of the abbey and author of the novel Mont-Saint-Michel; The Duke of Chartres (later Louis-Philippe
Radio Éireann Players (628 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
After the depredations of the war-time years and a devastating fire in the Abbey Theatre in 1951, the Radio Éireann Players' powerful weekly performances
Bosco Hogan (214 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
(1995). Hogan appeared in the play A Cry from Heaven by Vincent Woods at the Abbey Theatre in the summer of 2005. He portrayed St. John Fisher in the 2007
Stanbrook Abbey (1,053 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
was facing a risky pregnancy, gifted the Abbey with a portion of the copyright on the novel. Iris Murdoch's novel The Bell is said to have been partly
Augusta, Lady Gregory (2,983 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Yeats and Edward Martyn, she co-founded the Irish Literary Theatre and the Abbey Theatre, and wrote numerous short works for both companies. Lady Gregory
1926 in Ireland (814 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
February - Seán O'Casey's The Plough and the Stars (set in 1915–16) opens at the Abbey Theatre, Dublin. On 11 February, the performance is marred by ugly scenes
Royaumont Abbey (430 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
the abbey was bought by the Goüin family who in 1964 created the Royaumont Foundation, the first private French cultural foundation. Today, the abbey
Campione d'Italia (844 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
inheritance to the archbishopric of Milan. Ownership was transferred to the abbey of Sant’Ambrogio. In 1512, the surrounding area of Ticino was transferred
1990 in Ireland (1,110 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
a cathedral. 24 April – Brian Friel's Dancing at Lughnasa opened at the Abbey Theatre. Anton Chekhov's Three Sisters opened at the Gate Theatre with
The Bellmaker (1,160 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Mellus, and escapes the Abbey with Blaggut and a chalice. After Blaggut learns the truth, he kills his captain and returns to the Abbey with the chalice
John Millington Synge (3,392 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
the Abbey Theatre. He is best known for his play The Playboy of the Western World, which caused riots in Dublin during its opening run at the Abbey Theatre
Una Troy (472 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
new playwrights and was performed on the Abbey stage in 1940. Three subsequent plays were also performed at the Abbey in the 1940s. In 1938, Dead Star's
The Kingdom at the End of the Road (205 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
20 years as a Knight Templar. The book starts with Arn coming home to the abbey in which he grew up and reuniting with his kinsmen. Arn, now an experienced
The Legend of Luke (819 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The son is Martin the Warrior, founder of Redwall, who sets forth from the Abbey seeking the truth about the father he barely knew. His journey takes him
The Rogue Crew (492 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Rogue Crew is the 22nd novel of the Redwall series by Brian Jacques, released on May 3, 2011. It is the final novel of the series, due to Jacques'
Cerne Abbas (806 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
villeins and thirty two bordars. For more than 500 years, the abbey dominated the area. The abbey was surrendered to Henry VIII in 1539 with the Dissolution
Fontevraud Abbey (1,597 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
women—in separate quarters of the abbey—all of which were subject to the authority of the Abbess of Fontevraud. The Abbey of Fontevraud itself consisted
Jan Burke (621 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Mystery Short Story: "The Abbey Ghosts" Macavity nominations 1998 Best Novel Liar 1997 Best Novel Hocus 2003 Best Mystery Novel Nine Ellery Queen Mystery
Hereward the Wake (4,947 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
college in Coventry, see Hereward College. For the novel by Charles Kingsley, see Hereward the Wake (novel). Hereward the Wake (also known as Hereward the
At Swim-Two-Birds (3,442 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
At Swim-Two-Birds is a 1939 novel by Irish writer Brian O'Nolan, writing under the pseudonym Flann O'Brien. It is widely considered to be O'Brien's masterpiece
Hereward the Wake (4,947 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
college in Coventry, see Hereward College. For the novel by Charles Kingsley, see Hereward the Wake (novel). Hereward the Wake (also known as Hereward the
Alfonso VIII of Castile (1,795 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
surviving son, Henry I. Alfonso was the subject for Lion Feuchtwanger's novel Die Jüdin von Toledo (The Jewess of Toledo), in which is narrated an affair
Keith McErlean (184 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Gaiety School of Acting in June 1998. He has appeared in many plays for the Abbey Theatre and Peacock Theatre including Making History, Lovers at Versailles
Evesham (5,061 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
significantly contributing to the growth of Evesham. Income for the abbey came from pilgrims to the abbey to celebrate the vision and visitors to the tomb of Simon
Declan Hughes (writer) (242 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Writer-in-Association with the Abbey Theatre in Dublin and Irish Writer Fellow at Trinity College, Dublin. He has written a series of crime novels featuring the Irish-American
Strumpet City (550 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
a gloomier and more stylized stage play, The Risen People, staged at the Abbey Theatre. Kathleen Heininge characterises it as a dry work which read as
Outlander (novel) (1,714 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
This article is about the novel. For the TV series, see Outlander (TV series). Outlander (published in the United Kingdom as Cross Stitch) is the first
Woburn Abbey (1,497 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
1547, it became the seat of the Russell family and the Dukes of Bedford. The Abbey was largely rebuilt starting in 1744 by the architects Henry Flitcroft
François Rabelais (3,104 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Rabelais writes of the Abbey of Thélème, built by the giant Gargantua. It differs remarkably from the monastic norm, as the abbey has a swimming pool
Desmond MacNamara (546 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
the early 1940s, he found a place as stage designer and prop maker for the Abbey Theatre and at the Gate Theatre in Dublin, working with the legendary
Northanger Abbey (4,058 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
home, Northanger Abbey. Catherine, in accordance with her novel reading, expects the abbey to be exotic and frightening. Henry teases her about this,
The Black Abbot (1963 film) (1,170 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
treasure. They manage to discover some scroll cases containing maps of the abbey but are driven off by the Black Abbot. They later return to find the maps
Aurillac (4,212 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
founded in 898 by Gerald shortly after the abbey. The first urban area was circular and built close to the Abbey of Aurillac. Gerald died around 910 but
Dracula: the Musical (992 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Dracula: the Musical is a Swedish musical based on the novel Dracula by Bram Stoker produced in 2010. It was originally a theatre production meant for
1907 in the United Kingdom (1,247 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
performance of J. M. Synge's play The Playboy of the Western World at the Abbey Theatre in Dublin triggers a week of rioting. The Short Magazine Lee–Enfield
The Raven in the Foregate (3,443 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
the books in the series include maps of the abbey, Shrewsbury, or areas nearby in Shropshire, including this novel. This French language site has an interactive
Maulbronn Monastery (703 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
the very first buildings in Germany to use the Gothic style. In 1993, the abbey was declared a UNESCO World Heritage Site. The complex, surrounded by
Jane Austen (11,384 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
18 July 1817) was an English novelist known primarily for her six major novels, which interpret, critique and comment upon the British landed gentry at
Bankim Chandra Chattopadhyay (1,898 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Rajsimha (1881, rewritten and enlarged 1893). Anandamath (The Abbey of Bliss, 1882) is a political novel which depicts a Sannyasi (Hindu ascetic) army fighting
The White Company (1,263 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
This article is about the novel. For the military group, see White Company. The White Company is a historical adventure by Arthur Conan Doyle set during
F. J. McCormick (279 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Abbey Theatre. He joined the Abbey at age 19, and acted in some 500 productions there, a list of which can be found in the Abbey Theatre Archive. He was
Borstal Boy (331 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
the story debuted as a play, adapted by Frank McMahon and staged at the Abbey Theatre in Dublin, with Frank Grimes as the young Behan. The play was
Buckfastleigh (1,225 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
became a Cistercian abbey and was rebuilt in stone. In medieval times, the abbey became rich through fishing and trading in sheep wool, although the Black
Rakkety Tam (1,162 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
attacks the Abbey after slipping past the Long Patrol, led by Shard's mate, Freeta. It is she that is responsible for entrance of the Abbey for it was
Billboarding (102 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
and justified act[citation needed]. Billboarding takes a minor role in the Abbey novel The Monkey Wrench Gang. Billboard Liberation Front Ecodefense
Triss (1,083 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
together by fate, when Triss comes to Redwall, and the inhabitants of the abbey find that they have a new champion - someone brave enough to carry the
Murder in the Abbey (557 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Murder In The Abbey (known as The Abbey in Spain) is an adventure video game, developed by Spanish studio Alcachofa Soft and released in 2008. The majority
Olga Fielden (153 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
wrote a number of plays for the BBC and "Three To Go" was produced by the Abbey Theatre in Dublin. Belfast novelist and playwright dies, The Irish
Glastonbury (10,135 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Life Museum, which is based in an old tithe barn, are associated with the abbey. The Church of St John the Baptist dates from the 15th century. The town
Much Wenlock (2,346 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
in 687. Milburga of Wenlock was credited with many miraculous works. The abbey flourished until around 874 when it is thought that a Danish Viking attack
Chris Culver (1,075 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
his works featuring IMPD Detective Ashraf (Ash) Rashid. His debut novel, The Abbey, was on The New York Times bestseller list for 16 weeks. Chris Culver
The Sword in the Stone (241 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
the Abbey of San Galgano in Siena providence, Italy. (Chisdino). The Sword in the Stone, a 1963 Disney animated film based on the T. H. White novel "Indiana
Uzerche (2,606 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
viscount of Segur, gifted the 'Chapelle Notre-Dame' to the monks of the Abbey. This chapel still exists in Uzerche at the 'Place des Vignerons'. Around
The Name of the Rose (film) (1,745 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Franciscans were to debate with Papal emissaries the poverty of Christ. The abbey boasts a famed scriptorium where scribes copy, translate or illuminate
Rein Abbey, Norway (302 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
for the abbey in Austria, see Rein Abbey, Austria Rein Abbey was a Roman Catholic religious house for women located in Rissa on the Fosen peninsula to
1924 in literature (1,440 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
farces". March 3 – Seán O'Casey's drama Juno and the Paycock opens at the Abbey Theatre, Dublin. March – Leonard and Virginia Woolf move themselves and
Marlfox (750 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
pursuit, while the remaining Redwallers fight off a vermin invasion back at the Abbey. The wandering Noonvale companions travel to Redwall, where they wish
Robert III, Count of Flanders (851 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
For the 1838 novel by Hendrik Conscience, see De Leeuw van Vlaanderen (novel). Robert III (1249 – 17 September 1322), also called Robert of Béthune and
Maire O'Neill (816 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
them in the National Theatre Society, later known as the Abbey Theatre. Maire was part of the Abbey Theatre from 1906-1918 where she appeared in many productions
Mariel of Redwall (3,425 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Mariel of Redwall is a fantasy novel by Brian Jacques, published in 1991. It is the fourth book published and sixth chronologically in the Redwall series
The Scapegoat (novel) (959 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
John leaves and resolves to follow his original path to the Abbey de la Grande Trappe. Novels portal Doppelgänger Review of The Scapegoat by Jo Walton
Colbrand (giant) (280 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
giant Colbrand. Winchester tradition fixes the duel at Hyde Mead, before the Abbey near Winchester. Under the reign of Henry VIII, the royal household paid
The Masque of the Red Death (2,845 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
many other wealthy nobles, hosts a masquerade ball within seven rooms of the abbey, each decorated with a different color. In the midst of their revelry
Ivo Taillebois (726 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
hamlet in Saint-Gervais de Briouze, Calvados. He sold land at Villers to the Abbey of Saint-Étienne, Caen and donated a church of Christot in Calvados. The
Catherine of Valois (1,673 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
alabaster memorial, which was deliberately destroyed during extensions to the abbey in the reign of her grandson, Henry VII. It has been suggested that Henry
Walldorf (561 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
documentary mention of the settlement occurs as Waltorf in a 770 deed issued by the Abbey of Lorsch. The Electorate of the Palatinate received Walldorf as an Imperial
1796 in Great Britain (764 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Emma Courtney. Regina Maria Roche's popular Gothic novel The Children of the Abbey. Samuel Ireland publishes a collection of Shakespearean forgeries in his
Eorsa (317 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
ecclesiastical connections. Eorsa may have done too. It once belonged to the Abbey of Iona, and became the property of the Duke of Argyll. During World War
1976 in Ireland (1,030 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
on the Abbey Theatre's Peacock Stage. The Rooney Prize for Irish Literature is launched; Heno Magee is the first recipient. John Banville's novel Doctor
Hilda of Whitby (2,503 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
and the bells of the abbey can be heard ringing under the water, where they sank with the ship taking them to London after the abbey was dismantled.
