Find link

language:

jump to random article

Find link is a tool written by Edward Betts.

searching for Subject–object–verb 87 found (427 total)

alternate case: subject–object–verb

Angaataha language (568 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article

most languages spoken in Papua New Guinea, Angaatiha contains the subject-object-verb word order and utilizes the Latin script. The Angaatiha language
Kambaata language (327 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
large amount of morphophonemic changes. The language has SOV order (subjectobjectverb). The phonemes of Kambaata include five vowels (which are distinctively
Halbi language (215 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
people across the central part of India. It uses SOV word order (subject-object-verb), makes strong use of affixes, and places adjectives before nouns
Dime language (351 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
velar and uvular fricative phonemes. The basic word order is SOV (subjectobjectverb), as in other Omotic languages, indeed as in all the languages of
Tedim language (254 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
parentheses enclose optional constituents of a syllable. It is a subject-object verb language, and negation follows the verb. Tedim at Ethnologue (18th
Object (grammar) (1,242 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article
often spoken of in terms such as Agent-Object-Verb (AOV) instead of Subject-Object-Verb (SOV). Topic-prominent languages, such as Mandarin, focus their grammars
Cha'palaa language (201 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
among the tribe. Cha'palaa has agglutinative morphology, with a Subject-Object-Verb word order. Cha'palaa is written using the Latin alphabet, making
Bantawa language (661 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Nepali, especially in the northern region. Bantawa is spoken in subject-object-verb order, and has no noun classes or genders. Most of the Bantawa clan
Iyo language (1,514 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
follows. Depending on the sentence, the word order can change from a Subject Object Verb (SOV) order to an Object Subject Verb (OSV) order. SVO word order
Even language (1,772 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
syntax of the Even language follows the nominative case and SOV (subject-object-verb) word order, with the attribute preceding the dependent member. In
Korafe language (922 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Korafe language has primarily SOV or Subject-Object-Verb word order. An example of the use of Subject-Object-Verb word order is shown below: ere-gov-ena
Gastarbeiterdeutsch (518 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
SVO (subject/verb/object) structure, instead of the correct SOV (subject/object/verb) structure, and the article in front of the noun is missing. Gastarbeiterdeutsch:
Majhi language (1,092 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Subject ram-in Ram-ERG Object kam work Verb sək-le finish-PST.3SG Subject Object Verb ram-in kam sək-le Ram-ERG work finish-PST.3SG 'Ram finished the work
Yoruboid languages (398 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
having three level tones. Grammatically, they are isolating with a subjectobjectverb basic word order. Igala is a key Yoruboid language, spoken by 1.8
Konso language (207 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Bliese, Loren; Gignarta, Sokka (1986). "Konso Exceptions to SOV (subjectobjectverb) Typology". Journal of Ethiopian Studies. 19: 1–40. JSTOR 41965937
Bodo language (1,676 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
sentences in Boro language consist of either a "Subject + Verb" or "Subject + Object + Verb". The numerals used in Boro language are : [citation needed] Boro
Ngalakgan language (389 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
order Free word order, with no syntactically governed positions for subject, object, verb etc. in a sentence. All this information is encoded in the morphology
Awa Pit language (369 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
5% in the secondary Spanish language. The Awa pit language has a subjectobjectverb structure and has adopted the Latin script. Grammatically, Awa pit
Sunwar language (348 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
District, Province No. 1 Seu+wa+la (Sewala) In linguistic typology, a subject+object+verb (SOV) language is one in which the subject, object, and verb of a
Kakwa language (445 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Kakwa has 6 vowels: /a, e, i, ɨ, o, u/. The language uses both subject-object-verb and object-verb-subject word order. Reports gathered by SIL in 1982
Kaluli language (1,038 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Like most Trans New Guinea languages, Kaluli is verb-final, as Subject-Object-Verb (SOV). The unmarked word order for bivalent clauses is AOV, but OAV
Kiliwa language (1,624 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
female Kiliwa is a verb-final language that usually follows the order subject-object-verb. Dependent object clause should be found before the verb, whereas
Dolittle (programming language) (252 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
language also exist. The syntax is based on Japanese word order (Subject Object Verb), which is unnatural in English. The language is prototype-based
Izon language (1,167 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
related languages in the region, in the sense that it follows a SOV (subject object verb format, both in simple and complex sentences. Additionally, directional
Sulka language (1,530 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
follows the Subject Verb Object word order whereas Papuan follows a Subject Object Verb word order. Free pronouns mainly act as verbal or prepositional object
Nukuoro language (1,214 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
rearticulated” (Carroll 1965). The basic word order in Nukuoro is Subject-Object-Verb, but there are also cases of Verb-Subject-Object. An example sentence:
Lala language (Papua New Guinea) (790 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
basic constituent order in most sentences follows the structure subject, object, verb. The following clause types can be distinguished: Purpose clause
Kokborok grammar (419 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
b) Subject Object Verb Naisok mai chao. (Naisok) (rice) (eat). Naisok eats rice.
Tagoi language (849 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