Frank McGuinness (4,788 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Duck by Henrik Ibsen (The Abbey Theatre, Dublin 2003) Hecuba by Euripides (Donmar Warehouse, London, 2004) Rebecca, from a novel by Daphne du Maurier (Theatre
Macavity Awards (1,341 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
of Practical Cats. The award is given in four categories—best novel, best first novel, best nonfiction, and best short story. In recent years a new award
Nicholas Hawksmoor (3,084 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
"Hawksmoor" redirects here. For the novel, see Hawksmoor (novel). For the restaurants, see Hawksmoor (restaurant). Nicholas Hawksmoor (probably 1661 –
1912 in Ireland (1,009 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
reintroduction). 11 April - Lennox Robinson's play Patriots is first performed, at the Abbey Theatre (Dublin). 20 April - Bram Stoker, author of Dracula and theatrical
Sinéad Cusack (1,198 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Irish stage, television and film actress. Her first acting roles were at the Abbey Theatre in Dublin, before moving to London in 1975 to join the Royal Shakespeare
List of Ulysses characters (2,512 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Nighttown, having been played by Bernadette McKenna and Maire Ni Ghrainne at the Abbey Theatre. Richard Best is a character based on Celtic scholar Richard Irvine
Tresco, Isles of Scilly (1,751 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
began to create the Abbey Gardens on land which surrounded the old Priory. Flora Castledine, lead character of the Georgie Gale novel Tread Softly, was
1931 in the United Kingdom (1,447 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
on a Tuesday: all subsequent ones will be on Thursdays. 12 November - The Abbey Road Studios in London are opened by Sir Edward Elgar. 21 November - The
Halldór Laxness (2,426 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
(the Icelandic name of Irish martyr Saint Killian). Inside the walls of the abbey, he practiced self-study, read books, and studied French, Latin, theology
Himmerod Abbey (403 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
founded the Abbey of the Holy Cross, Itaporanga near São Paulo in Brazil, in 1936. The present community (as of 2006) consists of 14 monks. The abbey has
Edmund the Martyr (6,231 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
visited by many kings, including Canute, who was responsible for rebuilding the abbey: the stone church was rebuilt again in 1095. During the Middle Ages, when
Richard Whiting (abbot) (882 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Contemporary accounts show that Whiting was held in very high esteem. The abbey over which Whiting presided was one of the richest and most influential
Church of Saint Mary, Whitby (706 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
St. Mary's Church. Then as the cloud passed I could see the ruins of the Abbey coming into view; and as the edge of a narrow band of light as sharp as
Bayswater (1,282 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
ethnic-cuisine restaurants. The land now called Bayswater belonged to the Abbey of Westminster when the Domesday Book was compiled; the most considerable
Aleister Crowley (15,734 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
of the Abbey of Thelema in Cefalù Aleister Crowley and the Abbey of Thelema in Cefalù. Perdurabo (Where is Aleister Crowley?) A film on the Abbey of Thelema
Charles Dickens (12,802 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
down. On Sunday, 19 June 1870, five days after Dickens was buried in the Abbey, Dean Arthur Penrhyn Stanley delivered a memorial elegy, lauding "the
1928 in Ireland (882 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
is founded by Hilton Edwards and Micheál Mac Liammóir, initially using the Abbey Theatre's Peacock studio theatre space to stage works by European and
1924 in Ireland (796 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Street. 3 March - Seán O'Casey's drama Juno and the Paycock opens at the Abbey Theatre, Dublin. May - In the Art competitions at the 1924 Summer Olympics
Boyle, County Roscommon (2,546 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
public garden. The entry also noted the preservation of the fine ruins of the Abbey of Boyle, one of the most interesting of all our ecclesiastical structures
1904 in Ireland (878 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
at the Royal Court Theatre, London, after W. B. Yeats rejects it for the Abbey Theatre. 27 December – The Irish National Theatre Society (Abbey Theatre)
Reading, Berkshire (9,794 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
founded in 1121 by Henry I, who is buried within the Abbey grounds. As part of his endowments, he gave the abbey his lands in Reading, along with land at Cholsey
Patrick Kavanagh (3,812 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
1967) was an Irish poet and novelist. His best-known works include the novel Tarry Flynn, and the poems "On Raglan Road" and "The Great Hunger". He is
Nuneaton (4,331 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
stands) is used as the Parish Church of St. Mary and is known locally as the Abbey Church. Despite this building's significance in Nuneaton's past and its
The Sable Quean (2,254 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
the 21st novel in the Redwall series by Brian Jacques, and the last to be published before his death on February 5, 2011 (a twenty-second novel, The Rogue
Odd Man Out (1,421 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
plays the woman who loves Johnny. Also of note are W. G. Fay—a founder of the Abbey Theatre—as the kindly Father Tom, Fay Compton, Joseph Tomelty, and Eddie
The Third Kingdom (785 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Third Kingdom is the thirteenth novel in Terry Goodkind's epic fantasy series The Sword of Truth, continuing the story arc started in the The Omen
Robert (793 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
established the Abbey of Newminster near the castle of Ralph de Merlay, at Morpeth, Northumberland (d. 1159) Saint Robert de Turlande, founding abbot of the Abbey
Lilleshall Abbey (6,458 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
between 1145 and 1148 and followed the austere customs and observance of the Abbey of Arrouaise in northern France. It suffered from chronic financial difficulties
Isabella Kelly (686 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
diseases those which are weak." Madeline, or The Castle of Montgomery (1794) The Abbey of St Asaph (1795) The Ruins of Avondale Priory (1796) Joscelina, or The
A Redwall Winter's Tale (217 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
performers that are expected at the Abbey. The Abbot had given them permission to welcome them. The performers arrive, enter the abbey, and put on a show. Finally
Irish prose fiction (3,085 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
to India to study mysticism. Moore was involved in the setting up of the Abbey Theatre and wrote several volumes of memoirs. His short stories helped
1929 in literature (2,077 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
design by Augustus John. Rejected the previous year by W. B. Yeats for the Abbey Theatre in Dublin, it will not be seen in Ireland until 1935. October
Wissembourg (896 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
founded in the 7th century, perhaps under the patronage of Dagobert I. The abbey was supported by vast territories. Of the 11th-century buildings constructed
Irish literature (10,108 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
companies went on to form the Irish National Theatre Society, later to become the Abbey Theatre. It performed plays by W.B. Yeats (1865–1939), Lady Gregory (1852–1932)
Priory of Sion (6,751 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Jerusalem in 1099, conflating it with a genuine historical monastic order, the Abbey of Our Lady of Mount Zion. In Plantard's version, the priory was devoted
Eulalia! (1,144 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
article is about the novel by Brian Jacques. For other uses, see Eulalia (disambiguation). Eulalia! is the 19th book in the Redwall novel series by author
Hospital of St John the Baptist, Arbroath (2,125 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
time that Bernard of Kilwinning (1324–c.1328) was Abbot of Arbroath. The Abbey itself was founded in 1178 by King William the Lion for a group of Tironensian
Frank Carney (playwright) (199 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
the novel Friday's Well The Wild Goose, 1936 They went by the Bus, 1939. Peeping Tom, 1940. The Righteous are Bold, 1946. Frank Carney at the Abbey Theatre
Tewkesbury mustard (631 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
of events commemorating the 850th anniversary of the consecration of the Abbey and the 500th anniversary of the Battle of Tewkesbury), the mustard was
Saint-Étienne-du-Mont (1,002 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
his death in 1986. The church of Saint-Etienne-du-Mont originated in the abbey of Sainte-Genevieve, where the eponymous saint had been buried in the
Chertsey (4,992 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
on the right bank of the River Thames where it is met by a corollary, the Abbey River and a tributary, the River Bourne or Chertsey Bourne. It is within
Whalley, Lancashire (1,320 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
loss of three lives. The east side of the bridge, nearest the remains of the Abbey, has the only decorative treatment. The village has the ruins of Whalley
Eure-et-Loir (1,113 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
1180. Bernard of Tiron, founder of the monastic order of Tiron and of the abbey of Thiron-Gardais. Jean II of France, who signed the Treaty of Brittany
1923 in literature (1,758 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
drama The Shadow of a Gunman, the first of his "Dublin Trilogy", opens at the Abbey Theatre, Dublin. April 21 – The first of a series of innovative modern
The Last Arrow (1,451 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Last Arrow is a 1997 historical novel by Canadian author Marsha Canham, the third instalment of her "Medieval" trilogy inspired by the Robin Hood
Quentin Durward (TV series) (485 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
after many adventures they marry in the Abbey Notre Dame of Morienval. Locations appearing in the series: The Abbey Notre Dame of Morienval.
Sainte-Geneviève Library (869 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
public and university library in Paris, which inherited the collection of the Abbey of St Genevieve. The library contains around 2 million documents. Main
Souls (story) (297 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
12th-century Germany, Radulphus tells the story of Radegunde, abbess of the abbey where he spent his childhood, and of what she did "when the Norsemen came"
Citizens Theatre (3,532 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Paul Vincent Carroll, the latter of whose plays were first performed at the Abbey Theatre, Dublin (founder W.B.Yeats) and later on Broadway, winning the
Pforta (877 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
is coeducational and teaches around 300 high school students. The abbey was at first situated in Schmölln on the Sprotta, near Altenburg. In 1127
Sebastian Barry (1,139 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
before his career as a playwright began with his first play produced in the Abbey theatre, Boss Grady's Boys in 1988. Barry's maternal great-grandfather
1805 in literature (573 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Williams – The Witcheries of Craig Isaf Sophia Woodfall – The Child of the Abbey R. P. M. Yorke – My Master's Secret Mary Julia Young – The Witches of
Le Thoronet Abbey (3,182 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
published Les pierres sauvages, an historical novel in the form of the journal of a master worker at the abbey. Le Thoronet Abbey (English Edition), Monum
Dracula (1931 English-language film) (4,122 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
see Renfield heading for Carfax Abbey. They see Dracula with Mina in the abbey. When Harker shouts to Mina, Dracula thinks Renfield has led them there
Waltheof, Earl of Northumbria (902 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
chapter house, the abbot had Waltheof’s body moved to a prominent place in the abbey church. When the coffin was opened, it is reported that the corpse was
The Confessor (novel) (1,418 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
The Confessor is a 2003 spy fiction novel by Daniel Silva. It is the third step on the Gabriel Allon series. Gabriel Allon is tasked to investigate
Saint-Germain-des-Prés (3,610 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
of the Abbey were rebuilt in stone c. 1000 AD, and the Abbey developed into a major center of scholarship and learning. A village grew up around the Abbey
Death Comes to Pemberley (TV series) (722 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
three-part British television drama based on the best-selling P.D. James novel of the same name. Her murder mystery was based on the style and characters
Northanger Abbey (1986 film) (444 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Northanger Abbey is a 1986 made-for-television film adaptation of Jane Austen's novel Northanger Abbey (1818), and was originally broadcast on the A&E Network
Amatus of Montecassino (685 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
(Latin: Amatus Casinensis), (11th century) was a Benedictine monk of the Abbey of Montecassino who is best known for his historical chronicles of his
1921 in Ireland (1,456 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
petty offences. 6 January - George Shiels' play Bedmates is premiered at the Abbey Theatre, Dublin. 24 February - Terence MacSwiney's play The Revolutionist
Père Pamphile (625 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Père Pamphile is a fictional character in the novel Abbé Jules (fr. L'Abbé Jules), by the French writer Octave Mirbeau (1888). While he is only a marginal
Tavistock (4,483 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
long before the town's official history began, with the founding of the Abbey. The abbey of Saint Mary and Saint Rumon was founded in 961 by Ordgar, Earl
Gloucestershire (1,959 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
notably the cathedral of Gloucester, the abbey church of Tewkesbury, and the church of Cirencester. Of the abbey of Hailes near Winchcombe, founded by
Fonthill Abbey (1,812 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
have a Gothic cathedral built for his home. Construction of the abbey began in earnest 1796 in Beckford's estate of Fonthill Gifford near Hindon
1926 in literature (1,482 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
February 8 – Seán O'Casey's play The Plough and the Stars opens at the Abbey Theatre, Dublin. On February 11, the performance is marred by ugly scenes
Liam Neeson (4,894 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Arts Centre. He acted in several other Project productions and joined the Abbey Theatre (the National Theatre of Ireland).[citation needed] In 1980 he
The Murder on the Links (3,635 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
plot twists are inspired by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's "The Adventure of the Abbey Grange".[citation needed] The Murder on the Links was presented as a
Auguste Le Prévost (982 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
upswing" walks through the ruins of the Abbey of Saint-Evroul. Nez-de-Cuir also mentions a mysterious crypt in the abbey with "miscellaneous valuables, rings
Vande Mataram (3,660 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
by Bankim Chandra Chattopadhyay in 1870s, which he included in his 1881 novel Anandamath. The first two verses of the song were adopted as the national
Zebra crossing (1,479 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
tourist attraction, and it has been incorporated into the Abbey Road Studios logo. Since the Abbey Road photo was taken, zigzag lines at the kerb and in
L'abbaye truquée (197 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Renaldo. Continuing their search, they prevent the self-destruction of the abbey and capture Atan. But Renaldo frees his boss and the two gangsters flee
Lyme Regis (3,342 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Abbey had salt-boiling rights on land adjacent to the River Lym, and the abbey once owned part of the town. Lyme is mentioned in the Domesday Book of
Hermann Hesse (4,770 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Seminary of Maulbronn Abbey in 1891. The pupils lived and studied at the abbey, one of Germany's most beautiful and well-preserved, attending 41 hours
The Three Musketeers: One for all! (199 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Official Game Page on Legendo's website (Sweden) Story Trailer from GameTrailers The Abbey Trailer from GameTrailers NintendoLife review of the Wii version
Wandering Jew (7,559 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Wendover in his own history; and other Armenians appeared in 1252 at the Abbey of St Albans, repeating the same story, which was regarded there as a
Tegernsee Abbey (1,748 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Benedictine monastery in the town and district of Tegernsee in Bavaria. Both the abbey and the town that grew up around it, are named after the Tegernsee, the
Avalon (novel) (975 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Avalon is a 1965 novel by the American author Anya Seton. It is a fictional story about Saint Rumon and Merewyn, set against a broad historical background
Peterborough Chronicle (2,576 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Such was the case with the Peterborough Chronicle: a fire compelled the abbey to copy the chronicles from other churches up to 1120. When William the
List of Redwall characters (42,267 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
characters in Brian Jacques' fantasy series Redwall. This is a list of the Abbey Warriors from the books The Legend of Luke to Eulalia!. Martin I is an
Tarry Flynn (225 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
overturned following a challenge by the publisher. The novel was produced as a play at the Abbey Theatre, Dublin in 1966, adapted by P.J O'Connor. It was
The Power of Five (12,771 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
novel of the same name, see W.I.T.C.H. The Power of Five (also known as The Gatekeepers in the US) is a series of five fantasy and suspense novels,
Thale (1,164 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
was one of the first abbeys on Saxon soil. In the period that followed the abbey came under the guardianship of the chapter in Quedlinburg. The village
Hellfire Club (2,609 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Medmenham Abbey on the Thames from a friend, Francis Duffield. On moving into the Abbey, Dashwood had numerous expensive works done on the building. It was rebuilt
Robert Bloch (9,596 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
17 (July 1934), to Weird Tales, were the short stories "The Feast in the Abbey" and "The Secret in the Tomb". "Feast..." appeared first, in the January
Conal Holmes O'Connell O'Riordan (280 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Soldier's End (1938). He succeeded John Millington Synge as director of the Abbey Theatre, Dublin from 1909 to 1915. His plays include Rope Enough (1913)
Elizabeth of York (3,423 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
son, Edward, who died four years afterward (1499), was also buried in the Abbey. The first grave in the new Chapel was that of his wife, Elizabeth of
Baume Abbey (681 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
became Baume-les-Messieurs. In the novel Raptor, the protagonist Thorn is born and lives his youth in the Abbey of St. Damian Martyr within a ringed
Gargantua and Pantagruel (2,988 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
a concluding catalog attributed to the Abbey of Saint-Victor", states Bodemer in his essay, "Rabelais and the Abbey of Saint-Victor Revisited." He befriends
Iris Wildthyme (2,079 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
character created by writer Paul Magrs, who has appeared in short stories, novels and audio dramas from numerous publishers. She is best known from spin-off
Frank O'Connor (1,778 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
director of the Abbey. Following Yeats's death in 1939, O'Connor's long-standing conflict with other board members came to a head and he left the Abbey later
The Gauntlet (novel) (254 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
number of experiences, such as attending a medieval banquet, visiting the abbey, watching a joust, before returning to fight in a siege of the castle
1999 in Ireland (885 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
October – Frank McGuinness's drama Dolly West's Kitchen is premiered at the Abbey Theatre, Dublin. 1 November – Westlife release their first album, five
1985 in Ireland (1,075 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Sons of Ulster Marching Towards the Somme opened on the Peacock Stage of the Abbey Theatre in Dublin, winning the Rooney Prize for Irish Literature. 1 June
Thomas of Maurienne (1,074 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Thomas of Maurienne (died before 720) was the first abbot of the Abbey of Farfa, which he founded between 680 and c.700. Although the sources of his life
Henry Stuart, Lord Darnley (3,857 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
(1852), History of The Abbey and Palace of Holyrood. Pub. Edinburgh: Duncan Anderson, p. 65. Anderson, Duncan (1849). History of the Abbey and Palace of Holyrood
1943 in Ireland (829 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
April - M. J. Molloy's first play, the comedy Old Road, is premiered at the Abbey Theatre, Dublin. 25 May - Christine Longford's historical play Patrick
Nasty Habits (film) (378 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
campaign to topple Alexandra. At the same time, the publicity brings the abbey to the attention of the Holy See, which discovers that the order is an
Ha-ha (1,687 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
1964–1984, Richard Reece discovered an 18th-century ha-ha designed to protect the abbey from cattle. Ice houses were sometimes built into ha-ha walls because