and action nouns (e.g., ŋ-ìlàm "sight".) The basic word order is subjectobjectverb, including in the imperative. Locative complements also precede the
Dakota language (1,419 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
"bow," in tinazipe, and "friend," in takodaku. Dakota is mainly a subject-object-verb (SOV) language, where nouns, whether they are the subject or object
North Efate language (964 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
include: Buninga Emau Livara Nguna Paunangis Sesake Typology follows Subject Object Verb order as is observed in Nguna Verbs are prefixed with other stems
I'saka language (740 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
anything else, i.e. a generic, default gender. I’saka has fairly strict SubjectObjectVerb word order for declarative sentences. Personal pronouns have Unmarked
Sonsorolese language (915 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
- [u] v - [v] w - [w] y - [j] Sonsorolese’s basic word order is subject, object, verb (SOV). An example of the use of the SOV word order is: Etai maho
Turkish Sign Language (377 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
information on Turkish Sign Language. Turkish Sign Language exhibits an subject-object-verb order (SOV). There is a rich set of modal verbs which appear in a
Enga language (1,930 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
will precede the object. This particular word order is known as subject-object-verb or SOV. Akáli dokó-mé mená dóko p-í-á.y man DET-AG pig DET hit-PAST
Somali grammar (1,018 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Therefore the verb. Sentences in Somali are typically of the order Subject-Object-Verb (SOV). Nouns have different tonal markings for number, gender (masculine
Mojave language (1,388 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
morpheme {-č}.Thereby, the Mojave language can be described as a subject-object-verb, SOV, language. Even with that SOV description, however, there are
Aimol language (1,450 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
translation and preservation process. Aimol follows the traditional subject-object-verb word order, like the other Tibeto-Burman languages, and uses postposition
Dom language (1,823 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
subject object verb
Amis language (1,510 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Verb Subject Object Verb, Adjective, etc. ko (Preposition for Subjects)+Nouns to (Preposition for Objects)+Nouns
Satawalese language (1,177 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
/ɞ/, /ɒ/.[clarification needed][dubious – discuss] Satawalese use Subject-Object-Verb word order. Ex: Mary a foato-ki tinikii we aan “Mary wrote her letter
Kurdish grammar (1,114 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
-m, -t, -y, -man, -tan, -yan. The normal word order in Kurdish is Subject-Object-Verb (S-O-V). Modifiers follow the nouns they modify. Kurdish languages
Wolaytta language (994 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Omotic languages, the Wolaytta language has the basic word order SOV (subjectobjectverb), as shown in the following example (Wakasa 2008:1041): It has postpositional
Gan Chinese (1,483 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
varieties. The sequence subject–verb–object is most typical, but subjectobjectverb or the passive voice (with the sequence object–subject–verb) is possible
Grass Koiari language (1,298 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
specifier to form compound noun phrases. Grass Koirari is a SOV (subject object verb) language, with the verb being the morphological reflector of the
Grammatical conjugation (1,425 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
leading to increased ambiguity. The canonical word order in Basque is subjectobjectverb. However, all permutations of subject, verb and object are permitted
Tonkawa language (1,632 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
object is shown in the suffix. While the word order tends to be subject-object-verb (SOV), compounding words is very common in Tonkawa. Reduplication
Kaska language (1,543 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
prefix) When a sentence contains two independent nominals, it takes on Subject-Object-Verb (SOV) structure. eskie ayudeni ganehtan eskie ayudeni ga-Ø-ne-h-tan
Jarawa language (Andaman Islands) (1,578 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
all questions start with ka. The schema is presented as: ka + [subject] + [object] + [verb]. /Onəħə-le/ can either mean 'what is being done' or 'why', /ŋi
Ugaritic grammar (959 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
article. The word order for Ugaritic is Verb Subject Object (VSO), Subject Object Verb (SOV), possessed–possessor (NG), and noun–adjective (NA). Ugaritic
Walser German (2,143 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
and mother made a cross for the child' This is a change from SOV (subject, object, verb) to SVO word order. This change is due to the increasing influence
Language transfer (2,229 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
an interpretation in which the first noun phrase is the subject (subject-object-verb order). This is because they have transferred their parsing preference
Sioux language (2,023 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
i-ni-ma-skola "I am as small as you" "you are as small as I" Dakota has subject/object/ verb (SOV) word order. Along the same line, the language also has postpositions
Northern Qiang language (1,759 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
from the order stated above, Northern Qiang is a language with a Subject-Object-Verb sentence structure. Example: S χumtʂi Xumtʂi O ʐətɕʰaq-e-ze rabbit-one-CL
Latin word order (10,171 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
typology, Latin is classified by some scholars as basically an SOV (Subject-Object-Verb) language, with Preposition-Noun, Noun-Genitive, and Adjective-Noun
Nez Perce language (1,725 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
3→3-carry-csl-past coyote- obj ‘And the wind carried coyote here’ Subjectobjectverb word order Kawó’ kii háama-pim ’áayato-na pée-’nehnen-e then this
Hawai'i Sign Language (1,331 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
lexical and grammatical components with ASL. While HSL follows subject, object, verb (SOV) typology, ASL follows subject, verb, object (SVO) typology
Djinang language (2,294 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
indeed most Australian languages, have a tendency to follow a subject, object, verb (S.O.V.) typology (Koch 2007). An example of flexible typology can