Rumer Godden (1,533 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Philippa (a cloistered Benedictine nun in the abbey of Brede in Sussex) through her first years in the abbey and not only her, but many of the other nuns
Nasty Habits (film) (378 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
campaign to topple Alexandra. At the same time, the publicity brings the abbey to the attention of the Holy See, which discovers that the order is an
Ha-ha (1,687 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
1964–1984, Richard Reece discovered an 18th-century ha-ha designed to protect the abbey from cattle. Ice houses were sometimes built into ha-ha walls because
Dolores Hart (1,967 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
would forgo her life as an actress, leaving behind her career to enter the Abbey of Regina Laudis monastery in Connecticut, where she served her monastic
Henry James (8,531 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Abbeys and Castles. In particular the gloomy monastic fishponds behind the Abbey are said to have inspired the lake in Turn of the Screw. While living
The Gauntlet (novel) (254 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
number of experiences, such as attending a medieval banquet, visiting the abbey, watching a joust, before returning to fight in a siege of the castle
Catherine Gore (868 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
New School for Scandal (1840) Preferment, or My Uncle the Earl (1840) The Abbey and Other Tales (1840) Greville, or a Season in Paris (1841) Cecil, or
Falster (1,169 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
biggest attraction of the town. Among other attractions in Nykøbing are the Abbey Church (Klosterkirke) which was built in the 15th century, a City Museum
Rumer Godden (1,533 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Philippa (a cloistered Benedictine nun in the abbey of Brede in Sussex) through her first years in the abbey and not only her, but many of the other nuns
Walsham How (894 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
thirty years actively engaged in parish work in Shropshire, as curate at the Abbey Church in Shrewsbury in 1848. In 1851 he became Rector of Whittington
1946 in Ireland (940 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
- Frank Carney's religious melodrama The Righteous are Bold opens at the Abbey Theatre, Dublin, where it runs for an unprecedented 14 weeks. Denis Devlin
Clairvaux (199 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
of the former Cistercian site Clairvaux Prison, built on the site of the abbey Clairvaux MacKillop College in Brisbane, Australia Abbey of New Clairvaux
2002 in Ireland (879 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
satire Hinterland, based on the life of Charles Haughey, is premièred at the Abbey Theatre, Dublin, causing controversy. 10 August – Niall Bruton's sculpture
Eleanor of Provence (1,551 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
son, Edward; when he was deathly ill in 1246, she stayed with him at the abbey at Beaulieu in Hampshire for three weeks, long past the time allowed by
Críostóir Ó Floinn (300 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
annual Oireachtas competitions. His plays have been produced in Dublin at the Abbey Theatre and Gate Theatre, and at leading theatres in Galway and Belfast
Musée des Arts et Métiers (296 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
1990, includes an additional building adjacent to the abbey, with larger objects remaining in the abbey itself. The museum has over 80,000 objects and
1974 in Ireland (978 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Murphy's adaptation of The Vicar of Wakefield opens at the Abbey Theatre, Dublin. Jennifer Johnston's novel How Many Miles to Babylon? was published. 1 January
1975 in Ireland (733 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Theatre, Belfast. 7 October - Tom Murphy's play The Sanctuary Lamp opens at the Abbey Theatre, Dublin. The Druid theatre company is founded in Galway by Garry
Dracula: Prince of Darkness (1,320 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
and Helen, but is denied admission by the monks. Ludwig, a patient at the abbey, is in thrall to Dracula and invites the Count inside. Helen convinces
Weybridge (1,925 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
and Webruge held partly by Chertsey Abbey; partly by an Englishman from the abbey; and partly by Herfrid from the conqueror's brother, the Bishop of Bayeux
George Moore (novelist) (3,845 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
revision, and Martyn's Maeve. Staged by the company who would later become the Abbey Theatre, The Bending of the Bough was a historically important play and
Hugh Leonard (1,286 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Letters, 1988 Society of Authors Sagittarius Prize – novel of Parnell and the Englishwoman, 1992 The Abbey Theatre Award, 1999 Those crazy cat days in
No Resting Place (424 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Gough and Noel Purcell, Rotha drew the cast from Irish theaters including the Abbey Theatre and Irish radio. It is regarded by some critics as part of an
Sedlec Ossuary (719 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
small amount of earth he had removed from Golgotha and sprinkled it over the abbey cemetery. The word of this pious act soon spread and the cemetery in Sedlec
1796 in literature (742 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Purbeck – Matilda and Elizabeth Regina Maria Roche – The Children of the Abbey: a Tale Jane West as 'Prudentia Homespun' – A Gossip's Story, and a Legendary
Bobbio (5,433 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
on the left bank of the river Trebbia. Its history is identified with the Abbey founded in 614 by St. Columbanus an Irish missionary, and as a result
Oliver St. John Gogarty (3,640 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
conversationalist. He served as the inspiration for Buck Mulligan in James Joyce's novel Ulysses. Gogarty was born 17 August 1878 in Rutland Square, Dublin, the
Joan, Countess of Flanders (5,229 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
died soon after. Joan then married Thomas of Savoy. She died in 1244 at the Abbey of Marquette near Lille, having survived her only child, a daughter by
Saint-Amand-de-Coly (845 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
largely in the 19th and 20th centuries, on the remains of a ruined abbey, the Abbey of Saint-Amand-de-Coly. The building is particularly remarkable for the
Aine Ni Mhuiri (323 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
the Brooklyn Academy of Music in September 2015. Katie Roche 1975 "The Abbey Theatre Archive".  "The Teresa Deevy Archive".  "Winner of the 2001
Garden (2,118 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
von Arnim's novels Elizabeth and Her German Garden and Solitary Summer John Steinbeck's short-story The Chrysanthemums John Berendt's novel Midnight in
Hainault Forest (479 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Hatfield Forest are other remaining examples. The forest belonged to the abbey of Barking until the Dissolution of the Monasteries; it extended northwards
Louise-Magdeleine Horthemels (786 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
twenty-three plates depicting the nuns of the abbey of Port-Royal and their everyday life. The abolition of the abbey had been ordered by a bull of Pope Clement
St John's Wood (1,593 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Studios and the street Abbey Road, where The Beatles recorded, notably the Abbey Road album, the cover of which features the band crossing the road. The
Hertfordshire (3,147 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Aylesbury Line from London Marylebone runs via Rickmansworth and Chorleywood the Abbey Line, a local line from Watford to St Albans Abbey the Cambridge Line
Ekkehard II (380 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
(died 23 April 990), called Palatinus ("the Courtier"), was a monk of the Abbey of Saint Gall who became known for his sequence poetry. Ekkehard was
Goostrey (1,448 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
property until the 14th century, leased out at first and then managed by the abbey directly. Abbey records mostly relate to maintenance of ditches, mills
All Souls' Day (3,478 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
This article is about the Christian holiday. For the 1998 novel, see All Souls' Day (novel). For the 2005 film, see All Souls Day (film). "Holy Souls"
Boarding school (6,054 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
being tested on his grammar by Edward the Confessor's Queen Editha in the abbey cloisters as a Westminster schoolboy, in around the 1050s. Monastic schools
1914 in literature (2,420 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
(book publication) Elsie J. Oxenham – Girls of the Hamlet Club (first in the Abbey Series) Lord Dunsany – Five Plays (publication) Harley Granville-Barker
Green children of Woolpit (3,312 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
of the town of Bury St Edmunds. During the Middle Ages it belonged to the Abbey of Bury St Edmunds, and was part of one of the most densely populated
Milborne St Andrew (596 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
civil parishes remained separate until 1933. Milborne St Andrew is in the Abbey electoral ward, which also includes Winterborne Kingston, Winterborne
The Emberverse series (4,905 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
World, is a series of post-apocalyptic alternate history novels written by S. M. Stirling. The novels depict the events following a mysterious—yet sudden—worldwide
Clane (1,480 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The dormitory and other buildings probably stood on the north side of the Abbey Church, and have long since completely disappeared. The parish of Clane
Suite Française (film) (2,138 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
based on part of Irène Némirovsky's 2004 novel of the same name. The film depicts the second part of the novel, Dolce. The film stars Michelle Williams
Whitby Abbey (1,047 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
the Roman calculation of Easter and monastic tonsure - took place at the abbey. Streoneshalch was laid waste by Danes in successive raids between 867
1780 in literature (572 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Cowley – The Maid of Aragon George Crabbe – The Candidate Herbert Croft – The Abbey of Kilkhampton; or, Monumental Records for the Year 1980 (satire) Susannah
Lindsay Duncan (2,010 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
a new version by Frank McGuinness of Ibsen's John Gabriel Borkman at the Abbey Theatre, Dublin alongside her Liaisons dangereuses co-stars Alan Rickman
1482 (516 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Florence and meets Marsilio Ficino. Johannes Trithemius becomes a novice at the abbey of St. Martin at Sponheim in the diocese of Mainz. First printed edition
Normandy (4,620 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Architecture of Normandy Architecturally, Norman cathedrals, abbeys (such as the Abbey of Bec) and castles characterise the former Duchy in a way that mirrors
Limoges (2,987 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
is the centre of the modern Limoges. Starting from the construction of the Abbey of St. Martial (9th century), another settlement grew around the tomb
1482 (516 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Florence and meets Marsilio Ficino. Johannes Trithemius becomes a novice at the abbey of St. Martin at Sponheim in the diocese of Mainz. First printed edition
Normandy (4,620 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Architecture of Normandy Architecturally, Norman cathedrals, abbeys (such as the Abbey of Bec) and castles characterise the former Duchy in a way that mirrors
Saint Louis Priory School (2,398 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
in its 2016 list of "America's Most Challenging High Schools." The Abbey Church was constructed in 1962. It is also known as the Church of St.
Northanger Abbey (2007 film) (4,003 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
is a 2007 British television film adaptation of Jane Austen's eponymous novel. It was directed by British television director Jon Jones and the screenplay
Daniel Quinn (2,340 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
delayed part of this university education, however, while a postulant at the Abbey of Our Lady of Gethsemani in Bardstown, Kentucky, where he hoped to become
Dickon (novel) (892 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Dickon is a 1929 novel by Marjorie Bowen about King Richard III of England. It was one of many historical fiction works she wrote in her life. The book
Book burning (5,613 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
containing a vast number of documents relating to the 1500-years' history of the Abbey as well as some 1,400 irreplaceable manuscript codices, chiefly patristic
Brother Cadfael's Penance (5,025 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Cadfael's Penance is a medieval mystery novel set in the autumn of 1145 by Ellis Peters. It is the last novel in the Cadfael Chronicles, first published
Sherlock Holmes: Crimes & Punishments (1,506 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
colleagues. Holmes delves into an investigation featuring the Cult of Mithras. The Abbey Grange Affair: Sir Eustace Brackenstall, an aristocrat of violent temper
King Javan's Year (1,565 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
fantasy novel by American-born author Katherine Kurtz. It was first published by Del Rey Books in 1992. It was the eleventh of Kurtz' Deryni novels to be
Hartland Abbey (910 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
family of Boscastle, Cornwall, were among the most generous donors to the Abbey. (Male heirs were apparently all named William, until the death in 1462
Anne of Cleves (3,310 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
of average height. She is the only wife of Henry VIII to be buried in the Abbey. Anne's epitaph in Westminster Abbey, which is in English, reads simply:
Paul is dead (1,984 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
words were actually "cranberry sauce". Another is the interpretation of the Abbey Road album cover as symbolising a funeral procession, where Lennon, dressed
The Black Arrow: A Tale of the Two Roses (5,706 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
history as in the novel was a victory for the House of York. The presence of an abbey church in Shoreby is reminiscent of the abbey church of Tewkesbury
Belinda McKeon (792 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Belinda McKeon (born 1979) is an Irish writer. She is the author of two novels, Solace, winner of the 2011 Geoffrey Faber Memorial Prize, and Tender (2015)
Darling of the Day (1,252 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
E.Y. Harburg, and music by Jule Styne. It is based on Arnold Bennett's novel Buried Alive and his play The Great Adventure. The show closed after only
Robert Anthony Welch (1,411 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Transformations in Modern Irish Writing (1993, Routledge). His history of the Abbey Theatre, Dublin, was published in 1999 to mark the centenary of the first
Peter Bowler (lexicographer) (546 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Australia (he is an Officer of the Order of St John); and Vice-President of the Abbey Museum of Art and Archaeology in Brisbane. His books about words are published
Ely, Cambridgeshire (11,788 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Æthelthryth (also known as Etheldreda) founded an abbey at Ely in 673; the abbey was destroyed in 870 by Danish invaders and was rebuilt by Æthelwold,
Reichenau an der Rax (450 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
mentioned in a 1256 deed. Duke Otto IV the Merry, who in 1327 had established the abbey of Neuberg, acquired Reichenau in 1333 and granted it to the monastery
New religious movements and cults in popular culture (4,362 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
short-lived commune (the "Abbey of Thelema") in Sicily, wrote poetry (anthologized in 1917 in The Oxford Book of English Mystical Verse) and novels (Diary of a
Clan Douglas (3,952 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Lanarkshire. The Kirk of St Bride at Douglas, along with Melrose Abbey and the Abbey of Saint-Germain-des-Prés holds the remains of many of the Earls of Douglas
Stephen Smalley (782 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
to celebrate 900 years of worship and activity since the foundation of the Abbey of St Werburgh on the same site, the Dean launched ´Building for Tomorrow´
Tours (3,605 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
king, Clovis, which increased considerably the influence of the saint, the abbey and the city in Gaul. In the 9th century, Tours was at the heart of the
1914 in the United Kingdom (3,214 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Elsie J. Oxenham's children's novel Girls of the Hamlet Club, first in the Abbey Series. Robert Tressell's socialist novel The Ragged Trousered Philanthropists
Chartreuse (liqueur) (2,049 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
in 1984 to commemorate the 900 year anniversary of the foundation of the abbey. It is similar to Green Chartreuse but slightly sweeter. Chartreuse 1605
Douglas Kennedy (writer) (760 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
co-operative theatre company with a friend. He was later hired to run the Abbey Theatre's second house, The Peacock. At the age of 28, he resigned from
Bourne, Lincolnshire (6,301 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
part of the Beltisloe Deanery of the Diocese of Lincoln and is based at the Abbey Church of St Peter and St Paul, in Church Walk. The incumbent is Revd
Kenilworth (3,868 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
suppressed in the Dissolution of the Monasteries in the 1530s. Thereafter the abbey grounds next to the castle, were made common land in exchange for common
Eleanor of Aquitaine (8,914 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
English published a second novel, To Be Queen, which is another historical novel centered on Eleanor of Aquitaine's life. This novel covers the years 1132–1152
Alice Perrers (1,669 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Hertfordshire family of Perrers had a long-standing quarrel with the abbey of St Albans, which had caused him to be imprisoned in 1350 and even outlawed
Peasants' Revolt (13,315 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
already fled. The rebels broke open the abbey gaol, destroyed the fences marking out the abbey lands and burnt the abbey records in the town square. They
Peadar O'Donnell (3,367 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
performed at the Abbey Theatre in Dublin on 21 November 1932, and published by Jonathan Cape the following year. In total O'Donnell wrote seven novels and one
Maureen O'Hara (14,920 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
trained with the Rathmines Theatre Company from the age of 10 and at the Abbey Theatre from the age of 14. She was given a screen test, which was deemed
Sister Fidelma mysteries (5,386 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Sister Fidelma mysteries are a series of historical mystery novels and short stories by Peter Tremayne (pseudonym of Peter Berresford Ellis) about
Peter Abelard (6,307 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
she must submit to a religious life for which she had no calling. In the Abbey of Saint-Denis, the 40-year-old Abelard sought to bury himself as a monk
Wilton House (4,258 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
VIII, its prosperity was already on the wane. Following the seizure of the abbey, Henry presented it and its attached estates to William Herbert, 1st Earl
Echo chamber (1,936 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
metaphorical echo chambers in media, see Echo chamber (media). For the 2011 novel by Luke Williams, see The Echo Chamber. An echo chamber is a hollow
Ian Curteis (577 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Tales of Rudyard Kipling: Watches of the Night (1964) director Pity About the Abbey (1965) director Out of the Unknown: Walk's End (1966) director The Projected
The Monk (Doctor Who) (1,724 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Garden, the Monk is once again pretending to be a human monk, this time at the Abbey of Kells in Ireland, 1006. Calling himself Thelonios, he used the illuminated
Sydling St Nicholas (1,737 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
priest. The abbey was the lord of the village at the time of the Domesday Book in 1086, which recorded 54 households with a value to the abbey of £25.
1916 in Ireland (1,992 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Whiteheaded Boy is premiered at the Abbey Theatre, Dublin. 29 December - James Joyce's semi-autobiographical novel A Portrait of the Artist as a Young
Hell's Foundations Quiver (1,020 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
and sword ("Helm Cleaver") were all relocated before the destruction of the Abbey and that large portions of the journal are in Spanish, a language the
Stone of Scone (2,255 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
story credits the recovery of the stone at the abbey to his powers of ratiocination. In the alternate history novel Dominion by C.J. Sansom, the Stone of Scone
1983 in Ireland (1,424 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
for Irish Literature for her novel In Night's City. 29 September – Tom Murphy's play The Gigli Concert opened at the Abbey Theatre, Dublin. Shaun Davey's
1940 in Ireland (1,682 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Dublin. 5 August - George Shiels' play The Rugged Path is premiered at the Abbey Theatre, Dublin. October - The Bell, a liberal monthly magazine of literature
Young E. Allison (322 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
close friend J. Christian Bay of Chicago. He wrote several articles on the Abbey of Gethsemani, a Trappist monastery in western Kentucky. Allison also
Athos-Aspis (1,254 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Origins: Marca: Pierre de Marca, History of Béarn. Cartulary: Cartulary of the Abbey of Saint-Jean de Sorde Notaries: Notaries of Labastide-Villefranche Census:
Lawrence Scott (1,572 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
School, San Fernando, Trinidad (1950–54), and by the Benedictine monks at the Abbey School, Mount Saint Benedict, Tunapuna (1955–62), before leaving at the
Héloïse (3,760 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
castration, filled with shame at his situation, Abélard became a monk in the Abbey of St Denis in Paris. At the convent in Argenteuil, Héloïse took the habit
Robert Murray Gilchrist (1,203 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Richards, 1902. Beggar's Manor. London: William Heinemann, 1903. The Abbey Mystery: A Novel. London: Ward, Lock & Co., 1908. The Gentle Thespians. London:
Edith Pargeter (1,661 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
popular series of Brother Cadfael medieval mysteries, a Benedictine monk at the Abbey in Shrewsbury. That pseudonym was drawn from the name of her brother,
Bath, Somerset (11,629 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Alfred laid out the town afresh, leaving its south-eastern quadrant as the abbey precinct. In the Burghal Hidage, Bath is recorded as a burh (borough)
Lost work (7,764 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
dissolution. Only six of them have survived intact to the present day. At the abbey of the Augustinian Friars at York, a library of 646 volumes was destroyed
Ely Cathedral (7,842 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
people as Hereward the Wake, culminating in the Siege of Ely, for which the abbey suffered substantial fines. Under the Normans almost every English cathedral
David Rizzio (1,472 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Buchanan wrote in 1581 that David was first buried outside the door of the Abbey, and then Mary arranged for him to be buried in the tomb of her father
Bermondsey (2,519 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
a Cluniac priory in 1082, and was dedicated to St Saviour. Monks from the abbey began the development of the area, cultivating the land and embanking
Peterborough (15,831 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
history of the abbey, the Peterborough version of the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle (see Peterborough Chronicle below) and in a history of the abbey by the monk
Gabriel Byrne (1,920 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
acting at age 29, and began his career on stage with the Focus Theatre and the Abbey Theatre in Dublin. He later joined the Performing Arts Course in Sandymount
Stephen Boyd (5,116 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
turned to the cloistered life of a nun in 1963. He visited her in 1966 at the Abbey of Regina Laudis in Connecticut and remained in communication with her
Culture of Reading, Berkshire (2,416 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Reading. Jane Austen attended Reading Ladies Boarding School, based in the Abbey Gateway, in 1784–86. Mary Russell Mitford lived in Reading for a number
George Bernard Shaw (19,320 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
unsuccessfully to persuade Shaw to take up the vacant co-directorship of the Abbey Theatre after J. M. Synge's death in 1909. Shaw admired other figures
Abingdon-on-Thames (4,879 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
transferred to its present site when the Abbey was moved. In 1084, William the Conqueror celebrated Easter at the Abbey and then left his son, the future
Château de Montsoreau (2,191 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
mother-in-law, Hersende de Champagne, was the first great prior and co-founder of the Abbey with Robert d'Arbrissel. Guillaume IV de Montsoreau was on Geoffrey Plantagenet's
St. Irvyne (1,950 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