Supyire language (2,738 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
way. Instead, these languages are verb-final and most often are subjectobjectverb. The following examples provide evidence for this sentence structure:
Kanoê language (1,101 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
suffix {-te} is added . The syntax order of Kanoê follows SOV = subject + object + verb. In the Kanoê language, the process of morphological reduplication
Squamish language (2,204 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
related term) Subject R1(referant related term) Verb (Transitive) Subject Object Verb (Passive) R1(Initiator of action) Subject R2 (other referent related
Paresi language (2,687 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
sentences where the object is not a pronoun are usually ordered Subject-Object-Verb, (11) Paula Paula iyakaniti pictures hotikitsa show Paula iyakaniti
Yugambeh language (1,440 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Yugambeh language is fairly free ordered, with a tendency towards SOV (Subject Object Verb) structures. Adjectives and demonstratives part of noun phrases e
Mobilian Jargon (1,591 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
verbs are not required to have subject or object affixes and the subject-object-verb ordering in the sentence is variable. It also requires a separate
Timucua language (3,052 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Timucua was an SOV language; that is, the phrasal word order was subjectobjectverb, unlike the English order of subject–verb–object. There are six parts
Sorani (2,847 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
syllables in Sorani words. The standard word order in Sorani is SOV (subjectobjectverb). Nouns in Sorani may appear in three general forms. The Absolute
Bangime language (2,546 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
clause-initial particles. In simple transitive sentences, SOV (subject, object, verb) word order is used for the present tense, imperfective and SVO
Denaʼina language (2,681 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
outside of the predicate. Word order in the basic Denaʼina sentence is subject-object-verb (SOV). Because of this, there is a low danger of referential ambiguity
Early Middle Japanese (2,671 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
merged with /w/. Syntactically, Early Middle Japanese is an SOV (subject-object-verb) language with topic-comment structure. Morphologically it is agglutinative
Bangime language (2,546 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
clause-initial particles. In simple transitive sentences, SOV (subject, object, verb) word order is used for the present tense, imperfective and SVO
Shoshoni language (3,336 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
head" wɨ"- "with a long instrument or body"; generic instrumental Subject-object-verb is the typical word order for Shoshoni. For instance, nɨ hunanna
Mam language (1,874 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Huehuetenango Department. The basic word order of Mam is VSO (Verb-Subject-Object, Verb-Ergative-Absolutive, or Verb-Agent-Patient). Most roots take the
Tweants dialect (3,143 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Tweants follow a Subject-Verb-Object word order in main clauses, and Subject-Object-Verb in subordinate clauses. For instance, in the two following sentences:
Seneca language (4,265 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
word order, and cannot be neatly categorized along the lines of a subject/object/verb framework. Rather, new information appears first in the Seneca sentence;
Tsonga language (2,803 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
languages with a subject–verb–object order. The structure changes to subjectobjectverb when addressing another person: Present tense The present tense is
Crow language (4,041 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
markers d. Clauses without final markers XIII: Negative ssaa Crow is a subjectobjectverb (SOV) language; it is a verb-final and head marking. In noun phrases
Grammaticality (4,942 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
subject, verb, object (SVO) while both German and Dutch have the subject, object, verb (SOV) order. Based on the results, German and Dutch participants
Eskimo–Aleut languages (3,154 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Ergative-absolutive language: Eskimo-Aleut follows the basic word order of Subject-Object-Verb (SOV). Eskimo is an ergative–absolutive language. This means subjects
Meroitic language (4,069 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Sudanic languages, in which sentences exhibit verb-final order (SOV: subject-object-verb); there are postpositions and no prepositions; the genitive is placed
Aleut language (5,683 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
postbases (derivational suffixes). Aleut's canonical word order is subject object verb (SOV). Nouns are obligatorily marked for grammatical number (singular
Heavy NP shift (2,529 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
problem is not complex enough to be shifted. Japanese is an SOV (subject, object, verb) language. Particles in Japanese encode syntactic functions, marking
Inupiaq language (4,660 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
markings and verb agreement (see above). The basic word order is subject-object-verb. However, word order is flexible and both subject and/or object can
Kannada grammar (4,107 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
crude verb root 'ಬಾ' Kushalathe Kannada word order is 'S-O-V', or 'subject-object-verb', as opposed to English, which is a 'S-V-O', or 'subject-verb-object'
Dative shift (4,545 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
appear in the final position of a sentence in Korean, adopting a subject-object-verb (SOV) word order, whereas the majority of English sentences are formed
Old English grammar (4,512 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
same word-order patterns like modern German) as having underlying subject-object-verb (SOV) ordering. According to this theory, all sentences are initially
Crosslinguistic influence (3,646 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
the same syntactic rules are applied. For example, Japanese has subject-object-verb word order (SOV), and English has subject-verb-object word order
Guaymí language (7,284 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
scripts. The word order of the Ngäbere sentence generally follows a SubjectObjectVerb pattern, which is a common feature of Chibchan languages. Ti aro