communicate to you" and meet him in the abbey at St. Irvyne. In the final scene, which takes place at the abbey of St. Irvyne in France, Wolfstein finds
Tywardreath (1,384 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
priory established at around the time of the Norman conquest. Founded from the Abbey of SS. Sergius and Bacchus, Angers in France, it was founded to contain
Ben Travers (3,623 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Travers, a merchant, and his wife, Margaret, née Burges. He was educated at the Abbey School, Beckenham, and at Charterhouse. He did not greatly enjoy his schooldays
Cyril Cusack (1,257 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Kildare and University College Dublin. He left without a degree and joined the Abbey Theatre in 1932. Between then and 1945, he performed in over 60 productions
Antoine François Prévost (1,106 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
of the order, teaching, preaching and studying. In 1728 he was sent to the Abbey of Saint-Germain-des-Prés, Paris, where he contributed to the Gallia Christiana
List of television programs broadcast by Logo (148 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
LGBT-related issues. Wisecrack Stand-up comedy 2005 Stand-up comedy recorded at The Abbey in West Hollywood, California. The series featured comedians Page Hurwitz
William Blake (11,174 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Blake spent sketching in the Abbey, he was occasionally interrupted by boys from Westminster School, who were allowed in the Abbey. They teased him and one
Richard Lee (engineer) (786 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
dissolution of St Albans Abbey he himself purchased the grounds of the abbey (the abbey church itself was sold by King Edward VI to the people of St Albans
Flitch of bacon custom (2,902 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
at one time quite widespread. There was a flitch of bacon tradition at the Abbey of St Melaine, Rennes, Brittany, where the bacon is said to have hung
Brian Friel (5,046 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
journalist Sean Ward even referred to him in an Irish Press article as one of the Abbey Theatre's "rejects". In a 1965 interview, Friel spoke of his fear that
Holyrood Park (1,687 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
order of King David I of Scotland, within his royal deer-hunting park. The Abbey was in use until the 16th century. It was briefly used as a Chapel Royal
Lindisfarne (6,447 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
which started on 19 April 2007 and on a DVD of the same name. When the abbey was rebuilt by the Normans, the site was moved. The site of the original
Wolf Solent (2,926 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Wolf Solent is a novel by John Cowper Powys (1872–1963) published in 1929. This, Powys's fourth novel, was his first literary success. It is a bildungsroman
Emma Jane Guyton (845 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Sissie (1882) Warleigh's Trust (1883) The Abbey Mill (1883) Amy Wilton, etc. (1883) Fortune's Favourite. A Novel (1885) Helen Bury; or The Errors of My
Humphrey, Duke of Gloucester (1,536 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Candido Decembrio and Tito Livio de Forli. Duke Humphrey also patronised the Abbey of St Albans. Duke Humphrey's Walk was the name of an aisle in Old St
Irish Literary Revival (1,392 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Theatre Society with funding from Annie Horniman; Fred Ryan was secretary. The Abbey Theatre was opened by this society in Abbey Street on 27 December 1904
Lord Byron (13,111 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Abbey, in Nottinghamshire. His mother proudly took him to England, but the Abbey was in an embarrassing state of disrepair and, rather than live there
Camber MacRorie (4,069 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
the novel, see Camber of Culdi (novel). Camber MacRorie of Culdi is a fictional character in the Deryni series of historical fantasy novels by Katherine
The Beatles: Rock Band (9,002 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
performances, as well as a number of "dreamscape" sequences for songs from the Abbey Road Studios recording sessions during the group's studio years. The game's
Prisoners of the Sun (4,167 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
breakdown as a result of overwork, and to recover he spent time in retreat at the Abbey of Notre-Dame-de-Scourmont. In a letter to his wife Germaine, Hergé wrote
Mercia (5,115 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
arms were subsequently used by the Abbey of St Albans, founded by King Offa of Mercia. With the dissolution of the Abbey and the incorporation of the borough
Guthrie Theater (2,304 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
international reputation with his work at Ireland's national theater, the Abbey Theatre, including becoming the Abbey's youngest artistic director in
Giordano Bruno (10,034 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
This is recorded in the diary of one Guillaume Cotin, librarian of the Abbey of St. Victor, who recorded recollections of a number of personal conversations
Isola del Giglio (1,149 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
book i, verse 325 In 805, the island was donated by Charlemagne to the abbey of the Tre Fontane in Rome, and was later successively a possession of
Eye, Suffolk (1,431 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Hartismere, founded Eye Priory, a Benedictine Priory of St Peter, a cell of the Abbey of Bernay in Normandy. Eye began to lose its strategic importance
Mary Magdalene (12,297 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
[citation needed] St. Mary Magdalene's relics were first venerated at the Abbey of la Madaleine, Vézelay in Burgundy from about 1050. Jacobus de Voragine
Edward Plunkett, 18th Baron of Dunsany (5,867 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
short stories, as well as successful plays, novels and essays. He is best known for his 1924 fantasy novel The King of Elfland's Daughter. He achieved
Ingress Abbey (1,755 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
in 2001. The developers, Crest Nicholson, spent £6 million restoring the abbey, follies, and grounds as part of the redevelopment scheme. Ingress Abbey
Surrey (9,834 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
666. At this point Surrey was evidently under Kentish domination, as the abbey was founded under the patronage of King Ecgberht of Kent. However, a few
The Summer of the Danes (4,327 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
novel are real places, from Shrewsbury Abbey and Oswestry to St Asaph, Aber, Bangor, Abermenai and the many stops between Cadfael's home at the Abbey
Abbeville (9,556 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
could have been the location of the farm of Abbatisvilla, dependent upon the Abbey of Saint-Riquier. The suburbs of La Bouvaque and Thuison are located to
Desmond Hogan (2,379 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Short Walk to the Sea, Sanctified Distances, and The Squat – produced in the Abbey Theatre and the Project Arts Centre. RTÉ and BBC Radio broadcast some
Gelnhausen (1,112 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
conflict was escalated up to Pope Gregory IX who decided in favour of the abbey. From the 13th to the 15th century the church was used for weddings, baptisms
Suzanne R. Day (426 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
women poor-law guardians which led to her first novel. From 1913 to 1917 she wrote three plays for the Abbey Theatre in collaboration with Geraldine Cummins
Arthur Conan Doyle bibliography (869 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Watson to a wide audience; the duo had provided the subject of Doyle's first novel, A Study in Scarlet, which was published in Beeton's Christmas Annual in
Stewart Farrar (3,440 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
screenplay entitled Pity About the Abbey with his friend, Sir John Betjeman, who would later be made Poet Laureate. Pity About the Abbey was a story in which Westminster
Mont Saint-Michel in popular culture (1,133 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Avranches Robert of Thorigny, abbot Guillaume de Saint Pair, monk from the Abbey, author of the Roman du Mont-Saint-Michel Duc of Chartres (futur Louis-Philippe
Providence: The Story of a Fifty-Year Vision Quest (1,148 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
influenced by Thomas Merton’s The Seven Storey Mountain, Quinn went to the Abbey of Gethsemani in Kentucky. At Gethsemani, Merton in fact became Quinn’s
Llywelyn ap Gruffudd (3,897 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
As for the body of the Prince, his mangled trunk, it was interred in the Abbey of Cwm Hir, belonging to the Cistercian Order. Another theory is that
Stewart Farrar (3,440 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
screenplay entitled Pity About the Abbey with his friend, Sir John Betjeman, who would later be made Poet Laureate. Pity About the Abbey was a story in which Westminster
Aigues-Mortes (5,083 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
as confirmed by an act of endowment made by the Badila from Nîmes at the abbey. At that time, the people lived in reed huts and made their living from
Paula Meehan (1,149 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
of Winter. Produced by the Abbey Company: Abbey Theatre of Dublin, 2003. Wuthering Heights. Two-hour adaptation of the novel for RTÉ Radio 1, 2003. Repeat
Tom Vaughan-Lawlor (928 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Mahon in The Playboy of the Western World for the Abbey Theatre which toured North America. Also at the Abbey he played Len in Edward Bond's Saved, Solyony
Courtney (1,412 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Reginald de Curtenay, which was dated 1164, in "Feudal Documents from the Abbey of Bury St Edmunds", Suffolk, during the reign of King Henry II. Beth
Aaron Sorkin (8,922 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
workshop production of the play in collaboration with the Abbey Theatre. But in 2006, the Abbey Theatre's new management pulled out of all involvement
Cesare Borgia (3,680 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
both Castres and Elne. In 1494, he also received the title of abbot of the abbey of Saint-Michel-de-Cuxa. Along with his father's elevation to Pope, Cesare
Henry the Young King (2,336 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
left orders that his entrails and other body parts should be buried at the abbey of Charroux, but the rest of his body should rest in Rouen Cathedral.
Richard III of England (16,802 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Stroud (repr.). , pp. 81–82 Riley, T. (ed.), Ingulph's Chronicle of the Abbey of Croyland: with the Continuations By Ingulf, Peter (of Blois), London
Saint Gall (1,213 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
channel. After his death, a small church was erected which developed into the Abbey of St. Gall, the nucleus of the Canton of St. Gallen in eastern Switzerland
Edmund Ironside (1,651 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
near his grandfather Edgar at Glastonbury Abbey in Somerset, however the abbey was destroyed during the Dissolution of the Monasteries in the 16th century
Catherine Carey (1,430 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Chapel in Westminster Abbey. There is a small commemorative plaque in the abbey, although her chief monument is at Rotherfield Greys in Oxfordshire. Catherine's
The Janna Mysteries (942 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
reached a crucial point, and Janna meets the empress when she comes to the abbey, a meeting that will open her eyes to a whole new world and further discoveries
M. R. James (6,701 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
discovery of a manuscript fragment led to excavations in the ruins of the abbey at Bury St Edmunds, West Suffolk, in 1902, in which the graves of several
Erling Wold (1,251 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Balbuli Sancti Galli Monachi (2010). On Spooky Pooch Records. Recorded at the Abbey of Saint Gall under the direction of Hans Eberhard, with Kimberly Brockman
Window of the World (636 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Paris The Palace of Versailles near the town of Versailles, Île-de-France The abbey of Mont Saint-Michel in Normandy The Pont du Gard aqueduct of Vers-Pont-du-Gard
James Macpherson (1,640 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
of 59. Macpherson's remains were carried from Scotland and interred in the Abbey Church of Westminster.[citation needed] The Highland MP and antiquarian
Callan, County Kilkenny (891 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
located in Prologue, Callan Callan Augustinian Friary, known locally as the "Abbey Meadow" can be found at the North East end of Callan and can be accessed
Robert of Shrewsbury (died 1168) (2,010 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
probably just refers to his long-term connection with the abbey. He appears first as prior of the abbey in 1137, suggesting a birth date around the turn of
Thelema (6,548 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
epitomises the ideals considered in Rabelais's fiction. The inhabitants of the abbey were governed only by their own free will and pleasure, the only rule
Roger Casement (8,087 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
which was written by Richard Herd and Richard Stockton; it premiered at the Abbey Theatre in Dublin on 15 February 1972 A German TV series, Sir Roger Casement
Writers in Paris (5,842 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
of the most important new schools was established on the left bank at the Abbey of Sainte-Genevieve; its teachers included the scholar Pierre Abelard
Chipping Barnet (1,896 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
times the site was part of an extensive wood called Southaw, belonging to the Abbey of St Albans. The name of the town appears in early deeds as 'Bergnet'
The Last Supper (Leonardo da Vinci) (3,016 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
notable examples are: A 16th-century oil on canvas copy is conserved in the abbey of Tongerlo, Antwerp, Belgium. It reveals many details that are no longer
Lambesc (6,022 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
San-Peyre was sacked by Raymond Berenguer IV in 1222. In the twelfth century, the Abbey of Saint-André of Villeneuve-les-Avignon owned the church of St. John
Voltaire (14,216 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Paris, but friends and relations managed to bury his body secretly at the Abbey of Scellières in Champagne, where Marie Louise's brother was abbé. His
Laurie London (597 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
disc by the RIAA in 1958. According to one online source, "he worked at the Abbey Road Studios, London with such renowned record producers as Norman Newell
Hiddensee (4,070 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
there today, was consecrated in the current parish of Kloster, outside the abbey walls, especially for the farmers and fishermen on the island. On the
George Lennon (1,954 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
post-war Shannon flights. In May 1947 "Dead Star's Light" was performed on the Abbey stage as" The Dark Road". In the play it was noted that in 1930's Ireland
Malvern, Worcestershire (13,182 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
cloisters was destroyed), all that remains of Malvern's monastery is the Abbey Gateway (also known as the Priory Gatehouse) that houses today's Malvern
John Harrison (6,001 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
in the Abbey. London: Worshipful Company of Clockmakers. Published in Honour of John Harrison on the Occasion of the Unveiling of his Memorial in the Abbey
Catch-22 (Lost) (1,423 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
joining a monastery. He is greeted by Brother Campbell, who welcomes him to the abbey. The two quickly get along, and one day they are applying the labels for
Nightmare Abbey (4,679 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
sanguine Mr Hilary, who, as Mr Glowry's brother-in-law, is obliged to visit the abbey from family interests. The Reverend Mr Larynx, the vicar of nearby Claydyke
Madame du Barry (3,888 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
to the throne, Marie Antoinette made sure her husband exiled Jeanne to the Abbey du Pont-aux-Dames near Meaux-en-Brie. At first she was not met warmly
Shay Healy (1,162 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Seamus, was a civil servant and part-time stage actor who performed at the Abbey and Olympia theatres. His mother, Máirín Ní Shúilleabháin, was a singer
Storrington (760 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
small door in Browns Lane, the church, and the Dominican convent known as the Abbey to be historically significant. Since 1945 Storrington has expanded with
Rosslyn Chapel (4,012 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
that the altars of Roslene were haille demolishit. John Charles Carrick, The Abbey of S. Mary, Newbottle: a memorial of the royal visit, 1907, G. Lewis &
Fleur-de-lis (5,908 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
century, an allegorical poem by Guillaume de Nangis (d. 1300), written at the abbey of Joyenval at Chambourcy, relates how the golden lilies on an azure ground
Plan of Saint Gall (1,312 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
named because it was kept at the famous medieval monastery library of the Abbey of St. Gall, where it remains to this day. It was drawn in a scriptorium
Shropshire (6,904 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
St Milburga was the daughter of Anglo-Saxon king Merewalh, who founded the abbey within his sub-kingdom of Magonsæte.[8] The town adjoining the priory
Thomas Love Peacock (3,882 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Shelley and they influenced each other's work. Peacock wrote satirical novels, each with the same basic setting: characters at a table discussing and
John Chandos (1,534 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
and Saint-Savin, a few miles from Poitiers. Chandos decided to retake the abbey of Saint-Savin, with a surprise attack under cover of night. The planned
A Study in Pink (3,130 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
resolves a murder mystery. It is loosely based upon the first Sherlock Holmes novel, A Study in Scarlet. The episode was written by Steven Moffat, who co-created
Tintagel (5,628 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
early as the mid-13th century when the benefice came into the hands of the Abbey of Fontevraud in Anjou, France. Main article: King Arthur's Hall, Tintagel
St Swithun-upon-Kingsgate Church (845 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Most likely the church served as a chapel for lay people who worked for the Abbey. In 1337 some woodwork was done on the church, costing a total of fifteen
Stygge Krumpen (549 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
alongside his uncle, bishop Niels Stygge, and was the effective rule of the abbey. He had the provost of Børglum Abbey expelled and his rights transferred
Blanche of Castile (2,611 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Henry II of England and Eleanor of Aquitaine. In her youth, she visited the Abbey of Santa María la Real de Las Huelgas, founded by her parents, several
Latrun (2,344 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Carmel-Mizrahi Winery. Today they produce a wide variety of wines that are sold in the Abbey shop and elsewhere. The community was expelled by the Ottoman Turks between
William Morris (15,769 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
three years, 100 craftsmen would be employed there. Working conditions at the Abbey were better than at most Victorian factories. However, despite Morris's
Isabella of Angoulême (2,151 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
son King Henry III of England was shocked to find her buried outside the Abbey and ordered her immediately moved inside. She was finally placed beside
Saint Cecilia (2,404 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
needed] St Cecilia makes a brief appearance in Walter Pater's philosophical novel, Marius the Epicurean. The poem "Moschus Moschiferus", by Australian poet
Kevin Wallace (821 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
stage and television actor in his native Ireland and in Britain, with the Abbey Theatre, the Royal Shakespeare Company (RSC), Bristol Old Vic, The Liverpool
Propinquity (novel) (2,032 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
a 1986 novel by Australian author/journalist John Macgregor. The manuscript won the Adelaide Festival Biennial Award for Literature; the novel was short-listed
The Comedy of Errors (2,631 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Egeon's wife, Emilia of Babylon. The Duke pardons Egeon. All exit into the abbey to celebrate the reunification of the family. The play contains
Firle (1,594 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
During the reign of Edward the Confessor (1042–66) Firle was part of the Abbey of Wilton's estate. Following the Norman conquest of England the village
House of Tudor (8,905 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
History Today. 59 (4): 14–20.  "Leicester City Council - History of the Abbey; Cardinal Wolsey". 2012. Retrieved 19 January 2012.  Smith, p. 18-21
Minor Sherlock Holmes characters (5,921 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Adventure of Black Peter", in Weald set in 1895, and "The Adventure of the Abbey Grange", in 1897 in Chislehurst. In the first episode of Season Two of
15th century in literature (3,367 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The St Albans Press, the third printing press in England, is set up in the Abbey Gateway, St. Albans. Robert Ricart begins writing The Maire of Bristowe
Stronghold 3 (1,548 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
military campaign. The Boy helps rebuild the Abbey destroyed during the war.(The boy does not help rebuild the abbey if he dies at the end of the military
Paracelsus (4,978 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
chemist and physician. His mother was Swiss and probably a bondswoman of the abbey of Einsiedeln in Switzerland where he was born; she presumably died in
Kentucky (13,989 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
of his life and wrote most of his books during his time as a monk at the Abbey of Our Lady of Gethsemani near Bardstown, Kentucky. Hunter S. Thompson
Angela Brazil (3,827 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Brent-Dyer. The Melling School series of books written by Margaret Biggs. The Abbey Series, Abbey Connectors and other series of books about schoolgirls by
Daniel Asa Rose (383 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Daniel Asa Rose is an American author (memoirs, novels, short stories, essays, reviews, poems, travel, humor), journalist, and editor. His most recent
Deborah Warner (701 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Good Person of Sezuan (1989, National Theatre); Hedda Gabler (1991, The Abbey Theatre and BBC2); the controversial Richard II, with Shaw in the title
Owen Glendower (novel) (6,308 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Owen Glendower: An Historical Novel by John Cowper Powys was first published in America in January 1941, and in the UK in February 1942. Powys returned
Marseille (11,101 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
17th-century chapel of Sainte-Catherine, on the quayside near the Cathedral. The Abbey of Saint-Victor, one of the oldest places of Christian worship in Europe
Mary Manning (writer) (318 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Manning got her theatre training in Sara Allgood's teaching class in the Abbey Theatre. She had gone to school in Morehampton House and Alexandra College
Society of Jesus (15,594 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
health declined, the Nazis feared the creation of a martyr and sent him to the Abbey of Ettal, but Mayer died in 1945. For more details on this topic, see
Robert de Beaumont, 2nd Earl of Leicester (1,728 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
who can only be this Robert. On his death he left his own psalter to the abbey he founded at Leicester, which was still in its library in the late fifteenth
Geraldine Cummins (1,709 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
for the Abbey Theatre in collaboration with Suzanne R. Day, the most successful of which was the comedy Fox and Geese (1917). She published the novel The
Cherbourg-Octeville (24,858 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
1944. Bought by the Town Hall in 1961, the Abbey has been slowly restored since 1965. The smokestack of the Abbey House (16th century) is kept in the council
Wirral Peninsula (5,509 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
time, large areas of the Wirral were owned by Chester Abbey. In 1278 the Abbey was granted the right to hold an annual three-day fair at Bromborough
Antoinette Henriette Clémence Robert (703 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
de Chateaubriand and Juliette Récamier, in Mlle Récamier's quarters at the abbey. Clémence Robert died in Paris in 1872, five days before her 75th birthday
Star of the Guardians (2,968 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Star of the Guardians is a series of fantasy novels by Margaret Weis. The series consists of several volumes: The Lost King King's Test King's Sacrifice
Troyes (1,775 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
remained the capital of the Province of Champagne until the Revolution. The Abbey of Saint-Loup developed a renowned library and scriptorium. During the
The Cadfael Chronicles (4,245 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Shropshire in The Virgin in the Ice. The pillage of Winchester and burning of the abbey there sends the monks who are the centre of the story to Shrewsbury Abbey
Russell Brand (10,119 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
a recovering crack addict named Terry in the pilot for the ITV comedy The Abbey, written by Morwenna Banks. He voiced an Earth Guardian in Robbie the
Cassandra Austen (758 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
1785 and 1786 the sisters attended the Reading Ladies boarding school in the Abbey gatehouse in Reading, Berkshire. Jane was originally not to go, as she
Rubber Soul (6,382 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
monophonic mix. According to Beatles historian Bruce Spizer, Martin and the Abbey Road engineers devoted most of their time and attention to the mono mixdowns
Louis XIV of France (15,778 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Bragelonne, in which he is a central character. The final part of the latter novel recounts the legend that a mysterious prisoner in an iron mask was actually
Martha's Vineyard (6,633 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
England and is buried in the Great Churchyard which lies in front of the Abbey ruins between St. Mary's Church and the Cathedral. The island was also
Rocamadour (1,145 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
the right bank of the Alzou. Rocamadour was a dependency of the abbey of Tulle to the north in the Bas Limousin. The buildings of Rocamadour
Luke the Evangelist (2,971 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Thus, nowadays, the relics of Saint Luke are so divided: the body, in the Abbey of Santa Giustina in Padua; the head, in the St. Vitus Cathedral in Prague;
Pope Joan (4,711 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
last-mentioned date. On 7 October 855, Benedict III issued a charter for the Abbey of Corvey. Hincmar, Archbishop of Reims, informed Nicholas I that a messenger
Isles of Scilly (6,963 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
possession of a confederacy of hermits. King Henry I (r. 1100–35) gave it to the abbey of Tavistock who established a priory on Tresco, which was abolished at
Great Malvern (6,082 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
cloisters was destroyed), all that remains of Malvern's monastery is the Abbey Gateway (also known as the Priory Gatehouse) that houses today's Malvern
Mill Valley, California (8,960 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
several other summer resort hotels had cropped up in the canyon including the Abbey, the Eastland, and the Redwood Lodge. Fishing, hunting, hiking, swimming
Sidonia von Borcke (1,905 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
her (mostly younger) co-residents and with the administrative staff of the abbey. When in 1606 she was dismissed from her post as an Unterpriorin (sub-prioress)
Hermann of Reichenau (596 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
both theology and the world around him. He spent most of his life in the Abbey of Reichenau, an island on Lake Constancein Germany. Hermann contributed
Pygmalion (play) (5,230 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
the Garrick Theatre, London 2011: Risteárd Cooper and Charlie Murphy at the Abbey Theatre, Dublin Stage My Fair Lady (1956), the Broadway musical
Joram MacRorie (2,761 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
two of them are still at the abbey when Camber is killed while attempting to rendezvous with them. At the end of the novel, after examining Camber's
Nigel (bishop of Ely) (6,128 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
but its last abbot, Richard, had proposed to the king a plan by which the abbey would become a bishopric, presumably with the abbot himself as bishop
Mersea Island (3,302 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
was a Benedictine priory at West Mersea and land here was granted to the Abbey of St Ouen in France by Edward the Confessor in 1046. The priory survived
Bazeilles (1,613 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
version. In the 13th century Bazeilles was a small lordship dependent on the Abbey of Mouzon and the Reims Cathedral before being united with the lordship
Death of Diana, Princess of Wales (6,071 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
four-mile (6 km) route from Kensington Palace to Westminster Abbey. Outside the Abbey and in Hyde Park crowds watched and listened to proceedings on large outdoor
Leoš Janáček (7,242 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
abilities. In 1865 young Janáček enrolled as a ward of the foundation of the Abbey of St. Thomas in Brno, where he took part in choral singing under Pavel
St Alfege Church, Greenwich (825 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Henry VIII was baptised in 1491. The patronage of the church was given to the abbey at Ghent during the 13th century. Following the suppression of alien priories
Joram MacRorie (2,761 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
two of them are still at the abbey when Camber is killed while attempting to rendezvous with them. At the end of the novel, after examining Camber's
Hermann of Reichenau (596 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
both theology and the world around him. He spent most of his life in the Abbey of Reichenau, an island on Lake Constancein Germany. Hermann contributed
Shrewsbury (10,956 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
gathering was disbanded with the Dissolution of the Monasteries and as such the Abbey was closed in 1540. However, it is believed that Henry VIII thereafter
Vox populi (1,170 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
releasing Captain Crocker from his custody in the story The Adventure of the Abbey Grange. The quote "Vox populi, vox Dei" is mentioned by Joey Lucas (played
Nigel (bishop of Ely) (6,128 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
but its last abbot, Richard, had proposed to the king a plan by which the abbey would become a bishopric, presumably with the abbot himself as bishop
Eurico, the Presbyter (432 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
the Presbyter (Portuguese: Eurico, o Presbítero) is a 1844 historical novel by Alexandre Herculano. It is about the ending days of the Visigothic king
Michael Bogdanov (1,070 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
the 1980s, Bogdanov also worked internationally, directing Hamlet at the Abbey Theatre, Dublin, Romeo and Juliet at the Imperial Theatre, Tokyo, and
Little Jack Horner (1,046 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
asserted that the legend is untrue and that Wells purchased the deed from the abbey. Lord Byron mentions Jack in his Don Juan (Canto the Eleventh, stanza
Fintan O'Toole (1,025 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
since. He took a sabbatical in 1990-1991 to work as Literary Adviser to the Abbey Theatre. In 1994 he was one of the presenters for the last season of BBC
The Few (960 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Non-British personnel in the RAF during the Battle of Britain "Visiting the Abbey: The Royal Air Force Chapel." Westminster Abbey. Retrieved: 13 May 2012
Mary of Guise (5,884 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
furnishings from the Palace chapel into the Abbey; the attendance of eleven chaplains; boards for stages in the Abbey; and messengers sent to summon the ladies
Dr. Watson (4,786 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Watson declares that he had intended the previous story (“The Adventure of the Abbey Grange”) "to be the last of those exploits of my friend, Mr. Sherlock
Forlì (2,224 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Giuseppe Mazzini in the 19th century. The Piazza Saffi also includes the Abbey of San Mercuriale (named after Saint Mercurialis, a bishop of the city
Ireland (18,063 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
outposts of Irish culture. The Republic of Ireland's national theatre is the Abbey Theatre, which was founded in 1904, and the national Irish-language theatre
The Time Tunnel (4,124 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
a promotional novel, The Time Tunnel, was published by Pyramid Books. Murray Leinster was the author, who had previously written a novel of the same name
Fanny Howe (1,584 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
continued his work as a lawyer. Howe's Irish-born mother was an actress at the Abbey Theatre of Dublin for some time. Her sister is Susan Howe, who also became
Sobrado, Galicia (1,078 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
monasteries enforced by the government of Mendizábal in 1835 put an end to the abbey, and the abandoned buildings fell into decay. In 1954 the Trappist monks
French art (6,332 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Saint-Sever-de-Rustan in Gascony. In Paris a unique style developed at the abbey of Saint-Germain-des-Prés. In Normandy a new style arose in 975. By the
Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band (18,799 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
are mixed and dubbed down onto a master four-track machine, enabling the Abbey Road engineers to give the group a virtual multitrack studio. EMI's Studer
Rotrou III, Count of Perche (2,621 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
of his father tomb. There he asked to become a confrater (brother) of the Abbey of Cluny, Nogent's mother house, and to show his sincerity and prove the
Edward Elgar (14,163 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
was an early example of a studio premiere: its first performance was in the Abbey Road studios. For this work, dedicated to the wife and daughters of the
Margaret Simey (412 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Thursday 29 July 2004. 'Camp Fire Stories', article by Rita Lacey in The Abbey Compendium (1997), p. 50. Nassy Brown, Jacqueline (2005). Dropping Anchor
Gothic Revival architecture (7,106 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Commission that instructed Eugène Viollet-le-Duc to report on the condition of the Abbey of Vézelay in 1840. Following this, Viollet le Duc set to restore most
Abraham (name) (979 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
saint Abraham of Clermont (died c.485), Syrian-French abbot, founder of the abbey of St. Cirgues in Clermont Abraham of Cyrrhus (died 442), Syrian-born
Coventry (10,429 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
monastery in 1043 dedicated to St Mary. In time, a market was established at the abbey gates and the settlement expanded. By the 14th century, Coventry was an
Kings Langley (1,701 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
just south of the village. The town was probably part of the lands of the Abbey of St. Albans, although actual records have been lost. At the Norman conquest
Norwegian Wood (This Bird Has Flown) (3,067 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
(2005). The Complete Beatles Recording Sessions: The Official Story of the Abbey Road Years 1962–1970. London: Bounty Books. ISBN 978-0-7537-2545-0.  MacDonald
Great Stink (6,050 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Bethnal Green, before the connection. This combined main sewer ran to the Abbey Mills Pumping Station in Stratford, where it was joined by the eastern
Pienza (1,536 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
religious artifacts. Paintings include a 12th-century painted crucifix from the Abbey of San Pietro in Vollore, 14th century works by Pietro Lorenzetti (Madonna
Wirksworth (2,292 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
ports on the Humber. In Anglo-Saxon times there were many mines owned by the abbey of Repton. Three lead mines are identified in the entry for Wirksworth
List of fictional rodents in literature (323 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Retrieved November 21, 2014. Her status as orphan is of course central to the novel's plot; it is also subtly underscored in her naming of the rat Melchisedec
Gilbert Foliot (8,674 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Gloucester. During his tenure as abbot he acquired additional land for the abbey, and may have helped to fabricate some charters—legal deeds attesting
Margaret Beaufort, Countess of Richmond and Derby (4,156 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
after the death of her son. She is buried in the Henry VII Chapel of the Abbey. Her tomb is now situated between the later graves of William and Mary
2012 in Ireland (13,576 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Aoife Kavanagh resigned from RTÉ over her role in the scandal. 9 May The Abbey Theatre announced a nine-week closure when asbestos was discovered in
Downton Abbey (10,836 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Forbes. Retrieved 10 September 2013.  Fenton, James (8 March 2012). "The Abbey That Jumped the Shark". The New York Review of Books. Retrieved 10 September
Frome (7,959 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
later passing to the Abbey at Cirencester, which others were leased by the Crown to important families. By the 13th century, the Abbey had bought up some
Belle Île (1,313 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Belle-Île belonged to the county of Cornouaille. In 1572 the monks of the abbey of Ste Croix at Quimperlé ceded the island to the Retz family, in whose
Oliver Cromwell (15,557 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Ireton. (The body of Cromwell's daughter was allowed to remain buried in the Abbey.) His disinterred body was hanged in chains at Tyburn, and then thrown
Hungarian language (9,482 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
remaining fragments of the language are found in the establishing charter of the abbey of Tihany from 1055, mixed into Latin text. The first extant text fully
Anne of France (1,285 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
heir of the Duchy of Bourbon, who died aged 22 in 1498 and was buried in the Abbey of Souvigny, Auvergne. Suzanne succeeded Peter as suo jure Duchess of
Gerald Gardner (Wiccan) (8,454 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
1939, Gardner befriended the Christian mystic J.S.M. Ward, proprietor of the Abbey Folk Park, Britain's oldest open-air museum. One of the exhibits was a
Aidan of Lindisfarne (1,635 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
After his death, Aidan's body was buried at Lindisfarne, beneath the abbey that he had helped found. Though his popularity waned in the coming years
Nellie Melba (6,264 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
of the British ITV television show Downton Abbey (2013), performing at the abbey as a guest of Lord and Lady Grantham. Rupert Christiansen, writing in
The Wednesday Play (1,656 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Benedictus. Highlights included The Snowball (20 April 1966), adapted from the novel by Brigid Brophy, Toddler on the Run adapted by Shena Mackay from her novella
2112 (album) (2,392 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
December 16, 2016, 2112 a 40th Anniversary edition was released, featuring the Abbey Road Studios remaster and an additional CD of rare, live and previously
Charlemagne (16,201 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
surrendered and opened the gates in early summer. Desiderius was sent to the abbey of Corbie, and his son Adelchis died in Constantinople, a patrician. Charles
The Beatles in film (1,870 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
initially rejected both the film and the album, instead recording and issuing the Abbey Road album. But with so much money having been spent on the project, it
Chartres Cathedral (8,533 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
probably invented in the 11th century to authenticate some relics at the Abbey of St Denis. In fact, the relic was a gift to the cathedral from Charles
The Duchess of Malfi (8,266 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
two stage productions. In 1937, it was performed in Dublin, Ireland, at the Abbey Theatre, with incidental music composed by Arthur Duff. In the aftermath
Françoise d'Aubigné, Marquise de Maintenon (3,076 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Noisy-le-Roi; the king endowed St-Cyr at her request, using the funds of the Abbey of St. Denis. Madame de Maintenon drew up the rules of the institution